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English

mere fact

Tagalog

galos lamang katotohanan

Last Update: 2015-05-22
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference: Anonymous

English

in fact

Tagalog

sa katunayan

Last Update: 2015-02-25
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

English

ano sa tagalog ang facts

Tagalog

ano sa tagalog ang mga katotohanan

Last Update: 2015-12-18
Subject: Accounting
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

English

noting stated facts and details explanation

Tagalog

pagpuna nakasaad katotohanan at mga detalye ng paliwanag

Last Update: 2015-09-17
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

English

fact premises

Tagalog

nasasakupang katunayan

Last Update: 2015-07-28
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

English

sheer fact

Tagalog

purong katotohanan

Last Update: 2014-09-14
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
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English

ΦΛΕ Phi Lambda Epsilon 1965 Phi Lambda Epsilon was founded in March 8, 1965 by Ret. Col. Wilson Relox a native from Campalingo, San Fernando, Romblon. He became a regional director, WPD Director and NAPOLCOM Chief in his almost 35 years of military and police service. In 1966, we have joined forces with the CrimeBuster Fraternity and in the early 1980’s we have been strongly forged as one together with the rest of Magic-5 in the fortress of Intramuros, Manila. And in 2004, Phi Lambda Epsilon have been incorporated with Magic-5 Brotherhood Association, Inc (M-5BAI) with SEC No. 200406499 in the Securities and Exchange Commission of the Philippines In June 2010, the formation of National Phi Lambda Epsilon was initiated by P/Supt. Ricardo Fidelino and it was successfully registered to the Securities and Exchange Commission in February 2011 with SEC Registration Cert. No. 201102352. Throughout the years, our brotherhood has spread in many different colleges and universities around the Philippines archipelago. THE ESTABLISHMENT OF MINDANAO CHAPTERS Phi Lambda Epsilon in Butuan City was bought by Brod. Rino Canonoy together with Brod. Remus Busa Jr. (aka Tamoy) on December 5, 1980. Their pioneering members were Brod. Nestor Bacon+ and Brod. Toto Gultiano. Brods Rino and Remus are members that survived from University of Cebu on October 5, 1979 thru their sponsor Brod. Ian Makiling (survived 1977) who is now presently residing in Panabo City. The Delta Phi Chapter of Mindanao State University, Marawi City was founded by Danilo Canonoy. They were previously members from Beta Mu Phi (which later became Phi Lambda Epsilon) when they found out that the Beta Mu Phi fraternity was a notorious gang and the organizer could not provide the documents to register the fraternity in the campus. Then, followed by Brod Nestor Villanueva who formed the Cotabato City and Midsayap chapters which includes the Notre Dame University. They invited Rino Canonoy from Butuan to recognize the Phi Lambda Epsilon of MSU Delta Phi Chapter, where Brod Nestor Villanueva of Cotabato also attended the said chapter recognition event and members meeting. Our fraternity ΦΛΕ Phi Lambda Epsilons’ birthplace, Quiapo, Manila was a haven for most of our members who came from the central and southern provinces. We believe that the University of Cebu Chapter where Brod Rino Canonoy et came, were brought by the members from Quiapo, Manila. With these facts, we are still considering the Mindanao Chapters as our very own and that the only missing link was the final acceptance of each other. University of Cebu - Cebu Masbate Colleges, Masbate Silliman University, Dumaguete City Negros Oriental State University, Negros Oriental University Of Mindanao, Davao City University of Southeastern Philippines, Davao City Mindanao State University, Marawi/Gen. Santos/Iligan Agusan Colleges & Butuan City Colleges, Butuan, ADS DANILO BACSAFRA+ Brod. Danilo Bacsafra+ (aka. Lord Buck Zafra) was born in May 20, 1959 in Lumban, Laguna. He was the ΦΛΕ President 1978-79 in our mother chapter Philippine College of Criminology in Quiapo, Manila. He became a very famous Lambda when he established the Avanceña Chapter in Quiapo, Manila. Where most of our members then were moslems and christians that have been the roots of many Junior (HS) Chapters in Metro Manila. Unfortunately, Bacsafra was killed in an ambush by a policeman from a rival fraternity around the vicinity of PCCr in Sept. 17, 1980. That period became one of our deepest moments in ΦΛΕ history, that we are almost at the struggle of extinction. However, we have surpassed the hardship and trials in our mother chapter thru the support of M-5 that vowed to protect and defend one another. He has widowed Sister Tess and left a daughter named Danica. His name became legendary for Phi Lambda Epsilon and Magic-5 that spread throughout the Philippine archipelago.

Tagalog

pagsasalin

Last Update: 2016-02-02
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
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English

Bullionism is an economic theory that defines wealth by the amount of precious metals owned. Bullionism is an early or primitive form of mercantilism. It was derived, in the 16th century, from the observation that the English state possessed large amounts of gold and silver, despite the fact that there was no mining of precious metals on English soil, because of its large trade surplus.

Tagalog

bullionism

Last Update: 2015-11-17
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
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English

