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English

celebrate

Tagalog

ipinagdiriwang

Last Update: 2014-07-16
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference: Anonymous

English

celebrate

Tagalog

magbunyi

Last Update: 2013-09-30
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
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Reference:

English

Celebrate

Tagalog

ipinagdidiriwang

Last Update: 2014-10-08
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
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Reference:

English

celebrates

Tagalog

nagdiriwang

Last Update: 2015-03-13
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
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Reference:

English

Celebrates

Tagalog

pinagdidiriwang

Last Update: 2014-08-23
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
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English

Each time we celebrate the Eucharist, we thank God for His unending love for us.

Tagalog

Sa bawat oras na ipinagdidiwang natin ang Eukaristiya, nagpapasalamat kami sa Diyos para sa Kanyang walang hanggang pagmamahal sa atin.

Last Update: 2015-11-12
Subject: Religion
Usage Frequency: 1
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English

v., inf. honour (US: honor) someone; acclaim; celebrate publicly

Tagalog

ipagbunyi

Last Update: 2014-10-12
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
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English

In a faraway land named LA-J4, there exist three great tribes who are competing for power and who aspire of ruling the whole kingdom. 11111 is the most powerful of them. They are known for their bravery and greatness in battle. They occupy most of the plains in LA-J4. The other one, 22222, is famous for blacksmith. They live peacefully at the very heart of the forest making fine metals, weapons and armory. Moreover, most of the traders in the kingdom came from their tribe. The least powerful tribe is 33333. They reside in the mountains. Although, they are known to be experts in making potions and concoctions, people in the kingdom do not trust them completely because they live in seclusion and seldom do they get along with other people outside their tribe. One day, a sad news spread across the land as the leader of 11111 tribe was poisoined during the annual feast of the tribe. Along with that, a lot rumors have also spread as to who the culprit of the crime is. Because of what has happened, the 11111 tribe was enraged and wanted to seek revenge. Few weeks after that dreadful incident, while the 22222 tribe is busy preparing for the celebration of their tribe’s yearly tradition, a group of armored men attacked them. The supposedly blissful celebration has turned into fearful mass killings. The armored men furiously killed all the people in the tribe. Men, women, children, and elders were murdered mercilessly. Houses were burned leaving the tribe with no glory and honor but only ashes and dead bodies. The 33333 tribe led by Alfonzo delata Castilla came to aid them, but it was too late already. However, it seems like a miracle that a 7-year old girl has survived that terrible and violent event.They found her crying and very afraid. Her name is Fei-Tah, the daughter of the tribe’s master. She was able to escape the horror, hid in the forest, and helplessly watched her tribesmen being killed one by one. 33333 tribe adopted her and treated her like one of them. In her new tribe, she met Xylan, the son of Alfonzo, who became her closest friend. They grew up together. Fei Tah told Xylan with conviction that one day she will take revenge for her tribe. She spent all her life training in the art of battle and since she came from a tribe known for blacksmith she wanted to create the best weapon that would bring down the 11111 tribe, the tribe that killed her tribesmen. 13 years after, with the help of Xylan, they made Leo Collantes, a cyborg and their strongest weapon. At last her most awaited day of revenge has come. With all their might, they attacked the 11111 tribe. The battle went on for several days until the fortresses of the 11111 tribe had fallen one by one. Leo Collantes indeed is a great help to the tribe. Eventually, the forces of 11111 tribe had weaken and for that they decided to surrender, together with their commander. Alfonzo asked the commander to kneel before him as a sign of respect to the most powerful man and the new ruler of LA-J4. He called Fei Tah and gave her a sword so that she could finally fulfil her promise of revenge for her tribe. When she was about to kill the commander, a 7-year old girl ran towards her. She was crying and begging Fei Tah to spare the life of her father. Then suddenly, as if a flashback, she saw herself in that child years ago. She felt pity for the child and decided to put down the sword. Alfonzo was not happy about what Fei Tah did so he grabbed the sword from Fei Tah’s hand and struck it through the leader’s heart. Fei Tah was shocked as she saw the body of the commander fell to the ground. After that, Alfonzo pointed the sword to Fei Tah and admitted everything that he did. He revealed that he was the one responsible for the death of 11111 tribe’s leader. He made a concoction, a potent poison and hired someone to mix it to the drink of the tribe’s leader during the feast. He is also the one who spread the rumors that 22222 tribe was the culprit of the crime that’s why 11111 tribe was infuriated and attacked Fei Tah’s tribe. Alfonzo did all these because of his ambition to rule the land and to make known to everyone his tribe. Finally, he was able to achieve his dream. After revealing everything, he attacked Fei Tah but before he could reach her, a sword pierced through his body from behind. He fell to the ground and saw that it was Leo Collantes, the cyborg, who was commanded by his own son, Xylan. At last Fei Tah was able to avenge her tribe and from then on, peace in LA-J4 was finally restored.

