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English

Guts

Tagalog

lord bigyan mo po ako ng lakas ng loob

Last Update: 2014-12-15
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
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Reference: Anonymous

English

THE MOVIE The movie is about an Alien who is stranded on this planet; as it happens, his "remote" to contact his ship to come collect him is stolen on his landing. The rest of the movie is about his hunt for the remote, and his adventures as he goes about it. It is a hard-hitting expose on human nature and modern life, or what we call civilization. And, as we shall see, the movie ends with a punch to the gut, which leaves you almost feeling ashamed of being a human being on Earth. The movie gives you pride in being a Hindu, or to be accurate, a Sanaatan Dharmi; but it makes you feel ashamed to be a Human Being living on this planet, all in just one shocking dialogue, that takes your breath away, and leaves you retching in sheer disgust at humanity. The Alien, who has been given no name, is from an advanced race that does not speak, but communicates with telepathy. Thus, they are unable to lie, or practice chicanery in any form. And this poor fellow is loose in a land full of lies and uncaring people. {Close your eyes, and imagine this scene for a moment; imagine his desperation!} When people, unable to understand, tell him - ask God - he begins to question, who is this God? And gets directed to a Temple, as this is the most populous in India. He asks God to return his Remote to him, and sits in the Temple, waiting for God to give it back to him - since that is what he sees people do : ask God, do this and do that for me! He then sees people doing all sorts of penance - Flowers, Milk, Chaader on a Muslim Peer Tomb, Churches - and he does all of this. He sees people donate money to the Temple, and blindly follows this. And then, when obviously no result is obtained, doesnt get angry - unlike us. He just assumes that God is missing from these places of Worship, and distributes placards and posters with images of all Gods of all Religions, asking "Missing", if anyone finds God, please contact me! Religion is only one of the two or three themes of the movie; to be sure, it is a predominant theme - but it is one theme among two or three nonetheless. And the picture is not about Hinduism, it is about Religion, blind faith, loot, lies and chicanery. It just so happens that first, we Hindus are the majority in this nation. Other religions have also been covered. Second, can anyone imagine the reaction if such hard questions were asked of Islam? Or, to an admittedly much lesser extent, Christianity? Recall the protests to The Da Vinci Code? Or the various problems in the Islamic world? Is it really feasible to ask such hard questions of Islam? Thus, isnt it a matter of tremendous pride for us Sanaatan Dharmis that we are followers of an open faith, where such questions can be asked? The movie then acquires a compelling and rapid narrative, as PK gets mixed up in politicised religion, and gets pitted against a powerful so-called Godman. Also mixed in is a lovely India-Pakistan love story that will tug the strings of your heart. And the best part of this is that all these 3 narratives combine into one story effortlessly and naturally. The movie does not question the need for Religion; neither does it question the existence of God. It does not mock any Religion; rather it mocks the practices and blind faith that goes into the same. It does not question the core tenets of any faith, let alone Sanaatan Dharm. It actually preaches that Man does need to pray to God, and that God does help. The movie is not an attack on any Religion; it is an attack on Mankind as it exists today. It is teaches us to believe, to have faith in God, and that God helps those who helps themselves. Isnt that what Sanaatan Dharm says precisely? It teaches us the value of true love, of self-confidence, and of true faith; it teaches us to have faith in God, and focus on our Karm. Again, precisely Sanaatan Dharm. After all, the movie has been written and directed by a Hindu. {By the way, that reminds me - if this has been written and directed by a Hindu or Sanaatan Dharmi, pray tell how is Aamir Khan the only one being questioned?} Hats off to you, Team PK! Sad that so many people have not understood its core message... there are some movies with a message. And then there are some messages with a movie woven into them, like PK. A landmark movie... stupendous. Stupendous! We need more such movies, and more such courageous actors and directors and artists... take a bow, Team PK! Stunning! Superlative! One of the best motion picture features to come out of Mumbai! I say it again : Strange that Haidar does cause even a ripple, with its negative portrayal of our beloved Armed Forces, and PK with its questions on so many vital aspects of life can cause an uproar! Is the nation more important or the religion? I am an INDIAN first. Did not watch Haidar, do not intend to. No one insults my Army. Sorry. And PK is much, much de "jhoothh bolnaa seekh kar gayaa, pyaar karnaa sikhaa gayaa" the last dialogue of the movie...