Prince Hamlet is depressed. Having been summoned home to Denmark from school in Germany to attend his father's funeral, he is shocked to find his mother Gertrude already remarried. The Queen has wed Hamlet's Uncle Claudius, the dead king's brother. To Hamlet, the marriage is "foul incest." Worse still, Claudius has had himself crowned King despite the fact that Hamlet was his father's heir to the throne. Hamlet suspects foul play. When his father's ghost visits the castle, Hamlet's suspicions are confirmed. The Ghost complains that he is unable to rest in peace because he was murdered. Claudius, says the Ghost, poured poison in King Hamlet's ear while the old king napped. Unable to confess and find salvation, King Hamlet is now consigned, for a time, to spend his days in Purgatory and walk the earth by night. He entreats Hamlet to avenge his death, but to spare Gertrude, to let Heaven decide her fate. Hamlet vows to affect madness — puts "an antic disposition on" — to wear a mask that will enable him to observe the interactions in the castle, but finds himself more confused than ever. In his persistent confusion, he questions the Ghost's trustworthiness. What if the Ghost is not a true spirit, but rather an agent of the devil sent to tempt him? What if killing Claudius results in Hamlet's having to relive his memories for all eternity? Hamlet agonizes over what he perceives as his cowardice because he cannot stop himself from thinking. Words immobilize Hamlet, but the world he lives in prizes action. In order to test the Ghost's sincerity, Hamlet enlists the help of a troupe of players who perform a play called The Murder of Gonzago to which Hamlet has added scenes that recreate the murder the Ghost described. Hamlet calls the revised play The Mousetrap, and the ploy proves a success. As Hamlet had hoped, Claudius' reaction to the staged murder reveals the King to be conscience-stricken. Claudius leaves the room because he cannot breathe, and his vision is dimmed for want of light. Convinced now that Claudius is a villain, Hamlet resolves to kill him. But, as Hamlet observes, "conscience doth make cowards of us all." In his continued reluctance to dispatch Claudius, Hamlet actually causes six ancillary deaths. The first death belongs to Polonius, whom Hamlet stabs through a wallhanging as the old man spies on Hamlet and Gertrude in the Queen's private chamber. Claudius punishes Hamlet for Polonius' death by exiling him to England. He has brought Hamlet's school chums Rosencrantz and Guildenstern to Denmark from Germany to spy on his nephew, and now he instructs them to deliver Hamlet into the English king's hands for execution. Hamlet discovers the plot and arranges for the hanging of Rosencrantz and Guildenstern instead. Ophelia, distraught over her father's death and Hamlet's behavior, drowns while singing sad love songs bemoaning the fate of a spurned lover. Her brother, Laertes, falls next. Laertes, returned to Denmark from France to avenge his father's death, witnesses Ophelia's descent into madness. After her funeral, where he and Hamlet come to blows over which of them loved Ophelia best, Laertes vows to punish Hamlet for her death as well. Unencumbered by words, Laertes plots with Claudius to kill Hamlet. In the midst of the sword fight, however, Laertes drops his poisoned sword. Hamlet retrieves the sword and cuts Laertes. The lethal poison kills Laertes. Before he dies, Laertes tells Hamlet that because Hamlet has already been cut with the same sword, he too will shortly die. Horatio diverts Hamlet's attention from Laertes for a moment by pointing out that "The Queen falls." Gertrude, believing that Hamlet's hitting Laertes means her son is winning the fencing match, has drunk a toast to her son from the poisoned cup Claudius had intended for Hamlet. The Queen dies. As Laertes lies dying, he confesses to Hamlet his part in the plot and explains that Gertrude's death lies on Claudius' head. Finally enraged, Hamlet stabs Claudius with the poisoned sword and then pours the last of the poisoned wine down the King's throat. Before he dies, Hamlet declares that the throne should now pass to Prince Fortinbras of Norway, and he implores his true friend Horatio to accurately explain the events that have led to the bloodbath at Elsinore. With his last breath, he releases himself from the prison of his words: "The rest is silence." The play ends as Prince Fortinbras, in his first act as King of Denmark, orders a funeral with full military honors for slain Prince Hamlet.v

Tagalog

buong istorya Ng nayon

Last Update: 2015-10-08
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
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Reference:
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English

One day Monki and Makil carried out a plan. Makil let his wife place a piece of white cloth over his body, cry a kandidiagao (a cry of grief), and say, "Why did Makil die? He was very good to all the people! He planted sweet fruits and plenty of sugarcane." When the monkeys heard Monki's cry, they decided to help her. The leader of the monkeys said, "We shall help Monki, because it is really true that Makil was a good man. He always planted fruits for us." So all the monkeys went to the house of Monki. The leader of the monkeys asked her, "What can we do? Can we help you? Please tell us how we can help you!" Monki replied, "Oh, my friends, Makil will not die if you help him sit up." So they helped Makil sit up. The leader asked, "Can you tell us what else we can do to help you?" "Oh, my friend monkeys, you are very good to me!" continued Monki. "Makil will not die if you help him stand up." So they helped him stand up. "What else can we do, Monki?" asked the leader of the monkeys. "Oh, my friend monkeys, if you give this kampilan (long combat sword) to Makil, I promise you that we shall plant more sugarcane just for you," said Monki. When Amomantaragaga saw the kampilan he became wary and went out of the house. As soon as Makil received the kampilan, Monki closed the door and Makil killed all the monkeys in the house. Only Amomantaragaga escaped. One day Makil and Monki had another good idea. They made a litag (bamboo trap) in order to catch Amomantaragaga. Early in the morning, they went out to see if the trap had caught the monkey. In fact it had caught an animal, but it did not look like a monkey. They were annoyed when they came near and found out that the animal was a heron. This heron was called Tatalaonga. "Why are you here, Tatalaonga?" asked Makil. "I'll kill you because you are the reason why I did not catch Amomantaragaga." "Oh, datu, please don't kill me," pleaded the heron. "If you set me free, I'll go and kill Amomantaragaga myself!" So Makil set the heron free. Tatalaonga asked Makil to make a raft from pieces of sugarcane. When the raft was finished, Makil brought it to the river, and Tatalaonga perched on it. Drifting along, Tatalaonga passed Amomantaragaga by the banks of the river and invited the monkey to go rafting with him. The two continued down the river on the raft. Tatalaonga took a piece of sugarcane to use as a pole to move the raft, and then he took another one and gave it to Amomantaragaga, who greedily ate the pole. The monkey ate one cane after another, until only one piece was left. At that instance, Tatalaonga flew away and left Amomantaragaga to drown in the river. Monki and Makil and the sultan of Agamaniyog and his people were happy to be rid of the pestering monkeys.

