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bus stand

बस स्टैंड

Last Update: 2014-11-18
Subject: Religion
Usage Frequency: 3
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Reference:

bus stand hindi

बस स्टैंड हिन्दी

Last Update: 2015-07-22
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
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an eassy on my 4 hours on bus stand

मेरे 4 घंटे बस स्टैंड पर पर एक eassy

Last Update: 2015-07-05
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
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bus aise hi

hi

Last Update: 2015-04-26
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
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Is thre a taxi stand near by ?

क्या यहाँ पास में टैक्सी स्टैंड है?

Last Update: 2015-05-12
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
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bus stand essay in hi

हाय में बस स्टैंड निबंध

Last Update: 2015-03-25
Subject: History
Usage Frequency: 1
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i am in bus

मुझे कितना भुगतान करना है

Last Update: 2015-08-06
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
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bus mein chadna

TRAIN ME CHADNA

Last Update: 2015-05-21
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
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bus stand essay in hindi

हिंदी में बस स्टैंड निबंध

Last Update: 2015-08-06
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 3
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Last sunday i'want to the bus stand i show there where many passenger

मैं पिछले रविवार i'want बस स्टैंड को दिखाने के वहाँ जहाँ कई यात्री

Last Update: 2014-10-06
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
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bus stop

adda

Last Update: 2014-01-13
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
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Seed stands

बीज ढाँचा

Last Update: 2013-06-12
Subject: Agriculture and Farming
Usage Frequency: 1
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Seed stands

बीज फलोद्यान

Last Update: 2013-06-12
Subject: Agriculture and Farming
Usage Frequency: 1
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bus mein chadna

train mein chadna

Last Update: 2014-12-08
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
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witness and stand back from nature that is the first step to souls freedom

पक्षियों पर हिंदी में नारा

Last Update: 2014-11-23
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
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bus station essay in hindi

हिंदी में बस स्टेशन निबंध

Last Update: 2015-01-08
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
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I am a tree, tall and imposing, standing all alone near the campus of a temple. My life is ever so interesting as, I see a huge spectrum of society, funny gestures of people, and hear all kinds of conversation of the devotees who pass by me. I was not always so huge. As is true of all living beings I was also a long time back, a young sapling with this huge tree within me. At that time I looked fresh and beautiful as all other beings who are young, but, at that time I was of course not so imposing. This is what I have seen about life that, every stage has something good about it. I understand that, I am a peepal tree which just grows anywhere and everywhere. Ever since I was young, I remember several people coming to my root and worshipping me. They would light an earthenware lamp, and put it near my root, say their prayers and go away. This was a daily ritual which scores of people followed at my root ever since I can remember. As I started growing up bigger and bigger, the temple authorities put a two feet wall like boundary around my trunk. This was done to protect me from being destroyed by crowds who thronged to me. Since I am near a temple, I have always had the pleasure of a lot of company daily and, the great honour of being worshipped by scores of believers every day. Now, I am a full grown tree, and that two feet wall has been converted into a broad platform all around me, with my root out of sight, and the trunk also somewhat covered from vision. Here on the platform people sit and say their prayers and relax. At times they also consume their temple prasad while sitting on this platform. Oh, what a wonderful feeling it is to be so loved and cared for and, above all, being so honoured and respected. This honour is given to me as, I understand now that, a section of the Indian society considered me a holy tree to be worshipped. This is why there is so much hype about me and my kin. As I stand here, near a temple, I never ever feel lonely I get all sorts of company throughout the day, so, where is the scope of feeling lonely. Early in the morning the temple is opened at 6 a.m. It is cleaned and washed so, I get the company of people who clean the premises. They come to me also and broom the area around me, wash the platform and I am trim and neat to welcome my guests for the day. After the temple is cleaned there is a pooja, and from 7 a.m. devotees start pouring in, and the temple bells start ringing and breaking the silence of the night. Devotees continue pouring in the temple right from 7 a.m. to 10 p.m., when the temple closes. These long hours of the day, there is no chance of my getting bored as, I have the company of so many people moving around the area. Even though I am alone, a lonely tree but, my life is full of thrill and excitement, as I get lots of, and variety of company. This in turn is an added honour for me that, while my friends have the company of trees only, I have the company of human beings who talk and walk and discuss matters to make my life more lively and enjoyable. I often wondered to myself as to why there is so much of greatness thrust upon me, though I am just a tree like any other. Yes, here is the catch, I believe I am so revered because I am considered by the Hindus, a religious sect as a holy tree, an incarnation of their God. Aha! this makes me feel proud of myself and I am prone to thank God for this birth in which I get honour, respect, love and care. What else could any living being aspire for. I and my honour are further enhanced as, I stand near a temple of God. Now, all my anxiety is put to rest as, I have learnt that I am also here to be worshipped just as God himself. I stand here alone yet in great company of human beings. My life is just wonderful, I pray to God that HE grant such a wonderful and eventful life to all humans. One thing I forgot to tell you all, about my life. When people come and sit on the platform around me, I also get a lot of information about man’s world. I hear scandals, I hear about murders, thefts and what all evils that exist in this man’s world. At times I also get to hear small children saying lovely words to their mothers and, seeing the mothers cajoling them, I feel what a beautiful life men have. Thus to add to my experience of life, I have come to know a lot about human beings and their lives. Their lives are also full of pleasures and disappointments. It is not that men only enjoy as, most of us lesser beings seem to feel. Men also have their own problems. So, to add up I’d say my life is a pleasure and a rich experience.

