MyMemory, World's Largest Translation Memory
Click to expand

Language pair: Click to swap content  Subject   
Ask Google

You searched for: should ( English - Tagalog )

    [ Turn off colors ]

Human contributions

From professional translators, enterprises, web pages and freely available translation repositories.

Add a translation

English

Tagalog

Info

should

dapat

Last Update: 2015-06-24
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference: Anonymous

should

may facebook si anjinet yumul?

Last Update: 2014-09-12
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

What should you say

ano ang dapat mong sabihin

Last Update: 2015-04-14
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

what should i do about it

kung mahal ko siya, ano ang dapat kong gawin

Last Update: 2015-06-16
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

why you should not be blame

magbigay-sala

Last Update: 2015-02-21
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

Your lips should be on mine Guy

mangarap ng akin ngayong gabi okay

Last Update: 2014-10-22
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

aquino should resign from office

back view

Last Update: 2015-07-02
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

we should meet?

dapat naming matugunan

Last Update: 2014-12-12
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

Why should we accept the company

bakit dapat ka namin tanggapin sa kompanya

Last Update: 2015-03-10
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

you should be the one i'm blaming

hindi ba dapat ikaw ang sinisisi ko

Last Update: 2015-02-18
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

will inform everybody her reliever should she be not available

kamangmangan ng kautusan paliwanag walang I-sa tagalog

Last Update: 2015-01-07
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

I will crush her with my power should she come to this land...

tagasalin namekian

Last Update: 2015-01-04
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

it is absurd that a man should rule others, who cannot rule himself

kailangang-kailangan

Last Update: 2015-03-13
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

What should I do to have a problem because we have lost money because of the work my father.

ano bang dapat kung gawin kasi may problema kami sa pera ngayon nawalan na kasi ng trabaho yung tatay ko .

Last Update: 2015-07-05
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

which should be a surplus

kung saan dapat mapunta ang sobrang pondo

Last Update: 2015-02-12
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

If she loved her own and her family, she should think correctly, do not she know someone inter life if she did not realize she is kindly, I'm really angry with him, I do not scare her, nice person, my bad temper, Try she give me shame, I put him in prison so he might regret if I ask him to her mind first.

Subukan mo kanya?

Last Update: 2015-07-14
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

so basically the answer to what is enlightenment is to have a curiosity or the courage to start taking care of your self and to take care of your self in this context means to start practicing critical thinking like start reading and start examining your thoughts about like common ideas as what is a woman or what is a man what it just us do you know the answer wil start examine your thoughts and soon you are figure out that just this is the kind of knowledge i don't really know what just this really means, maybe i should look up what does't mean and i should start taking care of my self intelectually.

