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English

rare

Tagalog

bihirang kahulugan

Last Update: 2015-01-01
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
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English

rare meaning

Tagalog

bihirang kahulugan

Last Update: 2016-06-15
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
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English

a rare herb

Tagalog

freggy

Last Update: 2016-04-21
Subject: General
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English

[narrator] Once upon the last day of a golden summer, there was a boy... and bear. The boy, whom we shall meet in a moment, was called Christopher Robin. The bear was called Winnie the Pooh. And together they had many grand adventures in a remarkable place called the Hundred Acre Wood. But the grandest and most extraordinary of all their adventures was still to begin. T oday, I believe, is a good day for being Pooh. [hums] And here, I should say, is a good place for being Pooh. [hums] Any reason that I think of is a good one for being Pooh. [hums] [Iaughs] But the very best reason of all is... [boy] Pooh Bear. ...being with my very best friend, Christopher Robin. You are just in time for the best part of the day. What part is that? The part when you and me... ...become we. [clattering] Pooh,... there's something I have to tell you. Is it something nice? Not exactly. Then it can wait. It can? For how Iong? For ever and ever. # For ever and ever # Is a very long time, Pooh [chuckles] # Forever isn't long at all # When I'm with you [laughs] # I wanna call your name forever # And you will always answer forever # And both of us will be Forever you and me # For ever and ever [creaking, pop] # I wanna stay like this forever [Pooh Iaughs] # If only I could promise forever [Iaughing echoes] # Then we could just be we # Forever you and me [both] # For ever and ever # For ever and ever # Is a very long time, Pooh [Pooh chuckles] # Forever isn't long at all, Christopher # When I'm with you [Pooh chuckles] # I wanna be with you forever [echoes] # I want you right here beside me forever # One thing you should know # No matter where I go # We'll always be together # For ever and ever # [narrator] And so they stayed together, doing all the things a boy and a bear could do. And when the day began to end, Christopher Robin had quite forgotten he still had something to tell Pooh. [Christopher] Pooh Bear, there's one thing we didn't do today. [Pooh] And what thing might that be? [Christopher] Uh... nothing. Nothing? Christopher Robin, what exactly is "doing nothing"? Well, I'm told it means going along, Iistening to all of the things you can't hear, and not bothering. It's when people say "What are you two doing?" And we say "Oh, nothing." And we do it. This is sort of a nothing thing we're doing right now. I wish it could Iast forever. Well, then we must do it again tomorrow. And the tomorrow after. And the tomorrow following that. Pooh Bear,... what if... some day... there came a tomorrow when we were apart? As Iong as we're apart together we shall certainly be fine. [chuckles] Yes, yes, of course. But if we weren't together? If I were somewhere else? [chuckles] But you really couldn't be, as I would be quite Iost without you. Who would I call... [buzzing] ...on those days when I'm just not strong enough, or brave enough? Well, actually... And who would I ask for advice when I didn't know which way to turn? Pooh, we... We... We simply wouldn't be. [yawns] Oh, Pooh. If ever there's a tomorrow when we're not together, there's something you must remember. [yawns] And what might that be, Christopher Robin? You're braver than you believe, and stronger than you seem, and smarter than you think. [chuckles] Oh, that's easy. [clears throat] We are braver than a bee, and, uh, Ionger than a tree, and taller than a goose. Or was that a moose? [both chuckle] No, silly old bear. You're braver than you believe, and stronger than you seem... and smarter than you think. But the most important thing is... even if we're apart... I'II always be with you. [Pooh chuckles] I'II always be with you. [echoing] AIways be with you. [Pooh moans] [birds twitter] [mutters] [snores] Braver than our beans. [snores] Longer when we gleam. [snores] Hum dee duh de dum. Hm dee duh-duh dee. [mutters] [Iaughs] Hello, Christopher Robin. I can't seem to remember the... To remember the, uh,... It's autumn. It is. It's the first day of autumn. A time of hot-chocolaty mornings and toasty-marshmallow evenings. And best of all.... Ieaping into Ieaves. Oh... [chuckles] Oh, someone's Ieft a honey pot. AII alone and Ionely. [groans] With no one to care for it. I suppose... I should take it. AIthough it might belong to someone. Though, just as easily not. Hmm. Think, think. Think. I believe when a question becomes this sticky, I should ask my very good friend... Christopher Robin. [echoing] Christopher Robin. Are you here? Are you there? Are you... anywhere? [Pooh] Piglet! Piglet! Christopher Robin is gone. Christopher... Chri... Why, Piglet, whatever are you doing... up there? I'm doing just what Christopher Robin said I should do. I'm going to Iook my fear of heights right in the face and conquer it. [creaking] That is, if it doesn't conquer me first. Christopher Robin! Are you Iooking for him, too? [Tigger purrs] Hiya, Pooh! [chuckles] - What's up? - Hello, Tigger. Piglet... is up. Help! Oh, relax, Piglet, old pal. There's no difference between plunging 1 0,000 feet to the jagged rocks below and tumblin' out of bed. Oh, really? Why, sure! [Iaughs] Except for the splat at the end they're practic'Iy similar. Christopher Robin! Hmm. CIutched in the throes of terror, eh? Well, I guess I just better bounce up there and get him down. Stand back, this is gonna take a world's record bounce. What's the matter with you? Being a second-rate bouncer is not what tiggers Iike best. [rumbling] [creaking] [creaking] [strains] [strains] [shrieks] It doesn't matter if you think you're not ripe. This is Rabbit's garden, and Rabbit does his harvesting by the book. As it clearly says in the official almanac, "Today is... [clears throat] the first day of fall following the Iast day of summer." Harvest day. Any questions? [Pooh] Hello. Oh, yes, the rutabaga in the back row, "Hello" what? [rumbling] [shrieks] [Pooh] Hello, Rabbit. Not much of a house. Just right for not much of a donkey. [Rabbit gibbers] [shrieks] Easy come,... easy go. Excuse me, Rabbit,... but would you happen to have a... a, um,... Christopher Robin about you? No! I haven't seen him. - Bother. - [thud] - He isn't where he should be. - [thud] - And wasn't where we were. - [thud] - And seems not to be anywhere... - [thud] ...where he can tell me whose honey this is. [thud] Well, it isn't mine. And I don't have time. It's harvest day! Says so in the book! I have carrots to cut, pumpkins to pick, peas to pluck! Well, of course it's mine. It's got my name scribbled all over it. T-I double g... Honey?! Yuck! P-tooie! BIech! Tiggers do not Iike honey. It isn't mine. Then again, few things are. [grunts and groans] Oh, here! If only I could find Christopher Robin. He could tell me whose it is. Why don't you check the note and find out? A note! Why, Rabbit, how clever of you. I'II just read it. Or would... if I could. Perhaps you can, Rabbit. [harrumphs] I could read this with my eyes closed. [chuckles] It says... [clears throat] [talks nonsense] Well, I could have read it if Tigger hadn't bounced me so. Tar? Jar? Oh, far! "Dear Pooh" it begins. "Worry about me." "I'm going far away." "Help!" And the note is signed "Crelm-flummin Bobbin." [chuckles] Oh, Christopher Robin. Christopher Robin? Gone far away? Oh, what a frightful thought. Wait! Why? When? Who authorized it? Where will we get the strength... to go on without him? [whimpers] [Pooh] Christopher Robin. My very best best friend. It simply cannot be. Whatever will I do? I wonder, Pooh, if... if perhaps u-u-until Christopher Robin gets back... um... I might possibly be your... best best friend. Yeah. [sobs] And when Piglet gets sick of you... [sobs] we can take over. Oh, thank you. But you already are the very best of my best friends. You see, you and I can do anything. But only Christopher Robin and I could do... nothing. Poor guy. His very Iittle brain is half gone with grief. Ah-ha! I've discovered where he went. [Iaughs] An O, another O, and... [gasps] Oh, my. What is it, Owl? Where is it? Somewhere bad, I fear. How bad? On a scale of one to ten... It's not good. [match strikes] [match strikes] He has gone to S-C-H-O-O-L. [gasps] Skull. Skull? What sort of place is that? Well, from the very sound of it, one can tell it's a most forbidding and faraway place. Then we must help Christopher Robin. Help him get back... to here. And us. And me. Then it's a quest, is it? [Iaughs] That's the spirit. Hoo, the nobility of it. A Iong and dangerous journey through the Great Unknown. Of course, you'II need a map. D-d-d-dangerous? Oh, Owl,... you wouldn't suppose we'd meet any, uh... Heffalumps? Oh, thank you, I nearly forgot. Herds of Heffalumps. [mutters] Down here I fancy, in the... southeast corner of the far west portion. W-w-what about W-w-woozles? Woozles! Wonderful! - Jagulars? - Hoo-hoo, just a dozen or three. Here, there and yonder. Not to mention the fabled... [chuckles] Skullasaurus. S-skulla...s-saurus? Oh, come, come, come. Without a monster or two it's hardly a quest. Merely a gaggle of friends wandering about. Hoo-hoo-hoo, how I envy you. Not everyone has the chance to face the unspeakable terrors of the Great Unknown. # Today's the day # In only a matter of moments You'll all be on your way # What lurks around the corner Not a soul can say # But I can guess # More or less # Hidden dangers, great duress # Ah, the moment of glory Is close at hand # Hoo-wee, it's gonna be grand # Adventure is a wonderful thing # Pack only the essentials I'll tell you what to bring # Your strength, your nerve Your hearts, your wits # And for skullasaurus attacks First-aid kits # Adventure is a hoot and a half # You'll face unearthly dangers And look at them and laugh # The claws, the teeth The chase, the thrill # You'll never