पेड़ आत्मकथा पर हिंदी निबंध

Last Update: 2015-08-25
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
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googal translate engBy Daniel A. Rosenblum 2013, Vol. 5 No. 10 | pg. 2/4 | « » Cite References Print 5 Before the Streets: Livelihoods in Rural Bihar The children of rural Bihar are connected with the rest of India unlike any other time in history. In the district town of Sitamarhi, a place that sits some twenty miles from the Nepal border, the skyline is littered with cell phone towers. On the streets below, walkways are filled with mud, trash, and cow dung. Passersby trough through the mess to buy flee-bitten mitahi (sweets) and the sweltering fruits at nearby stands. For the children of Sitamarhi, they live in this contrast—the severe juxtaposition of “modernity”3 and urbanization with the dilapidated infrastructure surrounding them. The villages within five miles of the district town scarcely receive electricity, prompting me to wonder how anyone with a cell phone was able to recharge their phones.4 The villages I spent the majority of my time in, Amritpur and Baksampur5, gave insight into the livelihoods of children in rural Bihar. In Amritpur, every corner and passageway of the village had more and more children. At times, it would seem the ratio of children to adults was ten to one. Many of these children had prominent signs of malnutrition: kwashiorkor, stunned growth, and slowly healing infections (Bhutta, Black, Cousens, & Ahmed, 2008; Som, Pal, & Bharati, 2007). One boy of about twelve, Deepak, had a nasty infection on his lower leg that continued to worsen over the week I visited. However, there was no formal doctor in the village, only someone trained in basic medical practices. He would have to go to Sitamarhi town to be given medicine, which would cost too much money for Deepak’s mother. This was a problem all too common for children of rural Bihar. School quality and attendance throughout Sitamarhi district was quite mixed. A government school I visited in Amritpur was highly understaffed, lacking proper materials and facilities, and seemed more of a social gathering point for youth. Children would sit along the walls with other classmates drawing, talking, and laughing while the teachers and administrators sat near the entrance splitting their time between socializing and supervising. When we arrived, the teachers began to complain of uneven wage scales and low salaries, providing this as a link for chaos at the school. However, another school we visited in Baksampur, which was run entirely by women, had sufficient materials, was properly staffed, and seemed to be extremely beneficial for the students. In both cases, there were noticeably tensions between attending school and working at home. Especially for older children, many would work in the mornings, helping to transplant rice, and then check into school for the second half of the day. In some cases, children would stop attending school entirely in order to help at home, such as with the case of a lower caste girl in Baksampur, Hoja.6 Pressure to earn began to outweigh the importance of schooling as the children grew older, leading to the abandonment of education in order to help the family. The livelihoods of Bihari youth were rapidly transforming, surrounded by new “modern” pursuits and desires within a rural structure and community. Lunch at an Amritpur government school Lunch Photo Credit: Khushboo Jain Tracking Agricultural Transformations Bihar’s agricultural history is extremely complex, wrapped among transforming government policy, development, and increasing mechanization of the agrarian system. Prior to the Green Revolution taking hold in Bihari agriculture, there was a structure of landholding: the Zamindar system, established under the British Raj. The system’s abolishment, however, is what I wish to focus on, in terms of the uneven effects it had on rural villages, landholdings, and landlessness. The zamindari was a system of landholding that consolidated fields in the hands of powerful village elites. For Bihar, this meant most of the land fell in the hands of upper caste Hindus (Chaudhry, 1988). Peasants were then typically tied to the land, working for the grain they produced, while remaining landless themselves. In the late 19th century, however, Bihar began to feel the effects of commercialism, beginning a process of out-migration from both the zamindar and lower class populations. In the Chapra region at the beginning of this century, upper castes had to resort to occupations other than agriculture. Rajputs, an upper caste group, went out for ‘service’ along with lower class individuals, becoming “peons and durwans in estates of larger zamindars” (de Haan 2002:120). Out-migration existed in high numbers during the zamindari system for both landowners and lower caste laborers, yet the economic gaps between landowners and lower class, as well as the frequency of migration seemed to increase after the foundation of India and the subsequent abolishment of the colonial landholding system.lish to hindi

