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English

Wright brothers

Hindi

राइट बंधु

Last Update: 2014-10-16
Usage Frequency: 1
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Reference: Wikipedia

English

Where are brothers

Hindi

bhai log kidhar ho

Last Update: 2016-11-21
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

English

These brothers are fagots

Hindi

bhai ye gandu hain

Last Update: 2016-08-27
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
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Reference:

English

Q ** Video XX Brothers and Sisters

Hindi

x** video xx brothers and sister

Last Update: 2017-02-03
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

English

How many brothers and sisters do you have

Hindi

apke kitne bhai behan h

Last Update: 2016-06-06
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
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Reference:

English

What are known as the English brothers Ldaki

Hindi

bhai ki ladki ko english me kya kehete hai

Last Update: 2016-07-01
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
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English

the open windowFrampton Nuttel suffers from a nervous condition and has come to spend some time alone. His sister sets up introductions for him with a few members of the community. His first visit is to the Sappleton house where he meets fifteen-year-old Vera, the niece of Mrs. Sappleton. Vera keeps Nuttel company while he waits. Upon hearing that Nuttel has not met the Sappletons, Vera tells Nuttel some information about the family. Vera says that three years ago to the date, Mrs. Sappleton's husband and two younger brothers went on a hunting trip and never returned. Vera goes into detail about the clothes they were wearing, the dog that accompanied them, and the song thatMrs. Sappleton's brother sang upon their return. Vera says that her grief-stricken aunt watches out the windowexpecting their return. When Mrs. Sappleton enters, she tells Nuttel thatshe expects her husband and brothers to return at any moment. Nuttel listens, thinking that Mrs. Sappleton has in fact gone crazy. Suddenly, Mrs. Sappleton brightens as she tells Nuttel that they have returned. Nuttel turns only to see the"dead" hunters. He becomes frightened and leaves in a rush. Mrs. Sappleton doesn't understand Nuttel's strange behavior, but Vera replies that he is deathly afraid of dogs. Not until the end of the story does the reader realize that Vera has tricked Mr. Nuttel. This is revealed with the last line of the story:

Hindi

the open window

Last Update: 2017-03-06
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
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Reference:
Warning: Contains invisible HTML formatting

English

Born in Brixen (Bressanone), Italy, Messner is a native speaker of German and Italian, and also fluent in English.[1] He grew up in Villnöß and spent his early years climbing in the Alps and fell in love with the Dolomites. His father, Josef Messner, was a teacher. He was also very strict and sometimes severe with Reinhold. Josef led Reinhold to his first summit at the age of five. Reinhold had eight brothers and one sister; he later climbed with his brother Günther and made Arctic crossings with his brother Hubert. When Reinhold was 13, he began climbing with his brother Günther, age 11. By the time Reinhold and Günther were in their early twenties, they were among Europe's best climbers.[2] Since the 1960s, Messner, inspired by Hermann Buhl, was one of the first and most enthusiastic supporters of alpine style mountaineering in the Himalayas, which consisted of climbing with very light equipment and a minimum of external help. Messner considered the usual expedition style ("siege tactics") disrespectful toward nature and mountains. Messner's first major Himalayan climb in 1970, the unclimbed Rupal face of Nanga Parbat, turned out to be a tragic success. Both he and his brother Günther reached the summit, but Günther died two days later on the descent of the Diamir face. Reinhold lost seven toes, which had become badly frostbitten during the climb and required amputation.[2] Reinhold was severely criticized for persisting on this climb with the less experienced Günther.[3] The 2010 movie Nanga Parbat by Joseph Vilsmaier is based on his account of the events.[4] While Messner and Peter Habeler were noted for fast ascents in the Alps of the Eiger North Wall, standard route (10 hours) and Les Droites (8 hours), his 1975 Gasherbrum I first ascent of a new route took three days. This was unheard of at the time. In the 1970s, Messner championed the cause for ascending Mount Everest without supplementary oxygen, saying that he would do it "by fair means" or not at all.[5] In 1978, he reached the summit of Everest with Habeler.[5] This was the first time anyone had been that high without bottled oxygen and Messner and Habeler proved what certain doctors, specialists, and mountaineers thought impossible. He repeated the feat, without Habeler, from the Tibetan side in 1980, during the monsoon season. This was Everest's first solo summit.