want to come home Maybe you never will # That's the beauty of adventure It's strictly sink or float # It runs you till you're ragged Then it grabs you by the throat # You'll struggle to survive Although the chances are remote # Hoo-hoo, lucky you Wish I was coming too # Adventure is a wonderful thing I almost forgot the very best part. You not only save your friend from the most dangerous place, namely Skull, but from the most dangerous part of the most dangerous place. The eye of the skull itself. Oh, bother. # And you, General Pooh # Off you go Marching high and low # Your friend waits at the end # Right here # Take a look The map is perfectly clear # With your excellent sense of direction You've nothing to fear # Through the quicksand and the chasms # Tempting fate and fighting spasms # Dodging avalanching boulders # Remember # Christopher Robin's fate Rests completely on your shoulders, Pooh Excuse me. # It's up to you # That's the beauty of adventure # The trembling and the dread # I can't think of another thing I'd rather do instead Perhaps you could join us? # No, no, you go ahead # Hoo-hoo, lucky you Tally-ho and toodle-oo # Ready now? Noble chin Chest out, tummy in # Make a fracas, have a fling # Drop a postcard, give a ring # Get the lead out, time to swing # Whoop-de-doo and ba-da-bing # Adventure # Is a wonderful thing # I salute you. And those of you doomed to never return, I salute you twice. [narrator] And so Pooh and his friends crossed over into... well, that part of the Hundred Acre Wood which Owl called the "Great Unknown. " It was the start of their quest for Christopher Robin. They would find him, Owl said, if they could get through the woods. For the woods, Owl said, were filled with Heffalumps... and Woozles,... and... who knew how much worse? Look! "The Upside Down Rock." "If you've made it this far... you're where... monsters... are." [distant growling] What was that? Sounded too hungry for a Heffalump. [growling continues] Too plump for a Jagular. [growling continues] I'd say it's a... big old... buggy-eyed, saber-toothy skullasaurus. Skullasaurus? - Which way do we run? - Where do we hide? What's the shortest shortcut home? I believe... that way is a good way. [all] Run! [all gibber] AIthough, this way could be better. [Tigger] Give me a break! - If not over here. - [all scream] AIthough... [chuckles] there might be particularly pleasant as well. [all gibber] Stop it! We're getting nowhere fast, Pooh, and that just won't do. A Ieader must be someone Ieaderly, quick-thinking, informed. Someone Iike... - me. - [Iouder growling] Well,... there. Anyone with half a set of smarts can see we Iose the beast by cutting across this Iovely meadow. [squawking] And a Iovely meadow it is. [gasps] Why, Iook. Is that a golden dahlia-daffodilus? Rare for this Iocation. What exactly is this Iocation, Rabbit? And might it be nearer Christopher Robin than farther? Why, we're right here, on course, of course. Where else w-would we be? [squawking] Owl, where are we? "Nice peeceful spot!" Ha! Indeed! [ping] - [ping] - Oh, d-d-dear. This is not the place for a small and frightfully fearful animal... such as myself. Or myself. Or himself. Thanks for noticing. Yes, well, uh, precisely why I chose it. No skullasauruses would dare follow us in here. [chuckles] [distant growling] [screams] Piglet! Come back! I can't Iose you, too. [butterfly squeaks] [Piglet giggles] - [butterfly squeaks] - [Pooh] Oh, my, my. I believe you've made a friend, Piglet. [chuckles] I believe you're right, Pooh. [butterfly squeaks] [whistles] [butterflies squeak] And another, it seems. And also that one. And that one, too,... as well. And he, or her. And her, and him. And they, and them. Face it, Piglet, old pal, you're just plain popular. Some piglets have it,... some donkeys don't. [butterflies squeak] Why, I believe, Piglet, they want to take you home with them. [chuckles] It's very kind of them, I'm sure, but I already have a home. Oh, d-d-dear. Piglet. Don't Ieave. I wouldn't if I couldn't, but I can't. Jump, Piglet. We'II catch you, Iikely as not. I would if I could, but they won't Iet me. Perhaps you can ask your friends to bring you back. Why, yes. But I don't know which way back is. [chuckles] It's down here. Look. I'm afraid I'm too afraid to Iook. Oh, if only Christopher Robin was here. Christopher Robin. Piglet, that's it. He said all I have to do is remember that you are... bigger than a big Ieaf... I mean, uh, bolder when you're not green. [sighs] Or... Is any of this making you feel any Iess afraid, Piglet? I'm afraid not, Pooh. Oh, bother. Hm. How to get a piglet down who is very... up. [butterflies squeak] [Pooh] Oh, bother. E-excuse me, b-but is that you, Pooh? Yes, Piglet, it is. Might we be coming down soon? I believe so, Piglet. Uh, how soon? [Pooh] Very. [mutters] [shrieks] That's throwin' your weight around, Buddy Bear. Imagine, being outnumbered by those buggy boys a zillion to one. What a guy. Brave indeed. Now if you don't mind, Crustopher Ribbon, Ristopher Crobbin, Rustopher Crobbin, is this way. Are you all right, Piglet? Yes, Pooh. Thank you. Saving me was very brave of you. But you're brave, too, Piglet. Braver than... something. I am? Oh, what thing is that? I'm not sure, Piglet. Oh, if only I could remember. [narrator] This way and that way the map led them, to all the places Christopher Robin wasn't. But to none of the places he was. And still Rabbit refused to realize the map didn't know which way it was going. So we first head east by south, then south by east. Of course, minus the magnetic variation, plus the wind drift. We clearly go... this way! I wonder if those rather forbidding Iooking things might be the Forbidden Mountains, where Christopher Robin is. [Piglet] You're right, Pooh. [Tigger] You found 'em, Buddy Bear. Excuse me. The way to there is over here. But, Rabbit, isn't that them, over there? Now, which are you going to believe, this official map or your own eyes? Look for yourself and you'II see we're right on course. It's all right there in black and white. Why would anyone want to wander around wondering which way to go when they have a map to follow? # A map is not a guess An estimation or a hunch # A feeling or a foolish intuition # A map is a dependable, unwavering # Inarguably accurate portrayer # Of your position # Never trust your ears, your nose, your eyes # Putting faith in them is most unwise # Here's a phrase you all must memorize # "In the printed word is where truth lies " Y es, but, Rabbit... # Never trust your tummies, your tails or toes # You can't learn a thing from any of those # Here's another fact I must disclose # From the mighty pen true wisdom flows # If it says so # Then it is so # If it is so, well, so it is # A thought's not fit to think till it's printed in ink # Then it says so So it is Y es, but I think... # Never trust that thing between your ears # Brains will get you nowhere fast My dears # Haven't had a need for mine in years # On the page is where the truth appears # If it says so Then it is so # If it is so So it is # A thought's not fit to think Till it's printed in ink # Never differ from or doubt it - Bother. - # Or go anywhere without it # Thank goodness we've got this # So we don't need to fret about it # If it says so # So it is # [shrieks] Oh, no! The map! Get the map! With only half a map we're... we're Iess than nowhere. After that map! I got it! Don't have it. I had it! I don't have it now. I want it again. I got it! I ain't got it. I don't have it. I got it! Wait, I'II get it... No! I don't... I have it! Hmm. I wonder what's causing this tail to fail. Maybe it just doesn't have what it takes. [creaking] Yikes! Christopher Robin! Tigger, of all the safer places to be... I don't think this is one. - You could fall. - Yeah. Well, you know what they say. What doesn't bounce up has got to fall down. - [Iaughs] - [creaking] Uh... there's no time for this. We've had too many delays. So you just bounce out of there this moment. [Iaughs] No way. The wind isn't right. But there isn't any wind. OK, OK, you've got me. [sobs] The truth is... [whimpers] my tail... just doesn't have... enough strength. [sobs] Oh. [chuckles] Don't worry, Tigger, Christopher Robin said I just have to remember you're... taller than a beam. Really? Or was it "slower than whipped cream?" Do you feel any bouncier now? Nope. Oh... [chuckles] Perhaps your tail just needs a hand. Could you... bounce up this far? Pooh Bear! Ooh. How about now? No, no, no. Thanks for trying. I'm goin' out the way I came in. [sobs] A second-rate bouncer. [creaking] Piglet! [snorts, sobs] Um... Uh, Tigger. Hm? Oh... OK. Look at the biceps on that bear. I don't deserve to dangle from the same precipice. [creaking] [muffled] What's Donkey Boy saying? I said "Ouch." [all scream] [splash] Yike! Now, don't worry, Piglet, it's only me. Oh. Yike! Now, don't worry, Piglet, it's only Tigger and Rabbit and Eeyore. The map! Whoo-hoo, we have it! We can go now! [distant growling] Worry now, Piglet, it's the skullasaurus. I know we went over this way... And I came across... But then I... I Iost my way over... And if I don't... I know... Might you know which way Christopher Robin is from here, Rabbit? Uh, well... Uh, I mean the... There's this way, of course. Not that it's the right way. We obviously want to go this way. Though that way's further than farther and nearer than not. AIthough we can't rule out this way. Now, if Christopher Robin was here, what would he say? Well, he'd say... "That Rabbit can't function in this humidity." "It's not his fault. This fog isn't even on the map." "And that... [sobs] that Rabbit is just not smart enough to know where to go or... what to do." Oh. Christopher Robin says "At a time Iike this... all I have to do is remember..." Remember what? I forget. But it's something Iike... you're smarter when you're pink. Does that help? No. I don't know where we are and where we aren't. And I haven't known for hours. [sighs] I've failed us all. [footsteps] I believe I have as well. Let's face it, without Christopher Robin, we don't have a chance of finding Christopher Robin. Perhaps we might rest in there until this mist is mostly... mistless. [Eeyore] End o