QUERY LENGTH LIMIT EXCEDEED. MAX ALLOWED QUERY : 500 CHARS

Last Update: 2015-06-29
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

The movie entails about the life of the young ones who suffer from national crises. It all starts with the narration of the Painter about life of the children, as the character of his master piece of the Last Supper painting. The children in the painting have different stories in life. They are being abused and used for survival, who suffers from irresponsible parents, and putting their life into risk in order to feed their self. At the same time the painter tries to convey to the viewers on how to be sensitive to the children who are not worth of the life they have today. He tries to express that we are not blind of not seeing the environment of poverty. At present I know that poverty everywhere really existing, and who suffer from it are the young ones. I’ve experience the situation where in I’m kind of stupid to be hesitated to express my pity for those who are asking for money, to sustain their needs. I’m kind of inconsiderate of what they are begging. It’s just that I am thinking of myself but not about the situation they have now, being less fortunate of the society. I have also experience a situation where in I’m kind of judgmental person. I judge them to be bad and do bad things if they will approach you. I feel afraid of them; I think that they will take my cell phone, bag, my money in my pocket, or any thing when I am walking on the street. At the same time I’ve experience were I am taking my lunch break, I saw children who are facing in front of me begging for the food I ‘m eating. And what a damn thing I do to them, I surely eat my food until the chicken is flesh-less and leave the plate with a bone of the chicken, without thinking that there is a young individual that will get it and eat it just to feed there hungriness. Even at home, I am so choosy in the food at the table. I will not eat if I do not like the viand that is being served on the table. But don’t mind that I’m lucky enough that there is a blessing, a food that nourished me to survive in this world. Maybe I’m just thinking about my hungriness, but not for them who are hungrier. I realize after watching the movie, a flash back of what I did to the hungry individual, that I am really bad person, self-centered and damn. I think that I am a person without morality, feel enriching, and annoying; and pretending to be blind about the things that need my help. I am not worth to live in this place if what I think is just the world and me. I am so sorry for that. What I did is really a big sin to the society, to the world and to God. I should do even just a little thing, or the things that I really can for the welfare of those in need. I should struggle a lot rather than them because they are not obliged to do so. It is not there responsibility to travel from one place to another just to seek for money. I am educated enough, my range of thinking is good enough, and I already know how to start things move but don’t know how to move for those who do not experience what I do. I am aware about many things about poverty, I feel lose for them but just stop there, no action is being implemented. We are not here in this world just to understand for the things that must be understood, but to act what we really can. I suggest that we as a human who live with better nourishment should give even just a little time for them, by earning money, and maybe someday we can build a better living for them. We should share wholeheartedly, not just in terms of costly things but also in terms of caring and loving, as how God loves us and all of us. “Awareness is useless without action.”

anong paglilimi papel Ng I-sa kambas Ng lipunan

Last Update: 2015-06-27
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

alice in wonderland tagalog veOnce upon a time . . . there lived a woman who had no children. She dreamed of having a little girl, but time went by, and her dream never came true. She then went to visit a witch, who gave her a magic grain of barley. She planted it in a flower pot. And the very next day, the grain had turned into a lovely flower, rather like a tulip. The woman softly kissed its half-shut petals. And as though by magic, the flower opened in full blossom. Inside sat a tiny girl, no bigger than a thumb. The woman called her Thumbelina. For a bed she had a walnut shell, violet petals for her mattress and a rose petal blanket. In the daytime, she played in a tulip petal boat, floating on a plate of water. Using two horse hairs as oars, Thumbelina sailed around her little lake, singing and singing in a gentle sweet voice. Then one night, as she lay fast asleep