Hindi

रेनहोल्ड

Last Update: 2016-07-25
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:
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English

the open windowFrampton Nuttel suffers from a nervous condition and has come to spend some time alone. His sister sets up introductions for him with a few members of the community. His first visit is to the Sappleton house where he meets fifteen-year-old Vera, the niece of Mrs. Sappleton. Vera keeps Nuttel company while he waits. Upon hearing that Nuttel has not met the Sappletons, Vera tells Nuttel some information about the family. Vera says that three years ago to the date, Mrs. Sappleton's husband and two younger brothers went on a hunting trip and never returned. Vera goes into detail about the clothes they were wearing, the dog that accompanied them, and the song that Mrs. Sappleton's brother sang upon their return. Vera says that her grief-stricken aunt watches out the window expecting their return. When Mrs. Sappleton enters, she tells Nuttel that she expects her husband and brothers to return at any moment. Nuttel listens, thinking that Mrs. Sappleton has in fact gone crazy. Suddenly, Mrs. Sappleton brightens as she tells Nuttel that they have returned. Nuttel turns only to see the "dead" hunters. He becomes frightened and leaves in a rush. Mrs. Sappleton doesn't understand Nuttel's strange behavior, but Vera replies that he is deathly afraid of dogs. Not until the end of the story does the reader realize that Vera has tricked Mr. Nuttel. This is revealed with the last line of the story: "Romance at short notice was her [Vera's] specialty."

Hindi

the open window

Last Update: 2015-12-16
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:
Warning: Contains invisible HTML formatting

