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English

Gain

Tagalog

Ganansya

Last Update: 2015-04-13
Usage Frequency: 48
Quality:

Reference:

English

Gain

Tagalog

Gain

Last Update: 2013-07-23
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

English

gain weight

Tagalog

gain

Last Update: 2015-03-15
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

English

Personal gain

Tagalog

Tubo

Last Update: 2013-11-19
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

English

Gained

Tagalog

netizens ibig sabihin

Last Update: 2015-09-02
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

English

Gains

Tagalog

Ganansya

Last Update: 2013-07-23
Usage Frequency: 8
Quality:

Reference:

English

gained

Tagalog

umani

Last Update: 2014-08-18
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

English

meaning of gain

Tagalog

tumaas

Last Update: 2015-03-06
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

English

no pain no gain

Tagalog

walang sakit walang pakinabang

Last Update: 2014-08-28
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

English

You gain weight

Tagalog

tumaba ka

Last Update: 2015-09-20
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

English

The City's history dates back many centuries before the Spaniards came to Cagayan when the territory was called Kalambagohan. Its main town, Himologan, was a hill-top fortress situated some eight kilometers south of the present Poblacion. At the time when the first Spanish missionaries came in 1622, the people of Cagayan had tributary relation to Kudarat, the Muslim Sultan of Maguindanao empire in Cotabato. However, the people had not embraced Islam and instead, many became Christians after sometime. Because of this, Muslim warriors began to attack the settlement. As a defense strategy, the priests persuaded the people to transfer from the hilltop to a better location which is the present site of the Saint Augustine Cathedral. The Cagayanons were able to defend themselves for almost 250 years from Muslim harassment. In 1738, Spanish dominance was felt in Cagayan. When Misamis gained status of province in 1818, one of its four districts was the Partidos de Cagayan. In 1871, the "Partidos" became a town and was made permanent capital of Misamis. In 1883, the town became seat of the Spanish government in Mindanao for the provinces of Misamis Oriental, Misamis Occidental, Bukidnon, Lanao del Norte. Consequently, from a purely farming-fishing area, Cagayan emerged into a booming commerce and trade center. The war years in Cagayan were prompted by the presence of the Americans in 1898. The Americans were initially and successfully repulsed by the local forces led by Major Apolinar Velez at the historic battle of Macahambus in June 4, 1900. After the troubled years, peace finally brought back the economic activities to normal under the guidance of Americans. St. Augustine School, the forerunner of the present Xavier University and of Lourdes College, was inaugurated in 1928. On June 15, 1950 President Elpidio Quirino signed Republic Act No. 521, which granted the status of a chartered city to the municipality of Cagayan de Oro. Following these events, the socio-economic order underwent some far-reaching changes. Activities grew in scale and importance until it developed as the administrative center for the entire Northern Mindanao (Region X and XIII). Today, Cagayan de Oro is one of the fastest growing cities in the country and was declared a “Highly Urbanized City” by the Ministry of Local Government last November 22, 1983. articlel from the city of Cagayan de Oro verbatim

Tagalog

Please, specify two different languages

Last Update: 2016-06-16
Subject: History
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:
Warning: Contains invisible HTML formatting