Tagalog

reflection paper-tungkol sa buhay

Last Update: 2017-08-21
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:
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English

my guts in English

Tagalog

my lakas ng loob in english

Last Update: 2017-07-03
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

English

All it took was a solar eclipse and five-car collision atop the Magnetic Hill for the souls of five individuals --- the virginal bride-to-be (Angelica Panganiban), her histrionically litigious godmother (Eugene Domingo), her ringbearer's destitute nanny (Tuesday Vargas), her husband-to-be's amorous grandfather (Jaime Fabregas), and her gay beautician (John Lapuz) --- to switch bodies. With the bride-to-be's soul transferring to the godmother's body; the godmother's soul transferring to the nanny's body; the nanny's soul transferring to the grandfather's body; the grandfather's soul transferring to the beautician's body; and the beautician's soul transferring to the bride-to-be's body, the dream beach wedding turns into a hilarious riot, where long-dormant passions are awakened, sexual fantasies are fulfilled, economic alleviation is achieved, and a chance at love is obtained. Let us get it out of the way. Chris Martinez's Here Comes the Bride is top-notch entertainment. Martinez was able to come up with everything most recent Filipino mainstream comedies lack: that no-nonsense singular objective of making people laugh. From the getgo to the post-credit extra scene, the film never stopped to be overtly pedantic or moralistic, a problem that most Filipino comedies have since there always seems to be this need to use cinema as replacement for Sunday school. For example, Wenn Deramas' Ang Tanging Ina (The True Mother, 2003), and its sequel and many offshoots, are always derailed by its insistence on teaching a lesson; even Joyce Bernal's Kimmy Dora (2009) is stalled by its apologetic dénouement that went too long and too serious. Never mind the forced logic to explain the illogic, the negligible business about solar eclipses and souls, the history and science behind the soul-swap, as authoritatively explained by television trivia-master Kim Atienza. Here Comes the Bride is deliriously funny nonsense all the way and it thankfully works. The film's success is not entirely surprising. After all, Martinez is arguably one of the Philippines' better screenwriters. His screenplays, from Bridal Shower (Jeffrey Jeturian, 2004), about three friends in search of love, to Caregiver (Chito Roño, 2008), about a mother who follows her husband to London in the hopes of earning enough to live comfortably, reflect his ability to articulate something as minute as the language to something as pertinent as the needs of the rapidly-changing Filipino society for mainstream appeal. 100 (2008), his directorial debut about a woman who is dying from cancer, is salvaged from being a run-of-the-mill melodrama by an abundance of relevant humor. Martinez understands the Filipino soul, that the very best way to tackle something as devastating as death is to treat it with levity, to make it familiar and therefore personal. That said, Martinez may very well be the most current of all actively working screenwriters, actively pursuing entertainment without being dumbed down by the demands of commercial accessibility. Despite its astounding technical polish, Here Comes the Bride is fundamentally closer to Joey Gosiengfiao's redeemed Temptation Island (1981), where a bunch of beauty queens and the men surrounding them are stranded in a deserted island, than the mechanically churned comedies Star Cinema has been producing the past recent years. Underneath the caricatures that Martinez connected by the conceit of the convenient soul-swap, underneath the blatant inanity of its carefully conceived proceedings, is a well-pronounced understanding that life, as it is, is unfair, that there are those who are born poor, those who live loveless, and those who inevitably grow old and inutile. In a twist of fate, cruel only to the bride-to-be who suddenly gets a first-hand experience of the inequity of living after a lifetime of being sheltered and protected, inabilities and deficiencies are cured, emphasizing in what essentially is a film created for no other reason than to be an escapist fantasy that the key to a happy life is as unrealistic and as incredible as swapping souls via rare natural phenomena. Like Temptation Island whose gay pageant director becomes the unwilling sacrificial lamb simply because he presumably has the least to lose among the other loved and loving survivors, the most fully realized character in Here Comes the Bride is the love-starved gay beautician whose fortune of being transported to the body of the beautiful and sexy bride-to-be is the most dramatic out of the five. As expected, it is mostly played for laughs and Panganiban does a brilliant job in emulating the fabulous larger-than-life gestures of Lapuz. After all, the very idea of a gay man suddenly and surprisingly getting everything he ever wanted, from the body parts he can only have in his wildest dreams to the straight men who he can only love and lust for from a safe distance, is in itself a hoot. The hilarity of the absurd situation, at that scene where the bride-to-be in the body of her godmother insists that the gay beautician return her body, unravels into a well-pronounced statement of gay angst and sentiment as he emotionally shouts "Hindi ninyo maiintindihan dahil hindi kayo bakla! (You will never understand because you are not gay!). At that moment, the film, notwithstanding the fact that it never stopped being funny, reflected a current fundamental truth, something that not even a mainstream film as self-promotedly queer as Olivia Lamasan's In My Life (2009) can have the guts to state as plainly and matter-of-factly as that. The gay man becomes a girl. The loveless godmother feels how it is to be loved. The amorous yet incapacitated grandfather relives the passion and the romance of his distant youth. The poor nanny turns into a millionaire. The innocent bride-to-be wallows in the realities of life's misfortune. Martinez fills the screen with realized desires at the expense of the bride-to-be, emphasizing the frailty of the human soul in the face of happiness. In the midst of the film's invaluable wit and humor that frequently pumps in rhythm with the Latin beats of the apt lively music score, the film's characters, ideally uncomplicated and stereotypical, are allowed to live their desires realized, concretizing in easy-to-understand cinematic terms the pleasures of escape, of living a fantasy even if it is only momentarily. I am very happy to say that Here Comes the Bride is as current and relevant as it is entertaining and hysterical.