Tagalog

uyam ay walang limitasyon

Last Update: 2016-01-11
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
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English

meaning of post celebration

Tagalog

kahulugan ng post na pagdiriwang

Last Update: 2015-12-28
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
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English

life is so short and its just like a mirror.you can only see as much as it reflects. so dont be arrogant or proud by looking down on others because of their current situations. things get changed with time just like the weather. don't under estimate anyone because everyone has a great future! where have you been rejected before. you will be celebrated soon.

Tagalog

buhay ay maikli at ang kanyang tulad ng isang salamin.ikaw maaari lamang makita ng mas maraming bilang ay sumasalamin ito. kaya wala na abusado o maipagmamalaki sa pamamagitan ng pagtingin down na sa iba dahil sa kanilang kasalukuyang sitwasyon. bagay na makakuha ng nagbago sa panahon tulad ng mga taya ng panahon. hindi sa ilalim ng pagtantya sinuman dahil ang lahat ay may isang mahusay na hinaharap! tinanggihan kung saan mo nai-bago. ikaw ay kilala sa madaling panahon.

Last Update: 2015-12-05
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
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English

ongratulations, Church, you have arrived!!! 16th Anniversary! This is a very special anniversary when our church comes of age! This is the year of Celebration, let us rejoice and be glad! We have passed through many trials of persecutions and purification. We became stronger, more faithful and devoted! It is a new life that awaits us ahead, as we become “grown ups”. Let God’s grace be revealed to us even more! Let us remember, that God is always with us. Our church and each of its members has a purpose and calling from God, which is to bring people freedom and salvation. Let us give glory to God and His Son Jesus Christ. I am thankful for those who were not lead astray and stood faithfully accomplishing the work of God. I wish every one abundant joy, smiles and happiness in celebrating our anniversary. I wish that each of you will bear much fruit for the Kingdom of God and accomplish much glory for God. God bless you all! With love,

Tagalog

QUERY LENGTH LIMIT EXCEDEED. MAX ALLOWED QUERY : 500 CHARS

Last Update: 2015-11-14
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
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English

celebrity in Greece

Tagalog

mga tanyag na tao sa gresya

Last Update: 2015-08-30
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
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English

celebrity in South west asia

Tagalog

mga tanyag na tao sa timog silangang asya

Last Update: 2015-07-11
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
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English