English

I want to gain weight

Tagalog

gusto kong tumaba

Last Update: 2016-03-05
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

English

Good morning students, school board members, superintendent and district staff. First, I would like to thank all of you, from teachers to friends and family, for being in attendance this morning. You have all had a profound impact on the development of the students that will be graduating today, and I feel it is safe to say that I speak on behalf of the whole graduating Class of 2015, in thanking you for all of your efforts that you have invested in us to this day. When I first sat down to write this speech, tons of thoughts were flowing through my mind. Am I going to reminisce about memories of great importance to me? How about speaking of significant events for the entire school? What is the message I should try to convey? Will I pass out or just be at a loss for words, because to be honest, I did not think I had it in me to do this. But the most important goal I strove for was to create a speech that was truly different. Not that bored people to sleep or followed the traditional “your journey ends here, but a new one begins” format, but instead offered excitement and new insight into this monumental day. However, it is more so about your accomplishments and the best way for me to craft inspiration and motivation in you all. Today is no small feat. It perhaps is the most significant and life altering achievement most of you can claim to this day. Never hesitate to recognize how proud each and every person here today is for you to complete such a long and difficult task. Having worked for over thirteen years just for this moment, it is hard to ignore the determination, perseverance, patience, hardwork and even sacrifice that embodies itself the attitudes of every graduate. The innumerable amount of opportunities your diploma enables you to attain is without doubt, and I encourage all of you to pursue what is most dear to you. Pursue that in which you feel you can make a difference. Looking at you, the Class of 2015, I realize that after today, I may no longer see many of you. That is a painful thought. On the other hand, I am also filled with anticipation, because I have no doubt in my mind that every single one of you sitting before me has the potential to succeed and make a difference in life. Of course, not every one of us can be rich, famous, and powerful, but often times it is the people who just offer words of advice and encouragement that make the world a better place. It is human nature to reflect the mood of others in your own actions, so positive words and actions could have an overwhelming impact on the moods and quality of life of others. The future looks bright. Throughout my years in high school, not only have I gained knowledge of the subjects I have studied, but I have learned many other lessons as well. At times I know some of you questioned the need to attend class, but gaining intelligence is not the only purpose of it. School has helped to build priceless social skills, as well as, instilled a value to succeed. I don’t know about you, but when I see others performing well, I take it as a challenge to try my best as well. Having the correct mindset makes all of the difference. If you believe you can achieve anything, and don’t allow others to tell you differently, what you are capable of achieving is genuinely amazing. I would like to conclude my speech with a quote from Robert Frost. “Two roads diverged in a wood, and I took the road less traveled by, and that has made all the difference.” I encourage you, the Class of 2015, to not only follow the opportunities available to you, but to follow your heart and pursue a cause of