Tagalog

Sa sandaling unang sa huling araw ng isang ginintuang tag-init, nagkaroon ng isang batang lalaki ... at bear. Ang batang lalaki na ating masasalubong sa isang sandali, ay tinawag Christopher Robin. Magsilang ng sanggol ay tinawag Winnie ang puwe. At sama-sama sila'y nagkaroon ng maraming enggrandeng pakikipagsapalaran sa isang kapansin-pansin na lugar na tinatawag na ang Hundred Acre Wood. Ngunit ang grandest at pinaka-hindi pangkaraniwang ng lahat ng kanilang mga pakikipagsapalaran ay pa rin para magsimula. T oday, tingin ko, ay isang magandang araw para sa pagiging puwe.

Last Update: 2017-02-15
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
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English

All it took was a solar eclipse and five-car collision atop the Magnetic Hill for the souls of five individuals --- the virginal bride-to-be (Angelica Panganiban), her histrionically litigious godmother (Eugene Domingo), her ringbearer's destitute nanny (Tuesday Vargas), her husband-to-be's amorous grandfather (Jaime Fabregas), and her gay beautician (John Lapuz) --- to switch bodies. With the bride-to-be's soul transferring to the godmother's body; the godmother's soul transferring to the nanny's body; the nanny's soul transferring to the grandfather's body; the grandfather's soul transferring to the beautician's body; and the beautician's soul transferring to the bride-to-be's body, the dream beach wedding turns into a hilarious riot, where long-dormant passions are awakened, sexual fantasies are fulfilled, economic alleviation is achieved, and a chance at love is obtained. Let us get it out of the way. Chris Martinez's Here Comes the Bride is top-notch entertainment. Martinez was able to come up with everything most recent Filipino mainstream comedies lack: that no-nonsense singular objective of making people laugh. From the getgo to the post-credit extra scene, the film never stopped to be overtly pedantic or moralistic, a problem that most Filipino comedies have since there always seems to be this need to use cinema as replacement for Sunday school. For example, Wenn Deramas' Ang Tanging Ina (The True Mother, 2003), and its sequel and many offshoots, are always derailed by its insistence on teaching a lesson; even Joyce Bernal's Kimmy Dora (2009) is stalled by its apologetic dénouement that went too long and too serious. Never mind the forced logic to explain the illogic, the negligible business about solar eclipses and souls, the history and science behind the soul-swap, as authoritatively explained by television trivia-master Kim Atienza. Here Comes the Bride is deliriously funny nonsense all the way and it thankfully works. The film's success is not entirely surprising. After all, Martinez is arguably one of the Philippines' better screenwriters. His screenplays, from Bridal Shower (Jeffrey Jeturian, 2004), about three friends in search of love, to Caregiver (Chito Roño, 2008), about a mother who follows her husband to London in the hopes of earning enough to live comfortably, reflect his ability to articulate something as minute as the language to something as pertinent as the needs of the rapidly-changing Filipino society for mainstream appeal. 100 (2008), his directorial debut about a woman who is dying from cancer, is salvaged from being a run-of-the-mill melodrama by an abundance of relevant humor. Martinez understands the Filipino soul, that the very best way to tackle something as devastating as death is to treat it with levity, to make it familiar and therefore personal. That said, Martinez may very well be the most current of all actively working screenwriters, actively pursuing entertainment without being dumbed down by the demands of commercial accessibility. Despite its astounding technical polish, Here Comes the Bride is fundamentally closer to Joey Gosiengfiao's redeemed Temptation Island (1981), where a bunch of beauty queens and the men surrounding them are stranded in a deserted island, than the mechanically churned comedies Star Cinema has been producing the past recent years. Underneath the caricatures that Martinez connected by the conceit of the convenient soul-swap, underneath the blatant inanity of its carefully conceived proceedings, is a well-pronounced understanding that life, as it is, is unfair, that there are those who are born poor, those who live loveless, and those who inevitably grow old and inutile. In a twist of fate, cruel only to the bride-to-be who suddenly gets a first-hand experience of the inequity of living after a lifetime of being sheltered and protected, inabilities and deficiencies are cured, emphasizing in what essentially is a film created for no other reason than to be an escapist fantasy that the key to a happy life is as unrealistic and as incredible as swapping souls via rare natural phenomena. Like Temptation Island whose gay pageant director becomes the unwilling sacrificial lamb simply because he presumably has the least to lose among the other loved and loving survivors, the most fully realized character in Here Comes the Bride is the love-starved gay beautician whose fortune of being transported to the body of the beautiful and sexy bride-to-be is the most dramatic out of the five. As expected, it is mostly played for laughs and Panganiban does a brilliant job in emulating the fabulous larger-than-life gestures of Lapuz. After all, the very idea of a gay man suddenly and surprisingly getting everything he ever wanted, from the body parts he can only have in his wildest dreams to the straight men who he can only love and lust for from a safe distance, is in itself a hoot. The hilarity of the absurd situation, at that scene where the bride-to-be in the body of her godmother insists that the gay beautician return her body, unravels into a well-pronounced statement of gay angst and sentiment as he emotionally shouts "Hindi ninyo maiintindihan dahil hindi kayo bakla! (You will never understand because you are not gay!). At that moment, the film, notwithstanding the fact that it never stopped being funny, reflected a current fundamental truth, something that not even a mainstream film as self-promotedly queer as Olivia Lamasan's In My Life (2009) can have the guts to state as plainly and matter-of-factly as that. The gay man becomes a girl. The loveless godmother feels how it is to be loved. The amorous yet incapacitated grandfather relives the passion and the romance of his distant youth. The poor nanny turns into a millionaire. The innocent bride-to-be wallows in the realities of life's misfortune. Martinez fills the screen with realized desires at the expense of the bride-to-be, emphasizing the frailty of the human soul in the face of happiness. In the midst of the film's invaluable wit and humor that frequently pumps in rhythm with the Latin beats of the apt lively music score, the film's characters, ideally uncomplicated and stereotypical, are allowed to live their desires realized, concretizing in easy-to-understand cinematic terms the pleasures of escape, of living a fantasy even if it is only momentarily. I am very happy to say that Here Comes the Bride is as current and relevant as it is entertaining and hysterical.