English

hindi essay difference between boys and girlAs a good postfeminist-era mom, I certainly didn't push my son toward trucks and my daughter toward tutus. If anything, I went out of my way to avoid giving them gender-stereotyped toys, offering glittery finger paint to my son and trains to my daughter. But it didn't matter: My son turned his doll's crib into a race car and my daughter was obsessed with shoes. Even though I'm a psychologist who specializes in early education, it took having kids to make me realize that sex differences aren't just the stuff of Brady Bunch reruns. In fact, one study found that when 18-month-old boys and girls were shown pictures of a doll and a vehicle, for example, most of the girls opted for the doll, while the majority of the boys chose the vehicle. And while 18 months is old enough to have been influenced by stereotyped gifts, research suggests that many of the differences we see are evident from birth, and may even be hardwired. And that's just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to gender research. To see what else I unearthed, read on. Do you recognize your little XY or XX babe in what the science says? It's a Boy! If you've got a James or Brian at home, you've probably already learned that boys love action—watching it and being a part of it (hint: stock up on Band-Aids!). But they're also more emotional than the stereotypes give them credit for. Here, some of the milestones and traits you can look forward to as your little man grows: They like motion. According to psychologists at the University of Cambridge in England, boys prefer to watch mechanical motion over human motion. When they gave 12-month-old boys the choice of looking at people talking or windshield wipers moving, you can guess which the tots picked. And it turns out that baby boys are more adept at keeping track of moving objects; recent research shows that boys are about two months ahead of girls when it comes to figuring out the laws of motion (that if you roll a ball under a couch, say, it will take a few seconds to pop out on the other side). They've got the moves. You know that old saying, "Girls are talkers, boys are walkers"? Well, it's only half true. Girls do talk first, but boys are likely to start walking—and hit all the major motor milestones—around the same time as girls. It's easy to see how this misconception arose: Boys squirm, kick, and wiggle more than their female counterparts. To wit, according to new research, infant boys are more likely to end up in the ER for injuries. But all that activity does not pay off in meeting early-childhood milestones any sooner. (Boys' gross motor skills do take off, however, during the preschool years, at which point they outpace their female peers in most measures of physical ability.) They're more emotional than you think. There is some evidence that boys tend to be more easily agitated than girls and have a harder time self-soothing. According to one study, even when 6-month-old boys appeared as calm as the girls in the face of frustration, measures of heart rate and breathing suggested that they were actually experiencing greater distress. They love a crowd. Boys prefer looking at groups of faces (future teammates, perhaps?) rather than individual ones. In fact, given the choice, newborn boys would rather look at a mobile than a single face. They're (comparatively) fearless. Boys express fear later than girls, and less often. According to a recent survey, the parents of boys ages 3 to 12 months were much less likely than the parents of girls the same age to report that their child startles in response to loud noises or stimuli. Another study revealed that when moms made a fearful face as their 12-month-olds approached a toy, the boys disregarded the mom and went for the plaything anyway. Girls slowed their approach. It's a Girl! Raising a little lady? Then prepare to gab with your girl. Whether they're trying to maintain eye contact with you as newborns (research shows they excel at this more than infant boys) or saying their first words sooner, girls thrive on communicating with you. You can expect all or some of those characteristics to blossom in your baby girl: They're made to mimic. As early as three hours of age, girls excel at imitation, a precursor to back-and-forth interaction. In a study conducted last year, newborn girls did better than boys in trying to copy finger movements. As toddlers, girls zoom ahead of boys on imitative behaviors such as pretending to take care of a baby but, interestingly, are no different from little guys when it comes to pretending to drive a car or water the plants, actions that are much less about human interaction. They're good with their hands. Infant girls exceed boys when it comes to fine motor tasks, a head start that will stick with them until preschool. They're faster to manipulate toys; they use eating utensils sooner; and they write sooner (and more neatly), too. They may be better listeners. Recent research shows that girls are more attuned to the sound of human voices and seem to actually prefer the sound to other sounds. Shake a rattle and you'll see no difference between newborn girls and boys, but when you talk, the girls will be more likely to become engaged. They like face time. Girls are more likely to establish and maintain eye contact, and are attracted to individual faces—especially women's. They're also more skilled at reading emotional expressions; if shown a frightening face, for example, they'll look at Mom or get distressed, but they'll be fine if they see a happy one. Boys take longer to notice the difference, according to a meta-analysis of 26 studies on kids' capacity to recognize facial expressions. They talk sooner. All that watching and listening pays off: Girls start using gestures like pointing or waving bye-bye earlier than their brothers, and they play games like patty-cake and "So Big" sooner, according to a study of children ages 8 to 30 months. Girls understand what you're saying before boys do, start speaking earlier (at around 12 months versus 13 to 14 months for boys), and will continue to talk more through the toddler years. At 16 months, they produce as many as 100 words, while the average boy utters closer to 30. Although girls remain somewhat ahead through toddlerhood, the gap does begin to narrow and at 2 ½, both boys and girls have 500 words, more or less. Speaking of words, my daughter's first was "shiz" (as in "shoes," lots of them). But despite her obsession with fashion, she always surprises me with a confidence that often makes her tougher than her brothers. And my boys can be incredibly sensitive when I least expect it. The truth is, gender is only a part of what makes them who they are. If only science could study, and I could understand, the rest of them so well! Want to hear more about gender differences? Hear one mom's story of gender preferences.