particular importance to you. Instead of following the path of past generations and graduating classes, I challenge you all to make your own path. The risks are always present, but the battle always makes the win so much sweeter. For me, it is neither about the money nor the notoriety of a position, but instead whether I can make a difference and love what I do. Thanks again to all the families, friends, teachers, and any others I have missed, for your contributions. They are greatly appreciated. Congratulations again, Class of 2010, and I wish you all the best of luck. I know you’ll do your best. I’ll miss you all. Thank you!

Tagalog

Tagalog salutatory address in highschool

Last Update: 2016-02-26
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

English

buod sa talambuhay ni isko morenoIn the Philippine entertainment, Isko Moreno is an actor who had turned to politics as is career aside from being a celebrity. His real name is Francisco Domagoso, born in Tondo, Manila on October 24, 1974. He went to Arellano University, Pamantasan ng Lungsod ng Maynila and University of the Philippines for his education and a college degree in Bachelor of Laws. He was an only child to parents Joaquin and Rosario, who tried to raise him in spite of poverty and difficulties in life. His father worked as a stevedore at the North Harbor, and his earnings are barely enough to sustain the daily needs of the family. Isko saw this situation as a challenge and at an early age he tried to help and share in the burden of the family. He gathered all sorts of recyclable and reusable garbage such as plastics, cans, old newspapers and cartons and sold them. He was doing this until he had finished his elementary education at the Rosauro Almario Elementary School. In his high school days, he was a pedicab driver, and this supported him in his schooling at the Tondo High School. He did not mind the hardships and hindrances because he believed that all the hard works would pay off in the future. It is when he was enrolled in Marine Engineering at the Philippine Maritime Institute that luck and fate befalls him. This was the moment that he was discovered by Roxas. From doing bit roles he worked his way to become a good actor and be successful in his acting career. Focus is the right word to describe him, his firm determination to achieve whatever he wants is what makes him going. He used to be a member of German Moreno’s teen oriented show entitled “That’s Entertainment.” Isko used to work as a street vendor with a pushcart while studying until Wowie Roxas spotted and brought him to Kuya Germs (nickname of German Moreno.) That is how his acting and movie career started. Eventually, she married Diana Lynn Ditan and had four children namely, Vincent Patrick, Frances Diane, Joaquin Andre and Franco. It was in 1998 that he decided to enter politics, because of his desire to improve the plight of his community from where he came from. Barely new in the field, his opponents were surprised to see that he landed as one of the top councilors of the 1st District of Manila. He did his job, much to the amazement of the people in the political arena, which gained him a 3-term for the seat. Isko as he promised lived to create resolutions that served the interest of the poor population of Tondo. He did vow to serve the underprivileged people. Isko Moreno had completed his three-term Councilor in Manila and has won as Vice Mayor at the last election. Some of his memorable movie and TV appearances were, “May Minamahal,” “Muntik Na Kitang Minahal,””Sya’y Nagdadalaga,” “Exploitation,” “Mga Babae Sa Isla Azul,””Misteryosa,’ and “Tukso Layuan Mo Ako.” Other TV shows include, “Ligaw Na Bulaklak,””Bakekang,” “Mga Anghel Na Walang Langit,”