Tagalog

All it took was a solar eclipse and five-car collision atop the Magnetic Hill for the souls of five individuals --- the virginal bride-to-be (Angelica Panganiban), her histrionically litigious godmother (Eugene Domingo), her ringbearer's destitute nanny (Tuesday Vargas), her husband-to-be's amorous grandfather (Jaime Fabregas), and her gay beautician (John Lapuz) --- to switch bodies. With the bride-to-be's soul transferring to the godmother's body; the godmother's soul transferring to the nanny's body; the nanny's soul transferring to the grandfather's body; the grandfather's soul transferring to the beautician's body; and the beautician's soul transferring to the bride-to-be's body, the dream beach wedding turns into a hilarious riot, where long-dormant passions are awakened, sexual fantasies are fulfilled, economic alleviation is achieved, and a chance at love is obtained. Let us get it out of the way. Chris Martinez's Here Comes the Bride is top-notch entertainment. Martinez was able to come up with everything most recent Filipino mainstream comedies lack: that no-nonsense singular objective of making people laugh. From the getgo to the post-credit extra scene, the film never stopped to be overtly pedantic or moralistic, a problem that most Filipino comedies have since there always seems to be this need to use cinema as replacement for Sunday school. For example, Wenn Deramas' Ang Tanging Ina (The True Mother, 2003), and its sequel and many offshoots, are always derailed by its insistence on teaching a lesson; even Joyce Bernal's Kimmy Dora (2009) is stalled by its apologetic dénouement that went too long and too serious. Never mind the forced logic to explain the illogic, the negligible business about solar eclipses and souls, the history and science behind the soul-swap, as authoritatively explained by television trivia-master Kim Atienza. Here Comes the Bride is deliriously funny nonsense all the way and it thankfully works. The film's success is not entirely surprising. After all, Martinez is arguably one of the Philippines' better screenwriters. His screenplays, from Bridal Shower (Jeffrey Jeturian, 2004), about three friends in search of love, to Caregiver (Chito Roño, 2008), about a mother who follows her husband to London in the hopes of earning enough to live comfortably, reflect his ability to articulate something as minute as the language to something as pertinent as the needs of the rapidly-changing Filipino society for mainstream appeal. 100 (2008), his directorial debut about a woman who is dying from cancer, is salvaged from being a run-of-the-mill melodrama by an abundance of relevant humor. Martinez understands the Filipino soul, that the very best way to tackle something as devastating as death is to treat it with levity, to make it familiar and therefore personal. That said, Martinez may very well be the most current of all actively working screenwriters, actively pursuing entertainment without being dumbed down by the demands of commercial accessibility. Despite its astounding technical polish, Here Comes the Bride is fundamentally closer to Joey Gosiengfiao's redeemed Temptation Island (1981), where a bunch of beauty queens and the men surrounding them are stranded in a deserted island, than the mechanically churned comedies Star Cinema has been producing the past recent years. Underneath the caricatures that Martinez connected by the conceit of the convenient soul-swap, underneath the blatant inanity of its carefully conceived proceedings, is a well-pronounced understanding that life, as it is, is unfair, that there are those who are born poor, those who live loveless, and those who inevitably grow old and inutile. In a twist of fate, cruel only to the bride-to-be who suddenly gets a first-hand experience of the inequity of living after a lifetime of being sheltered and protected, inabilities and deficiencies are cured, emphasizing in what essentially is a film created for no other reason than to be an escapist fantasy that the key to a happy life is as unrealistic and as incredible as swapping souls via rare natural phenomena. Like Temptation Island whose gay pageant director becomes the unwilling sacrificial lamb simply because he presumably has the least to lose among the other loved and loving survivors, the most fully realized character in Here Comes the Bride is the love-starved gay beautician whose fortune of being transported to the body of the beautiful and sexy bride-to-be is the most dramatic out of the five. As expected, it is mostly played for laughs and Panganiban does a brilliant job in emulating the fabulous larger-than-life gestures of Lapuz. After all, the very idea of a gay man suddenly and surprisingly getting everything he ever wanted, from the body parts he can only have in his wildest dreams to the straight men who he can only love and lust for from a safe distance, is in itself a hoot. The hilarity of the absurd situation, at that scene where the bride-to-be in the body of her godmother insists that the gay beautician return her body, unravels into a well-pronounced statement of gay angst and sentiment as he emotionally shouts "Hindi ninyo maiintindihan dahil hindi kayo bakla! (You will never understand because you are not gay!). At that moment, the film, notwithstanding the fact that it never stopped being funny, reflected a current fundamental truth, something that not even a mainstream film as self-promotedly queer as Olivia Lamasan's In My Life (2009) can have the guts to state as plainly and matter-of-factly as that. The gay man becomes a girl. The loveless godmother feels how it is to be loved. The amorous yet incapacitated grandfather relives the passion and the romance of his distant youth. The poor nanny turns into a millionaire. The innocent bride-to-be wallows in the realities of life's misfortune. Martinez fills the screen with realized desires at the expense of the bride-to-be, emphasizing the frailty of the human soul in the face of happiness. In the midst of the film's invaluable wit and humor that frequently pumps in rhythm with the Latin beats of the apt lively music score, the film's characters, ideally uncomplicated and stereotypical, are allowed to live their desires realized, concretizing in easy-to-understand cinematic terms the pleasures of escape, of living a fantasy even if it is only momentarily. I am very happy to say that Here Comes the Bride is as current and relevant as it is entertaining and hysterical. All it took was a solar eclipse and five-car collision atop the Magnetic Hill for the souls of five individuals --- the virginal bride-to-be (Angelica Panganiban), her histrionically litigious godmother (Eugene Domingo), her ringbearer's destitute nanny (Tuesday Vargas), her husband-to-be's amorous grandfather (Jaime Fabregas), and her gay beautician (John Lapuz) --- to switch bodies. With the bride-to-be's soul transferring to the godmother's body; the godmother's soul transferring to the nanny's body; the nanny's soul transferring to the grandfather's body; the grandfather's soul transferring to the beautician's body; and the beautician's soul transferring to the bride-to-be's body, the dream beach wedding turns into a hilarious riot, where long-dormant passions are awakened, sexual fantasies are fulfilled, economic alleviation is achieved, and a chance at love is obtained. Let us get it out of the way. Chris Martinez's Here Comes the Bride is top-notch entertainment. Martinez was able to come up with everything most recent Filipino mainstream comedies lack: that no-nonsense singular objective of making people laugh. From the getgo to the post-credit extra scene, the film never stopped to be overtly pedantic or moralistic, a problem that most Filipino comedies have since there always seems to be this need to use cinema as replacement for Sunday school. For example, Wenn Deramas' Ang Tanging Ina (The True Mother, 2003), and its sequel and many offshoots, are always derailed by its insistence on teaching a lesson; even Joyce Bernal's Kimmy Dora (2009) is stalled by its apologetic dénouement that went too long and too serious. Never mind the forced logic to explain the illogic, the negligible business about solar eclipses and souls, the history and science behind the soul-swap, as authoritatively explained by television trivia-master Kim Atienza. Here Comes the Bride is deliriously funny nonsense all the way and it thankfully works. The film's success is not entirely surprising. After all, Martinez is arguably one of the Philippines' better screenwriters. His screenplays, from Bridal Shower (Jeffrey Jeturian, 2004), about three friends in search of love, to Caregiver (Chito Roño, 2008), about a mother who follows her husband to London in the hopes of earning enough to live comfortably, reflect his ability to articulate something as minute as the language to something as pertinent as the needs of the rapidly-changing Filipino society for mainstream appeal. 100 (2008), his directorial debut about a woman who is dying from cancer, is salvaged from being a run-of-the-mill melodrama by an abundance of relevant humor. Martinez understands the Filipino soul, that the very best way to tackle something as devastating as death is to treat it with levity, to make it familiar and therefore personal. That said, Martinez may very well be the most current of all actively working screenwriters, actively pursuing entertainment without being dumbed down by the demands of commercial accessibility. Despite its astounding technical polish, Here Comes the Bride is fundamentally closer to Joey Gosiengfiao's redeemed Temptation Island (1981), where a bunch of beauty queens and the men surrounding them are stranded in a deserted island, than the mechanically churned comedies Star Cinema has been producing the past recent years. Underneath the caricatures that Martinez connected by the conceit of the convenient soul-swap, underneath the blatant inanity of its carefully conceived proceedings, is a well-pronounced understanding that life, as it is, is unfair, that there are those who are born poor, those who live loveless, and those who inevitably grow old and inutile. In a twist of fate, cruel only to the bride-to-be who suddenly gets a first-hand experience of the inequity of living after a lifetime of being sheltered and protected, inabilities and deficiencies are cured, emphasizing in what essentially is a film created for no other reason than to be an escapist fantasy that the key to a happy life is as unrealistic and as incredible as swapping souls via rare natural phenomena. Like Temptation Island whose gay pageant director becomes the unwilling sacrificial lamb simply because he presumably has the least to lose among the other loved and loving survivors, the most fully realized character in Here Comes the Bride is the love-starved gay beautician whose fortune of being transported to the body of the beautiful and sexy bride-to-be is the most dramatic out of the five. As expected, it is mostly played for laughs and Panganiban does a brilliant job in emulating the fabulous larger-than-life gestures of Lapuz. After all, the very idea of a gay man suddenly and surprisingly getting everything he ever wanted, from the body parts he can only have in his wildest dreams to the straight men who he can only love and lust for from a safe distance, is in itself a hoot. The hilarity of the absurd situation, at that scene where the bride-to-be in the body of her godmother insists that the gay beautician return her body, unravels into a well-pronounced statement of gay angst and sentiment as he emotionally shouts "Hindi ninyo maiintindihan dahil hindi kayo bakla! (You will never understand because you are not gay!). At that moment, the film, notwithstanding the fact that it never stopped being funny, reflected a current fundamental truth, something that not even a mainstream film as self-promotedly queer as Olivia Lamasan's In My Life (2009) can have the guts to state as plainly and matter-of-factly as that. The gay man becomes a girl. The loveless godmother feels how it is to be loved. The amorous yet incapacitated grandfather relives the passion and the romance of his distant youth. The poor nanny turns into a millionaire. The innocent bride-to-be wallows in the realities of life's misfortune. Martinez fills the screen with realized desires at the expense of the bride-to-be, emphasizing the frailty of the human soul in the face of happiness. In the midst of the film's invaluable wit and humor that frequently pumps in rhythm with the Latin beats of the apt lively music score, the film's characters, ideally uncomplicated and stereotypical, are allowed to live their desires realized, concretizing in easy-to-understand cinematic terms the pleasures of escape, of living a fantasy even if it is only momentarily. I am very happy to say that Here Comes the Bride is as current and relevant as it is entertaining and hysterical.