Hindi

लड़के और लड़की के बीच हिंदी निबंध का अंतरAs a good postfeminist-era mom, I certainly didn't push my son toward trucks and my daughter toward tutus. If anything, I went out of my way to avoid giving them gender-stereotyped toys, offering glittery finger paint to my son and trains to my daughter. But it didn't matter: My son turned his doll's crib into a race car and my daughter was obsessed with shoes. Even though I'm a psychologist who specializes in early education, it took having kids to make me realize that sex differences aren't just the stuff of Brady Bunch reruns. In fact, one study found that when 18-month-old boys and girls were shown pictures of a doll and a vehicle, for example, most of the girls opted for the doll, while the majority of the boys chose the vehicle. And while 18 months is old enough to have been influenced by stereotyped gifts, research suggests that many of the differences we see are evident from birth, and may even be hardwired. And that's just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to gender research. To see what else I unearthed, read on. Do you recognize your little XY or XX babe in what the science says? It's a Boy! If you've got a James or Brian at home, you've probably already learned that boys love action—watching it and being a part of it (hint: stock up on Band-Aids!). But they're also more emotional than the stereotypes give them credit for. Here, some of the milestones and traits you can look forward to as your little man grows: They like motion. According to psychologists at the University of Cambridge in England, boys prefer to watch mechanical motion over human motion. When they gave 12-month-old boys the choice of looking at people talking or windshield wipers moving, you can guess which the tots picked. And it turns out that baby boys are more adept at keeping track of moving objects; recent research shows that boys are about two months ahead of girls when it comes to figuring out the laws of motion (that if you roll a ball under a couch, say, it will take a few seconds to pop out on the other side). They've got the moves. You know that old saying, "Girls are talkers, boys are walkers"? Well, it's only half true. Girls do talk first, but boys are likely to start walking—and hit all the major motor milestones—around the same time as girls. It's easy to see how this misconception arose: Boys squirm, kick, and wiggle more than their female counterparts. To wit, according to new research, infant boys are more likely to end up in the ER for injuries. But all that activity does not pay off in meeting early-childhood milestones any sooner. (Boys' gross motor skills do take off, however, during the preschool years, at which point they outpace their female peers in most measures of physical ability.) They're more emotional than you think. There is some evidence that boys tend to be more easily agitated than girls and have a harder time self-soothing. According to one study, even when 6-month-old boys appeared as calm as the girls in the face of frustration, measures of heart rate and breathing suggested that they were actually experiencing greater distress. They love a crowd. Boys prefer looking at groups of faces (future teammates, perhaps?) rather than individual ones. In fact, given the choice, newborn boys would rather look at a mobile than a single face. They're (comparatively) fearless. Boys express fear later than girls, and less often. According to a recent survey, the parents of boys ages 3 to 12 months were much less likely than the parents of girls the same age to report that their child startles in response to loud noises or stimuli. Another study revealed that when moms made a fearful face as their 12-month-olds approached a toy, the boys disregarded the mom and went for the plaything anyway. Girls slowed their approach. It's a Girl! Raising a little lady? Then prepare to gab with your girl. Whether they're trying to maintain eye contact with you as newborns (research shows they excel at this more than infant boys) or saying their first words sooner, girls thrive on communicating with you. You can expect all or some of those characteristics to blossom in your baby girl: They're made to mimic. As early as three hours of age, girls excel at imitation, a precursor to back-and-forth interaction. In a study conducted last year, newborn girls did better than boys in trying to copy finger movements. As toddlers, girls zoom ahead of boys on imitative behaviors such as pretending to take care of a baby but, interestingly, are no different from little guys when it comes to pretending to drive a car or water the plants, actions that are much less about human interaction. They're good with their hands. Infant girls exceed boys when it comes to fine motor tasks, a head start that will stick with them until preschool. They're faster to manipulate toys; they use eating utensils sooner; and they write sooner (and more neatly), too. They may be better listeners. Recent research shows that girls are more attuned to the sound of human voices and seem to actually prefer the sound to other sounds. Shake a rattle and you'll see no difference between newborn girls and boys, but when you talk, the girls will be more likely to become engaged. They like face time. Girls are more likely to establish and maintain eye contact, and are attracted to individual faces—especially women's. They're also more skilled at reading emotional expressions; if shown a frightening face, for example, they'll look at Mom or get distressed, but they'll be fine if they see a happy one. Boys take longer to notice the difference, according to a meta-analysis of 26 studies on kids' capacity to recognize facial expressions. They talk sooner. All that watching and listening pays off: Girls start using gestures like pointing or waving bye-bye earlier than their brothers, and they play games like patty-cake and "So Big" sooner, according to a study of children ages 8 to 30 months. Girls understand what you're saying before boys do, start speaking earlier (at around 12 months versus 13 to 14 months for boys), and will continue to talk more through the toddler years. At 16 months, they produce as many as 100 words, while the average boy utters closer to 30. Although girls remain somewhat ahead through toddlerhood, the gap does begin to narrow and at 2 ½, both boys and girls have 500 words, more or less. Speaking of words, my daughter's first was "shiz" (as in "shoes," lots of them). But despite her obsession with fashion, she always surprises me with a confidence that often makes her tougher than her brothers. And my boys can be incredibly sensitive when I least expect it. The truth is, gender is only a part of what makes them who they are. If only science could study, and I could understand, the rest of them so well! Want to hear more about gender differences? Hear one mom's story of gender preferences.