Tagalog

All it took was a solar eclipse and five-car collision atop the Magnetic Hill for the souls of five individuals --- the virginal bride-to-be (Angelica Panganiban), her histrionically litigious godmother (Eugene Domingo), her ringbearer's destitute nanny (Tuesday Vargas), her husband-to-be's amorous grandfather (Jaime Fabregas), and her gay beautician (John Lapuz) --- to switch bodies. With the bride-to-be's soul transferring to the godmother's body; the godmother's soul transferring to the nanny's body; the nanny's soul transferring to the grandfather's body; the grandfather's soul transferring to the beautician's body; and the beautician's soul transferring to the bride-to-be's body, the dream beach wedding turns into a hilarious riot, where long-dormant passions are awakened, sexual fantasies are fulfilled, economic alleviation is achieved, and a chance at love is obtained. Let us get it out of the way. Chris Martinez's Here Comes the Bride is top-notch entertainment. Martinez was able to come up with everything most recent Filipino mainstream comedies lack: that no-nonsense singular objective of making people laugh. From the getgo to the post-credit extra scene, the film never stopped to be overtly pedantic or moralistic, a problem that most Filipino comedies have since there always seems to be this need to use cinema as replacement for Sunday school. For example, Wenn Deramas' Ang Tanging Ina (The True Mother, 2003), and its sequel and many offshoots, are always derailed by its insistence on teaching a lesson; even Joyce Bernal's Kimmy Dora (2009) is stalled by its apologetic dénouement that went too long and too serious. Never mind the forced logic to explain the illogic, the negligible business about solar eclipses and souls, the history and science behind the soul-swap, as authoritatively explained by television trivia-master Kim Atienza. Here Comes the Bride is deliriously funny nonsense all the way and it thankfully works. The film's success is not entirely surprising. After all, Martinez is arguably one of the Philippines' better screenwriters. His screenplays, from Bridal Shower (Jeffrey Jeturian, 2004), about three friends in search of love, to Caregiver (Chito Roño, 2008), about a mother who follows her husband to London in the hopes of earning enough to live comfortably, reflect his ability to articulate something as minute as the language to something as pertinent as the needs of the rapidly-changing Filipino society for mainstream appeal. 100 (2008), his directorial debut about a woman who is dying from cancer, is salvaged from being a run-of-the-mill melodrama by an abundance of relevant humor. Martinez understands the Filipino soul, that the very best way to tackle something as devastating as death is to treat it with levity, to make it familiar and therefore personal. That said, Martinez may very well be the most current of all actively working screenwriters, actively pursuing entertainment without being dumbed down by the demands of commercial accessibility. Despite its astounding technical polish, Here Comes the Bride is fundamentally closer to Joey Gosiengfiao's redeemed Temptation Island (1981), where a bunch of beauty queens and the men surrounding them are stranded in a deserted island, than the mechanically churned comedies Star Cinema has been producing the past recent years. Underneath the caricatures that Martinez connected by the conceit of the convenient soul-swap, underneath the blatant inanity of its carefully conceived proceedings, is a well-pronounced understanding that life, as it is, is unfair, that there are those who are born poor, those who live loveless, and those who inevitably grow old and inutile. In a twist of fate, cruel only to the bride-to-be who suddenly gets a first-hand experience of the inequity of living after a lifetime of being sheltered and protected, inabilities and deficiencies are cured, emphasizing in what essentially is a film created for no other reason than to be an escapist fantasy that the key to a happy life is as unrealistic and as incredible as swapping souls via rare natural phenomena. Like Temptation Island whose gay pageant director becomes the unwilling sacrificial lamb simply because he presumably has the least to lose among the other loved and loving survivors, the most fully