Tagalog

Summary biography of isko moreno

Last Update: 2016-02-16
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

English

anong ibig sabihin ng gain sa tagalog

Tagalog

tagalog anong ibig Sabihin Ng makakuha ay isang

Last Update: 2016-01-27
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

English

Many men and women who are molding the minds of future generations have to look for other income sources to make both ends meet. One of them is Teacher V, who has been teaching in a local high school in Burgos, Pangasinan for two years now. Her passion for teaching came from her aunt, a teacher in a local elementary school in the province who supported her studies. “I’m happy with my teaching job because I know that in my own way, I’m not just teaching my students. I’m also touching their lives and inspiring them,” Teacher V said. Professors can be some of the most influential figures you will ever meet. While many school rankings include “academic rigor” as a way to determine the quality of scholarship at a given institution, this can fall short, and ignore a number of important factors. Factors like the ability of students to actually access professors, the extent to which the school enables collaboration between students and faculty, and if students rank professors positively or not. For this reason we’ve constructed our own rankings of the top 50 schools in the nation with the best professors. This member of the Five Colleges Consortium is the oldest college in Massachusetts, and perennially a top ranked liberal arts school. This year Amherst was ranked the second best liberal arts school in the nation by US News and World Report, and the 10th ranked liberal arts school by Forbes. The college is known for an unusually open curriculum, allowing freshman to take advanced courses and seniors to take introductory courses if they should choose. This places greater trust in quality students and instructors to create their own good outcomes and course interactions. A small student body (around 2,000 students) and a low student-teacher ratio (8 to 1) aids in creating quality interactions in class. Amherst has been known for quality instruction for years, so much so that in 2007,Harvard and Columbia consulted Amherst when reviewing their teaching programs. Swarthmore is one of the “little na buhay ,” and one of only three schools to hold the number one spot of the US News liberal arts rankings. Swarthmore is noted as the number one value for a private school in the US, and also for its rate of over 90% of graduates who attend either graduate or professional school, as well as 20% of graduates that proceed to garner their Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), numbers only topped by CalTech, Harvey Mudd, and Reed College. Swarthmore is a member of the Tri-College Consortium with Bryn Mawr and Haverford, allowing students to cross register at all three, as well as for Swarthmore students to register at UPenn’s College of arts and sciences (a school sharing a Quaker heritage). The school itself is quite small, with just over 1,500 students, with a student faculty ratio of 8 to 1. While not for everyone, for the select few who gain admission to West Point (you must both gain admission from the school and be nominated, often by a Senator), you are offered a full ride by the US Army (provided you serve in the armed forces upon graduation). Most graduates leave the academy commissioned as second lieutenants in the Army, though graduates may choose to be commissioned in another branch of the armed forces if wanted. Teaching styles at West Point follow the Thayer system, which focuses on daily homework, brought to class and collaboratively discussed. Curriculum is highly structured at West Point, with all students taking the same classes until junior year, including mathematics, information technology, chemistry, physics, engineering, history, physical geography, philosophy, leadership and general psychology, English composition and literature, foreign language, political science, international relations, economics, and constitutional law. Regardless of major, all graduates receive a Bachelor’s of Science. Slightly over 4,500 cadets attend the school, which has a student faculty ratio of seven to one. West Point was the 24th ranked national liberal arts school by US News this year. Bryn Mawr is a small (1,300+ undergraduate students) women’s liberal arts college that is one of the seven sisters colleges as well as the tri-college consortium (with other quaker-founded schools Haverford and Swarthmore). Bryn Mawr is tied for the 27th ranked liberal arts college in the nation by US News, and the 65th ranked overall college by Forbes. The college is noted for small class sizes, with over 3/4th of classes having under 20 students. The most popular majors are STEM heavy for a liberal arts school, with the most popular majors including (in decreasing rank) mathematics (11% of students), English, psychology, political science, and biology/biological sciences. There have been numerous professors of great fame at Bryn Mawr, and the institution itself has been progressive in organizing its academic programs, being the first institute of higher education to award doctorates in social work, as well as to award graduate and doctorate degrees to women. Washington and lee is the 14th ranked liberal arts school by US News, and the 33rd ranked overall university by Forbes. Though it has refused to send data to the Princeton Review for years, the 2007 edition of the Princeton Review ranked Washington and Lee 4th for “Professors get high marks” and sixth for “professor accessibility.” Home to 1,800 undergraduates housed in two college, Washington and Lee has a student-faculty ratio of eight to one. Washington and Lee has a great community centered around student, faculty, and community traditions. One of the more notable traditions enjoys coverage on national news every four years: the Mock Convention. A mock presidential election that has predicted the winning presidential nominee every election save two since 1948 (Ted Kennedy in 1972 and Barack Obama in 2008).

