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English

listen

Tagalog

makinig

Last Update: 2015-04-07
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference: Anonymous

English

Easy listening

Tagalog

Senti

Last Update: 2014-10-30
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

English

(1) Nearly five hundred years ago the Celestially August, the Son of Heaven, Yong-Lo, of the “Illustrious” or Ming dynasty, commanded the worthy official Kouan-Yu that he should have a bell made of such size that the sound thereof might be heard for one hundred li. And he further ordained that the voice of the bell should be strengthened with brass, and deepened with gold, and sweetened with silver; and that the face and the great lips of it should be graven with blessed sayings from the sacred books, and that it should be suspended in the centre of the imperial capital to sound through all the many-coloured ways of the City of Pe-King. (2) Therefore the worthy mandarin Kouan-Yu assembled the master-moulders and the renowned bellsmiths of the empire, and all men of great repute and cunning in foundry work; and they measured the materials for the alloy, and treated them skilfully, and prepared the moulds, the fires, the instruments, and the monstrous melting-pot for fusing the metal. And they laboured exceedingly, like giants neglecting only rest and sleep and the comforts of life; toiling both night and day in obedience to Kouan-Yu, and striving in all things to do the behest of the Son of Heaven. (3) But when the metal had been cast, and the earthen mould separated from the glowing casting, it was discovered that, despite their great labour and ceaseless care, the result was void of worth; for the metals had rebelled one against the other—the gold had scorned alliance with the brass, the silver would not mingle with the molten iron. Therefore the moulds had to be once more prepared, and the fires rekindled, and the metal remelted, and all the work tediously and toilsomely repeated. The Son of Heaven heard and was angry, but spake nothing. (4) A second time the bell was cast, and the result was even worse. Still the metals obstinately refused to blend one with the other; and there was no uniformity in the bell, and the sides of it were cracked and fissured, and the lips of it were slagged and split asunder; so that all the labour had to be repeated even a third time, to the great dismay of Kouan-Yu. And when the Son of Heaven heard these things, he was angrier than before; and sent his messenger to Kouan-Yu with a letter, written upon lemon-coloured silk and sealed with the seal of the dragon, containing these words: (5) “From the Mighty Young-Lo, the Sublime Tait-Sung, the Celestial and August, whose reign is called ‘Ming,’ to Kouan-Yu the Fuh-yin: Twice thou hast betrayed the trust we have deigned graciously to place in thee; if thou fail a third time in fulfilling our command, thy head shall be severed from thy neck. Tremble, and obey!” (6) Now, Kouan-Yu had a daughter of dazzling loveliness whose name—Ko-Ngai—was ever in the mouths of poets, and whose heart was even more beautiful than her face. Ko-Ngai loved her father with such love that she had refused a hundred worthy suitors rather than make his home desolate by her absence; and when she had seen the awful yellow missive, sealed with the Dragon-Seal, she fainted away with fear for her father’s sake. And when her senses and her strength returned to her, she could not rest or sleep for thinking of her parent’s danger, until she had secretly sold some of her jewels, and with the money so obtained had hastened to an astrologer, and paid him a great price to advise her by what means her father might be saved from the peril impending over him. So the astrologer made observations of the heavens, and marked the aspect of the Silver Stream (which we call the Milky Way), and examined the signs of the Zodiac—the Hwang-tao, or Yellow Road—and consulted the table of the Five Hin, or Principles of the Universe, and the mystical books of the alchemists. And after a long silence, he made answer to her, saying: “Gold and brass will never meet in wedlock, silver and iron never will embrace, until the flesh of a maiden be melted in the crucible; until the blood of a virgin be mixed with the metals in their fusion.” So Ko-Ngai returned home sorrowful at heart; but she kept secret all that she had heard, and told no one what she had done. (7) At last came the awful day when the third and last effort to cast the great bell was to be made; and Ko-Ngai, together with her waiting-woman, accompanied her father to the foundry, and they took their places upon a platform overlooking the toiling of the moulders and the lava of liquefied metal. All the workmen wrought at their tasks in silence; there was no sound heard but the muttering of the fires. And the muttering deepened into a roar like the roar of typhoons approaching, and the blood-red lake of metal slowly brightened like the vermilion of a sunrise, and the vermilion was transmuted into a radiant glow of gold, and the gold whitened blindingly, like the silver face of a full moon. Then the workers ceased to feed the raving flame, and all fixed their eyes upon the eyes of Kouan-Yu; and Kouan-Yu prepared to give the signal to cast. (8) But ere ever he lifted his finger, a cry caused him to turn his head and all heard the voice of Ko-Ngai sounding sharply sweet as a bird’s song above the great thunder of the fires—“For thy sake, O my father!” And even as she cried, she leaped into the white flood of metal; and the lava of the furnace roared to receive her, and spattered monstrous flakes of flame to the roof, and burst over the verge of the earthen crater, and cast up a whirling fountain of many-coloured fires, and subsided quakingly, with lightnings and with thunders and with mutterings. (9) Then the father of Ko-Ngai, wild with his grief, would have leaped in after her, but that strong men held him back and kept firm grasp upon him until he had fainted away, and they could bear him like one dead to his home. And the serving-woman of Ko-Ngai, dizzy and speechless for pain, stood before the furnace, still holding in her hands a shoe, a tiny, dainty shoe, with embroidery of pearls and flowers—the shoe of her beautiful mistress that was. For she had sought to grasp Ko-Ngai by the foot as she leaped, but had only been able to clutch the shoe, and the pretty shoe came off in her hand; and she continued to stare at it like one gone mad. (10) But in spite of all these things, the command of the Celestial and August had to be obeyed, and the work of the moulders to be finished, hopeless as the result might be. Yet the glow of the metal seemed purer and whiter than before; and there was no sign of the beautiful body that had been entombed therein. So the ponderous casting was made; and lo! when the metal had become cool, it was found that the bell was beautiful to look upon and perfect in form, and wonderful in colour above all other bells. Nor was there any trace found of the body of Ko-Ngai; for it had been totally absorbed by the precious alloy, and blended with the well-blended brass and gold, with the intermingling of the silver and the iron. And when they sounded the bell, its tones were found to be deeper and mellower and mightier than the tones of any other bell, reaching even beyond the distance of one hundred li, like a pealing of summer thunder; and yet also like some vast voice uttering a name, a woman’s name, the name of Ko-Ngai. And still, between each mighty stroke there is a long low moaning heard; and ever the moaning ends with a sound of sobbing and of complaining, as though a weeping woman should murmur, “Hiai!” And still, when the people hear that great golden moan they keep silence, but when the sharp, sweet shuddering comes in the air, and the sobbing of “Hiai!” then, indeed, do all the Chinese mothers in all the many-coloured ways of Pe-King whisper to their little ones: “Listen! that is Ko-Ngai crying for her shoe! That is Ko-Ngai calling for her shoe!”