realized character in Here Comes the Bride is the love-starved gay beautician whose fortune of being transported to the body of the beautiful and sexy bride-to-be is the most dramatic out of the five. As expected, it is mostly played for laughs and Panganiban does a brilliant job in emulating the fabulous larger-than-life gestures of Lapuz. After all, the very idea of a gay man suddenly and surprisingly getting everything he ever wanted, from the body parts he can only have in his wildest dreams to the straight men who he can only love and lust for from a safe distance, is in itself a hoot. The hilarity of the absurd situation, at that scene where the bride-to-be in the body of her godmother insists that the gay beautician return her body, unravels into a well-pronounced statement of gay angst and sentiment as he emotionally shouts "Hindi ninyo maiintindihan dahil hindi kayo bakla! (You will never understand because you are not gay!). At that moment, the film, notwithstanding the fact that it never stopped being funny, reflected a current fundamental truth, something that not even a mainstream film as self-promotedly queer as Olivia Lamasan's In My Life (2009) can have the guts to state as plainly and matter-of-factly as that. The gay man becomes a girl. The loveless godmother feels how it is to be loved. The amorous yet incapacitated grandfather relives the passion and the romance of his distant youth. The poor nanny turns into a millionaire. The innocent bride-to-be wallows in the realities of life's misfortune. Martinez fills the screen with realized desires at the expense of the bride-to-be, emphasizing the frailty of the human soul in the face of happiness. In the midst of the film's invaluable wit and humor that frequently pumps in rhythm with the Latin beats of the apt lively music score, the film's characters, ideally uncomplicated and stereotypical, are allowed to live their desires realized, concretizing in easy-to-understand cinematic terms the pleasures of escape, of living a fantasy even if it is only momentarily. I am very happy to say that Here Comes the Bride is as current and relevant as it is entertaining and hysterical. All it took was a solar eclipse and five-car collision atop the Magnetic Hill for the souls of five individuals --- the virginal bride-to-be (Angelica Panganiban), her histrionically litigious godmother (Eugene Domingo), her ringbearer's destitute nanny (Tuesday Vargas), her husband-to-be's amorous grandfather (Jaime Fabregas), and her gay beautician (John Lapuz) --- to switch bodies. With the bride-to-be's soul transferring to the godmother's body; the godmother's soul transferring to the nanny's body; the nanny's soul transferring to the grandfather's body; the grandfather's soul transferring to the beautician's body; and the beautician's soul transferring to the bride-to-be's body, the dream beach wedding turns into a hilarious riot, where long-dormant passions are awakened, sexual fantasies are fulfilled, economic alleviation is achieved, and a chance at love is obtained. Let us get it out of the way. Chris Martinez's Here Comes the Bride is top-notch entertainment. Martinez was able to come up with everything most recent Filipino mainstream comedies lack: that no-nonsense singular objective of making people laugh. From the getgo to the post-credit extra scene, the film never stopped to be overtly pedantic or moralistic, a problem that most Filipino comedies have since there always seems to be this need to use cinema as replacement for Sunday school. For example, Wenn Deramas' Ang Tanging Ina (The True Mother, 2003), and its sequel and many offshoots, are always derailed by its insistence on teaching a lesson; even Joyce Bernal's Kimmy Dora (2009) is stalled by its apologetic dénouement that went too long and too serious. Never mind the forced logic to explain the illogic, the negligible business about solar eclipses and souls, the history and science behind the soul-swap, as authoritatively explained by television trivia-master Kim Atienza. Here Comes the Bride is deliriously funny nonsense all the way and it thankfully works. The film's success is not entirely surprising. After all, Martinez is arguably one of the Philippines' better screenwriters. His screenplays, from Bridal Shower (Jeffrey Jeturian, 2004), about three friends in search of love, to Caregiver (Chito Roño, 2008), about a mother who follows her husband to London in the hopes of earning enough to live comfortably, reflect his ability to articulate something as minute as the language to something as pertinent as the needs of the rapidly-changing Filipino society for mainstream appeal. 