Tagalog

One day Monki and Makil carried out a plan. Makil let his wife place a piece of white cloth over his body, cry a kandidiagao (a cry of grief), and say, "Why did Makil die? He was very good to all the people! He planted sweet fruits and plenty of sugarcane." When the monkeys heard Monki's cry, they decided to help her. The leader of the monkeys said, "We shall help Monki, because it is really true that Makil was a good man. He always planted fruits for us." So all the monkeys went to the house of Monki. The leader of the monkeys asked her, "What can we do? Can we help you? Please tell us how we can help you!" Monki replied, "Oh, my friends, Makil will not die if you help him sit up." So they helped Makil sit up. The leader asked, "Can you tell us what else we can do to help you?" "Oh, my friend monkeys, you are very good to me!" continued Monki. "Makil will not die if you help him stand up." So they helped him stand up. "What else can we do, Monki?" asked the leader of the monkeys. "Oh, my friend monkeys, if you give this kampilan (long combat sword) to Makil, I promise you that we shall plant more sugarcane just for you," said Monki. When Amomantaragaga saw the kampilan he became wary and went out of the house. As soon as Makil received the kampilan, Monki closed the door and Makil killed all the monkeys in the house. Only Amomantaragaga escaped. One day Makil and Monki had another good idea. They made a litag (bamboo trap) in order to catch Amomantaragaga. Early in the morning, they went out to see if the trap had caught the monkey. In fact it had caught an animal, but it did not look like a monkey. They were annoyed when they came near and found out that the animal was a heron. This heron was called Tatalaonga. "Why are you here, Tatalaonga?" asked Makil. "I'll kill you because you are the reason why I did not catch Amomantaragaga." "Oh, datu, please don't kill me," pleaded the heron. "If you set me free, I'll go and kill Amomantaragaga myself!" So Makil set the heron free. Tatalaonga asked Makil to make a raft from pieces of sugarcane. When the raft was finished, Makil brought it to the river, and Tatalaonga perched on it. Drifting along, Tatalaonga passed Amomantaragaga by the banks of the river and invited the monkey to go rafting with him. The two continued down the river on the raft. Tatalaonga took a piece of sugarcane to use as a pole to move the raft, and then he took another one and gave it to Amomantaragaga, who greedily ate the pole. The monkey ate one cane after another, until only one piece was left. At that instance, Tatalaonga flew away and left Amomantaragaga to drown in the river. Monki and Makil and the sultan of Agamaniyog and his people were happy to be rid of the pestering monkeys.

Last Update: 2015-09-06
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:
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English

FRENCH HOLIDAYS & FESTIVALS Les fetes (festivals) The French enjoy 11 national jours feriés (holidays) annually. The civic calendar was first instituted in 1582; Bastille Day was incorporated in 1789, Armistice Day in 1918, Labor Day in 1935, and Victory Day in 1945. During the month of May, there is a holiday nearly every week, so be prepared for stores, banks and museums to shut their doors for days at a time. It is a good idea to call museums, restaurants and hotels in advance to make sure they will be open. Frenchman caricature Trains and roads near major cities tend to get busy around the national holidays. Not coincidentally, this also happens to be the time when service unions (such as transporters, railroad workers, etc.) like to go on strike – something of a tradition, in fact. Travelers would do well to check ahead, particularly when planning a trip for the last week of June or first week of July! There are also many regional festivals throughout France which are not included in our calendar. ViaFrance hosts an excellent site which lists fairs and festivals, traditional ceremonies, as well as sporting events, concerts, and trade shows for all regions throughout France. Use the interactive search form below to choose a region and range of dates for a listing of special events, to help plan your itinerary. Under the law, every French citizen is entitled to 5 weeks of vacation. Most of the natives take their summer vacations in July or August, and many major businesses are then closed. All of France takes to the roads, railroads, boats, and airways. Consequently, traveling in France during August is generally not recommended for foreigners. Public Holidays 1 January New Year's Day (Jour de l'an) 1 May Labor Day (Fête du premier mai) 8 May WWII Victory Day (Fête de la Victoire 1945; Fête du huitième mai) 14 July Bastille Day (Fête nationale) 15 August Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary (Assomption) 1 November All Saints Day (La Toussaint) 11 November Armistice Day (Jour d'armistice) 25 December Christmas Day (Noël) 26 December 2nd Day of Christmas (in Alsace and Lorraine only)

Tagalog

FRENCH HOLIDAYS & FESTIVALS Les fetes (festivals) The French enjoy 11 national jours feriés (holidays) annually. The civic calendar was first instituted in 1582; Bastille Day was incorporated in 1789, Armistice Day in 1918, Labor Day in 1935, and Victory Day in 1945. During the month of May, there is a holiday nearly every week, so be prepared for stores, banks and museums to shut their doors for days at a time. It is a good idea to call museums, restaurants and hotels in advance to make sure they will be open. Frenchman caricature Trains and roads near major cities tend to get busy around the national holidays. Not coincidentally, this also happens to be the time when service unions (such as transporters, railroad workers, etc.) like to go on strike – something of a tradition, in fact. Travelers would do well to check ahead, particularly when planning a trip for the last week of June or first week of July! There are also many regional festivals throughout France which are not included in our calendar. ViaFrance hosts an excellent site which lists fairs and festivals, traditional ceremonies, as well as sporting events, concerts, and trade shows for all regions throughout France. Use the interactive search form below to choose a region and range of dates for a listing of special events, to help plan your itinerary. Under the law, every French citizen is entitled to 5 weeks of vacation. Most of the natives take their summer vacations in July or August, and many major businesses are then closed. All of France takes to the roads, railroads, boats, and airways. Consequently, traveling in France during August is generally not recommended for foreigners. Public Holidays 1 January New Year's Day (Jour de l'an) 1 May Labor Day (Fête du premier mai) 8 May WWII Victory Day (Fête de la Victoire 1945; Fête du huitième mai) 14 July Bastille Day (Fête nationale) 15 August Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary (Assomption) 1 November All Saints Day (La Toussaint) 11 November Armistice Day (Jour d'armistice) 25 December Christmas Day (Noël) 26 December 2nd Day of Christmas (in Alsace and Lorraine only)

Last Update: 2015-07-14
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
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English

He was in excellent condition.He made an excellent companion, a fact that hadn't occurred to her before that moment.