Pygmalion and Galatea Pygmalion and Galatea The story of Pygmalion and Galatea is found in Greek Mythology, and in the famous work "Metamorphoses", by the great Roman poet Ovid. Their love was so unique that it is difficult to define it. But from this legendary love story, one thing is clear, man can never love an inanimate object with as much passion as he loves a living, breathing being. Love gives rise to desire and without this passion any love remains unfulfilled. Pygmalion was a master sculptor in the ancient city of Greece. All day he sculpted beautiful statues from huge pieces of rock. In fact, his creations were so wonderful that whoever saw them were mesmerised by their sheer artistic beauty and exact finish. Pygmalion himself was a fine and handsome young man. He was liked by all men and women. Many women loved him for his great skill and looks. But Pygmalion never paid attention to any of these women. He saw so much to blame in women that he came at last to abhor the sex, and resolved to live unmarried. He was a sculptor, and with his with wonderful skill he sculpted a beautiful ivory statue which was so lifelike that it was difficult to believe that it was lifeless at the first glance. The beauty was such that no living woman could compete with it. It was indeed the perfect semblance of a maiden that seemed to be alive, and only prevented from moving by modesty. His art was so perfect that it concealed itself and its product looked like the workmanship of nature. Pygmalion spent hours admiring his creation. By and by Pygmalion's admiration for his own sculpture turned to love. Oftentimes he laid his hand upon it as if to assure himself whether it were living or not, and could not, even then, believe that it was only ivory. He caressed it, and gave it such presents as young girls love - bright shells and polished stones, little birds and flowers of various hues, beads and amber. He adorned his ivory maiden with jewels. He put rainment on its limbs, and jewels on its fingers, and a necklace about its neck. To the ears he hung earrings and strings of pearls upon the breast. Her dress became her, and she looked not less charming than when unattired. He laid her on a couch spread with cloths of Tyrian dye, and called her his wife, and put her head upon a pillow of the softest feathers, as if she could enjoy their softness. He gave the statue a name: "Galatea", meaning "sleeping love'. But what will be the consequence of falling in love with a lifeless ivory maiden? The festival of Aphrodite was at hand - a festival celebrated with great pomp at Cyprus. Victims were offered, the altars smoked, and the odor of incense filled the air. When the festivities of Aphrodite started, Pygmalion took part in the ceremonies. He went to the temple of Aphrodite to ask forgiveness for all the years he had shunned her. When Pygmalion had performed his part in the solemnities, he hesitantly prayed for a wife like his ivory virgin statue. He stood before the altar of Aphrodite and timidly said, "Ye gods, who can do all things, give me, I pray you, for my wife" - he dared not utter "my ivory virgin," but said instead - "one like my ivory virgin." But Goddess Aphrodite understood what the poor man was trying to say. She was curious. How can a man love a lifeless thing so much? Was it so beautiful that Pygmalion fell in love with his own creation? So she visited the studio of the sculptor while he was away. What she saw greatly amazed her. For the sculpture had a perfect likeness to her. In fact, it would not have been wrong to say that the sculpture was an image of Aphrodite herself. Goddess Aphrodite was charmed by Pygmalion's creation. She brought the statue to life. When Pygmalion returned to his home, he went before Galatea and knelt down before the woman of his dreams. He looked at her lovingly, with a lover's ardour. It seemed to him that Galatea was looking at her lovingly too. For a moment, it seemed to Pygmalion that it was just a figment of his imagination. He rubbed his eyes and looked again. But no. There was no mistake this time. Galatea was smiling at him. He laid his hand upon the limbs; the ivory felt soft to his touch and yielded to his fingers like the wax of Hymettus. It seemed to be warm. He stood up; his mind oscillated between doubt and joy. Fearing he may be mistaken, again and again with a lover's ardor he touches the object of his hopes. It was indeed alive! The veins when pressed yielded to the finger and again resumed their roundness. Slowly it dawned on Pygmalion that the animation of his sculpture was the result of his prayer to Goddess Aphrodite who knew his desire. At last, the votary of Aphrodite found words to thank the goddess. Pygmalion humbled himself at the Goddess' feet. Soon Pygmalion and Galatea were wed, and Pygmalion never forgot to thank Aphrodite for the gift she had given him. Aphrodite blessed the nuptials she had formed, and this union between Pygmalion and Galatea produced a son named Paphos, from whom the city Paphos, sacred to Aphrodite, received its name. He and Galatea brought gifts to her temple throughout their life and Aphrodite blessed them with happiness and love in return. The unusual love that blossomed between Pygmalion and Galatea enthralls all. Falling in love with one's creation and then getting the desired object as wife- perhaps this was destined for Pygmalion. Even to this day, countless people and young lovers are mesmerized by this exceptional love that existed between two persons at a time when civilization was in its infancy.

Tagalog

pygmalion sa galatea

Last Update: 2015-06-13
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
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English

opening remarks fiesta celebration

Tagalog

Puna pambungad na pista pagdiriwang

Last Update: 2015-05-17
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
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English

celebrity in northern Asia

Tagalog

mga tanyag na tao sa hilagang asya

Last Update: 2015-03-22
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
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English

Many festivals celebrated in the Philippines. Which of the following is correct to use to expand the sentence?

Tagalog

Maraming piyesta na ipinagdiriwang sa Pilipinas. Alin sa mga sumusunod ang wastong gamitin para mapalawak ang pangungusap?