By Daniel A. Rosenblum 2013, Vol. 5 No. 10 | pg. 2/4 | « » Cite References Print 5 Before the Streets: Livelihoods in Rural Bihar The children of rural Bihar are connected with the rest of India unlike any other time in history. In the district town of Sitamarhi, a place that sits some twenty miles from the Nepal border, the skyline is littered with cell phone towers. On the streets below, walkways are filled with mud, trash, and cow dung. Passersby trough through the mess to buy flee-bitten mitahi (sweets) and the sweltering fruits at nearby stands. For the children of Sitamarhi, they live in this contrast—the severe juxtaposition of “modernity”3 and urbanization with the dilapidated infrastructure surrounding them. The villages within five miles of the district town scarcely receive electricity, prompting me to wonder how anyone with a cell phone was able to recharge their phones.4 The villages I spent the majority of my time in, Amritpur and Baksampur5, gave insight into the livelihoods of children in rural Bihar. In Amritpur, every corner and passageway of the village had more and more children. At times, it would seem the ratio of children to adults was ten to one. Many of these children had prominent signs of malnutrition: kwashiorkor, stunned growth, and slowly healing infections (Bhutta, Black, Cousens, & Ahmed, 2008; Som, Pal, & Bharati, 2007). One boy of about twelve, Deepak, had a nasty infection on his lower leg that continued to worsen over the week I visited. However, there was no formal doctor in the village, only someone trained in basic medical practices. He would have to go to Sitamarhi town to be given medicine, which would cost too much money for Deepak’s mother. This was a problem all too common for children of rural Bihar. School quality and attendance throughout Sitamarhi district was quite mixed. A government school I visited in Amritpur was highly understaffed, lacking proper materials and facilities, and seemed more of a social gathering point for youth. Children would sit along the walls with other classmates drawing, talking, and laughing while the teachers and administrators sat near the entrance splitting their time between socializing and supervising. When we arrived, the teachers began to complain of uneven wage scales and low salaries, providing this as a link for chaos at the school. However, another school we visited in Baksampur, which was run entirely by women, had sufficient materials, was properly staffed, and seemed to be extremely beneficial for the students. In both cases, there were noticeably tensions between attending school and working at home. Especially for older children, many would work in the mornings, helping to transplant rice, and then check into school for the second half of the day. In some cases, children would stop attending school entirely in order to help at home, such as with the case of a lower caste girl in Baksampur, Hoja.6 Pressure to earn began to outweigh the importance of schooling as the children grew older, leading to the abandonment of education in order to help the family. The livelihoods of Bihari youth were rapidly transforming, surrounded by new “modern” pursuits and desires within a rural structure and community. Lunch at an Amritpur government school Lunch Photo Credit: Khushboo Jain Tracking Agricultural Transformations Bihar’s agricultural history is extremely complex, wrapped among transforming government policy, development, and increasing mechanization of the agrarian system. Prior to the Green Revolution taking hold in Bihari agriculture, there was a structure of landholding: the Zamindar system, established under the British Raj. The system’s abolishment, however, is what I wish to focus on, in terms of the uneven effects it had on rural villages, landholdings, and landlessness. The zamindari was a system of landholding that consolidated fields in the hands of powerful village elites. For Bihar, this meant most of the land fell in the hands of upper caste Hindus (Chaudhry, 1988). Peasants were then typically tied to the land, working for the grain they produced, while remaining landless themselves. In the late 19th century, however, Bihar began to feel the effects of commercialism, beginning a process of out-migration from both the zamindar and lower class populations. In the Chapra region at the beginning of this century, upper castes had to resort to occupations other than agriculture. Rajputs, an upper caste group, went out for ‘service’ along with lower class individuals, becoming “peons and durwans in estates of larger zamindars” (de Haan 2002:120). Out-migration existed in high numbers during the zamindari system for both landowners and lower caste laborers, yet the economic gaps between landowners and lower class, as well as the frequency of migration seemed to increase after the foundation of India and the subsequent abolishment of the colonial landholding system.