Tagalog

Please, specify two different languages

Last Update: 2015-06-18
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

English

He was in excellent condition.He made an excellent companion, a fact that hadn't occurred to her before that moment.

Tagalog

Siya ay sa mahusay na kondisyon.

Last Update: 2015-06-18
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
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English

Pygmalion and Galatea Pygmalion and Galatea The story of Pygmalion and Galatea is found in Greek Mythology, and in the famous work "Metamorphoses", by the great Roman poet Ovid. Their love was so unique that it is difficult to define it. But from this legendary love story, one thing is clear, man can never love an inanimate object with as much passion as he loves a living, breathing being. Love gives rise to desire and without this passion any love remains unfulfilled. Pygmalion was a master sculptor in the ancient city of Greece. All day he sculpted beautiful statues from huge pieces of rock. In fact, his creations were so wonderful that whoever saw them were mesmerised by their sheer artistic beauty and exact finish. Pygmalion himself was a fine and handsome young man. He was liked by all men and women. Many women loved him for his great skill and looks. But Pygmalion never paid attention to any of these women. He saw so much to blame in women that he came at last to abhor the sex, and resolved to live unmarried. He was a sculptor, and with his with wonderful skill he sculpted a beautiful ivory statue which was so lifelike that it was difficult to believe that it was lifeless at the first glance. The beauty was such that no living woman could compete with it. It was indeed the perfect semblance of a maiden that seemed to be alive, and only prevented from moving by modesty. His art was so perfect that it concealed itself and its product looked like the workmanship of nature. Pygmalion spent hours admiring his creation. By and by Pygmalion's admiration for his own sculpture turned to love. Oftentimes he laid his hand upon it as if to assure himself whether it were living or not, and could not, even then, believe that it was only ivory. He caressed it, and gave it such presents as young girls love - bright shells and polished stones, little birds and flowers of various hues, beads and amber. He adorned his ivory maiden with jewels. He put rainment on its limbs, and jewels on its fingers, and a necklace about its neck. To the ears he hung earrings and strings of pearls upon the breast. Her dress became her, and she looked not less charming than when unattired. He laid her on a couch spread with cloths of Tyrian dye, and called her his wife, and put her head upon a pillow of the softest feathers, as if she could enjoy their softness. He gave the statue a name: "Galatea", meaning "sleeping love'. But what will be the consequence of falling in love with a lifeless ivory maiden? The festival of Aphrodite was at hand - a festival celebrated with great pomp at Cyprus. Victims were offered, the altars smoked, and the odor of incense filled the air. When the festivities of Aphrodite started, Pygmalion took part in the ceremonies. He went to the temple of Aphrodite to ask forgiveness for all the years he had shunned her. When Pygmalion had performed his part in the solemnities, he hesitantly prayed for a wife like his ivory virgin statue. He stood before the altar of Aphrodite and timidly said, "Ye gods, who can do all things, give me, I pray you, for my wife" - he dared not utter "my ivory virgin," but said instead - "one like my ivory virgin." But Goddess Aphrodite understood what the poor man was trying to say. She was curious. How can a man love a lifeless thing so much? Was it so beautiful that Pygmalion fell in love with his own creation? So she visited the studio of the sculptor while he was away. What she saw greatly amazed her. For the sculpture had a perfect likeness to her. In fact, it would not have been wrong to say that the sculpture was an image of Aphrodite herself. Goddess Aphrodite was charmed by Pygmalion's creation. She brought the statue to life. When Pygmalion returned to his home, he went before Galatea and knelt down before the woman of his dreams. He looked at her lovingly, with a lover's ardour. It seemed to him that Galatea was looking at her lovingly too. For a moment, it seemed to Pygmalion that it was just a figment of his imagination. He rubbed his eyes and looked again. But no. There was no mistake this time. Galatea was smiling at him. He laid his hand upon the limbs; the ivory felt soft to his touch and yielded to his fingers like the wax of Hymettus. It seemed to be warm. He stood up; his mind oscillated between doubt and joy. Fearing he may be mistaken, again and again with a lover's ardor he touches the object of his hopes. It was indeed alive! The veins when pressed yielded to the finger and again resumed their roundness. Slowly it dawned on Pygmalion that the animation of his sculpture was the result of his prayer to Goddess Aphrodite who knew his desire. At last, the votary of Aphrodite found words to thank the goddess. Pygmalion humbled himself at the Goddess' feet. Soon Pygmalion and Galatea were wed, and Pygmalion never forgot to thank Aphrodite for the gift she had given him. Aphrodite blessed the nuptials she had formed, and this union between Pygmalion and Galatea produced a son named Paphos, from whom the city Paphos, sacred to Aphrodite, received its name. He and Galatea brought gifts to her temple throughout their life and Aphrodite blessed them with happiness and love in return. The unusual love that blossomed between Pygmalion and Galatea enthralls all. Falling in love with one's creation and then getting the desired object as wife- perhaps this was destined for Pygmalion. Even to this day, countless people and young lovers are mesmerized by this exceptional love that existed between two persons at a time when civilization was in its infancy.

Tagalog

pygmalion sa galatea

Last Update: 2015-06-13
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English

become fully aware of (something) as a fact; understand clearly.