Last Update: 2015-03-08
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
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English

Enjoyed the celebration of Christmas in the Philippines. The appearance of the sentence is simple.

Tagalog

Masaya ang pagdiriwang ng Pasko sa Pilipinas. Ang anyo ng pangungusap ay payak.

Last Update: 2015-03-08
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

English

celebrity in Asia

Tagalog

mga tanyag na tao sa asya

Last Update: 2015-03-08
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

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English

The culture of Thailand incorporates cultural beliefs and characteristics indigenous to the area known as modern-day Thailand coupled with much influence from ancient China, Cambodia, Laos, India along with the neighboring pre-historic cultures of Southeast Asia.[1] It is influenced primarily by animism, Hinduism, Buddhism, as well as by later migrations from China, and northern India. Contents 1 Religion 2 Customs 2.1 Traditional clothing 3 Marriage 4 Birth traditions and beliefs 5 Funerals 6 Arts 7 Holidays 8 Sports 9 Traditional Games of Thailand 9.1 Kratai Kha Deow(One Legged Rabbit) 9.2 Banana rib hobbyhorse riding 10 Nicknames 11 See also 12 Notes and references 13 External links Religion Buddhist novices receiving joss sticks. Main article: Religion in Thailand Thailand is nearly 94%-95% Theravada Buddhist (which includes the Thai Forest Tradition and the Dhammayuttika Nikaya and Santi Asoke sects), with minorities of Muslims (5-6%), Christians (1%), Mahayana Buddhists, and other religions.[2] Thai Theravada Buddhism is supported and overseen by the government, with monks receiving a number of government benefits, such as free use of the public transportation infrastructure. Buddhism in Thailand is strongly influenced by traditional beliefs regarding ancestral and natural spirits, which have been incorporated into Buddhist cosmology. Most Thai people own spirit houses, miniature wooden houses in which they believe household spirits live. They present offerings of food and drink to these spirits to keep them happy. If these spirits aren't happy, it is believed that they will inhabit the larger household of the Thai, and cause chaos. These spirit houses can be found in public places and in the streets of Thailand, where the public make offerings.[3] Prior to the rise of Theravada Buddhism, both Indian Brahmanic religion and Mahayana Buddhism were present in Thailand. Influences from both these traditions can still be seen in present day Thai folklore. Brahmanist shrines play an important role in Thai folk religion, and the Mahayana Buddhist influence is reflected in the presence of figures like Lokesvara, a form of the bodhisattva Avalokitesvara sometimes incorporated into Thailand's iconography.[4][5] Customs See also: Thai folklore Thai greeting, the smile is an important symbol of refinement in Thai culture. The traditional customs and the folklore of Thai people were gathered and described by Phya Anuman Rajadhon in the 20th century, at a time when modernity changed the face of Thailand and a great number of traditions disappeared or became adapted to modern life. Still, the striving towards refinement, rooted in ancient Siamese culture, consisting of promoting that which is refined and avoiding coarseness is a major focus of the daily life of Thai people and high on their scale of values.[6] One of the most distinctive Thai customs is the wai. Used in greetings, leave-taking, or as an acknowledgement, it comes in many forms, reflecting the relative status of those involved. Generally the salutation involves a prayer-like gesture with the hands, similar to the Añjali Mudrā of the Indian subcontinent, and it also may include a slight bow of the head. This salutation is often accompanied by a serene smile symbolizing a welcoming disposition and a pleasant attitude. Thailand is often referred to as the "land of smiles" in tourist brochures. Public displays of affection is not overly common in traditional Thai society, especially between lovers.[7] It is becoming more common, especially among the younger generation. A notable social norm holds that touching someone on the head may be considered rude. It is also considered rude to place one's feet at a level above someone else's head, especially if that person is of higher social standing. This is because the Thai people consider the foot to be the dirtiest and lowliest part of the body, and the head the most respected and highest part of the body. This also influences how Thais sit when on the ground—their feet always pointing away from others, tucked to the side or behind them. Pointing at or touching something with the feet is also considered rude. Display of respect of the younger towards the elder is a cornerstone value in Thailand. A family during the Buddhist ceremony for young men who are to be ordained as monks. Since serene detachment is valued, conflict and sudden displays of anger are eschewed in Thai culture and, as is many Asian cultures, the notion of face is extremely