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English

Treasure

Tagalog

kayamanan

Last Update: 2015-01-14
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 5
Quality:

Reference: Anonymous

English

Sophocles was an ancient Greek poet and one of three ancient Greek tragedians whose plays have survived. His plays belonged to the period after Aeschylus and earlier of Euripides. Based on the information provided by Suda, a 10th century encyclopedia, Sophocles wrote 123 plays during his lifetime, out of which only seven have survived in a complete form. These plays are Ajax, Antigone, Trachinian Women, Oedipus the King, Electra, Philoctetes and Oedipus at Colonus. It was believed that he remained the most celebrated playwright in the dramatic competitions of the city-state of Athens held during the religious festivals of the Lenaea and the Dionysia. Sophocles participated in thirty competitions, of which he won 24 and never went below second place in the rest. Among his plays, the two most famous tragedies, Oedipus and Antigone are generally known as the Theban plays, even though each play belonged to a part of a different tetralogy. Sophocles greatly influenced the drama. His main contribution was the addition of third actor which reduced the importance of the chorus in the presentation of the plot. A crater on the surface of Mercury has been after this ace Greek poet and playwright. Sophocles Childhood and Life Sophocles was the son of Sophilus, who was a rich member of the rural deme (small community) of Colonus Hippius. Sophocles was said to have been born in Attica. It is said that he was born few years before the Battle of Marathon in 490 BC, which is probably around 497/6 BC. Sophocles received his first artistic achievement in 468 BC, when he won first prize in the Dionysia theatre competition over the reigning master of Athenian drama, Aeschylus. According to Greek historian Plutarch, this victory was quite unusual. Unlike the usual custom of choosing judges by lot, the archon asked Cimon and the other strategoi present to decide the victor of the contest. According to him after being defeated, Aeschylus left for Sicily. “Triptolemus” was one amongst the plays that Sophocles presented at this festival. When Sophocles was sixteen, he was chosen to lead the paean, a choral chant to a God, celebrating the Greek victory over the Persians at the Battle of Salamis. He was one of the ten strategoi, high executive officials that commanded the armed forces and was the junior colleague of Pericles. In the beginning of his career, Sophocles received patronage from the politician Cimon. Even when Cimon was ostracized by Pericles (Cimon's rival) in 461 BC, Sophocles received no harm. In 443/ 442 he became one of the Hellenotamiai, or treasurers of Athena, and had the role to assist managing the finances of the city during the political ascendancy of Pericles. Based on the accounts of the Vita Sophoclis, he served as a general in the Athenian campaign against Samos in 441 BC. It was believed that Sophocles received this post because of his writing of Antigone. In 420 BC, when Asclepius was introduced to Athens, he welcomed it and set up an altar for the image of deity at his house. In 413, Sophocles was elected one of the commissioners who reacted to the catastrophic destruction of the Athenian expeditionary force in Sicily during the Peloponnesian War. Personal Life Sophocles first married to Nicostrata, with whom he had a son named Iophon. In the later life, he had relationship with a woman of Sicyon. She bore him a son called Ariston. It was believed that he had three more sons, but there is not much information about them. Death In the winter of 406/ 405 BC, Sophocles died at the age of ninety or ninety one. Like the other famous men from the ancient history, his death also inspired many apocryphal stories. One of the stories states that he died from the strain of trying to recite a long sentence from his play, “Antigone” without pausing to take a breath. Whereas the other story suggests that he choked to death while eating grapes at the Anthesteria festival in Athens. The third story accounts that he died due to excessive happiness over winning his final victory at the City Dionysia. Works The earliest contribution of Sophocles to the drama was the introduction of the third actor which immensely reduced the role of the chorus and created better opportunities for character development and conflict between characters. Even his competitor Aeschylus, who dominated Athenian playwrights during Sophocles' early career, accepted the new idea and adopted it into his own work towards the end of his life. Aristotle gave Sophocles the credit of the introduction of skenographia, or scenery-painting. After the death of Aeschylus in 456 BC, Sophocles became the celebrated playwright in Athens. He emerged victorious in different dramatic competitions, 18 at Dionysia and 6 at Lenaea festivals. Apart from making innovations in the dramatic structure, he was also known for his deeper development of characters than the earlier playwrights. His widespread reputation helped him to get invitation from foreign rulers to attend their courts, but unlike other playwrights Aeschylus who died in Sicily, or Euripides who spent time in Macedon, he never accepted any of these invitations. Sophocles works were influential and significant for the Greek culture. Two out of his seven plays can be estimated correctly to their exact dates, which namely are “Philoctetes” (409 BC) and “Oedipus at Colonus” (401 BC, staged after his death by his grandson). From the rest of his plays, “Electra” had striking similarities to these two plays which put forwards the fact that it was written in the later part of his literary career. Again based on the stylistic characteristics of “Oedipus the King” which came in his middle period, “Ajax”, “Antigone” and “The Trachiniae” belonged to his early days. Sophocles had also written three Theban plays namely, “Oedipus the King”, “Oedipus at Colonus” and “Antigone”. All these plays described the fate of Thebes during and after the reign of King Oedipus. These plays were sometimes even published under a single cover. Sophocles had written these plays in separate festival competitions with several years of difference between them. They cannot be called trilogy because of the presence of inconsistencies among them. Apart from these, Sophocles is supposed to have written few more Theban plays such as such as “The Progeny”, which survived in fragments. The majority of his plays depicted the undercurrent of early fatalism and the offset of Socratic logic being the keystone for the long tradition of Greek tragedy.