Tagalog

napagtanto

Last Update: 2015-06-04
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
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English

Santos admitted that during the yearlong consultations before implementing the calendar shift, there were stakeholders who expressed reservations. “One of the more popular concerns was the heat. Students and teachers have expressed concern about the fact that they would have to study and teach during the hottest times of the year,” Santos recalled.

Tagalog

Santos inamin na sa panahon ng yearlong konsultasyon bago ang pagpapatupad ng shift ng kalendaryo, mayroong mga parokyano na ipinahayag reserbasyon. "Ang isa sa mga mas popular na mga alalahanin ay ang init. Mga mag-aaral at mga guro ay nagpahayag ng pag-aalala tungkol sa katotohanan na sila ay may upang pag-aralan at ituro sa pinakamainit na mga oras ng taon, "naalala Santos.

Last Update: 2015-06-03
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
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English

how do you know if she was telling the facts

Tagalog

pano mo malalaman na gusto ka nang gusto mo

Last Update: 2015-03-11
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
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English

act of lascivioThe crimes of Rape and Acts of Lasciviousness are very different from each other. Firstly, the crime of Acts of Lasciviousness is classified as a crime against chastity under Title Eleven of the Revised Penal Code. On the other hand, Rape, by virtue of Republic Act (R.A.) No. 8353 otherwise known as the Anti-Rape Law of 1997, is classified as a crime against persons. Secondly, the elements of these crimes are distinct from each other. In order that there be a crime of Rape, it must be shown that it was committed: (1) By a man who shall have carnal knowledge of a woman under any of the following circumstances: a) Through force, threat, or intimidation; b) When the offended party is deprived of reason or otherwise unconscious; c) By means of fraudulent machination or grave abuse of authority; and d) When the offended party is under twelve (12) years of age or is demented, even though none of the circumstances mentioned above be present; or (2) By any person who, under any of the circumstances mentioned in paragraph 1 hereof, shall commit an act of sexual assault by inserting his penis into another person’s mouth or anal orifice, or any instrument or object, into the genital or anal orifice of another person (Article 266-A, Revised Penal Code (RPC) as amended). In contrast, the elements of the crime of Acts of Lasciviousness are: (1) the offender commits any act of lasciviousness or lewdness against the offended party who is another person of either sex; (2) that it is done: (a) by using force or intimidation; (b) by deprivation of reason or consciousness; or (c) when the offended party is under 12 years of age, even though neither of the circumstances mentioned in the two next preceding paragraphs shall be present (Article 336, RPC). Applying the foregoing, it is only possible for your friend to file a criminal complaint for Rape against the person who has sexually assaulted her if the aforestated elements for the crime of Rape are present. A contrario, a complaint for Rape may not be entertained or may even be dismissed, notwithstanding the same has been filed before the proper authorities, if any of the mentioned elements is lacking. Nevertheless, a complaint for Acts of Lasciviousness may stand if she can establish that the elements provided under Article 336 of the RPC transpired during the time she was assailed sexually. We hope that we were able to answer your queries. Please be reminded that this advice is based solely on the facts you have narrated and our appreciation of the same. Our opinion may vary when other facts are changed or elaboratedusness

Tagalog

The crimes of Rape and Acts of Lasciviousness are very different from each other. Firstly, the crime of Acts of Lasciviousness is classified as a crime against chastity under Title Eleven of the Revised Penal Code. On the other hand, Rape, by virtue of Republic Act (R.A.) No. 8353 otherwise known as the Anti-Rape Law of 1997, is classified as a crime against persons. Secondly, the elements of these crimes are distinct from each other. In order that there be a crime of Rape, it must be shown that it was committed: (1) By a man who shall have carnal knowledge of a woman under any of the following circumstances: a) Through force, threat, or intimidation; b) When the offended party is deprived of reason or otherwise unconscious; c) By means of fraudulent machination or grave abuse of authority; and d) When the offended party is under twelve (12) years of age or is demented, even though none of the circumstances mentioned above be present; or (2) By any person who, under any of the circumstances mentioned in paragraph 1 hereof, shall commit an act of sexual assault by inserting his penis into another person’s mouth or anal orifice, or any instrument or object, into the genital or anal orifice of another person (Article 266-A, Revised Penal Code (RPC) as amended). In contrast, the elements of the crime of Acts of Lasciviousness are: (1) the offender commits any act of lasciviousness or lewdness against the offended party who is another person of either sex; (2) that it is done: (a) by using force or intimidation; (b) by deprivation of reason or consciousness; or (c) when the offended party is under 12 years of age, even though neither of the circumstances mentioned in the two next preceding paragraphs shall be present (Article 336, RPC). Applying the foregoing, it is only possible for your friend to file a criminal complaint for Rape against the person who has sexually assaulted her if the aforestated elements for the crime of Rape are present. A contrario, a complaint for Rape may not be entertained or may even be dismissed, notwithstanding the same has been filed before the proper authorities, if any of the mentioned elements is lacking. Nevertheless, a complaint for Acts of Lasciviousness may stand if she can establish that the elements provided under Article 336 of the RPC transpired during the time she was assailed sexually. We hope that we were able to answer your queries. Please be reminded that this advice is based solely on the facts you have narrated and our appreciation of the same. Our opinion may vary when other facts are changed or elaborated