important. For these reasons, visitors should take care not to create conflict, to display anger or to cause a Thai person to lose face. Disagreements or disputes should be handled with a smile and no attempt should be made to assign blame to another. In everyday life in Thailand, there is a strong emphasis on the concept of sanuk; the idea that life should be fun. Because of this, Thais can be quite playful at work and during day-to-day activities. Displaying positive emotions in social interactions is also important in Thai culture. Often, Thais will deal with disagreements, minor mistakes, or misfortunes by using the phrase mai pen rai, translated as "it doesn't matter". The ubiquitous use of this phrase in Thailand reflects a disposition towards minimizing conflict, disagreements or complaints. A smile and the sentence "mai pen rai" indicates that the incident is not important and therefore there is no conflict or shame involved. Respect for hierarchy is a very important value for Thai people. The custom of bun khun emphasizes the indebtedness towards parents, as well as towards guardians, teachers, and caretakers. It describes the feelings and practices involved in certain relationships organized around generalized reciprocity, the slow-acting accounting of an exchange calculated according to locally interpreted scales and measures.[8] It is also considered rude to step on any type of Thai currency (Thai coin or banknote) as they include a likeness of the king. The 1941-42 Thai cultural mandates, promulgated by Plaek Pibulsonggram, made sweeping changes in Thai culture. Modernization efforts discouraged the wearing of women's traditional costumes, in favour of more modern forms of dress . There are a number of Thai customs relating to the special status of monks in Thai society. Thai monks are forbidden physical contact with women. Women are therefore expected to make way for passing monks to ensure that accidental contact does not occur. A variety of methods are employed to ensure that no incidental contact (or the appearance of such contact) between women and monks occurs. Women making offerings to monks place their donation at the feet of the monk, or on a cloth laid on the ground or a table. Powders or unguents intended to carry a blessing are applied to Thai women by monks using the end of a candle or stick. Laypersons are expected to sit or stand with their heads at a lower level than that of a monk. Within a temple, monks may sit on a raised platform during ceremonies to make this easier to achieve. When sitting in a temple, one is expected to point one's feet away from images of the Buddha. Shrines inside Thai residences are arranged so as to ensure that the feet are not pointed towards the religious icons, such as placing the shrine on the same wall as the head of a bed, if a house is too small to remove the shrine from the bedroom entirely. It is also customary to remove one's footwear before entering a home or the sacred areas within a temple, and not to step on the threshold. Traditional clothing A woman wearing a chut Thai Main article: Chut thai Traditional Thai clothing is called chut thai (Thai: ชุดไทย Thai pronunciation: [tɕʰút.tʰaj]) which literally means "Thai outfit". It can be worn by men, women, and children. Chut thai for women usually consists of a pha nung or a chong kraben, a blouse, and a sabai. Northern and northeastern women may wear a sinh instead of a pha nung and a chong kraben with either a blouse or a suea pat. Chut thai for men includes a chong kraben or pants, a Raj pattern shirt, with optional knee-length white socks and a sabai. Chut thai for northern Thai men is composed of a sado, a white Manchu styled jacket, and sometimes a khian hua. In formal occasions, people may choose to wear a chut thai phraratchaniyom. Marriage A traditional wedding in Thailand. Main article: Thai marriage Thai Buddhist marriage ceremonies are generally divided into two parts: a Buddhist component, which includes the recitation of prayers and the offering of food and other gifts to monks and images of the Buddha, and a non-Buddhist component rooted in folk traditions, which centers on the couple's families. In former times, it was unknown for Buddhist monks to be present at any stage of the marriage ceremony itself. As monks were required to attend to the dead during funerals, their presence at a marriage (which was associated with fertility, and intended to produce children) was considered a bad omen. A couple would seek a blessing from their local temple before or after being married, and might consult a monk for astrological advice in setting an auspicious date for the wedding. The non-Buddhist portions of the wedding would take place away from the temple, and would often take place on a separate day. In modern times, these prohibitions have been significantly relaxed. It is not uncommon for a visit to a temple to be made on the same day as the non-Buddhist portions of a wedding, or even for the wedding to take place within the temple. While a division is still commonly observed between the "religious" and "secular" portions