Tagalog

Sopokles

Last Update: 2016-02-09
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

English

If I become treasurer in school I can not promise that I will do the right thing and if I do what I can for this school

Tagalog

Kung ako ang magiging treasurer dito sa paaralang ito Hindi ko maipapangako na gagawin ko kung and ang tama pero gagawin ko ang makakaya ko para sa paaralang ito

Last Update: 2016-02-07
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

English

The gentle child, parent's treasure

Tagalog

ang anak na magalang, ay kayamanan ng magulang

Last Update: 2015-12-08
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

English

A king and queen have three daughters. All three of the girls are attractive, but one of them is absolutely gorgeous – Psyche. People come from all around just to check out how beautiful Psyche is. All this adoration of Psyche gets totally out of hand; men start worshiping her as if she were a goddess and ignore the altars of the goddess of love and beauty, Venus (a.k.a. Aphrodite). Men even start saying that Psyche is more beautiful than Venus. (Uh-oh.) We bet you can guess who got mad about this. Yup, that's right – Venus. The goddess of love gets kind of hateful and orders her son, Cupid (a.k.a. Eros), to go and punish Psyche by making her fall in love with the ugliest thing around. Cupid sneaks into Psyche's bedroom to do his mother's bidding, but, when he sees how beautiful Psyche is, he gets all distracted and pricks himself with his own arrow. Cupid falls instantly in love with Psyche and leaves without doing what his mother told him to do. Psyche's life continues on as usual: everybody comes to gawk at how hot she is. However, since Venus has it in for her, nobody ever falls in love with Psyche. Psyche's two sisters end up getting married, but Psyche is stuck sitting alone in her room. Getting worried that they've made some god angry, Psyche's parents decide to go consult the oracle of Apollo about their daughter's future. The oracle tells them that Psyche is destined to marry a monster that neither god nor mortal can resist. Psyche's parents are instructed to leave her on a mountain to await her monstrous husband. They cry a lot about it, but they do it anyway. So, Psyche is chilling on top of the mountain, fully expecting something terrible to happen. Zephyr, the west wind, comes and lifts her, carrying the princess gently from the mountaintop down to a beautiful field of flowers. Psyche comes across an amazing castle and goes inside. The place is decked out with tons of treasure and priceless pieces of art. She hears voices that tell her that the palace and all the amazing stuff in it is hers. She's treated to a wonderful feast, complete with an invisible singing chorus for entertainment. Her husband-to-be comes to her that night in the darkness of her bedroom, so she can't see what he looks like. He tells her that she must never try to see what he looks like. She's cool with that for a while, but eventually she gets lonely since he only comes at night and because there are no other humans around. Psyche convinces her invisible husband to let her sisters come and visit her. He reluctantly agrees and has Zephyr float them down. Psyche's sisters get super-jealous about her incredibly posh lifestyle. They start interrogating her about who her husband is. At first, Psyche lies and says he's a handsome young man who spends all day hunting in the mountains. They don't buy it, though, and keep pumping her for information. Eventually, Psyche admits that she's never seen him and that he only comes at night. The jealous sisters remind Psyche of the prophecy that she would marry a monster, and they convince their sister that she has to see what her husband looks like. They advise her to wait until he's asleep, then stand over him with a lamp and a knife (in case he's a monster). That night she follows her sisters' advice and sees that her husband is none other than Cupid. Psyche is blown away by how ridiculously handsome her husband is. She's so distracted that she lets a drop of oil fall and burns his skin. Cupid wakes up and sees his wife standing there with the lamp and a knife. Furious, he flies out the window, telling Psyche that she'll never see him again. The beautiful palace disappears and Psyche is left all alone. Totally depressed, Psyche goes back to her sisters and tells them what happened. As if they hadn't already shown how