Last Update: 2016-12-05
Subject: General
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English

Education is a rare privilege.

Tagalog

Ang edukasyon ay pambihirang tsansa.

Last Update: 2016-10-27
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English

Becaks are fast becoming a rare breed, as City Governments across the Archipelago ban them for their antiquated and inhumane nature, replacing them with motorized versions trikes similar to Thailand’s tuk -tuks.

Tagalog

Becaks are fast becoming a rare breed, as City Governments across the Archipelago ban them for their antiquated and inhumane nature, replacing them with motorized versions trikes similar to Thailand’s tuk -tuks.

Last Update: 2016-02-24
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English

If you are one of the lucky people going to view this rare celestial event, these moments of magic on July 22nd, please remember to take adequate eye safety measures.

Tagalog

Kung ikaw ay isa sa mga masuwerteng makapunta para mamasdan ang pambihirang pangkalawakang pangyayaring ito, ang mga sandaling mahiya ng ika-22 ng Hulyo, pakitandaan na kumuha ng sapat na kaligtasan para sa mga mata.

Last Update: 2016-02-24
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English

The rotating power woes inconvenienced the public which sparked a rare but peaceful protest in Mandalay a few days ago. The protesters lighted candles and displayed posters to deliver their message.

Tagalog

Dahil sa malaking abala na dulot ng mga rotating blackout, naglunsad kamakailan ang mga mamamayan sa Mandalay, sa isang pambihirang pagkakataon, ng isang mapayapang kilos-protesta.

Last Update: 2016-02-24
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English