Last Update: 2015-02-19
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

English

act of lascivioThe crimes of Rape and Acts of Lasciviousness are very different from each other. Firstly, the crime of Acts of Lasciviousness is classified as a crime against chastity under Title Eleven of the Revised Penal Code. On the other hand, Rape, by virtue of Republic Act (R.A.) No. 8353 otherwise known as the Anti-Rape Law of 1997, is classified as a crime against persons. Secondly, the elements of these crimes are distinct from each other. In order that there be a crime of Rape, it must be shown that it was committed: (1) By a man who shall have carnal knowledge of a woman under any of the following circumstances: a) Through force, threat, or intimidation; b) When the offended party is deprived of reason or otherwise unconscious; c) By means of fraudulent machination or grave abuse of authority; and d) When the offended party is under twelve (12) years of age or is demented, even though none of the circumstances mentioned above be present; or (2) By any person who, under any of the circumstances mentioned in paragraph 1 hereof, shall commit an act of sexual assault by inserting his penis into another person’s mouth or anal orifice, or any instrument or object, into the genital or anal orifice of another person (Article 266-A, Revised Penal Code (RPC) as amended). In contrast, the elements of the crime of Acts of Lasciviousness are: (1) the offender commits any act of lasciviousness or lewdness against the offended party who is another person of either sex; (2) that it is done: (a) by using force or intimidation; (b) by deprivation of reason or consciousness; or (c) when the offended party is under 12 years of age, even though neither of the circumstances mentioned in the two next preceding paragraphs shall be present (Article 336, RPC). Applying the foregoing, it is only possible for your friend to file a criminal complaint for Rape against the person who has sexually assaulted her if the aforestated elements for the crime of Rape are present. A contrario, a complaint for Rape may not be entertained or may even be dismissed, notwithstanding the same has been filed before the proper authorities, if any of the mentioned elements is lacking. Nevertheless, a complaint for Acts of Lasciviousness may stand if she can establish that the elements provided under Article 336 of the RPC transpired during the time she was assailed sexually. We hope that we were able to answer your queries. Please be reminded that this advice is based solely on the facts you have narrated and our appreciation of the same. Our opinion may vary when other facts are changed or elaboratedusness