in her walnut shell, a large frog hopped through a hole in the window pane. As she gazed down at Thumbelina, she said to herself: "How pretty she is! She'd make the perfect bride for my own dear son!" She picked up Thumbelina, walnut shell and all, and hopped into the garden. Nobody saw her go.Back at the pond, her fat ugly son, who always did as mother told him, was pleased with her choice. But mother frog was afraid that her pretty prisoner might run away. So she carried Thumbellna out to a water lily leaf ln the middle of the pond. "She can never escape us now," said the frog to her son. "And we have plenty of time to prepare a new home for you and your bride." Thumbelina was left all alone. She felt so desperate. She knew she would never be able to escape the fate that awaited her with the two horrid fat frogs. All she could do was cry her eyes out. However, one or two minnows who had been enjoying the shade below the water lily leaf, had overheard the two frogs talking, and the little girl's bitter sobs. They decided to do something about it. So they nibbled away at the lily stem till it broke and drifted away in the weak current. A dancing butterfly had an idea: "Throw me the end of your belt! I'll help you to move a little faster!" Thumbelina gratefully did so, and the leaf soon floated away from the frog pond. But other dangers lay ahead. A large beetle snatched Thumbelina with his strong feet and took her away to his home at the top of a leafy tree. "Isn't she pretty?" he said to his friends. But they pointed out that she was far too different. So the beetle took her down the tree and set her free. It was summertime, and Thumbelina wandered all by herself amongst the flowers and through the long grass. She had pollen for her meals and drank the dew. Then the rainy season came, bringing nastyweather. The poor child found it hard to find food and shelter. When winter set in, she suffered from the cold and felt terrible pangs of hunger. One day, as Thumbelina roamed helplessly over the bare meadows, she met a large spider who promised to help her. He took her to a hollow tree and guarded the door with a stout web. Then he brought her some dried chestnuts and called his friends to come and admire her beauty. But just like the beetles, all the other spiders persuaded Thumbelina's rescuer to let her go. Crying her heart out, and quite certain that nobody wanted her because she was ugly, Thumbelina left the spider's house. As she wandered, shivering with the cold, suddenly she came across a solid little cottage, made of twigs and dead leaves. Hopefully, she knocked on the door. It was opened by a field mouse. "What are you doing outside in this weather?" he asked. "Come in and warm yourself." Comfortable and cozy, the field mouse's home was stocked with food. For her keep, Thumbelina did the housework and told the mouse stories. One day, the field mouse said a friend was coming to visit them. "He's a very rich mole, and has a lovely house. He wears a splendid black fur coat, but he's dreadfully shortsighted. He needs company and he'd like to marry you!" Thumbelina did not relish the idea. However, when the mole came, she sang sweetly to him and he fell head over heels in love. The mole invited Thumbelina and the field mouse to visit him, but . . . to their surprise and horror, they came upon a swallow in the tunnel. It looked dead. Mole nudged it wi his foot, saying: "That'll teach her! She should have come underground instead of darting about the sky all summer!" Thumbelina was so shocked by such cruel words that later, she crept back unseen to the tunnel. And every day, the little girl went to nurse the swallow and tenderly give it food. In the meantime, the swallow told Thumbelina its tale. Jagged by a thorn, it had been unable to follow its companions to a warmer climate. "It's kind of you to nurse me," it told Thumbelina. But, in spring, the swallow flew away, after offering to take the little girl with it. All summer, Thumbelina did her best to avoid marrying the mole. The little girl thought fearfully of how she'd have to live underground forever. On the eve of her wedding, she asked to spend a day in the open air. As she gently fingered a flower, she heard a familiar song: "Winter's on its way and I'll be off to warmer lands. Come with me!" Thumbelina quickly clung to her swallow friend, and the bird soared into the sky. They flew over plains and hills till they reached a country of flowers. The swallow gently laid Thumbelina in a blossom. There she met a tiny, white-winged fairy: the King of the Flower Fairies. Instantly, he asked her to marry him. Thumbelina eagerly said "yes", and sprouting tiny white wings, she became the Flower Queen!rsion