Tagalog

kuwento ng ang kaluluwa ng mahusay na kampanilya

Last Update: 2016-04-14
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

English

Not even listening to their mother, me more so

Tagalog

Hindi nga nakikinig sa kanilang nanay, sa'kin pa kaya

Last Update: 2016-02-24
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

English

What is the importance of listening?

Tagalog

ano ang kahalagahan ng pakikinig?

Last Update: 2015-10-14
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

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English

proverbs about listening

Tagalog

salawikain tungkol sa pakikinig

Last Update: 2015-10-09
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

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English

Once there was a presidente 151 who was very unjust to his people, and one day he became so angry that he wished he had horns so that he might frighten them. No sooner had he made this rash wish, than horns began to grow on his head. He sent for a barber who came to his house to cut his hair, and as he worked the presidente asked: "What do you see on my head?" "I see nothing," answered the barber; for although he could see the horns plainly, he was afraid to say so. Soon, however, the presidente put up his hands and felt the horns, and then when he inquired again the barber told him that he had two horns. "If you tell anyone what you have seen, you shall be hanged," said the presidente as the barber started away, and he was greatly frightened. When he reached home, the barber did not intend to tell anyone, for he was afraid; but as he thought of his secret more and more, the desire to tell someone became so strong that he knew he could not keep it. Finally he went to the field and dug a hole under some bamboo, and when the hole was large enough he crawled in and whispered that the presidente had horns. He then climbed out, filled up the hole, and went home. By and by some people came along the road on their way to market, and as they passed the bamboo they stopped in amazement, for surely a voice came from the trees, and it said that the presidente had horns. These people hastened to market and told what they had heard, and the people there went to the bamboo to listen to the strange voice. They informed others, and soon the news had spread all over the town. The councilmen were told, and they, too, went to the bamboo. When they had heard the voice, they ran to the house of the presidente. But his wife said that he was ill and they could not see him. By this time the horns had grown until they were one foot in length, and the presidente was so ashamed that he bade his wife tell the people that he could not talk. She told this to the councilmen when they came on the following day, but they replied that they must see him, for they had heard that he had horns, and if this were true he had no right to govern the people. She refused to let them in, so they broke down the door. They saw the horns on the head of the presidente and killed him. For, they said, he was no better than an animal

Tagalog

ingles sa ilocano isalin ang

Last Update: 2015-10-07
Subject: Literary Translations
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:
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English