Tagalog

fulltext

Last Update: 2016-01-08
Subject: Social Science
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

English

honor gains

Tagalog

mga karangalan natamo

Last Update: 2015-09-06
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

English

Plato was born around the year 428 BCE in Athens. His father died while Plato was young, and his mother remarried to Pyrilampes, in whose house Plato would grow up. Plato's birth name was Aristocles, and he gained the nickname Platon, meaning broad, because of his broad build. His family had a history in politics, and Plato was destined to a life in keeping with this history. He studied at a gymnasium owned by Dionysios, and at the palaistra of Ariston of Argos. When he was young he studied music and poetry. According to Aristotle, Plato developed the foundations of his metaphysics and epistemology by studying the doctrines of Cratylus, and the work of Pythagoras and Parmenides. When Plato met Socrates, however, he had met his definitive teacher. As Socrates' disciple, Plato adopted his philosophy and style of debate, and directed his studies toward the question of virtue and the formation of a noble character. Plato was in military service from 409 BC to 404 BC. When the Peloponnesian War ended in 404 BC he joined the Athenian oligarchy of the Thirty Tyrants, one of whose leaders was his uncle Charmides. The violence of this group quickly prompted Plato to leave it. In 403 BC, when democracy was restored in Athens, he had hopes of pursuing his original goal of a political career. Socrates' execution in 399 BC had a profound effect on Plato, and was perhaps the final event that would convince him to leave Athenian politics forever. Plato left Attica along with other friends of Socrates and traveled for the next twelve years. To all accounts it appears that he left Athens with Euclides for Megara, then went to visit Theodorus in Cyrene, moved on to study with the Pythagoreans in Italy, and finally to Egypt. During this period he studied the philosophy of his contemporaries, geometry, geology, astronomy and religion. After 399 BC Plato began to write extensively. It is still up for debate whether he was writing before Socrates' death, and the order in which he wrote his major texts is also uncertain. However, most scholars agree to divide Plato's major work into three distinct groups. The first of these is known as the Socratic Dialogues because of how close he stays within the text to Socrates' teachings. They were probably written during the years of his travels between 399 and 387 BC. One of the texts in this group called the Apology seems to have been written shortly after Socrates' death. Other texts relegated to this group include the Crito, Laches, Lysis, Charmides, Euthyphro, and Hippias Minor and Major. Plato returned to Athens in 387 BC and, on land that had once belonged to Academos, he founded a school of learning which he called the Academy. Plato's school is often described at the first European university. Its curriculum offered subjects including astronomy, biology, mathematics, political theory, and philosophy. Plato hoped the Academy would provide a place where thinkers could work toward better government in the Grecian cities. He would preside over the Academy until his death. The period from 387 to 361 BC is often called Plato's "middle" or transitional period. It is thought that he may have written the Meno, Euthydemus, Menexenus, Cratylus, Repuglic, Phaedrus, Syposium and Phaedo during this time. The major difference between these texts and his earlier works is that he tends toward grander metaphysical themes and begins to establish his own voice in philosophy. Socrates still has a presence, however, sometimes as a fictional character. In the Meno for example Plato writes of the Socratic idea that no one knowingly does wrong, and adds the new doctrine of recollection questioning whether virtue can be taught. In the Phaedo we are introduced to the Platonic doctrine of the Forms, in which Plato makes claims as to the immortality of the human soul. The middle dialogues also reveal Plato's method of hypothesis. Plato's most influential work, The Republic, is also a part of his middle dialogues. It is a discussion of the virtues of justice, courage, wisdom, and moderation, of the individual and in society. It works with the central question of how to live a good life, asking what an ideal State would be like, and what defines a just individual. These lead to more questions regarding the education of citizens, how government should be formed, the nature of the soul, and the afterlife. The dialogue finishes by reviewing various forms of government and describing the ideal state, where only philosophers are fit to rule. The Republic covers almost every aspect of Plato's thought. In 367 BC Plato was invited to be the personal tutor to Dionysus II, the new ruler of Syracuse. Plato accepted the invitation, but found on his arrival that the situation was not conducive for philosophy. He continued to teach the young ruler until 365 BC when Syracuse entered into war. Plato returned to Athens, and it was around this time that Plato's famous pupil Aristotle began to study at the Academy. In 361 BC Plato returned to Syracuse in response to a letter from Dion, the uncle and guardian of Dionysus II, begging him to come back. However, finding the situation even more unpleasant than his first visit, he returned to Athens almost as fast as he had come. Back at the Academy, Plato probably spent the rest of his life writing and conversing. The way he ran the Academy and his ideas of what constitutes an educated individual have been a major influence to education theory. His work has also been influential in the areas of logic and legal philosophy. His beliefs on the importance of mathematics in education has had a lasting influence on the subject, and his insistence on accurate definitions and clear hypotheses formed the foundations for Euclid's system of mathematics. His final years at the Academy may be the years when he wrote the "Later" dialogues, including the Parmenides, Theatetus, Sophist,Statesmas,Timaeus,Critias,Philebus, and Laws. Socrates has been delegated a minor role in these texts. Plato uses these dialogues to take a closer look at his earlier metaphysical speculations. He discusses art, including dance, music, poetry, architecture and drama, and ethics in regards to immortality, the mind, and Realism. He also works with the philosophy of mathematics, politics and religion, covering such specifics as censorship, atheism, and pantheism. In the area of epistemology he discusses a priori knowledge and Rationalism. In his theory of Forms, Plato suggests that the world of ideas is constant and true, opposing it to the world we perceive through our senses, which is deceptive and changeable. In 347 Plato died, leaving the Academy to his sister's son Speusippus. The Academy remained a model for institutions of higher learning until it was closed, in 529 CE, by the Emperor Justinian.