Last Update: 2015-07-28
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:
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Virtually any medium can be used for advertising. Commercial advertising media can include wall paintings, billboards, street furniture components, printed flyers and rack cards, radio, cinema and television adverts, web banners, mobile telephone screens, shopping carts, web popups, skywriting, bus stop benches, human billboards and forehead advertising, magazines, newspapers, town criers, sides of buses, banners attached to or sides of airplanes ("logojets"), in-flight advertisements on seatback tray tables or overhead storage bins, taxicab doors, roof mounts and passenger screens, musical stage shows, subway platforms and trains, elastic bands on disposable diapers, doors of bathroom stalls, stickers on apples in supermarkets, shopping cart handles (grabertising), the opening section of streaming audio and video, posters, and the backs of event tickets and supermarket receipts. Any place an "identified" sponsor pays to deliver their message through a medium is advertising.[citation needed] Television advertising / Music in advertising In 2014, a study conducted over 7 years found that the television commercial is still the most effective mass-market advertising format.[43] The study's findings stated that for every £1 (GBP) invested in TV advertising, it returned £1.79.[44] This is reflected by the high prices television networks charge for commercial airtime during popular events. The annual Super Bowl football game in the United States is known as the most prominent advertising event on television - with an audience of over 108 million and studies showing that 50% of those only tuned in to see the advertisements.[45] The average cost of a single thirty-second television spot during this game reached US$4 million & a 60-second spot double that figure in 2014.[45] Virtual advertisements may be inserted into regular programming through computer graphics. It is typically inserted into otherwise blank backdrops[46] or used to replace local billboards that are not relevant to the remote broadcast audience.[47] More controversially, virtual billboards may be inserted into the background[48] where none exist in real-life. This technique is especially used in televised sporting events.[49][50] Virtual product placement is also possible.[51][52]

निबंध विज्ञापनों

Last Update: 2015-07-20
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:
Warning: Contains invisible HTML formatting

I believe children should always respect their parents. Showing parental respect in our everyday lives provides us with the ability to treat every person we meet with kindness and adoration. Billy Graham once said “A child who is allowed to be disrespectful to his parents will not have true respect for anyone.” Children today imagine their parents have everything the world has to offer, and that they are there to serve to their every whim. Every child needs to realize that sometimes parents have more responsibilities and hardships that maybe they don’t see. They try their hardest to support their families and don’t need a child that causes extra stress to their everyday lives. A large number of my friends have explained how they “love their parents so much” yet they cause them a considerable amount of grief with their unacceptable behavior. Many can’t look past their own “problems” to give their parents the respect they deserve. On occasion some of my friends have exploded with such rude behavior without paying any mind to the guests that stand before them. Some are asked to do the simplest of chores and they bawl and whine like toddlers! The very least they could do was lend a helping hand. When I see my friends acting like this I know I must try my hardest to never act in such a horrible manner. I have taken to the heart the lessons my parents have taught me, and I know I will follow them for the rest of my life. I have taught myself to be kind to others and to be aware of the stresses of adulthood, and I should always give an attempt to be benevolent. All of us children, no matter what age, should try to be considerate towards our parents and adults in our lives. We should try to lend a hand around the house and take on some of our parents burden. Soon enough we will be adults and parents faced with the same anxieties. Be mindful to your parents and administer the love they deserve for trying their hardest. Be a respectful person and take on the responsibilities your parents have been trying to teach you. The first step to kindness should be the love you will to your parents. To you, I pose a challenge. I challenge you to share in my belief and show love and most of all respect towards your parents

माता-पिता का सम्मान करने पर निबंध

Last Update: 2015-06-09
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
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