The policeman on the beat moved up the avenue impressively. The impressiveness was habitual and not for show, for spectators were few. The time was barely 10 o'clock at night, but chilly gusts of wind with a taste of rain in them had well nigh depeopled the streets. Trying doors as he went, twirling his club with many intricate and artful movements, turning now and then to cast his watchful eye adown the pacific thoroughfare, the officer, with his stalwart form and slight swagger, made a fine picture of a guardian of the peace. The vicinity was one that kept early hours. Now and then you might see the lights of a cigar store or of an all-night lunch counter; but the majority of the doors belonged to business places that had long since been closed. When about midway of a certain block the policeman suddenly slowed his walk. In the doorway of a darkened hardware store a man leaned, with an unlighted cigar in his mouth. As the policeman walked up to him the man spoke up quickly. "It's all right, officer," he said, reassuringly. "I'm just waiting for a friend. It's an appointment made twenty years ago. Sounds a little funny to you, doesn't it? Well, I'll explain if you'd like to make certain it's all straight. About that long ago there used to be a restaurant where this store stands--'Big Joe' Brady's restaurant." "Until five years ago," said the policeman. "It was torn down then." The man in the doorway struck a match and lit his cigar. The light showed a pale, square-jawed face with keen eyes, and a little white scar near his right eyebrow. His scarfpin was a large diamond, oddly set. "Twenty years ago to-night," said the man, "I dined here at 'Big Joe' Brady's with Jimmy Wells, my best chum, and the finest chap in the world. He and I were raised here in New York, just like two brothers, together. I was eighteen and Jimmy was twenty. The next morning I was to start for the West to make my fortune. You couldn't have dragged Jimmy out of New York; he thought it was the only place on earth. Well, we agreed that night that we would meet here again exactly twenty years from that date and time, no matter what our conditions might be or from what distance we might have to come. We figured that in twenty years each of us ought to have our destiny worked out and our fortunes made, whatever they were going to be." "It sounds pretty interesting," said the policeman. "Rather a long time between meets, though, it seems to me. Haven't you heard from your friend since you left?" "Well, yes, for a time we corresponded," said the other. "But after a year or two we lost track of each other. You see, the West is a pretty big proposition, and I kept hustling around over it pretty lively. But I know Jimmy will meet me here if he's alive, for he always was the truest, stanchest old chap in the world. He'll never forget. I came a thousand miles to stand in this door to-night, and it's worth it if my old partner turns up." The waiting man pulled out a handsome watch, the lids of it set with small diamonds. "Three minutes to ten," he announced. "It was exactly ten o'clock when we parted here at the restaurant door."__ "Did pretty well out West, didn't you?" asked the policeman. "You bet! I hope Jimmy has done half as well. He was a kind of plodder, though, good fellow as he was. I've had to compete with some of the sharpest wits going to get my pile. A man gets in a groove in New York. It takes the West to put a razor-edge on him." The policeman twirled his club and took a step or two. "I'll be on my way. Hope your friend comes around all right. Going to call time on him sharp?" "I should say not!" said the other. "I'll give him half an hour at least. If Jimmy is alive on earth he'll be here by that time. So long, officer." "Good-night, sir," said the policeman, passing on along his beat, trying doors as he went. There was now a fine, cold drizzle falling, and the wind had risen from its uncertain puffs into a steady blow. The few foot passengers astir in that quarter hurried dismally and silently along with coat collars turned high and pocketed hands. And in the door of the hardware store the man who had come a thousand miles to fill an appointment, uncertain almost to absurdity, with the friend of his youth, smoked his cigar and waited. About twenty minutes he waited, and then a tall man in a long overcoat, with collar turned up to his ears, hurried across from the opposite side of the street. He went directly to the waiting man. "Is that you, Bob?" he asked, doubtfully. "Is that you, Jimmy Wells?" cried the man in the door. "Bless my heart!" exclaimed the new arrival, grasping both the other's hands with his own. "It's Bob, sure as fate. I was certain I'd find you here if you were still in existence. Well, well, well! --twenty years is a long time. The old gone, Bob; I wish it had lasted, so we could have had another dinner there. How has the West treated you, old man?" "Bully; it has given me everything I asked it for. You've changed lots, Jimmy. I never thought you were so tall by two or three inches." "Oh, I grew a bit after I was twenty." "Doing well in New York, Jimmy?" "Moderately. I have a position in one of the city departments. Come on, Bob; we'll go around to a place I know of, and have a good long talk about old times." The two men started up the street, arm in arm. The man from the West, his egotism enlarged by success, was beginning to outline the history of his career. The other, submerged in his overcoat, listened with interest. At the corner stood a drug store, brilliant with electric lights. When they came into this glare each of them turned simultaneously to gaze upon the other's face. The man from the West stopped suddenly and released his arm. "You're not Jimmy Wells," he snapped. "Twenty years is a long time, but not long enough to change a man's nose from a Roman to a pug." "It sometimes changes a good man into a bad one, said the tall man. "You've been under arrest for ten minutes, 'Silky' Bob. Chicago thinks you may have dropped over our way and wires us she wants to have a chat with you. Going quietly, are you? That's sensible. Now, before we go on to the station here's a note I was asked to hand you. You may read it here at the window. It's from Patrolman Wells." The man from the West unfolded the little piece of paper handed him. His hand was steady when he began to read, but it trembled a little by the time he had finished. The note was rather short. ~"Bob: I was at the appointed place on time. When you struck the match to light your cigar I saw it was the face of the man wanted in Chicago. Somehow I couldn't do it myself, so I went around and got a plain clothes man to do the job.