A long time ago, cricket fighting caught on in the imperial court, with the emperor leading the fad. A local magistrate in Huayin, who wanted to win the favor of the monarch, tried in every way to get him the best fighting crickets. He had a strategy for doing so: He managed to get a cricket that was very good at fighting. He then made his subordinates go to the heads of each village and force them to send in a constant supply of fighting crickets. He would send to the imperial court the crickets that could beat the one he was keeping. Theoretically, everything should have worked smoothly. However, as the magistrate was extremely zealous to please the emperor, he meted out harsh punishment on any village heads who failed to accomplish their tasks. The village heads in turn shifted the burden to the poor villagers, who had to search for the crickets. If they failed to catch them, they had to purchase them from someone else, or they had to pay a levy in cash. The small insects suddenly became a rare commodity. Speculators hoarded good crickets, buying them at a bargain and selling them for an exorbitant price. Many village heads worked hand in hand with the speculators to make profits. In so doing, they bankrupted many a family. Cheng Ming was one such villager. The head of his village delegated part of his duties to him because he found Cheng Ming easy to push around. Cheng Ming did not want to bully his fellow villagers as the village head did him, so he often had to pay cash out of his own pocket when he failed to collect any competent crickets. Soon the little proper ties he had were draining away, and he went into a severe depression. One day, he said to his wife that he wanted to die.“Death is easy, but what will our son do without you?” asked his wife, glancing at their only son, sleeping on the kang. “Why can’t we look for the crickets ourselves instead of buying them? Perhaps we’ll strike some goodluck.” Cheng Ming gave up the idea of suicide and went to search for crickets. Armed with a tiny basket of copper wires for catching crickets and a number of small bamboo tubes for holding them, he went about the tedious task. Each day he got up at dawn and did not return until late in the evening. He searched beneath brick debris, dike crevices, and in the weeds and bushes. Days went by, and he caught only a few mediocre crickets that did not measure up to the magistrate’s standards. His worries increased as the dead line drew closer and closer. The day for cricket delivery finally came, but Cheng Ming could not produce any good ones. He was clubbed a hundred times on the buttocks, a form of corporal punishment in the ancient Chinese judicial system. When he was released the next day, he could barely walk. The wound on his buttocks confined him to bed for days and further delayed his search for crickets. He thought of committing suicide again. His wife did not know what to do Then they heard about a hunchbacked fortune teller who was visiting the village. Cheng Ming’s wife went to see him. The fortune teller gave her a piece of paper with a picture on it. It was a pavilion with a jiashan (rockgarden) behind it. On the bushes by the jiashan sat a fat male cricket. Beside it, however, lurked a large toad, ready to catch the insect with its long, elastic tongue. When the wife got home, she showed the paper to her husband. Cheng Ming sprang up and jumped to the floor, forgetting the pain in his buttocks.“This is the fortune teller’s hint at the location where I can find a perfect cricket to accomplish my task!” he exclaimed.“But we don’t have a pavilion in our village,” his wife re minded him.“Well, take a closer look and think. Doesn’t the temple on the east side of our village have a rock garden? That must be it.” So saying, Cheng Ming limped to the temple with the support of a make shift crutch. Sure enough, he saw the cricket, and the toad squatting nearby in the rock garden at the back of the temple. He caught the big, black male cricket just before the toad got hold of it. Back home, he carefully placed the cricket in a jar he had prepared for it and stowed the jar away in a safe place. “Everything will be over tomorrow,” he gave a sigh of relief and went to tell his best friends in the village the good news. Cheng Ming’s nine-year-old son was very curious. Seeing his father was gone, he took the jar and wanted to have a peek at the cricket. He was removing the lid carefully, when the big cricket jumped out and hopped away. Panicked, the boy tried to catch the fleeing cricket with his hands, but in a flurry, he accidentally squashed the insect when he finally got hold of it.“Good heavens! What’re you going to say to your father when he comes back?” the mother said in distress and dread. Without a word, the boy went out of the room, tears in his eyes.Cheng Ming became distraught when he saw the dead cricket. He couldn’t believe that all his hopes had been dashed in a second. He looked around for his son, vowing to teach the little scoundrel a good lesson. He searched inside and outside the house, only to locate him in a well at the corner of the court yard. When he fished him out, the boy was already dead. The father’s fury instantly gave way to sorrow. The grieved parents laid their son on the kang and lamented over his body the entire night. As Cheng Ming was dressing his son for burial the next morning, he felt the body still warm. Immediately he put the boy back on the kang, hoping that he would revive. Gradually the boy came back to life, but to his parents’dismay, he was unconscious, as if he were in a trance. The parents grieved again for the loss of their son. Suddenly they heard a cricket chirping. The couple traced the sound to a small cricket on the door step. The appearance of the cricket, however, dashed their hopes, for it was very small. “Well, it’s better than nothing,” Cheng Ming thought. He was about to catch it, when it jumped nimbly on to a wall, cheeping at him. He tip toed to ward it, but it showed no sign of fleeing. Instead, when Cheng Ming came a few steps closer, the little cricket jumped onto his chest. Though small, the cricket looked smart and energetic. Cheng Ming planned to take it to the village head. Uncertain of its capabilities, ChengMing could not go to sleep. He wanted to put the little cricket to the test before sending it to the village head. The next morning, Cheng Ming went to a young man from a rich family in his neighborhood, having heard him boasting about an “invincible” cricket that he wanted to sell for a high price. When the young man showed his cricket, Cheng Ming hesitated, because his little cricket seemed no match for this gigantic insect. To fight this monster would be to condemn his dwarf to death.“There’s no way my little cricket could survive a confrontation with your big guy,” Cheng Ming said to the young man, holding his jar tight. The young man goaded and taunted him. At last, Cheng Ming decided to take a risk. “Well, it won’t hurt to give a try. If the little cricket is a good-for-nothing, what’s the use of keeping it anyway?” he thought. When they put the two crickets together in a jar, Cheng Ming’s small insect seemed transfixed. No matter how the young man prodded it to fight, it simply would not budge. The young man burst into a guffaw, to the great embarrassment of Cheng Ming. As the young man spurred the little cricket on, it suddenly seemed to have run out of patience. With great wrath, it charged the giant opponent head on. The sudden burst of action stunned both the young man and Cheng Ming. Before the little creature planted its small but sharp teeth into the neck of the big cricket, the terrified young man fished the big insect out of the jar just in time and called off the contest. The little cricket chirped victoriously, and Cheng Ming felt exceedingly happy and proud.Cheng Ming and the young man were commenting on the little cricket’s extraordinary prowess, when a big rooster rushed over to peck at the little cricket in the jar. The little cricket hopped out of the jar in time to dodge the attack. The rooster then went for it a second time, but suddenly began to shake its head violently, screaming in agony. This sudden turn of events baffled Cheng Ming and the onlookers. When they took a closer look, they could not believe their eyes: The little cricket was gnawing on the rooster’s bloody comb. The story of a cricket fighting a rooster soon spread throughout the village and beyond. The next day, Cheng Ming, along with the village head, sent the cricket to the magistrate and asked for a test fight with his master cricket, but the magistrate re fused on the ground that Cheng Ming’s cricket was too small.“I don’t think you have heard its rooster-fighting story,” Cheng Ming proclaimed with great pride. “You can’t judge it only by its appearance.”“Nonsense, how can a cricket fight a rooster?” asked the magistrate. He ordered a big rooster brought to his office, thinking that Cheng Ming would quit telling his tall tales when his cricket became the bird’s snack. The battle between the little cricket and the rooster ended with the same result: The rooster sped away in great pain, the little cricket chirping triumphantly on its heels. The magistrate was first astonished and then pleased, thinking that he finally had the very insect that could win him the emperor’s favor. He had a golden cage manufactured for the little cricket. Placing it cautiously in the cage, he took it to the emperor. The emperor pitted the little cricket against all his veteran combat ant crickets, and it defeated them one by one. What amused the emperor most was that the little creature could even dance to the tune of his court music! Extremely pleased with the magic little creature, the emperor rewarded the magistrate liberally and promoted him to a higher position. The magistrate, now a governor, in turn exempted Cheng Ming from his levies in cash as well as crickets. A year later, Cheng Ming’s son came out of his stupor. He sat up and rubbed his eyes, to the great surprise and joy of his parents. The first word she uttered to his jubilant parents were, “I’m so tired and hungry.” After a hot meal, he told them, “I dreamed that I had become a cricket, and I fought a lot of other crickets. It was such fun! You know what? The greatest fun I had was my fight with a couple of roosters!” (Taken from a website)

Tagalog

mga cricket boy maikling kuwento

Last Update: 2015-07-28
Subject: General
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English