totally awful they were, the sisters now go to the mountaintop thinking that one of them might take Psyche's husband for themselves. They jump off the mountain, expecting Zephyr to take them down. (No such luck.) The jealous sisters fall to their deaths on the rocks below. Meanwhile, Psyche wanders around trying to find Cupid. She ends up going to a temple of Ceres (a.k.a. Demeter), goddess of the harvest. The temple is a total wreck, so Psyche cleans it up. Ceres is impressed with Psyche's devotion. Psyche asks for some help. Ceres wishes she could give Psyche a hand, but the goddess says she can't go against Venus. Ceres advises Psyche to go to Venus and humbly beg for forgiveness. Psyche takes Ceres' advice and presents herself to Venus. Venus is still crazy mad and gives Psyche a tongue lashing, telling the girl that Cupid is still trying to recover from the burn that the oil gave him when it dripped on him. The goddess of love tells Psyche that she must prove herself worthy to be Cupid's wife by completing a task. Psyche is taken to a storehouse full of wheat, millet, barley, and all kinds of stuff that Venus uses to feed her pigeons. Psyche is ordered to organize all the different kinds of grain – the wheat with the wheat, the barley with the barley, etc. The job seems pretty much impossible, and, to make matters worse, Venus orders Psyche to get it done by evening. Cupid intervenes, however, and inspires a colony of ants to come out of the ground and help out Psyche. (Phew! We were worried that Rumpelstiltskin might show up.) The ants get the job done and disappear underground. Venus returns and tells Psyche that it doesn't count, because Psyche couldn't have done it by herself. The next day the goddess of love gives her daughter-in-law another task. Psyche must collect golden fleece from the back of every sheep in a herd that hangs out by a river. As she's about to cross the river, though, a river god warns Psyche that, if she tries it when the sun is rising, the human-hating rams will kill her. The helpful river god advises her to wait until the noontime sun makes the herd go chill out in the shade; then the rams won't mess with her. Psyche follows the river god's advice and safely collects the wool. Venus is still not satisfied, though, saying again that Psyche didn't do it on her own. Next, the love goddess orders Psyche to go down to the world of the dead and see Proserpine (a.k.a. Persephone), the queen of the underworld and wife of Pluto (a.k.a. Hades). Venus says she wants Psyche to bring a little bit of Proserpine's beauty back in a box. Psyche bravely heads off to find the underworld, but she's really upset this time – going to the land of the dead is beyond dangerous. How is Psyche supposed to get to the underworld? Is she supposed to kill herself? She seems to think so. Thankfully, before Psyche jumps off a cliff, she hears a voice (Cupid) that tells her how to pull it off. The voice tells her where there's a cave that leads down to the underworld, how to convince Charon (the ferryman) to take her there and back, and how to avoid Cerberus, the vicious three-headed dog who guards the underworld. Psyche makes it to Pluto and Proserpine's palace in the land of the dead and tells Proserpine that Venus wants to borrow a little beauty. A box is given to Psyche, and she's on her way. The voice warns Psyche not to open the box, no matter what she does, but Psyche's just so curious and can't help herself. The girl opens the box, thinking that, if she had a little of the beauty herself, then she'd truly be worthy of Cupid. Unfortunately, there's no beauty in the box at all, and when Psyche takes off the lid, she's plunged into a deep sleep, collapsing in the middle of the road. Cupid, who has finally recovered from his burn, flies to help his wife. He wakes her up with one of his arrows, and he points out that once again her curiosity has gotten her in trouble. Cupid tells her to take the box to Venus and to let him take care of the rest. He flies to Jupiter (a.k.a. Zeus), and he begs the king of the gods to help him and Psyche. Jupiter summons Venus and convinces her to chill out about the whole thing. Then he brings Psyche up to Mt. Olympus, the home of the gods, and gives her some ambrosia, which makes the girl immortal. At long last, Cupid and Psyche get to be together. Cupid and Psyche end up having a daughter together, named Voluptas (a.k.a. Hedone, sometimes translated as Pleasure).