Tagalog

batas ng lasciviousness

Last Update: 2015-02-19
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

English

fairy tale stHigh above the city, on a tall column, stood the statue of the Happy Prince. He was gilded all over with thin leaves of fine gold, for eyes he had two bright sapphires, and a large red ruby glowed on his sword-hilt. He was very much admired indeed.'He is as beautiful as a weathercock,' remarked one of the Town Councillors who wished to gain a reputation for having artistic taste; 'only not quite so useful,' he added, fearing lest people should think him unpractical, which he really was not. 'Why can't you be like the Happy Prince?' asked a sensible mother of her little boy who was crying for the moon. 'The Happy Prince never dreams of crying for anything.' 'I am glad there is some one in the world who is quite happy', muttered a disappointed man as he gazed at the wonderful statue. 'He looks just like an angel,' said the Charity Children as they came out of the cathedral in their bright scarlet cloaks, and their clean white pinafores. 'How do you know?' said the Mathematical Master, 'you have never seen one.' 'Ah! but we have, in our dreams,' answered the children; and the Mathematical Master frowned and looked very severe, for he did not approve of children dreaming. One night there flew over the city a little Swallow. His friends had gone away to Egypt six weeks before, but he had stayed behind, for he was in love with the most beautiful Reed. He had met her early in the spring as he was flying down the river after a big yellow moth, and had been so attracted by her slender waist that he had stopped to talk to her. 'Shall I love you said the Swallow', who liked to come to the point at once, and the Reed made him a low bow. So he flew round and round her, touching the water with his wings, and making silver ripples. This was his courtship, and it lasted all through the summer. 'It is a ridiculous attachment,' twittered the other Swallows, 'she has no money, and far too many relations;' and indeed the river was quite full of Reeds. Then, when the autumn came, they all flew away. After they had gone he felt lonely, and began to tire of his lady-love. 'She has no conversation,' he said, 'and I am afraid that she is a coquette, for she is always flirting with the wind.' And certainly, whenever the wind blew, the Reed made the most graceful curtsies. I admit that she is domestic,' he continued, 'but I love travelling, and my wife, consequently, should love travelling also.' 'Will you come away with me?' he said finally to her; but the Reed shook her head, she was so attached to her home. 'You have been trifling with me,' he cried, 'I am off to the Pyramids. Good-bye!' and he flew away. All day long he flew, and at night-time he arrived at the city. 'Where shall I put up?' he said 'I hope the town has made preparations.' Then he saw the statue on the tall column. 'I will put up there,' he cried; 'it is a fine position with plenty of fresh air.' So he alighted just between the feet of the Happy Prince. 'I have a golden bedroom,' he said softly to himself as he looked round, and he prepared to go to sleep; but just as he was putting his head under his wing, a large drop of water fell on him.'What a curious thing!' he cried, 'there is not a single cloud in the sky, the stars are quite clear and bright, and yet it is raining. The climate in the north of Europe is really dreadful. The Reed used to like the rain, but that was merely her selfishness.' Then another drop fell. 'What is the use of a statue if it cannot keep the rain off?' he said; 'I must look for a good chimney-pot,' and he determined to fly away. But before he had opened his wings, a third drop fell, and he looked up, and saw - Ah! what did he see? The eyes of the Happy Prince were filled with tears, and tears were running down his golden cheeks. His face was so beautiful in the moonlight that the little Swallow was filled with pity. 'Who are you?' he said. 'I am the Happy Prince.' 'Why are you weeping then?' asked the Swallow; 'you have quite drenched me.' 'When I was alive and had a human heart,' answered the statue, 'I did not know what tears were, for I lived in the Palace of Sans-Souci where sorrow is not allowed to enter. In the daytime I played with my companions in the garden, and in the evening I led the dance in the Great Hall. Round the garden ran a very lofty wall, but I never cared to ask what lay beyond it, everything about me was so beautiful. My courtiers called me the Happy Prince, and happy indeed I was, if pleasure be happiness. So I lived, and so I died. And now that I am dead they have set me up here so high that I can see all the ugliness and all the misery of my city, and though my heart is made of lead yet I cannot choose but weep.' 'What, is he not solid gold?' said the Swallow to himself. He was too polite to make any personal remarks out loud. 'Far away,' continued the statue in a low musical voice,'far away in a little street there is a poor house. One of the windows is open, and through it I can see a woman seated at a table. Her face is thin and worn, and she has coarse, red hands, all pricked by the needle, for she is a seamstress. She is embroidering passion-fowers on a satin gown for the loveliest of the Queen's maids-of-honour to wear at the next Court-ball. In a bed in the corner of the room her little boy is lying ill. He has a fever, and is asking for oranges. His mother has nothing to give him but river water, so he is crying. Swallow, Swallow, little Swallow, will you not bring her the ruby out of my sword-hilt? My feet are fastened to this pedestal and I cannot move.' 'I am waited for in Egypt,' said the Swallow. 'My friends are flying up and down the Nile, and talking to the large lotus flowers. Soon they will go to sleep in the tomb of the great King. The King is there himself in his painted coffin. He is wrapped in yellow linen, and embalmed with spices. Round his neck is a chain of pale green jade, and his hands are like withered leaves.' 'Swallow, Swallow, little Swallow,' said the Prince,'will you not stay with me for one night, and be my messenger? The boy is so thirsty, and the mother so sad. 'I don't think I like boys,' answered the Swallow. 'Last summer, when I was staying on the river, there were two rude boys, the miller's sons, who were always throwing stones at me. They never hit me, of course; we swallows fly far too well for that, and besides, I come of a family famous for its agility; but still, it was a mark of disrespect.' But the Happy Prince looked so sad that the little Swallow was sorry. 'It is very cold here,' he said 'but I will stay with you for one night, and be your messenger.' 'Thank you, little Swallow,' said the Prince. So the Swallow picked out the great ruby from the Prince's sword, and flew away with it in his beak over the roofs of the town. He passed by the cathedral tower, where the white marble angels were sculptured. He passed by the palace and heard the sound of dancing. A beautiful girl came out on the balcony with her lover. 'How wonderful the stars are,' he said to her,'and how wonderful is the power of love!' 'I hope my dress will be ready in time for the State-ball,' she answered; 'I have ordered passion-flowers to be embroidered on it; but the seamstresses are so lazy.' He passed over the river, and saw the lanterns hanging to the masts of the ships. He passed over the Ghetto, and saw the old Jews bargaining with each other, and weighing out money in copper scales. At last he came to the poor house and looked in. The boy was tossing feverishly on his bed, and the mother had fallen asleep, she was so tired. In he hopped, and laid the great ruby on the table beside the woman's thimble. Then he flew gently round the bed, fanning the boy's forehead with his wings. 'How cool I feel,' said the boy, 'I must be getting better;' and he sank into a delicious slumber. Then the Swallow flew back to the Happy Prince, and told him what he had done. 'It is curious,' he remarked, 'but I feel quite warm now, although it is so cold.' 'That is because you have done a good action,' said the Prince. And the little Swallow began to think, and then he fell asleep. Thinking always made him sleepy. When day broke he flew down to the river and had a bath. 'What a remarkable phenomenon,' said the Professor of Omithology as he was passing over the bridge. 'A swallow in winter!' And he wrote a long letter about it to the local newspaper. Every one quoted it, it was full of so many words that they could not understand. 'To-night I go to Egypt,' said the Swallow, and he was in high spirits at the prospect. He visited all the public monuments, and sat a long time on top of the church steeple. Wherever he went the Sparrows chirruped, and said to each other, 'What a distinguished stranger!' so he enjoyed himself very much. When the moon rose he flew back to the Happy Prince. 'Have you any commissions for Egypt?' he cried; 'I am just starting.' 'Swallow, Swallow, little Swallow,' said the Prince, 'will you not stay with me one night longer?' 