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English

Soul

Tagalog

Kaluluwa

Last Update: 2015-06-04
Usage Frequency: 14
Quality:

Reference: Wikipedia

English

Souls

Tagalog

Mga kaluluwa

Last Update: 2014-07-12
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

English

soul searching in tagalog

Tagalog

kaluluwa na naghahanap sa tagalog

Last Update: 2016-03-25
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

English

the soul of the great bell

Tagalog

sa kaluluwa ng mahusay na kampanilya

Last Update: 2016-03-10
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

English

[1] The wrath sing, goddess, of Peleus' son, Achilles, that destructive wrath which brought countless woes upon the Achaeans, and sent forth to Hades many valiant souls of heroes, and made them themselves spoil for dogs and every bird; thus the plan of Zeus came to fulfillment, [5] from the time when1 first they parted in strife Atreus' son, king of men, and brilliant Achilles. Who then of the gods was it that brought these two together to contend? The son of Leto and Zeus; for he in anger against the king roused throughout the host an evil pestilence, and the people began to perish, [10] because upon the priest Chryses the son of Atreus had wrought dishonour. For he had come to the swift ships of the Achaeans to free his daughter, bearing ransom past counting; and in his hands he held the wreaths of Apollo who strikes from afar,2 on a staff of gold; and he implored all the Achaeans, [15] but most of all the two sons of Atreus, the marshallers of the people: “Sons of Atreus, and other well-greaved Achaeans, to you may the gods who have homes upon Olympus grant that you sack the city of Priam, and return safe to your homes; but my dear child release to me, and accept the ransom [20] out of reverence for the son of Zeus, Apollo who strikes from afar.” Then all the rest of the Achaeans shouted assent, to reverence the priest and accept the glorious ransom, yet the thing did not please the heart of Agamemnon, son of Atreus, but he sent him away harshly, and laid upon him a stern command: [25] “Let me not find you, old man, by the hollow ships, either tarrying now or coming back later, lest your staff and the wreath of the god not protect you. Her I will not set free. Sooner shall old age come upon her in our house, in Argos, far from her native land, [30] as she walks to and fro before the loom and serves my bed. But go, do not anger me, that you may return the safer.”

Tagalog

kwentong iliad odyssey

Last Update: 2016-02-28
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

English

you are my soul mate

Tagalog

ikaw ang aking soul mate

Last Update: 2016-02-21
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

English

script-the soul of the great bell

Tagalog

script-kaluluwa ng dakilang bell

Last Update: 2015-09-27
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

English

Out of the night that covers me, Black as the pit from pole to pole, I thank whatever gods may be For my unconquerable soul. In the fell clutch of circumstance I have not winced nor cried aloud. Under the bludgeonings of chance My head is bloody, but unbowed. Beyond this place of wrath and tears Looms but the Horror of the shade, And yet the menace of the years Finds and shall find me unafraid. It matters not how strait the gate, How charged with punishments the scroll, I am the master of my fate, I am the captain of my soul

Tagalog

walang talo

Last Update: 2015-09-24
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

English

sevens of the soul

Tagalog

taga sundo ng kaluluwa

Last Update: 2015-09-15
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

English

kwento ng the soul of the great bell

Tagalog

kwento Ng kaluluwa ng mahusay na kampanilya

Last Update: 2015-07-15
Subject: History
Usage Frequency: 1
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Reference:

English

Plato was born around the year 428 BCE in Athens. His father died while Plato was young, and his mother remarried to Pyrilampes, in whose house Plato would grow up. Plato's birth name was Aristocles, and he gained the nickname Platon, meaning broad, because of his broad build. His family had a history in politics, and Plato was destined to a life in keeping with this history. He studied at a gymnasium owned by Dionysios, and at the palaistra of Ariston of Argos. When he was young he studied music and poetry. According to Aristotle, Plato developed the foundations of his metaphysics and epistemology by studying the doctrines of Cratylus, and the work of Pythagoras and Parmenides. When Plato met Socrates, however, he had met his definitive teacher. As Socrates' disciple, Plato adopted his philosophy and style of debate, and directed his studies toward the question of virtue and the formation of a noble character. Plato was in military service from 409 BC to 404 BC. When the Peloponnesian War ended in 404 BC he joined the Athenian oligarchy of the Thirty Tyrants, one of whose leaders was his uncle Charmides. The violence of this group quickly prompted Plato to leave it. In 403 BC, when democracy was restored in Athens, he had hopes of pursuing his original goal of a political career. Socrates' execution in 399 BC had a profound effect on Plato, and was perhaps the final event that would convince him to leave Athenian politics forever. Plato left Attica along with other friends of Socrates and traveled for the next twelve years. To all accounts it appears that he left Athens with Euclides for Megara, then went to visit Theodorus in Cyrene, moved on to study with the Pythagoreans in Italy, and finally to Egypt. During this period he studied the philosophy of his contemporaries, geometry, geology, astronomy and religion. After 399 BC Plato began to write extensively. It is still up for debate whether he was writing before Socrates' death, and the order in which he wrote his major texts is also uncertain. However, most scholars agree to divide Plato's major work into three distinct groups. The first of these is known as the Socratic Dialogues because of how close he stays within the text to Socrates' teachings. They were probably written during the years of his travels between 399 and 387 BC. One of the texts in this group called the Apology seems to have been written shortly after Socrates' death. Other texts relegated to this group include the Crito, Laches, Lysis, Charmides, Euthyphro, and Hippias Minor and Major. Plato returned to Athens in 387 BC and, on land that had once belonged to Academos, he founded a school of learning which he called the Academy. Plato's school is often described at the first European university. Its curriculum offered subjects including astronomy, biology, mathematics, political theory, and philosophy. Plato hoped the Academy would provide a place where thinkers could work toward better government in the Grecian cities. He would preside over the Academy until his death. The period from 387 to 361 BC is often called Plato's "middle" or transitional period. It is thought that he may have written the Meno, Euthydemus, Menexenus, Cratylus, Repuglic, Phaedrus, Syposium and Phaedo during this time. The major difference between these texts and his earlier works is that he tends toward grander metaphysical themes and begins to establish his own voice in philosophy. Socrates still has a presence, however, sometimes as a fictional character. In the Meno for example Plato writes of the Socratic idea that no one knowingly does wrong, and adds the new doctrine of recollection questioning whether virtue can be taught. In the Phaedo we are introduced to the Platonic doctrine of the Forms, in which Plato makes claims as to the immortality of the human soul. The middle dialogues also reveal Plato's method of hypothesis. Plato's most influential work, The Republic, is also a part of his middle dialogues. It is a discussion of the virtues of justice, courage, wisdom, and moderation, of the individual and in society. It works with the central question of how to live a good life, asking what an ideal State would be like, and what defines a just individual. These lead to more questions regarding the education of citizens, how government should be formed, the nature of the soul, and the afterlife. The dialogue finishes by reviewing various forms of government and describing the ideal state, where only philosophers are fit to rule. The Republic covers almost every aspect of Plato's thought. In 367 BC Plato was invited to be the personal tutor to Dionysus II, the new ruler of Syracuse. Plato accepted the invitation, but found on his arrival that the situation was not conducive for philosophy. He continued to teach the young ruler until 365 BC when Syracuse entered into war. Plato returned to Athens, and it was around this time that Plato's famous pupil Aristotle began to study at the Academy. In 361 BC Plato returned to Syracuse in response to a letter from Dion, the uncle and guardian of Dionysus II, begging him to come back. However, finding the situation even more unpleasant than his first visit, he returned to Athens almost as fast as he had come. Back at the Academy, Plato probably spent the rest of his life writing and conversing. The way he ran the Academy and his ideas of what constitutes an educated individual have been a major influence to education theory. His work has also been influential in the areas of logic and legal philosophy. His beliefs on the importance of mathematics in education has had a lasting influence on the subject, and his insistence on accurate definitions and clear hypotheses formed the foundations for Euclid's system of mathematics. His final years at the Academy may be the years when he wrote the "Later" dialogues, including the Parmenides, Theatetus, Sophist,Statesmas,Timaeus,Critias,Philebus, and Laws. Socrates has been delegated a minor role in these texts. Plato uses these dialogues to take a closer look at his earlier metaphysical speculations. He discusses art, including dance, music, poetry, architecture and drama, and ethics in regards to immortality, the mind, and Realism. He also works with the philosophy of mathematics, politics and religion, covering such specifics as censorship, atheism, and pantheism. In the area of epistemology he discusses a priori knowledge and Rationalism. In his theory of Forms, Plato suggests that the world of ideas is constant and true, opposing it to the world we perceive through our senses, which is deceptive and changeable. In 347 Plato died, leaving the Academy to his sister's son Speusippus. The Academy remained a model for institutions of higher learning until it was closed, in 529 CE, by the Emperor Justinian.