Tagalog

cupid and psyche tagalog version

Last Update: 2015-06-20
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

English

A king and queen have three daughters. All three of the girls are attractive, but one of them is absolutely gorgeous – Psyche. People come from all around just to check out how beautiful Psyche is. All this adoration of Psyche gets totally out of hand; men start worshiping her as if she were a goddess and ignore the altars of the goddess of love and beauty, Venus (a.k.a. Aphrodite). Men even start saying that Psyche is more beautiful than Venus. (Uh-oh.) We bet you can guess who got mad about this. Yup, that's right – Venus. The goddess of love gets kind of hateful and orders her son, Cupid (a.k.a. Eros), to go and punish Psyche by making her fall in love with the ugliest thing around. Cupid sneaks into Psyche's bedroom to do his mother's bidding, but, when he sees how beautiful Psyche is, he gets all distracted and pricks himself with his own arrow. Cupid falls instantly in love with Psyche and leaves without doing what his mother told him to do. Psyche's life continues on as usual: everybody comes to gawk at how hot she is. However, since Venus has it in for her, nobody ever falls in love with Psyche. Psyche's two sisters end up getting married, but Psyche is stuck sitting alone in her room. Getting worried that they've made some god angry, Psyche's parents decide to go consult the oracle of Apollo about their daughter's future. The oracle tells them that Psyche is destined to marry a monster that neither god nor mortal can resist. Psyche's parents are instructed to leave her on a mountain to await her monstrous husband. They cry a lot about it, but they do it anyway. So, Psyche is chilling on top of the mountain, fully expecting something terrible to happen. Zephyr, the west wind, comes and lifts her, carrying the princess gently from the mountaintop down to a beautiful field of flowers. Psyche comes across an amazing castle and goes inside. The place is decked out with tons of treasure and priceless pieces of art. She hears voices that tell her that the palace and all the amazing stuff in it is hers. She's treated to a wonderful feast, complete with an invisible singing chorus for entertainment. Her husband-to-be comes to her that night in the darkness of her bedroom, so she can't see what he looks like. He tells her that she must never try to see what he looks like. She's cool with that for a while, but eventually she gets lonely since he only comes at night and because there are no other humans around. Psyche convinces her invisible husband to let her sisters come and visit her. He reluctantly agrees and has Zephyr float them down. Psyche's sisters get super-jealous about her incredibly posh lifestyle. They start interrogating her about who her husband is. At first, Psyche lies and says he's a handsome young man who spends all day hunting in the mountains. They don't buy it, though, and keep pumping her for information. Eventually, Psyche admits that she's never seen him and that he only comes at night. The jealous sisters remind Psyche of the prophecy that she would marry a monster, and they convince their sister that she has to see what her husband looks like. They advise her to wait until he's asleep, then stand over him with a lamp and a knife (in case he's a monster). That night she follows her sisters' advice and sees that her husband is none other than Cupid. Psyche is blown away by how ridiculously handsome her husband is. She's so distracted that she lets a drop of oil fall and burns his skin. Cupid wakes up and sees his wife standing there with the lamp and a knife. Furious, he flies out the window, telling Psyche that she'll never see him again. The beautiful palace disappears and Psyche is left all alone. Totally depressed, Psyche goes back to her sisters and tells them what happened. As if they hadn't already shown how totally awful they were, the sisters now go to the mountaintop thinking that one of them might take Psyche's husband for themselves. They jump off the mountain, expecting Zephyr to take them down. (No such luck.) The jealous sisters fall to their deaths on the rocks below. Meanwhile, Psyche wanders around trying to find Cupid. She ends up going to a temple of Ceres (a.k.a. Demeter), goddess of the harvest. The temple is a total wreck, so Psyche cleans it up. Ceres is impressed with Psyche's devotion. Psyche asks for some help. Ceres wishes she could give Psyche a hand, but the goddess says she can't go against Venus. Ceres advises Psyche to go to Venus and humbly beg for forgiveness. Psyche takes Ceres' advice and presents herself to Venus. Venus is still crazy mad and gives Psyche a tongue lashing, telling the girl that Cupid is still trying to recover from the burn that the oil gave him when it dripped on him. The goddess of love tells Psyche that she must prove herself worthy to be Cupid's wife by completing a task. Psyche is taken to a storehouse full of wheat, millet, barley, and all kinds of stuff that Venus uses to feed her pigeons. Psyche is ordered to organize all the different kinds of grain – the wheat with the wheat, the barley with the barley, etc. The job seems pretty much impossible, and, to make matters worse, Venus orders Psyche to get it done by evening. Cupid intervenes, however, and inspires a colony of ants to come out of the ground and help out Psyche. (Phew! We were worried that Rumpelstiltskin might show up.) The ants get the job done and disappear underground. Venus returns and tells Psyche that it doesn't count, because Psyche couldn't have done it by herself. The next day the goddess of love gives her daughter-in-law another task. Psyche must collect golden fleece from the back of every sheep in a herd that hangs out by a river. As she's about to cross the river, though, a river god warns Psyche that, if she tries it when the sun is rising, the human-hating rams will kill her. The helpful river god advises her to wait until the noontime sun makes the herd go chill out in the shade; then the rams won't mess with her. Psyche follows the river god's advice and safely collects the wool. Venus is still not satisfied, though, saying again that Psyche didn't do it on her own. Next, the love goddess orders Psyche to go down to the world of the dead and see Proserpine (a.k.a. Persephone), the queen of the underworld and wife of Pluto (a.k.a. Hades). Venus says she wants Psyche to bring a little bit of Proserpine's beauty back in a box. Psyche bravely heads off to find the underworld, but she's really upset this time – going to the land of the dead is beyond dangerous. How is Psyche supposed to get to the underworld? Is she supposed to kill herself? She seems to think so. Thankfully, before Psyche jumps off a cliff, she hears a voice (Cupid) that tells her how to pull it off. The voice tells her where there's a cave that leads down to the underworld, how to convince Charon (the ferryman) to take her there and back, and how to avoid Cerberus, the vicious three-headed dog who guards the underworld. Psyche makes it to Pluto and Proserpine's palace in the land of the dead and tells Proserpine that Venus wants to borrow a little beauty. A box is given to Psyche, and she's on her way. The voice warns Psyche not to open the box, no matter what she does, but Psyche's just so curious and can't help herself. The girl opens the box, thinking that, if she had a little of the beauty herself, then she'd truly be worthy of Cupid. Unfortunately, there's no beauty in the box at all, and when Psyche takes off the lid, she's plunged into a deep sleep, collapsing in the middle of the road. Cupid, who has finally recovered from his burn, flies to help his wife. He wakes her up with one of his arrows, and he points out that once again her curiosity has gotten her in trouble. Cupid tells her to take the box to Venus and to let him take care of the rest. He flies to Jupiter (a.k.a. Zeus), and he begs the king of the gods to help him and Psyche. Jupiter summons Venus and convinces her to chill out about the whole thing. Then he brings Psyche up to Mt. Olympus, the home of the gods, and gives her some ambrosia, which makes the girl immortal. At long last, Cupid and Psyche get to be together. Cupid and Psyche end up having a daughter together, named Voluptas (a.k.a. Hedone, sometimes translated as Pleasure).