Tagalog

okupasyon

Last Update: 2015-09-13
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:
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English

What Englisg listening

Tagalog

sasabihin ko na sa inyo habang maaga pa huwag susubukng gumamit ng droga lalong lalo na kung pang katuwaan lamang

Last Update: 2015-09-09
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

English

task of the listener

Tagalog

gawain ng tagapakinig

Last Update: 2015-08-23
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

English

What do you listen to music like that

Tagalog

ano yong naririnig ko diyan parang music

Last Update: 2015-06-15
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

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English

As we know alot of people treat the guitar as a friend because it is always there when they need it . . . What ever feeling they have, they can use the guitar to express what they feel. Some song sucessful song writer use the guitar to make inspiring and beautiful music. We can say that the guitar is one of the most known instrument in the world. Alot of people can use and olay the guitar. But fsome became famous by playing it. As for me playing the guitar relieves every single depression and stress. It comforts anyone when they need it specialy when they are feeling down every single music sang along with the guitar makes it easy to guess what the composer felt when he/she was writing the song whether it is sadness or happiness. The most known genre by the guitar is acoustic it is often fone by vocal and guitar only it gives alot of good vibes to many people listening to it, javing total peace and a good piece of mind a guitar is a friend and a family we can treat to be with us everytime we need a little relaxation and inspiration.

Tagalog

story of haraya

Last Update: 2015-06-04
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
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English

and I learned is what form of waveskasi I am not listening to you so I know him very learned and I also wonder how the wave of wave of weakly.pero strong and have a copy of the form of the wave but I sha understand

Tagalog

at ang mga hindi ko natutunan ay yung form of waveskasi hindi ako nakikinig sa inyo kaya hindi ko siya masyadong natutunan at di ko rin po kung paano ang wave ng malakas at wave ng mahina.pero may kopya ako ng form of wave pero hindi ko sha maintindihan

Last Update: 2015-03-01
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

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English

Gloria saw Mario and she was asking for some money to feed there children to Mario. Mario said that he have no money because he did something. Gloria didn't believe on what Mario said and said to tell the truth. When Mario answered it, Gloria was shocked on what she heard because Mario lost his job. Gloria asked Mario if how he lost his job and Mario answered it and Gloria was shocked again because Mario said that he lost his job because of an apple. Gloria said that how can he loose his job by just taking one not a dozen not a crate but one apple and Mario answered that he just saw it rolling and he found himself putting it in his bag because Tita would love to have it, and Mario told Gloria that there's no need to worry because he found a new job. Suddenly Pablo was there ruining the whole conversation and asked them if how is there daughter doing and he'll loan a few pesos to help there daughter and Gloria said that no thank you because Mario stopped depending on Pablo. Pablo said that Mario's new job was with Pablo and when Gloria heard it he told Mario that it's a bad doing and risky. But Mario didn't listen and walks away with Pablo and told Gloria not to worry because he will come back early morning and don't wait for him. Gloria cries and shouting Mario, while Tita was crying also because he heard the conversation.

Tagalog

ang mundo ay isang bersyon ng mansanas tagalog

Last Update: 2015-02-04
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

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English

A Walk to Remember Movie Poster A Walk to Remember (2002) Cast Mandy Moore as Jamie Sullivan Shane West as Landon Carter Daryl Hannah as Cynthia Carter Peter Coyote as Rev. Sullivan Lauren German as Belinda Clayne Crawford as Dean Directed by Adam Shankman Written by Karen Janszen Based on the novel by Nicholas Sparks Drama, Family, Romance Rated PG For Thematic Elements Language and Some Sensual Material 100 minutes Watch This Movie iTunes Netflix Mail Add_to_queue_mini_off Powered by GoWatchIt | Roger Ebert January 25, 2002 | Print Page "A Walk to Remember" is a love story so sweet, sincere and positive that it sneaks past the defenses built up in this age of irony. It tells the story of a romance between two 18-year-olds that is summarized when the boy tells the girl's doubtful father: "Jamie has faith in me. She makes me want to be different. Better." After all of the vulgar crudities of the typical modern teenage movie, here is one that looks closely, pays attention, sees that not all teenagers are as cretinous as Hollywood portrays them. The singer Mandy Moore, a natural beauty in both face and manner, stars as Jamie Sullivan, an outsider at school who is laughed at because she stands apart, has values, and always wears the same ratty blue sweater. Her father (Peter Coyote) is a local minister. Shane West plays Landon Carter, a senior boy who hangs with the popular crowd but is shaken when a stupid dare goes wrong and one of his friends is paralyzed in a diving accident. He dates a popular girl and joins in the laughter against Jamie. Then, as punishment for the prank, he is ordered by the principal to join the drama club: "You need to meet some new people." Jamie's in the club. He begins to notice her in a new way. He asks her to help him rehearse for a role in a play. She treats him with level honesty. She isn't one of those losers who skulks around feeling put upon; her self-esteem stands apart from the opinion of her peers. She's a smart, nice girl, a reminder that one of the pleasures of the movies is to meet good people. The plot has revelations that I will not reveal. Enough to focus on the way Jamie's serene example makes Landon into a nicer person--encourages him to become more sincere and serious, to win her where she approaches him while he's with his old friends and says, "See you tonight," and he says, "In your dreams." When he turns up at her house, she is hurt and angry, and his excuses sound lame even to him. The movie walks a fine line with the Peter Coyote character, whose church Landon attends. Movies have a way of stereotyping reactionary Bible-thumpers who are hostile to teen romance. There is a little of that here; Jamie is forbidden to date, for example, although there's more behind his decision than knee-jerk strictness. But when Landon goes to the Rev. Sullivan and asks him to have faith in him, the minister listens with an open mind. Yes, the movie is corny at times. But corniness is all right at times. I forgave the movie its broad emotion because it earned it. It lays things on a little thick at the end, but by then it had paid its way. Director Adam Shankman and his writer, Karen Janszen, working from the novel by Nicholas Sparks, have an unforced trust in the material that redeems, even justifies the broad strokes. They go wrong only three times: (1) The subplot involving the paralyzed boy should have either been dealt with, or dropped; (2) It's tiresome to make the black teenager use "brother" in every sentence, as if he is not their peer but was ported in from another world; (3) As Kuleshov proved more than 80 years ago in a famous experiment, when an audience sees an impassive closeup, it supplies the necessary emotion from the context. It can be fatal for an actor to try to "act" in a closeup, and Landon's little smile at the end is a distraction at a crucial moment. Those are small flaws in a touching movie. The performances by Moore and West are so quietly convincing we're reminded that many teenagers in movies seem to think like 30-year-old standup comics. That Jamie and Landon base their romance on values and respect will blindside some viewers of the film, especially since the first five or 10 minutes seem to be headed down a familiar teenage movie trail. "A Walk to Remember" is a small treasure.