Tagalog

talambuhay ni Plato

Last Update: 2015-06-07
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:
Warning: Contains invisible HTML formatting

English

Good morning students, school board members, superintendent and district staff. First, I would like to thank all of you, from teachers to friends and family, for being in attendance this morning. You have all had a profound impact on the development of the students that will be graduating today, and I feel it is safe to say that I speak on behalf of the whole graduating Class of 2015, in thanking you for all of your efforts that you have invested in us to this day. When I first sat down to write this speech, tons of thoughts were flowing through my mind. Am I going to reminisce about memories of great importance to me? How about speaking of significant events for the entire school? What is the message I should try to convey? Will I pass out or just be at a loss for words, because to be honest, I did not think I had it in me to do this. But the most important goal I strove for was to create a speech that was truly different. Not that bored people to sleep or followed the traditional “your journey ends here, but a new one begins” format, but instead offered excitement and new insight into this monumental day. However, it is more so about your accomplishments and the best way for me to craft inspiration and motivation in you all. Today is no small feat. It perhaps is the most significant and life altering achievement most of you can claim to this day. Never hesitate to recognize how proud each and every person here today is for you to complete such a long and difficult task. Having worked for over thirteen years just for this moment, it is hard to ignore the determination, perseverance, patience, hardwork and even sacrifice that embodies itself the attitudes of every graduate. The innumerable amount of opportunities your diploma enables you to attain is without doubt, and I encourage all of you to pursue what is most dear to you. Pursue that in which you feel you can make a difference. Looking at you, the Class of 2015, I realize that after today, I may no longer see many of you. That is a painful thought. On the other hand, I am also filled with anticipation, because I have no doubt in my mind that every single one of you sitting before me has the potential to succeed and make a difference in life. Of course, not every one of us can be rich, famous, and powerful, but often times it is the people who just offer words of advice and encouragement that make the world a better place. It is human nature to reflect the mood of others in your own actions, so positive words and actions could have an overwhelming impact on the moods and quality of life of others. The future looks bright. Throughout my years in high school, not only have I gained knowledge of the subjects I have studied, but I have learned many other lessons as well. At times I know some of you questioned the need to attend class, but gaining intelligence is not the only purpose of it. School has helped to build priceless social skills, as well as, instilled a value to succeed. I don’t know about you, but when I see others performing well, I take it as a challenge to try my best as well. Having the correct mindset makes all of the difference. If you believe you can achieve anything, and don’t allow others to tell you differently, what you are capable of achieving is genuinely amazing. I would like to conclude my speech with a quote from Robert Frost. “Two roads diverged in a wood, and I took the road less traveled by, and that has made all the difference.” I encourage you, the Class of 2015, to not only follow the opportunities available to you, but to follow your heart and pursue a cause of particular importance to you. Instead of following the path of past generations and graduating classes, I challenge you all to make your own path. The risks are always present, but the battle always makes the win so much sweeter. For me, it is neither about the money nor the notoriety of a position, but instead whether I can make a difference and love what I do. Thanks again to all the families, friends, teachers, and any others I have missed, for your contributions. They are greatly appreciated. Congratulations again, Class of 2010, and I wish you all the best of luck. I know you’ll do your best. I’ll miss you all. Thank you!

Tagalog

salutatory address Tagalog

Last Update: 2015-03-25
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

English

Syed Alwi Syed Hassan from Pondok Tanjong , Taiping . He is the only theater figures and activists who wrote the script and directing theater Malay and English . Among his works is the Alang Pace thousand (1973 ) , Tok Perak (1974 ) , I Remember the Rest House (1992 ) , and Member of the Club (1994 ) . Experience ( in and outside the country ) , consistently striving to gain knowledge , and works diligently to produce quality , Syed Alwi received the National Art Award 2002. He died on 30 November, 2008

Tagalog

correct grammar on translations

Last Update: 2015-02-25
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

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