Tagalog

cupid and psyche (salin sa filipino)

Last Update: 2015-06-15
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 4
Quality:

Reference:

English

If you've been thinking about putting your romantic situation on a firmer footing, today's the time to do it, according to the Pope and Judgment. It looks as though you could get the emotional happiness and security you're looking for. Your partner's love for you is sincere and you enjoy many moments of togetherness and harmony. Don't keep hunting for the buried treasure, Jalanie--you've found it!In your work environment, you are someone who is dedicated to their own work and who also has no hesitation helping others when they ask for help. You literally radiate reassurance and success. Your colleagues are happy to take you into their confidence, and your boss is delighted to confer you with more important projects. Even so, you manage to remain modest and helpful.

Tagalog

QUERY LENGTH LIMIT EXCEDEED. MAX ALLOWED QUERY : 500 CHARS

Last Update: 2015-05-05
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

English

Scene 2: An Angel Visits Mary MARY enters from the side and stands near the BASKET OF CLOTHES. MARY begins folding the clothes. NARRATOR God sent the angel Gabriel to Nazareth, a town in Galilee. ANGEL begins sneakily tip-toeing from the side, making their way to stand behind MARY, who doesn’t notice. NARRATOR He was sent to a girl named Mary. The angel greeted her and said... ANGEL 1 (Jumps out from behind MARY) Mary! MARY throws the piece of clothing she was folding in the air. MARY takes a few steps away and hides behind the RECTANGULAR BOX. ANGEL 1 The Lord has given you special favor. He is with you. NARRATOR Mary was very upset because of his words. Mary wondered... MARY stands up and scratches her head. MARY What kind of greeting this could be? NARRATOR But the angel said to her... ANGEL 1 (Holds out a hand out) Do not be afraid, Mary. God is very pleased with you. NARRATOR Then the angel said... The ANGEL reaches into their sash, pulls out the FOLDED LETTER, walks over to the NARRATOR, and hands it to them. The NARRATOR unfolds the letter and glances over it, then looks at the ANGEL quizzically. The ANGEL leans over and whispers in the NARRATOR’S ear. The NARRATOR nods. NARRATOR Ladies and Gentlemen, the angel has informed me that, after a long and tiring trip from heaven, they’d like a little help delivering their long message from God. Any volunteers? (Waits a second.) Ah, yes, you over there. The ANGEL’S MOM OR DAD comes and stands next to the NARRATOR. The NARRATOR hands the LETTER to the ANGEL’S MOM OR DAD. The ANGEL returns to where they were onstage. NARRATOR The angel continued... PARENT NARRATOR You will become pregnant... The ANGEL pats their belly a few times. PARENT NARRATOR And give birth to a son. You must name him Jesus. The ANGEL grabs the JESUS SIGN from the back of the stage, holds it up for the audience to see, and hands it to MARY, who holds it in one hand. PARENT NARRATOR He will be great and will be called the Son of the Most High God. The ANGEL flexes their muscles several times like a body builder. PARENT NARRATOR The Lord God will make him a king like his father David of long ago. The ANGEL grabs the CROWN SIGN from the back of the stage, holds it up for the audience to see, and hands it to MARY, who holds it in her other hand. PARENT NARRATOR He will rule forever over his people, who came from Jacob's family. His kingdom will never end. NARRATOR Mary asked the angel... PARENT NARRATOR How can this happen? MARY shrugs. NARRATOR The angel answered... PARENT NARRATOR The Holy Spirit will come to you. The ANGEL reaches up to the sky and slowly lowers their hands to waist level while wiggling their fingers. PARENT NARRATOR The power of the Most High God will cover you. So the holy one that is born will be called the Son of God. ANGEL 1 Nothing is impossible with God. NARRATOR Mary answered... MARY I serve the Lord. May it happen to me just as you said it would. NARRATOR Then the angel left her. The ANGEL exits to the side of the stage. MARY sets the SIGNS back on the back of the stage. MARY puts the clothes in the basket and exits to the side of the stage. Scene 3: An Angel Visits Joseph in a Dream NARRATOR This is how the birth of Jesus Christ came about. JOSEPH enters from the side of the stage, holding a BOUQUET OF FLOWERS. NARRATOR His mother Mary and Joseph had promised to get married. JOSEPH gestures over to the side of the stage for someone to come over. MARY enters in slowly from the side of the stage with a