Tagalog

isang maglakad sa tandaan buod ng pelikula

Last Update: 2014-12-04
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
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Reference:
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English

While still in the grade school, his mother used to tell him to be a priest, to dignify and ameliorate their state of life; but the father would vehemently counter, no, he should be a lawyer. As always during the eve of the fiesta, Celedonio G. Aguilar earnestly desire to watch the parade with deep interest and enthusiasm especially when the platoon of soldiers march by and roiled in his mind the well-mannered discipline and dignity of mien of the soldiers, that someday, he thought and figured himself to be one of them. So when he enrolled at the Albay High School, after his academic classes, posthaste he would scurry out to his custodial concern, joined the formation of the preparatory military training activities. Through the years he rose from the ranks to become battalion commander. It was October, during his senior year in school that he hide down to the military camp to take the Philippine Military Academy Examination, but the Japanese Imperial forces landed at legazpi on December 14, 1941 thus throwing his ambition to be a soldier to the winds. However during the Japanese occupation, he joined the guerilla movement (NOMETA) Noli Me Tangere Guerilla as 2nd Lieutenant. He was enraptured with much interest when the American Force landed at legazpi on april 1, 1945. And NOMETA unit became 1st. Battalion of Sandico’s 52nd Division Guerilla Unit was re – entrenched to a company and merge to first Regiment Bicol Brigade that include him in the activated regular force of the Philippine Army as First class Private. Utterly disgusted he resigned from the army and applied to teach in the District of camalig as a substitute teacher. After a year of teaching, he became a temporary teacher and was appointed head teacher at Del Rosario Public School. Three years after classroom work, he resigned to pursue a degree in education and Graduated in 1951 at the National University, Manila. He first taught at Libon Private High School, after a year, transferred to St. John’s Academy in Camalig where his former student, Mrs. Minda Grageda Muñoz in their St. John’s Academy Golden Anniversary Souvenir booklet, In Retrospect elucidated; “Mr. Aguilar is a tall respectable man, eloquent and dedicated English instructor. We were all eyes and ears for him when he’s in front of the class, listening intently and spellbound to his interesting lecture. He was forthright and his dignified stature demanded respect.” In the same booklet, Reminiscing Our High School days with our Mentors, Mrs. Josefina Nuas Ramos averred, “Mr. Aguilar was our English teacher. He spoke English fluently. He developed our interest in reading literature and novels. He is a writer. Some of his books are: Shaken Shadows, Time and Sunken Sun, This Season and Night, Pink Sun and Neutral Dust, Readings in Philippine Literature, Speaking and Writing English, Critiques on Poetry, Understanding Poetry through imagery, Thesis Writing Made Easy, Functional Research Techniques, Dimensions in Reading, and Before the Tide Sets In.” Then the Civil Sevice Commission, in a letter, ordered him to report to Marcial O. Rañola Memorial School to teach English, non – compliance will be tantamount to scrapping out his civil service eligibility. Banners in The Quill, student publication of Marcial O. Rañola Memorial School, that new teacher added to MORMS Teaching Force,”one of them was MR. Aguilar of Camalig, Albay who had his first feel of teaching in 1945 when he accepted a teaching position in a barrio elementary school in the District of Camalig. But three years teaching in the elementary, resigned to enroll at National University, where in 1951 obtained his Bachelor of Science degree in Educational major in English and minor in history. He taught for five years at St. John’s Academy. During summer enrolled at U.P. for masteral degree.” He enjoyed immensely his secondary teaching adventure. Especially his literature teaching which spurred in him for more writing for publication in the national magazines: This Week Magazine, Free Press, Sunday Times Magazine, Graphic, Solidarity, etc. Through the suggestion of Bienvenido N. Santos, he organized Albay Writers with membership officials as: Dr. Rodrigo Salazar, Valdemar Olaguer, Jose Ravalo, Vic O. Ballesfin, and 15 other budding writers of Albay with Celedonio G. Aguilar as President and Bienvinido Santos as Adviser. At one instance, through Santos, N.V.M. Gonzales was guest speaker of the group along with Hilario Francia and Petronilo Daroy. To cap it all, he was elected President of the Albay Secondary Teachers Association which perhaps paved the way for his selection for the Master of Art in Teaching Reading Scholarship at the University of the Philippines. In the Class 76 reunion at MORMS of which Dr. Susan Princesa Mallonga was the President presented to him a certificate, which states: “Class 76”presents this certificate of Appreciation to Mr. Celedonio G. Aguilar for his demonstrated patience, hard work and dedication in molding our young minds in the pursuit of our secondary education, most of all, giving us the foundation in academic excellence, and teaching