'I am waited for in Egypt,' answered the Swallow. To-morrow my friends will fly up to the Second Cataract. The river-horse couches there among the bulrushes, and on a great granite throne sits the God Memnon. All night long he watches the stars, and when the morning star shines he utters one cry of joy, and then he is silent. At noon the yellow lions come down to the water's edge to drink. They have eyes like green beryls, and their roar is louder than the roar of the cataract.' 'Swallow, Swallow, little Swallow,' said the Prince,'far away across the city I see a young man in a garret. He is leaning over a desk covered with papers, and in a tumbler by his side there is a bunch of withered violets. His hair is brown and crisp, and his lips are red as a pomegranate, and he has large and dreamy eyes. He is trying to finish a play for the Director of the Theatre, but he is too cold to write any more. There is no fire in the grate, and hunger has made him faint.' 'I will wait with you one night longer,' said the Swallow, who really had a good heart. 'Shall I take him another ruby?' 'Alas! I have no ruby now,' said the Prince; 'my eyes are all that I have left. They are made of rare sapphires, which were brought out of India a thousand years ago. Pluck out one of them and take it to him. He will sell it to the jeweller, and buy food and firewood, and finish his play.' 'Dear Prince,' said the Swallow,'I cannot do that;' and he began to weep. 'Swallow, Swallow, little Swallow,' said the Prince, 'do as I command you.' So the Swallow plucked out the Prince's eye, and flew away to the student's garret. It was easy enough to get in, as there was a hole in the roof. Through this he darted, and came into the room. The young man had his head buried in his hands, so he did not hear the flutter of the bird's wings, and when he looked up he found the beautiful sapphire lying on the withered violets. 'I am beginning to be appreciated,' he cried; 'this is from some great admirer. Now I can finish my play,' and he looked quite happy. The next day the Swallow flew down to the harbour. He sat on the mast of a large vessel and watched the sailors hauling big chests out of the hold with ropes. 'Heave a-hoy!' they shouted as each chest came up. 'I am going to Egypt!' cried the Swallow, but nobody minded, and when the moon rose he flew back to the Happy Prince. 'I am come to bid you good-bye,' he cried. 'Swallow, Swallow, little Swallow,' said the Prince,'will you not stay with me one night longer?' 'It is winter,' answered the Swallow, and the chill snow will soon be here. In Egypt the sun is warm on the green palm-trees, and the crocodiles lie in the mud and look lazily about them. My companions are building a nest in the Temple of Baalbec, and the pink and white doves are watching them, and cooing to each other. Dear Prince, I must leave you, but I will never forget you, and next spring I will bring you back two beautiful jewels in place of those you have given away. The ruby shall be redder than a red rose, and the sapphire shall be as blue as the great sea. 'In the square below,' said the Happy Prince, 'there stands a little match-girl. She has let her matches fall in the gutter, and they are all spoiled. Her father will beat her if she does not bring home some money, and she is crying. She has no shoes or stockings, and her little head is bare. Pluck out my other eye, and give it to her, and her father will not beat her. 'I will stay with you one night longer,' said the Swallow,'but I cannot pluck out your eye. You would be quite blind then.' 'Swallow, Swallow, little Swallow,' said the Prince, 'do as I command you.' So he plucked out the Prince's other eye, and darted down with it. He swooped past the match-girl, and slipped the jewel into the palm of her hand. 'What a lovely bit of glass,' cried the little girl; and she ran home, laughing. Then the Swallow came back to the Prince. 'You are blind now,' he said, 'so I will stay with you always.' 'No, little Swallow,' said the poor Prince, 'you must go away to Egypt.' 'I will stay with you always,' said the Swallow, and he slept at the Prince's feet. All the next day he sat on the Prince's shoulder, and told him stories of what he had seen in strange lands. He told him of the red ibises, who stand in long rows on the banks of the Nile, and catch gold fish in their beaks; of the Sphinx, who is as old as the world itself, and lives in the desert, and knows everything; of the merchants, who walk slowly by the side of their camels, and carry amber beads in their hands; of the King of the Mountains of the Moon, who is as black as ebony, and worships a large crystal; of the great green snake that sleeps in a palm-tree, and has twenty priests to feed it with honey-cakes; and of the pygmies who sail over a big lake on large flat leaves, and are always at war with the butterflies. 'Dear little Swallow,' said the Prince, 'you tell me of marvellous things, but more marvellous than anything is the suffering of men and of women. There is no Mystery so great as Misery. Fly over my city, little Swallow, and tell me what you see there.' So the Swallow flew over the great city, and saw the rich making merry in their beautiful houses, while the beggars were sitting at the gates. He flew into dark lanes, and saw the white faces of starving children looking out listlessly at the black streets. Under the archway of a bridge two little boys were lying in one another's arms to try and keep themselves warm. 'How hungry we are' they said. 'You must not lie here,' shouted the Watchman, and they wandered out into the rain. Then he flew back and told the Prince what he had seen. 'I am covered with fine gold,' said the Prince, 'you must take it off, leaf by leaf, and give it to my poor; the living always think that gold can make them happy.' Leaf after leaf of the fine gold the Swallow picked off, till the Happy Prince looked quite dull and grey. Leaf after leaf of the fine gold he brought to the poor, and the children's faces grew rosier, and they laughed and played games in the street. 'We have bread nod' they cried. Then the snow came, and after the snow came the frost. The streets looked as if they were made of silver, they were so bright and glistening; long icicles like crystal daggers hung down from the eaves of the houses, everybody went about in furs, and the little boys wore scarlet caps and skated on the ice. The poor little Swallow grew colder and colder, but he would not leave the Prince, he loved him too well. He picked up crumbs outside the baker's door when the baker was not looking, and tried to keep himself warm by flapping his wings. But at last he knew that he was going to die. He had just strength to fly up to the Prince's shoulder once more.'Good-bye, dear Prince!' he murmured, 'will you let me kiss your hand?' 'I am glad that you are going to Egypt at last, little Swallow,' said the Prince, 'you have stayed too long here; but you must kiss me on the lips, for I love you.' 'It is not to Egypt that I am going,' said the Swallow. I am going to the House of Death. Death is the brother of Sleep, is he not?' And he kissed the Happy Prince on the lips, and fell down dead at his feet. At that moment a curious crack sounded inside the statue, as if something had broken. The fact is that the leaden heart had snapped right in two. It certainly was a dreadfully hard frost. Early the next morning the Mayor was walking in the square below in company with the Town Councillors. As they passed the column he looked up at the statue: 'Dear me! how shabby the Happy Prince looks!' he said. 'How shabby indeed!' cried the Town Councillors, who always agreed with the Mayor, and they went up to look at it. 'The ruby has fallen out of his sword, his eyes are gone, and he is golden no longer,' said the Mayor; 'in fact, he is little better than a beggar!' 'Little better than a beggar,' said the Town Councillors. 'And there is actually a dead bird at his feet,' continued the Mayor. 'We must really issue a proclamation that birds are not to be allowed to die here.' And the Town Clerk made a note of the suggestion. So they pulled down the statue of the Happy Prince. 'As he is no longer beautiful he is no longer useful,' said the Art Professor at the University. Then they melted the statue in a furnace, and the Mayor held a meeting of the Corporation to decide what was to be done with the metal. 'We must have another statue, of course,' he said, 'and it shall be a statue of myself.' 'Of myself,' said each of the Town Councillors, and they quarrelled. When I last heard of them they were quarrelling still. 'What a strange thing!' said the overseer of the workmen at the foundry.'This broken lead heart will not melt in the furnace. We must throw it away.' So they threw it on a dust-heap where the dead Swallow was also lying. 'Bring me the two most precious things in the city,' said God to one of His Angels; and the Angel brought Him the leaden heart and the dead bird. 'You have rightly chosen,' said God,'for in my garden of Paradise this little bird shall sing for evermore, and in my city of gold the Happy Prince shall praise me.'ories

Tagalog

mga kuwento Fairy kuwento

Last Update: 2015-01-14
Subject: General
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