Once upon a time . . . there lived a woman who had no children. She dreamed of having a little girl, but time went by, and her dream never came true. She then went to visit a witch, who gave her a magic grain of barley. She planted it in a flower pot. And the very next day, the grain had turned into a lovely flower, rather like a tulip. The woman softly kissed its half-shut petals. And as though by magic, the flower opened in full blossom. Inside sat a tiny girl, no bigger than a thumb. The woman called her Thumbelina. For a bed she had a walnut shell, violet petals for her mattress and a rose petal blanket. In the daytime, she played in a tulip petal boat, floating on a plate of water. Using two horse hairs as oars, Thumbelina sailed around her little lake, singing and singing in a gentle sweet voice. Then one night, as she lay fast asleep in her walnut shell, a large frog hopped through a hole in the window pane. As she gazed down at Thumbelina, she said to herself: "How pretty she is! She'd make the perfect bride for my own dear son!" She picked up Thumbelina, walnut shell and all, and hopped into the garden. Nobody saw her go.Back at the pond, her fat ugly son, who always did as mother told him, was pleased with her choice. But mother frog was afraid that her pretty prisoner might run away. So she carried Thumbellna out to a water lily leaf ln the middle of the pond. "She can never escape us now," said the frog to her son. "And we have plenty of time to prepare a new home for you and your bride." Thumbelina was left all alone. She felt so desperate. She knew she would never be able to escape the fate that awaited her with the two horrid fat frogs. All she could do was cry her eyes out. However, one or two minnows who had been enjoying the shade below the water lily leaf, had overheard the two frogs talking, and the little girl's bitter sobs. They decided to do something about it. So they nibbled away at the lily stem till it broke and drifted away in the weak current. A dancing butterfly had an idea: "Throw me the end of your belt! I'll help you to move a little faster!" Thumbelina gratefully did so, and the leaf soon floated away from the frog pond. But other dangers lay ahead. A large beetle snatched Thumbelina with his strong feet and took her away to his home at the top of a leafy tree. "Isn't she pretty?" he said to his friends. But they pointed out that she was far too different. So the beetle took her down the tree and set her free. It was summertime, and Thumbelina wandered all by herself amongst the flowers and through the long grass. She had pollen for her meals and drank the dew. Then the rainy season came, bringing nastyweather. The poor child found it hard to find food and shelter. When winter set in, she suffered from the cold and felt terrible pangs of hunger. One day, as Thumbelina roamed helplessly over the bare meadows, she met a large spider who promised to help her. He took her to a hollow tree and guarded the door with a stout web. Then he brought her some dried chestnuts and called his friends to come and admire her beauty. But just like the beetles, all the other spiders persuaded Thumbelina's rescuer to let her go. Crying her heart out, and quite certain that nobody wanted her because she was ugly, Thumbelina left the spider's house. As she wandered, shivering with the cold, suddenly she came across a solid little cottage, made of twigs and dead leaves. Hopefully, she knocked on the door. It was opened by a field mouse. "What are you doing outside in this weather?" he asked. "Come in and warm yourself." Comfortable and cozy, the field mouse's home was stocked with food. For her keep, Thumbelina did the housework and told the mouse stories. One day, the field mouse said a friend was coming to visit them. "He's a very rich mole, and has a lovely house. He wears a splendid black fur coat, but he's dreadfully shortsighted. He needs company and he'd like to marry you!" Thumbelina did not relish the idea. However, when the mole came, she sang sweetly to him and he fell head over heels in love. The mole invited Thumbelina and the field mouse to visit him, but . . . to their surprise and horror, they came upon a swallow in the tunnel. It looked dead. Mole nudged it wi his foot, saying: "That'll teach her! She should have come underground instead of darting about the sky all summer!" Thumbelina was so shocked by such cruel words that later, she crept back unseen to the tunnel. And every day, the little girl went to nurse the swallow and tenderly give it food. In the meantime, the swallow told Thumbelina its tale. Jagged by a thorn, it had been unable to follow its companions to a warmer climate. "It's kind of you to nurse me," it told Thumbelina. But, in spring, the swallow flew away, after offering to take the little girl with it. All summer, Thumbelina did her best to avoid marrying the mole. The little girl thought fearfully of how she'd have to live underground forever. On the eve of her wedding, she asked to spend a day in the open air. As she gently fingered a flower, she heard a familiar song: "Winter's on its way and I'll be off to warmer lands. Come with me!" Thumbelina quickly clung to her swallow friend, and the bird soared into the sky. They flew over plains and hills till they reached a country of flowers. The swallow gently laid Thumbelina in a blossom. There she met a tiny, white-winged fairy: the King of the Flower Fairies. Instantly, he asked her to marry him. Thumbelina eagerly said "yes", and sprouting tiny white wings, she became the Flower Queen!