us values of honesty, diligence, sincerity and humility,” After enjoying the DECS scholarships, he was promoted to Junior College Instructor and assigned to School for Philippine a Craftsmen, Polangui, Albay. In The Craftlet official student publication of School for Philippine Craftsmen, in Campus Tidbits by June Ailes where she spot lighted and enunciated campus personalities, she articulated on Mr. Aguilar as “our beloved English instructor and his being very energetic to drill us in writing as if he was ink in his veins, for he has several collection of poetry which he considers his vice: together with his scholarships at U.P. and Silliman University. Indeed how lucky we are to be our instructor.” On School visitation of the Regional Director at SPC observing teachers, he spotted Mr. Aguilar for promotion to Regional General Education Supervisor, at which instance, he devoted his time after office hours to teaching at Bicol College and then to Divine Word College of Legazpi. Then retired from the government service. Outrightly, Bicol College took him to be Dean of the College of Education with only secondary teaching as the course offered. So he formalized the opening of the elementary grades in preparation for the opening of Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education (BSEed). At point and time, Mr. Manuel T. Javier, Bicol College Faculty and Adviser of Bicol Collegian, Student Publication of the School, wrote a feature which said: If the Colossus of Rhodes has been one wonders of the world in the days of antiquity, it has its equal in our present time at our school at that. We are referring to Dr. Celedonio G. Aguilar as the mighty colossus. Aside from being Dean of the College of Education, he is also Secretary of the Graduate School, twin positions enough to stymie the most intrepid of men, but not this titan. He savors these burdens with gusto. His student is the living witness to his pedagogical virtuosity. They would swear to high heaven how this man could change adrab classroom into exciting arena of intellectual combat where educational myths and heresies are blasted and intellectual pursuits are probed and defend.” Eventually a year after, he became the Dean of the Graduated School. As Dean of the Graduate School, he worked for the opening of the doctoral program subsequently a year later, through the help of his friend in the Higher Education Division, Manila, its recognition, a help exerted to boost Bicol College’s headway to educational permanence. But resigned later on when University of Santo Thomas called him for interview in connection to his application to teach at that school. But Fr. Reyes, President of Divine Word College of Legazpi and was to be promoted to higher position in Manila, sweet talked him to teach rather the King Seminary in Quezon City, which he accepted. He only taught half – day at the Seminary which gave him ample time for research, and call to mind, the dearth of specific books for the subject he taught in college, such as Philippine Literature, so Readings in Philippines Literature was written, Grammar and Composition, for Speaking and writing English, literary Criticism, for Critiques on Poetry, Poetry and Drama, for Understanding Poetry through Imagery, and for Graduate Students, Thesis Writing Made Easy, and Functional Research Techniques, for teacher and would be teacher, Dimension in Reading and Before the Tide Sets In. He also included in foreign and local anthologies: World Poetry by Kim Young Sam (Korea), East – West Voices by Dr. V.S. Skanda Prasad, (Mangalore, India), Edicao Commemorativo by Wilson Oliviera Jasa, (Sao Paulo, Brazil), and National Library of Poetry: Walk Through Paradise 1995, Portraits of Life 1996, Owing Mills, Maryland, USA, Bicol Voice Anthology by Merito B. Espinas, Bicol of the Philippines by Lilia Realubit, Ani by Cultural Center of the Philippines, Palihan by U.P. Creative Writing Center. On the outset of June, a letter from Mayor’s Office, requested all occupational pursuits an Camalig to submit their Bio – Data emphasizing their significant accomplishments in their chosen job career, such as: Civic Action Movement, business enterprises, inventions, constructions, mentors to take from classroom teacher, principals, (district, division, regional) supervisors, college professors, and Deans of schools who are legitimate Camaligueños. In view of his teaching feat, scholarship, written books that benefited college and graduates students throughout the country and his Doctor of Education degree from Bicol University, prompted the award as outstanding Camaligueños in the field of EDUCATION (along with other professional pursuits) June 24, 2005 camalig’s town fiesta by the Camalig Council on Arts, Culture and Tourism to Dr. Celedonio G. Aguilar. Apathetically he muttered, if only there is a school who would avail of his expertise on the subjects corresponding to his written books, he is still willing to teach, for teaching to him is a life time endeavor, not anymore for remuneration, with life and Comfort, but to deciminate and share the knowledge he has learned from his scholarships by the DECS in Master of Arts in Teaching Reading at U.P. Diliman, QC, Master of fine Art in Creative Writing a Silliman University under the Tiempos (Edilberto and Edith) and William Sweet, Master of Arts in Educational Management.