noticeably pregnant belly, holding one hand against the small of her back. NARRATOR But before they started to live together, it became clear that she was going to have a baby. She became pregnant by the power of the Holy Spirit. JOSEPH stares with his mouth open, throws the FLOWERS in the air, and puts his head in his hands. MARY covers her face, crying, and runs, exiting to the side of the stage. NARRATOR Her husband Joseph was a godly man. JOSEPH paces back and forth, pretending to talk to himself. NARRATOR He did not want to put her to shame in public. So he planned to divorce her quietly. NARRATOR But as Joseph was thinking about this... JOSEPH sits down on the RECTANGULAR BOX and poses like the thinker. He slowly leans his head and lays down on the RECTANGULAR BOX to sleep. NARRATOR ...an angel of the Lord appeared to him in a dream. The ANGEL runs in from the side, does a somersault, and jumps up with arms outstretched. NARRATOR The angel said... ANGEL 2 (Holding out one hand to Joseph) Joseph, son of David... JOSEPH sits up, startled. He hides behind the RECTANGULAR BOX. ANGEL 2 Don't be afraid to take Mary home as your wife. PARENT NARRATOR The baby inside her... The ANGEL pats their belly a few times. PARENT NARRATOR ...is from the Holy Spirit. The ANGEL holds out their hands up to the sky and wiggles his fingers while hopping from foot to foot. PARENT NARRATOR She is going to have a son. You must give him the name Jesus. The ANGEL grabs the JESUS SIGN from the back of the stage, holds it up for the audience to see, and hands it to JOSEPH, who holds it in one hand. PARENT NARRATOR That is because he will save his people from their sins. The ANGEL grabs the SAVIOR SIGN from the back of the stage, holds it up for the audience to see, and hands it to JOSEPH, who holds it in one hand. After a beat, the ANGEL takes the SIGNS back and sets the where they were before. The ANGEL helps JOSEPH lay back down on the RECTANGULAR BOX. The ANGEL grabs the BLANKET from behind the RECTANGULAR BOX and lays it on JOSEPH. The ANGEL then exits to the side of the stage, doing another somersault as they leave. NARRATOR Joseph woke up. JOSEPH sits up, pulls off the BLANKET, and sets it behind the RECTANGULAR BOX. JOSEPH rubs his eyes with his palms, pinches himself, and stands up. NARRATOR He did what the angel of the Lord commanded him to do. JOSEPH Mary! MARY does a pregnant-style run over to JOSEPH. JOSEPH pats down his torso, as if feeling in his pockets. He then does a “COME ON” gesture towards the NARRATOR. The NARRATOR walks over to JOSEPH and hands him a ring. JOSEPH bows down on one knee. MARY holds a hand, and JOSEPH puts a ring on it. NARRATOR He took Mary home as his wife. JOSEPH and MARY hold hands and exit to the side of the stage. Scene 4: Mary and Joseph Travel to Bethlehem NARRATOR In those days, Caesar Augustus made a law. CAESAR AUGUSTUS enters from the side holding a SCROLL and stands in the center of the stage. CAESAR AUGUSTUS lets the SCROLL roll to the ground and pretends to read it. CAESAR AUGUSTUS Hear ye, hear ye! Let there be a list be made of everyone in the whole Roman world. CAESAR AUGUSTUS exits to the side of the stage. NARRATOR All went to their own towns to be listed. So Joseph went also. He went from the town of Nazareth in Galilee to Judea. The INNKEEPERS enter from the side of stage, holding INNKEEPER SIGNS, with their heads poking out from the cutout of the sign. They stand, spread out in a long line. NARRATOR That is where Bethlehem, the town of David, was. JOSEPH enters from the side, pulling a WAGON with MARY riding in it. MARY is looking very pregnant. NARRATOR He went there with Mary to be listed. Mary was engaged to him. She was expecting a baby. JOSEPH pulls the wagon up to INNKEEPER 1 and knocks on their INNKEEPER SIGN. INNKEEPER 1 No room! JOSEPH pulls the wagon up to INNKEEPER 2 and knocks on their INNKEEPER SIGN. INNKEEPER 2 No room! JOSEPH pulls the wagon up to INNKEEPER 3 and knocks on their INNKEEPER SIGN. INNKEEPER 3 No room! NARRATOR There was no room for them in the inn. The INNKEEPERS exit to the side of the stage. The STABLEKEEPER enters from the side carrying the STABLEKEEPER SIGN and stands in the center of the stage, in front of the RECTANGULAR BOX. JOSEPH pulls the wagon over to the STABLEKEEPER and KNOCKS on their STABLEKEEPER SIGN. STABLEKEEPER There’s room in the barn! JOSEPH gives the STABLEKEEPER a bow of thanks. The STABLEKEEPER exits to the side of the stage. JOSEPH and MARY sit on the RECTANGULAR BOX. The STAGE HANDS carry the MANGER and set it in the middle of the