Last Update: 2015-10-07
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:
Warning: Contains invisible HTML formatting

English

koyal bird-essaLittle Swetha was playing alone in the backyard of her house. She was feeling lonely and waited for her friends from the neighbor houses to come and play with her. Suddenly she heard a beautiful song of a bird from the top of her house. She looked up and spotted a black bird there. Though it was black looking something like a crow, he sang beautifully and Swetha was very happy. She forgot about her loneliness in the company of the bird. As there was no sound from Swetha, her mother got worried and left her job in the kitchen and came to the backyard to find out about her daughter. Amazingly, she found Swetha in a very happy mood engrossed in the cuckoo’s song. But when the bird saw her mother he flew away. “O mama! What a nice bird? Such a beautiful song? What is the name of this bird, mama?” Swetha wanted to know more about the bird, which made her happy all this time. “This bird is called Cuckoo or Koel. Cuckoo is a small bird seen all over India. They are also found in many Bird Sanctuaries in India. Cuckoos are also seen in Australia. A cuckoo has a length of 39-46 cms," said her mother, sitting next to her daughter. By then Swetha’s friends – Reema and Sujith - came and joined them. “Mummy, tell me more about cuckoo,” demanded Swetha. “Okay. I’ll tell you everything about this bird. I know what all questions you will have, and I will answer them one by one. Listen carefully.” “Aunty, what is the zoological name of a cuckoo?” asked Sujith who was a 5th standard student. "The zoological name of cuckoo is Eudynamys scolopacea." “Aunty, how do they look in appearance?” That was Reema’s question. "A cuckoo has a long tail, pointed wings and curved bills. A cuckoo’s tail is dark gray and slightly white in colour. The crown is dark brown and the bill is pale green in colour." "How do we differentiate them whether they are males or females? Asked Sujith." "A male cuckoo is glistening black, with yellowish green bill and crimson eyes. They have short wings but long tail". Female cuckoos are slightly smaller than the males. A female cuckoo has green beak and red eyes. The female is dark brown, with profusely spotted and barred with white. They have green beak and red eyes," said Swetha's mother. “Mummy, what do they eat? Who gives them food?” "Cuckoos are carnivorous. You may wonder what is carnivorous? It means they eat flesh" "They eat fruits, insects,caterpillars, grasshoppers, lizards, small snakes and mammals." The children looked at each other in surprise. "Where do they live? Do they have houses like us?" asked Swetha. Her mother smiled. "They live on the canopy of the trees, where they make their nests." "How do they get brothers and sisters?" Reema wanted to know. "A mother cuckoo lays egg in the nest of the other bird. Once the egg is hatched the chick forces the other eggs and hatchings out of the nest. The babies have dark eyes. When the chick leaves the nest it roosts in the outer branches of a tree." "A mother koel lays her eggs in the nest of a crow. After laying the eggs, the female koel flies away to the dense forests as it likes to live on big trees full of leaves to hide it. Their eggs are hatched by the crow." She added. "Very interesting! Aunty, when is their breeding season?" asked Sujith. "The breeding season of Cuckoos is September to March," replied Swetha's mother. "Do they always sing like this?" asked Swetha. "No. They usually sing in spring season because it is their mating season. The males sing such beautiful song to attract the female ones." "How sad we missed watching the cuckoo singing!" Reema was disappointed. "Don't worry, Reema. I have a video of a cuckoo singing. Watch this video. All of you come inside and I will switch the computer on," said Swetha's mother. y in hindi

Hindi

हिंदी में कोयल पक्षी-निबंध

Last Update: 2015-08-03
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:
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English

My name is Polly. I was born in a cage owned by a little boy named George. He was very small, and when he used to take me away from my two brothers, my mother would peck his fingers. When I was about two weeks old, I fell out of my cage on account of the little boy's father leaving the door open when he came to feed us. I only hurt my foot a little bit, and George's mother came and tucked me under my mother's wing again. My foot soon got better and when I was about six months old, I was given to a little girl called Mary. After she had me for a few weeks she taught me to talk, and when I used to see anybody I |used to say "Good day. How are you keeping ? " One night the big black cat caught hold of me and gave me a good hiding. I happened to break my chain, so I flew away and went to an- other place. A man shot at me when he was shooting at the cockatoo on his maize, so I am back again In my cage.

Hindi

pakshi की आत्मकथा

Last Update: 2015-04-20
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
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