Tagalog

kombertidorWhile still in the grade school, his mother used to tell him to be a priest, to dignify and ameliorate their state of life; but the father would vehemently counter, no, he should be a lawyer. As always during the eve of the fiesta, Celedonio G. Aguilar earnestly desire to watch the parade with deep interest and enthusiasm especially when the platoon of soldiers march by and roiled in his mind the well-mannered discipline and dignity of mien of the soldiers, that someday, he thought and figured himself to be one of them. So when he enrolled at the Albay High School, after his academic classes, posthaste he would scurry out to his custodial concern, joined the formation of the preparatory military training activities. Through the years he rose from the ranks to become battalion commander. It was October, during his senior year in school that he hide down to the military camp to take the Philippine Military Academy Examination, but the Japanese Imperial forces landed at legazpi on December 14, 1941 thus throwing his ambition to be a soldier to the winds. However during the Japanese occupation, he joined the guerilla movement (NOMETA) Noli Me Tangere Guerilla as 2nd Lieutenant. He was enraptured with much interest when the American Force landed at legazpi on april 1, 1945. And NOMETA unit became 1st. Battalion of Sandico’s 52nd Division Guerilla Unit was re – entrenched to a company and merge to first Regiment Bicol Brigade that include him in the activated regular force of the Philippine Army as First class Private. Utterly disgusted he resigned from the army and applied to teach in the District of camalig as a substitute teacher. After a year of teaching, he became a temporary teacher and was appointed head teacher at Del Rosario Public School. Three years after classroom work, he resigned to pursue a degree in education and Graduated in 1951 at the National University, Manila. He first taught at Libon Private High School, after a year, transferred to St. John’s Academy in Camalig where his former student, Mrs. Minda Grageda Muñoz in their St. John’s Academy Golden Anniversary Souvenir booklet, In Retrospect elucidated; “Mr. Aguilar is a tall respectable man, eloquent and dedicated English instructor. We were all eyes and ears for him when he’s in front of the class, listening intently and spellbound to his interesting lecture. He was forthright and his dignified stature demanded respect.” In the same booklet, Reminiscing Our High School days with our Mentors, Mrs. Josefina Nuas Ramos averred, “Mr. Aguilar was our English teacher. He spoke English fluently. He developed our interest in reading literature and novels. He is a writer. Some of his books are: Shaken Shadows, Time and Sunken Sun, This Season and Night, Pink Sun and Neutral Dust, Readings in Philippine Literature, Speaking and Writing English, Critiques on Poetry, Understanding Poetry through imagery, Thesis Writing Made Easy, Functional Research Techniques, Dimensions in Reading, and Before the Tide Sets In.” Then the Civil Sevice Commission, in a letter, ordered him to report to Marcial O. Rañola Memorial School to teach English, non – compliance will be tantamount to scrapping out his civil service eligibility. Banners in The Quill, student publication of Marcial O. Rañola Memorial School, that new teacher added to MORMS Teaching Force,”one of them was MR. Aguilar of Camalig, Albay who had his first feel of teaching in 1945 when he accepted a teaching position in a barrio elementary school in the District of Camalig. But three years teaching in the elementary, resigned to enroll at National University, where in 1951 obtained his Bachelor of Science degree in Educational major in English and minor in history. He taught for five years at St. John’s Academy. During summer enrolled at U.P. for masteral degree.” He enjoyed immensely his secondary teaching adventure. Especially his literature teaching which spurred in him for more writing for publication in the national magazines: This Week Magazine, Free Press, Sunday Times Magazine, Graphic, Solidarity, etc. Through the suggestion of Bienvenido N. Santos, he organized Albay Writers with membership officials as: Dr. Rodrigo Salazar, Valdemar Olaguer, Jose Ravalo, Vic O. Ballesfin, and 15 other budding writers of Albay with Celedonio G. Aguilar as President and Bienvinido Santos as Adviser. At one instance, through Santos, N.V.M. Gonzales was guest speaker of the group along with Hilario Francia and Petronilo Daroy. To cap it all, he was elected President of the Albay Secondary Teachers Association which perhaps paved the way for his selection for the Master of Art in Teaching Reading Scholarship at the University of the Philippines. In the Class 76 reunion at MORMS of which Dr. Susan Princesa Mallonga was the President presented to him a certificate, which states: “Class 76”presents this certificate of Appreciation to Mr. Celedonio G. Aguilar for his demonstrated patience, hard work and dedication in molding our young minds in the pursuit of our secondary education, most of all, giving us the foundation in academic excellence, and teaching us values of honesty, diligence, sincerity and humility,” After enjoying the DECS scholarships, he was promoted to Junior College Instructor and assigned to School for Philippine a Craftsmen, Polangui, Albay. In The Craftlet official student publication of School for Philippine Craftsmen, in