100 (2008), his directorial debut about a woman who is dying from cancer, is salvaged from being a run-of-the-mill melodrama by an abundance of relevant humor. Martinez understands the Filipino soul, that the very best way to tackle something as devastating as death is to treat it with levity, to make it familiar and therefore personal. That said, Martinez may very well be the most current of all actively working screenwriters, actively pursuing entertainment without being dumbed down by the demands of commercial accessibility. Despite its astounding technical polish, Here Comes the Bride is fundamentally closer to Joey Gosiengfiao's redeemed Temptation Island (1981), where a bunch of beauty queens and the men surrounding them are stranded in a deserted island, than the mechanically churned comedies Star Cinema has been producing the past recent years. Underneath the caricatures that Martinez connected by the conceit of the convenient soul-swap, underneath the blatant inanity of its carefully conceived proceedings, is a well-pronounced understanding that life, as it is, is unfair, that there are those who are born poor, those who live loveless, and those who inevitably grow old and inutile. In a twist of fate, cruel only to the bride-to-be who suddenly gets a first-hand experience of the inequity of living after a lifetime of being sheltered and protected, inabilities and deficiencies are cured, emphasizing in what essentially is a film created for no other reason than to be an escapist fantasy that the key to a happy life is as unrealistic and as incredible as swapping souls via rare natural phenomena. Like Temptation Island whose gay pageant director becomes the unwilling sacrificial lamb simply because he presumably has the least to lose among the other loved and loving survivors, the most fully realized character in Here Comes the Bride is the love-starved gay beautician whose fortune of being transported to the body of the beautiful and sexy bride-to-be is the most dramatic out of the five. As expected, it is mostly played for laughs and Panganiban does a brilliant job in emulating the fabulous larger-than-life gestures of Lapuz. After all, the very idea of a gay man suddenly and surprisingly getting everything he ever wanted, from the body parts he can only have in his wildest dreams to the straight men who he can only love and lust for from a safe distance, is in itself a hoot. The hilarity of the absurd situation, at that scene where the bride-to-be in the body of her godmother insists that the gay beautician return her body, unravels into a well-pronounced statement of gay angst and sentiment as he emotionally shouts "Hindi ninyo maiintindihan dahil hindi kayo bakla! (You will never understand because you are not gay!). At that moment, the film, notwithstanding the fact that it never stopped being funny, reflected a current fundamental truth, something that not even a mainstream film as self-promotedly queer as Olivia Lamasan's In My Life (2009) can have the guts to state as plainly and matter-of-factly as that. The gay man becomes a girl. The loveless godmother feels how it is to be loved. The amorous yet incapacitated grandfather relives the passion and the romance of his distant youth. The poor nanny turns into a millionaire. The innocent bride-to-be wallows in the realities of life's misfortune. Martinez fills the screen with realized desires at the expense of the bride-to-be, emphasizing the frailty of the human soul in the face of happiness. In the midst of the film's invaluable wit and humor that frequently pumps in rhythm with the Latin beats of the apt lively music score, the film's characters, ideally uncomplicated and stereotypical, are allowed to live their desires realized, concretizing in easy-to-understand cinematic terms the pleasures of escape, of living a fantasy even if it is only momentarily. I am very happy to say that Here Comes the Bride is as current and relevant as it is entertaining and hysterical.