stage. Scene 5: Jesus is Born in a Stable NARRATOR While Joseph and Mary were there, the time came for the child to be born. JOSEPH kneels next to MARY and grabs her hand. He rubs his hand once along her hair. NARRATOR She gave birth to her first baby. JOSEPH reaches behind the RECTANGULAR BOX and grabs the BABY. JOSPEH (Holding the BABY up) It’s a boy! MARY grabs the BLANKET from behind the RECTANGULAR BOX . JOSEPH hands the BABY to MARY. NARRATOR She wrapped him in large strips of cloth. MARY wraps the BABY in the BLANKET. NARRATOR Then she placed him in a manger. MARY places the BABY in the manger. MARY and JOSEPH exit to the side of the stage, taking the WAGON with them. Scene 6: The Angels Visit Shepherds NARRATOR There were shepherds living out in the fields nearby. A group of SHEPHERDS enter from the side of the stage. NARRATOR They were looking after their sheep. A group of children dressed as SHEEP enter from the side of the stage wearing SHEEP HATS and sit down, scattered near the center. NARRATOR It was night. The SHEEP yawn and stretch. The SHEPHERDS run to the side of the stage and grab blankets and pillows. The SHEPHERDS proceed to tuck each of the sheep in by laying then down on the floor, placing a pillow under their heads, and pulling a blanket over them. When the SHEPHERDS are finished, they sit down on or near the RECTANGULAR BOX . NARRATOR An angel of the Lord appeared to them. ANGEL 3 jumps out from the side of the stage with their hands up and stands near the SHEPHERDS. NARRATOR And the glory of the Lord shone around them and they were terrified. The SHEPHERDS kneel and cower in fear, hiding behind the RECTANGULAR BOX. NARRATOR But the angel said to them... ANGEL 3 (Holding out a hand) Do not be afraid. I bring you good news of great joy. PARENT NARRATOR It is for all the people. The ANGEL gestures out toward the audience. PARENT NARRATOR Today in the town of David a Savior has been born to you. He is Christ the Lord. The ANGEL makes the baseball “Safe!” sign with their arms. PARENT NARRATOR Here is how you will know I am telling you the truth. You will find a baby wrapped in strips of cloth... The ANGEL grabs the BABY SIGN from the back of the stage, holds it up for the audience to see, and hands it to one of the SHEPHERDS, who holds it in their hand. PARENT NARRATOR And lying in a manger. The ANGEL grabs the MANGER SIGN from the back of the stage, holds it up for the audience to see, and hands it to one of the SHEPHERDS, who holds it in their hand. NARRATOR Suddenly a large group of angels from heaven also appeared. ANGEL 1 and ANGEL 2 run on stage and stand next to ANGEL 1. NARRATOR They were praising God. They said... ANGELS 1, 2 AND 3 (Raising their hands to the sky) Glory to God in heaven! PARENT NARRATOR And may peace be given to those he is pleased with on earth! NARRATOR The angels left and went into heaven. The ANGELS exit to the side of the stage. NARRATOR Then the shepherds said to one another... SHEPHERDS Let's go to Bethlehem. PARENT NARRATOR Let's see this thing that has happened, which the Lord has told us about." NARRATOR So they hurried off... The SHEPHERDS and all of the SHEEP exit to the right of the stage. NARRATOR They found Mary and Joseph and the baby. MARY and JOSEPH enter from the side of the stage and sit on the RECTANGULAR BOX. NARRATOR The baby was lying in the manger. The SHEPHERDS enter from the side of the stage and kneel around the manger. NARRATOR After the shepherds had seen him, they told everyone. They reported what the angel had said about this child. The SHEPHERDS run all over into the audience, going to various people, putting their hands on their shoulders and saying, “Jesus is born!” After 30 seconds of this, they run to the back of the auditorium and wait. NARRATOR Everyone who heard it were amazed at what the shepherds said to them. (Pauses) I said, everyone who heard it were amazed at what the shepherds said to them. (Gestures to the congregation) CONGREGATION Oooooh! Aaaaaah! NARRATOR But Mary kept all these things like a secret treasure in her heart. MARY picks up the BABY and walks off the side of the stage, looking up contemplatively. JOSEPH exits to the side of the stage after her. NARRATOR She thought about them over and over. NARRATOR The shepherds returned. The SHEPHERDS run from the back on the auditorium and onto the stage. NARRATOR They gave glory and praise to God. The SHEPHERDS to a brief, silly dance of celebration. NARRATOR Everything they had seen and heard was just as they had been told. The SHEPHERDS exit to the side of the stage. THE END