Campus Tidbits by June Ailes where she spot lighted and enunciated campus personalities, she articulated on Mr. Aguilar as “our beloved English instructor and his being very energetic to drill us in writing as if he was ink in his veins, for he has several collection of poetry which he considers his vice: together with his scholarships at U.P. and Silliman University. Indeed how lucky we are to be our instructor.” On School visitation of the Regional Director at SPC observing teachers, he spotted Mr. Aguilar for promotion to Regional General Education Supervisor, at which instance, he devoted his time after office hours to teaching at Bicol College and then to Divine Word College of Legazpi. Then retired from the government service. Outrightly, Bicol College took him to be Dean of the College of Education with only secondary teaching as the course offered. So he formalized the opening of the elementary grades in preparation for the opening of Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education (BSEed). At point and time, Mr. Manuel T. Javier, Bicol College Faculty and Adviser of Bicol Collegian, Student Publication of the School, wrote a feature which said: If the Colossus of Rhodes has been one wonders of the world in the days of antiquity, it has its equal in our present time at our school at that. We are referring to Dr. Celedonio G. Aguilar as the mighty colossus. Aside from being Dean of the College of Education, he is also Secretary of the Graduate School, twin positions enough to stymie the most intrepid of men, but not this titan. He savors these burdens with gusto. His student is the living witness to his pedagogical virtuosity. They would swear to high heaven how this man could change adrab classroom into exciting arena of intellectual combat where educational myths and heresies are blasted and intellectual pursuits are probed and defend.” Eventually a year after, he became the Dean of the Graduated School. As Dean of the Graduate School, he worked for the opening of the doctoral program subsequently a year later, through the help of his friend in the Higher Education Division, Manila, its recognition, a help exerted to boost Bicol College’s headway to educational permanence. But resigned later on when University of Santo Thomas called him for interview in connection to his application to teach at that school. But Fr. Reyes, President of Divine Word College of Legazpi and was to be promoted to higher position in Manila, sweet talked him to teach rather the King Seminary in Quezon City, which he accepted. He only taught half – day at the Seminary which gave him ample time for research, and call to mind, the dearth of specific books for the subject he taught in college, such as Philippine Literature, so Readings in Philippines Literature was written, Grammar and Composition, for Speaking and writing English, literary Criticism, for Critiques on Poetry, Poetry and Drama, for Understanding Poetry through Imagery, and for Graduate Students, Thesis Writing Made Easy, and Functional Research Techniques, for teacher and would be teacher, Dimension in Reading and Before the Tide Sets In. He also included in foreign and local anthologies: World Poetry by Kim Young Sam (Korea), East – West Voices by Dr. V.S. Skanda Prasad, (Mangalore, India), Edicao Commemorativo by Wilson Oliviera Jasa, (Sao Paulo, Brazil), and National Library of Poetry: Walk Through Paradise 1995, Portraits of Life 1996, Owing Mills, Maryland, USA, Bicol Voice Anthology by Merito B. Espinas, Bicol of the Philippines by Lilia Realubit, Ani by Cultural Center of the Philippines, Palihan by U.P. Creative Writing Center. On the outset of June, a letter from Mayor’s Office, requested all occupational pursuits an Camalig to submit their Bio – Data emphasizing their significant accomplishments in their chosen job career, such as: Civic Action Movement, business enterprises, inventions, constructions, mentors to take from classroom teacher, principals, (district, division, regional) supervisors, college professors, and Deans of schools who are legitimate Camaligueños. In view of his teaching feat, scholarship, written books that benefited college and graduates students throughout the country and his Doctor of Education degree from Bicol University, prompted the award as outstanding Camaligueños in the field of EDUCATION (along with other professional pursuits) June 24, 2005 camalig’s town fiesta by the Camalig Council on Arts, Culture and Tourism to Dr. Celedonio G. Aguilar. Apathetically he muttered, if only there is a school who would avail of his expertise on the subjects corresponding to his written books, he is still willing to teach, for teaching to him is a life time endeavor, not anymore for remuneration, with life and Comfort, but to deciminate and share the knowledge he has learned from his scholarships by the DECS in Master of Arts in Teaching Reading at U.P. Diliman, QC, Master of fine Art in Creative Writing a Silliman University under the Tiempos (Edilberto and Edith) and William Sweet, Master of Arts in Educational Management.

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retentive listening

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retentive pakikinig

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Easy listening

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madali pakingan

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