of a wedding service, it may be as simple as the monks present for the Buddhist ceremony departing to take lunch once their role is complete. During the Buddhist component of the wedding service, the couple first bow before the image of the Buddha. They then recite certain basic Buddhist prayers or chants (typically including taking the Three Refuges and the Five Precepts), and light incense and candles before the image. The parents of the couple may then be called upon to "connect" them, by placing upon the heads of the bride and groom twin loops of string or thread that link the couple together. The couple may then make offerings of food, flowers, and medicine to the monks present. Cash gifts (usually placed in an envelope) may also be presented to the temple at this time. The monks may then unwind a small length of thread that is held between the hands of the assembled monks. They begin a series of recitations of Pali scriptures intended to bring merit and blessings to the new couple. The string terminates with the lead monk, who may connect it to a container of water that will be "sanctified" for the ceremony. Merit is said to travel through the string and be conveyed to the water. A similar arrangement is used to transfer merit to the dead at a funeral, further evidence of the weakening of the taboo on mixing funerary imagery and trappings with marriage ceremonies. Blessed water may be mixed with wax drippings from a candle lit before the Buddha image and other unguents and herbs to create a paste that is then applied to the foreheads of the bride and groom to create a small dot, similar to the marking made with red ochre on Hindu devotees. The bride's mark is created with the butt end of the candle rather than the monk's thumb, in keeping with the Vinaya prohibition against touching women. The highest-ranking monk present may elect to say a few words to the couple, offering advice or encouragement. The couple may then make offerings of food to the monks, at which point the Buddhist portion of the ceremony is concluded. The Thai dowry system is known as the sin sodt Thai: สินสอด. Traditionally, the groom will be expected to pay a sum of money to the family, to compensate them and to demonstrate that the groom is financially capable of taking care of their daughter. Sometimes, this sum is purely symbolic, and will be returned to the bride and groom after the wedding has taken place. The religious component of marriage ceremonies between Thai Muslims are markedly different from that described above. The Imam of the local mosque, the groom, the father of the bride, men in the immediate family, and important men in the community sit in a circle during the ceremony, conducted by the Imam. All the women, including the bride, sit in a separate room and do not have any direct participation in the ceremony. The secular component of the ceremony, however, is often nearly identical to the secular part of Thai Buddhist wedding ceremonies. The only notable difference here is the type of meat served to guests (goat and/or beef instead of pork). Thai Muslims frequently, though not always, also follow the conventions of the Thai dowry system. Birth traditions and beliefs Main article: Birth in Thailand Traditional principles concerning pregnancy and childbirth are largely influenced by folk beliefs, especially in rural areas of central and north Thailand. Modern practices follow the Western medical model. Funerals See also: Funeral (Buddhism) Funeral pyre of Chan Kusalo, the patriarch-abbot of northern Thailand. Traditionally, funerals last for at least one week. Crying is discouraged during the funeral, so as not to worry the spirit of the deceased. Many activities surrounding the funeral are intended to make merit for the deceased. Copies of Buddhist scriptures may be printed and distributed in the name of the deceased, and gifts are usually given to a local temple. Monks are invited to chant prayers that are intended to provide merit for the deceased, as well as to provide protection against the possibility of the dead relative returning as a malicious spirit. A picture of the deceased from his/her best days will often be displayed next to the coffin. Often, a thread is connected to the corpse or coffin which is held by the chanting monks during their recitation; this thread is intended to transfer the merit of the monks' recitation to the deceased. The corpse is cremated, and the urn with the ash is usually kept in a chedi in the local temple. Thai Chinese and Thai Muslim minorities bury their deceased according to the rituals of their respective communities. Arts A depiction of a white elephant in 19th century Thai art. Main articles: Thai art and Music of Thailand Thai visual arts were traditionally Buddhist. Thai Buddha images from different periods have a number of distinctive styles. Thai temple art and architecture evolved from a number of sources, one of them being Khmer architecture. Contemporary Thai art often combines traditional Thai elements with modern techniques. Literature in Thailand is heavily influenced by Indian Hindu culture. The