Last Update: 2016-12-05
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:
Warning: Contains invisible HTML formatting

English

The digestive system is made up of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract—also called the digestive tract—and the liver, pancreas, and gallbladder. The GI tract is a series of hollow organs joined in a long, twisting tube from the mouth to the anus. The hollow organs that make up the GI tract are the mouth, esophagus, stomach, small intestine, large intestine—which includes the rectum—and anus. Food enters the mouth and passes to the anus through the hollow organs of the GI tract. The liver, pancreas, and gallbladder are the solid organs of the digestive system. The digestive system helps the body digest food. Bacteria in the GI tract, also called gut flora or microbiome, help with digestion. Parts of the nervous and circulatory systems also play roles in the digestive process. Together, a combination of nerves, hormones, bacteria, blood, and the organs of the digestive system completes the complex task of digesting the foods and liquids a person consumes each day.

Tagalog

digestive bahagi ng sistema

Last Update: 2016-10-16
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

English

bowed by the weight of centuries he leans upon his hoe and gazes on the ground, the emptinous up ages does in his face and on his back the burden of the world who made him dead to rapture and dispair, a thing that griebes not and that newer hopes stupid and stunned, a brother to the ox? who loosed and let clown this brutal jaw? who was the hand that stanted back this brow whose breath blew out the light within this brain? is the thing the lord god made and gave to have dominion over sea and land, to trace the stars and search the newers for power; to feel the passion of eternity? is the dream he dreamd who shaped the suns and mark their ways upon the acient deep? down all the stretch of hell to its last gult there is no shape more terrible than this more tongued with censure if the world's blidn greed more filled with signs and portents. for the soul more traught with danger to the universe what guts between him and the seraphim! slave of the wheel of labor, what to him are plato and the swing of pleiades? what the long veaches of the peaks of song, the rift of down, the reddening of the rase? through this dread shape humanity betrayed plundered, profaned and dis inherited, cries protest to the judges of the world, a protest that is also prophecy. o masters lords and rules in all lands in this the handwork you give to god, this monstrous thing distorted and soul quenched? how will you over straightened up this shape; to uch it again with immortality; give back the upward looking and the light; building in it the music and dream; make right the immemorial infamies, perfidious wrongs, immocable woes? O, masters, lords and rulers in all lands, how will the future reck with this man? how answer his brute question in that hour when whirl winds of rebellion shake the world with those who shaped him to the things he is; when this dumb terror shall reply to god after the silence of the centuries?

Tagalog

ang tao na may asarol at iba poems

Last Update: 2016-09-22
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

English

no guts, no glory

Tagalog

walang lakas ng loob, walang kaluwalhatian

Last Update: 2015-04-12
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

English

such unfit notes will end one or two weeks to finish it ... force of that day ... for you know the reference number that they are in the line of eight and the reference number they gave us for verify the guts to say is 8282 ... Pardon the interruption ... I will follow up this matter with the BSP to update everyday I love you

Tagalog

ang nasabing unfit notes ay matatapos ng isa o dalawang linggo...pipilitin nilang tapusin ito ng nasabing araw...para sa inyong kaalaman ang reference number na ginagawa na nila ay nasa line of eight at ang reference number na binigay nila sa atin para sa pina pa verify natin ay 8282...pasensya na po sa abala...i will follow up this matter sa BSP araw araw para ma update ko po kayo

Last Update: 2015-01-11
Subject: Banking
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

English

ano sa tagalog ang guts

Tagalog

tagalog ang tapang ano I-sa

Last Update: 2015-01-07
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

English

Gut

Tagalog

Gut

Last Update: 2014-10-18
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:
Reference:

English

Gut

Tagalog

TAPANG

Last Update: 2014-09-05
Usage Frequency: 1
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