Last Update: 2015-06-22
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:
Warning: Contains invisible HTML formatting

alice in wonderland tagalog veOnce upon a time . . . there lived a woman who had no children. She dreamed of having a little girl, but time went by, and her dream never came true. She then went to visit a witch, who gave her a magic grain of barley. She planted it in a flower pot. And the very next day, the grain had turned into a lovely flower, rather like a tulip. The woman softly kissed its half-shut petals. And as though by magic, the flower opened in full blossom. Inside sat a tiny girl, no bigger than a thumb. The woman called her Thumbelina. For a bed she had a walnut shell, violet petals for her mattress and a rose petal blanket. In the daytime, she played in a tulip petal boat, floating on a plate of water. Using two horse hairs as oars, Thumbelina sailed around her little lake, singing and singing in a gentle sweet voice. Then one night, as she lay fast asleep in her walnut shell, a large frog hopped through a hole in the window pane. As she gazed down at Thumbelina, she said to herself: "How pretty she is! She'd make the perfect bride for my own dear son!" She picked up Thumbelina, walnut shell and all, and hopped into the garden. Nobody saw her go.Back at the pond, her fat ugly son, who always did as mother told him, was pleased with her choice. But mother frog was afraid that her pretty prisoner might run away. So she carried Thumbellna out to a water lily leaf ln the middle of the pond. "She can never escape us now," said the frog to her son. "And we have plenty of time to prepare a new home for you and your bride." Thumbelina was left all alone. She felt so desperate. She knew she would never be able to escape the fate that awaited her with the two horrid fat frogs. All she could do was cry her eyes out. However, one or two minnows who had been enjoying the shade below the water lily leaf, had overheard the two frogs talking, and the little girl's bitter sobs. They decided to do something about it. So they nibbled away at the lily stem till it broke and drifted away in the weak current. A dancing butterfly had an idea: "Throw me the end of your belt! I'll help you to move a little faster!" Thumbelina gratefully did so, and the leaf soon floated away from the frog pond. But other dangers lay ahead. A large beetle snatched Thumbelina with his strong feet and took her away to his home at the top of a leafy tree. "Isn't she pretty?" he said to his friends. But they pointed out that she was far too different. So the beetle took her down the tree and set her free. It was summertime, and Thumbelina wandered all by herself amongst the flowers and through the long grass. She had pollen for her meals and drank the dew. Then the rainy season came, bringing nastyweather. The poor child found it hard to find food and shelter. When winter set in, she suffered from the cold and felt terrible pangs of hunger. One day, as Thumbelina roamed helplessly over the bare meadows, she met a large spider who promised to help her. He took her to a hollow tree and guarded the door with a stout web. Then he brought her some dried chestnuts and called his friends to come and admire her beauty. But just like the beetles, all the other spiders persuaded Thumbelina's rescuer to let her go. Crying her heart out, and quite certain that nobody wanted her because she was ugly, Thumbelina left the spider's house. As she wandered, shivering with the cold, suddenly she came across a solid little cottage, made of twigs and dead leaves. Hopefully, she knocked on the door. It was opened by a field mouse. "What are you doing outside in this weather?" he asked. "Come in and warm yourself." Comfortable and cozy, the field mouse's home was stocked with food. For her keep, Thumbelina did the housework and told the mouse stories. One day, the field mouse said a friend was coming to visit them. "He's a very rich mole, and has a lovely house. He wears a splendid black fur coat, but he's dreadfully shortsighted. He needs company and he'd like to marry you!" Thumbelina did not relish the idea. However, when the mole came, she sang sweetly to him and he fell head over heels in love. The mole invited Thumbelina and the field mouse to visit him, but . . . to their surprise and horror, they came upon a swallow in the tunnel. It looked dead. Mole nudged it wi his foot, saying: "That'll teach her! She should have come underground instead of darting about the sky all summer!" Thumbelina was so shocked by such cruel words that later, she crept back unseen to the tunnel. And every day, the little girl went to nurse the swallow and tenderly give it food. In the meantime, the swallow told Thumbelina its tale. Jagged by a thorn, it had been unable to follow its companions to a warmer climate. "It's kind of you to nurse me," it told Thumbelina. But, in spring, the swallow flew away, after offering to take the little girl with it. All summer, Thumbelina did her best to avoid marrying the mole. The little girl thought fearfully of how she'd have to live underground forever. On the eve of her wedding, she asked to spend a day in the open air. As she gently fingered a flower, she heard a familiar song: "Winter's on its way and I'll be off to warmer lands. Come with me!" Thumbelina quickly clung to her swallow friend, and the bird soared into the sky. They flew over plains and hills till they reached a country of flowers. The swallow gently laid Thumbelina in a blossom. There she met a tiny, white-winged fairy: the King of the Flower Fairies. Instantly, he asked her to marry him. Thumbelina eagerly said "yes", and sprouting tiny white wings, she became the Flower Queen!rsion

Alice sa wonderland tagalog bersyon

Last Update: 2015-06-22
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:
Warning: Contains invisible HTML formatting

Add a translation

We use cookies to enhance your experience. By continuing to visit this site you agree to our use of cookies. Learn more. OK