most notable works of Thai literature are a version of the Ramayana, a Hindu religious epic, called the Ramakien, written in part by Kings Rama I and Rama II, and the poetry of Sunthorn Phu. There is no tradition of spoken drama in Thailand, the role instead being filled by Thai dance. This is divided into three categories: khon, lakhon, and likay, khon being the most elaborate and likay the most popular. Nang drama, a form of shadow play, is found in the south. The music of Thailand includes classical and folk music traditions, e.g., piphat and mor lam, respectively) as well as string or pop music. Holidays Main article: Public holidays in Thailand Important holidays in Thai culture include Thai New Year, or Songkran, which is officially observed from 13–15 April each year. Falling at the end of the dry season and during the hot season in Thailand, the celebrations notoriously feature boisterous water throwing. The water throwing stemmed from washing Buddha images and lightly sprinkling scented water on the hands of elderly people. Small amounts of scented talcum powder were also used in the annual cleansing rite. In recent decades, water fights have been increasingly industrialised with use of hoses, barrels, squirt guns, water-filled surgical tubing, and copious amounts of powder. Loi Krathong is held on the 12th full moon of the Thai lunar calendar, usually early-November. While not a government-observed holiday, it is nonetheless an auspicious day in Thai culture, in which Thai people "loi", meaning "to float" a "krathong", a small raft traditionally made from elaborately folded banana leaves and including flowers, candles, incense sticks, and small offerings. The act of floating away the candle raft is symbolic of letting go of all one's grudges, anger, and defilements so that one can start life afresh on a better footing. Sports Thai boxing is the indigenous national sport in Thailand.[citation needed] Football is perhaps the most-watched sport. The English Premier League is surprisingly popular.[citation needed] Traditional Games of Thailand Kratai Kha Deow(One Legged Rabbit) “Kratai Kha Deow” or “One Legged Rabbit” is one type of catch game. The catcher will call the rabbit, and the rabbit must stand on one leg and jump or tiptoe to catch the other players and switch to rabbit instead. This game will exercise your legs and practice balancing on one leg. The number of players are divided into two teams, or may not have a team at all. Normally, there are two or more players. At the first time, the player will select the rabbit or team by “Rock-Paper-Scissors”. The loser would have to be a rabbit. In the case of solo player, the rabbit must stand on one leg, then jump to chase and touch any part of the body of other children who have run away. Everyone must stay within the designated area. A player who runs out of space loses the game and must be switched to rabbit, but if the rabbit is exhausted and cannot stand on one leg, it was that defeated and must be punished. In team play, the rules are similar to the solo player, but the rabbit team will send a representative to catch the other team to all the people. Those arrested will have to wait outside until the rabbit team can catch all of the rival teams. Rabbit team can switch to teammates to catch on until they are exhausted, and if the all of the members in rabbit team are exhausted and cannot stand on one leg, the rabbit team lose the game and must be punished too. Banana rib hobbyhorse riding Banana rib hobbyhorse riding or "Khee Ma Khan Kluay" in Thai is a traditional game of Thailand that Thai kids frequently played in the past. They use a banana rib to make the parts of a horse such as head, ear, and horsetail. The kids can make a horse on their own by using banana rib from banana trees irrelevant. This game makes kids enjoy their imagination by assume themselves as a rider, and an exercise. That is a local traditional which is the kids can spent time together. The materials for making a banana rib hobbyhorse are banana rib, knife, small bamboo pin, and string. First, find a rib of a banana around 1.5 is long (1 meter = 2 wa). Cut it in a form of the head, neck, and ears then use a small bamboo pin to connect the ear to the head of a horse. The remaining part of a banana rib, becomes a horsetail. Attach a string between the head and the tail of this banana rib horse and place on the shoulder of the rider. How to play banana rib hobbyhorse riding. Kids will sit on the horse and behave like they are riding a real horse shouting ‘hee hee’ or ‘yee haaah’(making the usual sounds people shout when controlling their horses). They may race with other friends if they have player more than 2 players. Which team runs faster, will be the winner or continuously ride around a wide open space and have fun. Nicknames See also: Thai names Thai people universally have one, or occasionally more, short nicknames (Thai: ชื่อเล่น name-play) that they use with friends a

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Last Update: 2015-01-19
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