The culture of Thailand incorporates cultural beliefs and characteristics indigenous to the area known as modern-day Thailand coupled with much influence from ancient China, Cambodia, Laos, India along with the neighboring pre-historic cultures of Southeast Asia.[1] It is influenced primarily by animism, Hinduism, Buddhism, as well as by later migrations from China, and northern India. Contents 1 Religion 2 Customs 2.1 Traditional clothing 3 Marriage 4 Birth traditions and beliefs 5 Funerals 6 Arts 7 Holidays 8 Sports 9 Traditional Games of Thailand 9.1 Kratai Kha Deow(One Legged Rabbit) 9.2 Banana rib hobbyhorse riding 10 Nicknames 11 See also 12 Notes and references 13 External links Religion Buddhist novices receiving joss sticks. Main article: Religion in Thailand Thailand is nearly 94%-95% Theravada Buddhist (which includes the Thai Forest Tradition and the Dhammayuttika Nikaya and Santi Asoke sects), with minorities of Muslims (5-6%), Christians (1%), Mahayana Buddhists, and other religions.[2] Thai Theravada Buddhism is supported and overseen by the government, with monks receiving a number of government benefits, such as free use of the public transportation infrastructure. Buddhism in Thailand is strongly influenced by traditional beliefs regarding ancestral and natural spirits, which have been incorporated into Buddhist cosmology. Most Thai people own spirit houses, miniature wooden houses in which they believe household spirits live. They present offerings of food and drink to these spirits to keep them happy. If these spirits aren't happy, it is believed that they will inhabit the larger household of the Thai, and cause chaos. These spirit houses can be found in public places and in the streets of Thailand, where the public make offerings.[3] Prior to the rise of Theravada Buddhism, both Indian Brahmanic religion and Mahayana Buddhism were present in Thailand. Influences from both these traditions can still be seen in present day Thai folklore. Brahmanist shrines play an important role in Thai folk religion, and the Mahayana Buddhist influence is reflected in the presence of figures like Lokesvara, a form of the bodhisattva Avalokitesvara sometimes incorporated into Thailand's iconography.[4][5] Customs See also: Thai folklore Thai greeting, the smile is an important symbol of refinement in Thai culture. The traditional customs and the folklore of Thai people were gathered and described by Phya Anuman Rajadhon in the 20th century, at a time when modernity changed the face of Thailand and a great number of traditions disappeared or became adapted to modern life. Still, the striving towards refinement, rooted in ancient Siamese culture, consisting of promoting that which is refined and avoiding coarseness is a major focus of the daily life of Thai people and high on their scale of values.[6] One of the most distinctive Thai customs is the wai. Used in greetings, leave-taking, or as an acknowledgement, it comes in many forms, reflecting the relative status of those involved. Generally the salutation involves a prayer-like gesture with the hands, similar to the Añjali Mudrā of the Indian subcontinent, and it also may include a slight bow of the head. This salutation is often accompanied by a serene smile symbolizing a welcoming disposition and a pleasant attitude. Thailand is often referred to as the "land of smiles" in tourist brochures. Public displays of affection is not overly common in traditional Thai society, especially between lovers.[7] It is becoming more common, especially among the younger generation. A notable social norm holds that touching someone on the head may be considered rude. It is also considered rude to place one's feet at a level above someone else's head, especially if that person is of higher social standing. This is because the Thai people consider the foot to be the dirtiest and lowliest part of the body, and the head the most respected and highest part of the body. This also influences how Thais sit when on the ground—their feet always pointing away from others, tucked to the side or behind them. Pointing at or touching something with the feet is also considered rude. Display of respect of the younger towards the elder is a cornerstone value in Thailand. A family during the Buddhist ceremony for young men who are to be ordained as monks. Since serene detachment is valued, conflict and sudden displays of anger are eschewed in Thai culture and, as is many Asian cultures, the notion of face is extremely important. For these reasons, visitors should take care not to create conflict, to display anger or to cause a Thai person to lose face. Disagreements or disputes should be handled with a smile and no attempt should be made to assign blame to another. In everyday life in Thailand, there is a strong emphasis on the concept of sanuk; the idea that life should be fun. Because of this, Thais can be quite playful at work and during day-to-day activities. Displaying positive emotions in social interactions is also important in Thai culture. Often, Thais will deal with disagreements, minor mistakes, or misfortunes by using the phrase mai pen rai, translated as "it doesn't matter". The ubiquitous use of this phrase in Thailand reflects a disposition towards minimizing conflict, disagreements or complaints. A smile and the sentence "mai pen rai" indicates that the incident is not important and therefore there is no conflict or shame involved. Respect for hierarchy is a very important value for Thai people. The custom of bun khun emphasizes the indebtedness towards parents, as well as towards guardians, teachers, and caretakers. It describes the feelings and practices involved in certain relationships organized around generalized reciprocity, the slow-acting accounting of an exchange calculated according to locally interpreted scales and measures.[8] It is also considered rude to step on any type of Thai currency (Thai coin or banknote) as they include a likeness of the king. The 1941-42 Thai cultural mandates, promulgated by Plaek Pibulsonggram, made sweeping changes in Thai culture. Modernization efforts discouraged the wearing of women's traditional costumes, in favour of more modern forms of dress . There are a number of Thai customs relating to the special status of monks in Thai society. Thai monks are forbidden physical contact with women. Women are therefore expected to make way for passing monks to ensure that accidental contact does not occur. A variety of methods are employed to ensure that no incidental contact (or the appearance of such contact) between women and monks occurs. Women making offerings to monks place their donation at the feet of the monk, or on a cloth laid on the ground or a table. Powders or unguents intended to carry a blessing are applied to Thai women by monks using the end of a candle or stick. Laypersons are expected to sit or stand with their heads at a lower level than that of a monk. Within a temple, monks may sit on a raised platform during ceremonies to make this easier to achieve. When sitting in a temple, one is expected to point one's feet away from images of the Buddha. Shrines inside Thai residences are arranged so as to ensure that the feet are not pointed towards the religious icons, such as placing the shrine on the same wall as the head of a bed, if a house is too small to remove the shrine from the bedroom entirely. It is also customary to remove one's footwear before entering a home or the sacred areas within a temple, and not to step on the threshold. Traditional clothing A woman wearing a chut Thai Main article: Chut thai Traditional Thai clothing is called chut thai (Thai: ชุดไทย Thai pronunciation: [tɕʰút.tʰaj]) which literally means "Thai outfit". It can be worn by men, women, and children. Chut thai for women usually consists of a pha nung or a chong kraben, a blouse, and a sabai. Northern and northeastern women may wear a sinh instead of a pha nung and a chong kraben with either a blouse or a suea pat. Chut thai for men includes a chong kraben or pants, a Raj pattern shirt, with optional knee-length white socks and a sabai. Chut thai for northern Thai men is composed of a sado, a white Manchu styled jacket, and sometimes a khian hua. In formal occasions, people may choose to wear a chut thai phraratchaniyom. Marriage A traditional wedding in Thailand. Main article: Thai marriage Thai Buddhist marriage ceremonies are generally divided into two parts: a Buddhist component, which includes the recitation of prayers and the offering of food and other gifts to monks and images of the Buddha, and a non-Buddhist component rooted in folk traditions, which centers on the couple's families. In former times, it was unknown for Buddhist monks to be present at any stage of the marriage ceremony itself. As monks were required to attend to the dead during funerals, their presence at a marriage (which was associated with fertility, and intended to produce children) was considered a bad omen. A couple would seek a blessing from their local temple before or after being married, and might consult a monk for astrological advice in setting an auspicious date for the wedding. The non-Buddhist portions of the wedding would take place away from the temple, and would often take place on a separate day. In modern times, these prohibitions have been significantly relaxed. It is not uncommon for a visit to a temple to be made on the same day as the non-Buddhist portions of a wedding, or even for the wedding to take place within the temple. While a division is still commonly observed between the "religious" and "secular" portions of a wedding service, it may be as simple as the monks present for the Buddhist ceremony departing to take lunch once their role is complete. During the Buddhist component of the wedding service, the couple first bow before the image of the Buddha. They then recite certain basic Buddhist prayers or chants (typically including taking the Three Refuges and the Five Precepts), and light incense and candles before the image. The parents of the