Tagalog

talambuhay ni Plato

Last Update: 2015-06-07
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:
Warning: Contains invisible HTML formatting

English

Out of the night that covers me, Black as the pit from pole to pole, I thank whatever gods may be For my unconquerable soul. In the fell clutch of circumstance I have not winced nor cried aloud. Under the bludgeonings of chance My head is bloody, but unbowed. Beyond this place of wrath and tears Looms but the Horror of the shade, And yet the menace of the years Finds and shall find me unafraid. It matters not how strait the gate, How charged with punishments the scroll, I am the master of my fate, I am the captain of my soul

Tagalog

Out of the night that covers me, Black as the pit from pole to pole, I thank whatever gods may be For my unconquerable soul. In the fell clutch of circumstance I have not winced nor cried aloud. Under the bludgeonings of chance My head is bloody, but unbowed. Beyond this place of wrath and tears Looms but the Horror of the shade, And yet the menace of the years Finds and shall find me unafraid. It matters not how strait the gate, How charged with punishments the scroll, I am the master of my fate, I am the captain of my soul

Last Update: 2015-01-24
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

English

Out of the night that covers me, Black as the pit from pole to pole, I thank whatever gods may be For my unconquerable soul. In the fell clutch of circumstance I have not winced nor cried aloud. Under the bludgeonings of chance My head is bloody, but unbowed. Beyond this place of wrath and tears Looms but the Horror of the shade, And yet the menace of the years Finds and shall find me unafraid. It matters not how strait the gate, How charged with punishments the scroll, I am the master of my fate, I am the captain of my soul

Tagalog

invictus isalin sa tagalog

Last Update: 2015-01-24
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

English

I Have Begrudged the Years by Angela Manalang-Gloria One of my favourites by her. I Have Begrudged the Years Angela Manalang-Gloria Perhaps the years will get me after all, Though I have sought to cheat them of their due By documenting in beauty’s name my soul And locking out of sight my revenue Of golden rapture and of sterling tears, Let others give to Caesar Caesar’s own: I have begrudged the dictatorial years The right usurious to tax me to the bone, Therefore behold me now, a Timon bent On hoarding each coin of love that should be spent On you and you, and hushing all display Of passionate splendour lest I betray My wealth, lest the sharp years in tithes retrieve Even the heart not worn upon my sleeve.

Tagalog

i na begrudged ng mga taon

Last Update: 2015-01-04
Subject: Literary Translations
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

English

Dear Lord thanks for opening the world to Your love. May each good gift bring good actions that honor You. May they make us kind not just on Christmas day but every day. May every kind greeting be treated as a prayer to the world and a call to honor Your better way. Thank you Jesus for delivering us from evil and sin. May we never forget Your sacrifice and always be open to receiving its forgiveness and love. Let us rejoice in the knowledge that we are children of God. May we be merry with true and devout hearts. May you always be in our best dreams as well as our souls and hearts and mind. Please grant us and the world this Jesus. Amen.

Tagalog

pagbubukas ng panalangin para sa pasko party na tagalog

Last Update: 2014-12-18
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

English

HOW DO I LOVE THEE How do I love thee? Let me count the ways I love thee to the depth and breadth and height My soul can reach, when feeling out of sight For the ends of Being and idela Grace I love thee to the level of everyday’s Most quiet need, by sun and candle-light I love thee freely, as men strive for Right; I love thee purely, as they turn from Praise I love thee with a passion put to use In my old griefs, and with my childhood’s faith I love thee with a love I seemed to lose With my lost saints, — I love thee with the breath, Smiles, tears of all my life! – and, if God choose, I shall but love thee better after death

Tagalog

tanga

Last Update: 2014-11-03
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

English

The painting shows a diver diving into the sea, and it is usually considered to be symbolic, a representation of the moment of death, when the soul dives from life into the sea of eternity

Tagalog


Last Update: 2014-07-29
Subject: Art
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

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