couple may then be called upon to "connect" them, by placing upon the heads of the bride and groom twin loops of string or thread that link the couple together. The couple may then make offerings of food, flowers, and medicine to the monks present. Cash gifts (usually placed in an envelope) may also be presented to the temple at this time. The monks may then unwind a small length of thread that is held between the hands of the assembled monks. They begin a series of recitations of Pali scriptures intended to bring merit and blessings to the new couple. The string terminates with the lead monk, who may connect it to a container of water that will be "sanctified" for the ceremony. Merit is said to travel through the string and be conveyed to the water. A similar arrangement is used to transfer merit to the dead at a funeral, further evidence of the weakening of the taboo on mixing funerary imagery and trappings with marriage ceremonies. Blessed water may be mixed with wax drippings from a candle lit before the Buddha image and other unguents and herbs to create a paste that is then applied to the foreheads of the bride and groom to create a small dot, similar to the marking made with red ochre on Hindu devotees. The bride's mark is created with the butt end of the candle rather than the monk's thumb, in keeping with the Vinaya prohibition against touching women. The highest-ranking monk present may elect to say a few words to the couple, offering advice or encouragement. The couple may then make offerings of food to the monks, at which point the Buddhist portion of the ceremony is concluded. The Thai dowry system is known as the sin sodt Thai: สินสอด. Traditionally, the groom will be expected to pay a sum of money to the family, to compensate them and to demonstrate that the groom is financially capable of taking care of their daughter. Sometimes, this sum is purely symbolic, and will be returned to the bride and groom after the wedding has taken place. The religious component of marriage ceremonies between Thai Muslims are markedly different from that described above. The Imam of the local mosque, the groom, the father of the bride, men in the immediate family, and important men in the community sit in a circle during the ceremony, conducted by the Imam. All the women, including the bride, sit in a separate room and do not have any direct participation in the ceremony. The secular component of the ceremony, however, is often nearly identical to the secular part of Thai Buddhist wedding ceremonies. The only notable difference here is the type of meat served to guests (goat and/or beef instead of pork). Thai Muslims frequently, though not always, also follow the conventions of the Thai dowry system. Birth traditions and beliefs Main article: Birth in Thailand Traditional principles concerning pregnancy and childbirth are largely influenced by folk beliefs, especially in rural areas of central and north Thailand. Modern practices follow the Western medical model. Funerals See also: Funeral (Buddhism) Funeral pyre of Chan Kusalo, the patriarch-abbot of northern Thailand. Traditionally, funerals last for at least one week. Crying is discouraged during the funeral, so as not to worry the spirit of the deceased. Many activities surrounding the funeral are intended to make merit for the deceased. Copies of Buddhist scriptures may be printed and distributed in the name of the deceased, and gifts are usually given to a local temple. Monks are invited to chant prayers that are intended to provide merit for the deceased, as well as to provide protection against the possibility of the dead relative returning as a malicious spirit. A picture of the deceased from his/her best days will often be displayed next to the coffin. Often, a thread is connected to the corpse or coffin which is held by the chanting monks during their recitation; this thread is intended to transfer the merit of the monks' recitation to the deceased. The corpse is cremated, and the urn with the ash is usually kept in a chedi in the local temple. Thai Chinese and Thai Muslim minorities bury their deceased according to the rituals of their respective communities. Arts A depiction of a white elephant in 19th century Thai art. Main articles: Thai art and Music of Thailand Thai visual arts were traditionally Buddhist. Thai Buddha images from different periods have a number of distinctive styles. Thai temple art and architecture evolved from a number of sources, one of them being Khmer architecture. Contemporary Thai art often combines traditional Thai elements with modern techniques. Literature in Thailand is heavily influenced by Indian Hindu culture. The most notable works of Thai literature are a version of the Ramayana, a Hindu religious epic, called the Ramakien, written in part by Kings Rama I and Rama II, and the poetry of Sunthorn Phu. There is no tradition of spoken drama in Thailand, the role instead being filled by Thai dance. This is divided into three categories: khon, lakhon, and likay, khon being the most elaborate and likay the most popular. Nang drama, a form of shadow play, is found in the south. The music of Thailand includes classical and folk music traditions, e.g., piphat and mor lam, respectively) as well as string or pop music. Holidays Main article: Public holidays in Thailand Important holidays in Thai culture include Thai New Year, or Songkran, which is officially observed from 13–15 April each year. Falling at the end of the dry season and during the hot season in Thailand, the celebrations notoriously feature boisterous water throwing. The water throwing stemmed from washing Buddha images and lightly sprinkling scented water on the hands of elderly people. Small amounts of scented talcum powder were also used in the annual cleansing rite. In recent decades, water fights have been increasingly industrialised with use of hoses, barrels, squirt guns, water-filled surgical tubing, and copious amounts of powder. Loi Krathong is held on the 12th full moon of the Thai lunar calendar, usually early-November. While not a government-observed holiday, it is nonetheless an auspicious day in Thai culture, in which Thai people "loi", meaning "to float" a "krathong", a small raft traditionally made from elaborately folded banana leaves and including flowers, candles, incense sticks, and small offerings. The act of floating away the candle raft is symbolic of letting go of all one's grudges, anger, and defilements so that one can start life afresh on a better footing. Sports Thai boxing is the indigenous national sport in Thailand.[citation needed] Football is perhaps the most-watched sport. The English Premier League is surprisingly popular.[citation needed] Traditional Games of Thailand Kratai Kha Deow(One Legged Rabbit) “Kratai Kha Deow” or “One Legged Rabbit” is one type of catch game. The catcher will call the rabbit, and the rabbit must stand on one leg and jump or tiptoe to catch the other players and switch to rabbit instead. This game will exercise your legs and practice balancing on one leg. The number of players are divided into two teams, or may not have a team at all. Normally, there are two or more players. At the first time, the player will select the rabbit or team by “Rock-Paper-Scissors”. The loser would have to be a rabbit. In the case of solo player, the rabbit must stand on one leg, then jump to chase and touch any part of the body of other children who have run away. Everyone must stay within the designated area. A player who runs out of space loses the game and must be switched to rabbit, but if the rabbit is exhausted and cannot stand on one leg, it was that defeated and must be punished. In team play, the rules are similar to the solo player, but the rabbit team will send a representative to catch the other team to all the people. Those arrested will have to wait outside until the rabbit team can catch all of the rival teams. Rabbit team can switch to teammates to catch on until they are exhausted, and if the all of the members in rabbit team are exhausted and cannot stand on one leg, the rabbit team lose the game and must be punished too. Banana rib hobbyhorse riding Banana rib hobbyhorse riding or "Khee Ma Khan Kluay" in Thai is a traditional game of Thailand that Thai kids frequently played in the past. They use a banana rib to make the parts of a horse such as head, ear, and horsetail. The kids can make a horse on their own by using banana rib from banana trees irrelevant. This game makes kids enjoy their imagination by assume themselves as a rider, and an exercise. That is a local traditional which is the kids can spent time together. The materials for making a banana rib hobbyhorse are banana rib, knife, small bamboo pin, and string. First, find a rib of a banana around 1.5 is long (1 meter = 2 wa). Cut it in a form of the head, neck, and ears then use a small bamboo pin to connect the ear to the head of a horse. The remaining part of a banana rib, becomes a horsetail. Attach a string between the head and the tail of this banana rib horse and place on the shoulder of the rider. How to play banana rib hobbyhorse riding. Kids will sit on the horse and behave like they are riding a real horse shouting ‘hee hee’ or ‘yee haaah’(making the usual sounds people shout when controlling their horses). They may race with other friends if they have player more than 2 players. Which team runs faster, will be the winner or continuously ride around a wide open space and have fun. Nicknames See also: Thai names Thai people universally have one, or occasionally more, short nicknames (Thai: ชื่อเล่น name-play) that they use with friends a

Tagalog

nilalaman

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English

I see a rare flower in the vase.

Tagalog

Nakikita ko ang isang pambihirang bulaklak sa plorera.

Last Update: 2014-02-01
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English

There are many rare fish at the aquarium.

Tagalog

Maraming pambihirang isda sa akwaryum.

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