Tagalog

script ng isang comedy-play

Last Update: 2014-12-27
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English

A Walk to Remember Movie Poster A Walk to Remember (2002) Cast Mandy Moore as Jamie Sullivan Shane West as Landon Carter Daryl Hannah as Cynthia Carter Peter Coyote as Rev. Sullivan Lauren German as Belinda Clayne Crawford as Dean Directed by Adam Shankman Written by Karen Janszen Based on the novel by Nicholas Sparks Drama, Family, Romance Rated PG For Thematic Elements Language and Some Sensual Material 100 minutes Watch This Movie iTunes Netflix Mail Add_to_queue_mini_off Powered by GoWatchIt | Roger Ebert January 25, 2002 | Print Page "A Walk to Remember" is a love story so sweet, sincere and positive that it sneaks past the defenses built up in this age of irony. It tells the story of a romance between two 18-year-olds that is summarized when the boy tells the girl's doubtful father: "Jamie has faith in me. She makes me want to be different. Better." After all of the vulgar crudities of the typical modern teenage movie, here is one that looks closely, pays attention, sees that not all teenagers are as cretinous as Hollywood portrays them. The singer Mandy Moore, a natural beauty in both face and manner, stars as Jamie Sullivan, an outsider at school who is laughed at because she stands apart, has values, and always wears the same ratty blue sweater. Her father (Peter Coyote) is a local minister. Shane West plays Landon Carter, a senior boy who hangs with the popular crowd but is shaken when a stupid dare goes wrong and one of his friends is paralyzed in a diving accident. He dates a popular girl and joins in the laughter against Jamie. Then, as punishment for the prank, he is ordered by the principal to join the drama club: "You need to meet some new people." Jamie's in the club. He begins to notice her in a new way. He asks her to help him rehearse for a role in a play. She treats him with level honesty. She isn't one of those losers who skulks around feeling put upon; her self-esteem stands apart from the opinion of her peers. She's a smart, nice girl, a reminder that one of the pleasures of the movies is to meet good people. The plot has revelations that I will not reveal. Enough to focus on the way Jamie's serene example makes Landon into a nicer person--encourages him to become more sincere and serious, to win her where she approaches him while he's with his old friends and says, "See you tonight," and he says, "In your dreams." When he turns up at her house, she is hurt and angry, and his excuses sound lame even to him. The movie walks a fine line with the Peter Coyote character, whose church Landon attends. Movies have a way of stereotyping reactionary Bible-thumpers who are hostile to teen romance. There is a little of that here; Jamie is forbidden to date, for example, although there's more behind his decision than knee-jerk strictness. But when Landon goes to the Rev. Sullivan and asks him to have faith in him, the minister listens with an open mind. Yes, the movie is corny at times. But corniness is all right at times. I forgave the movie its broad emotion because it earned it. It lays things on a little thick at the end, but by then it had paid its way. Director Adam Shankman and his writer, Karen Janszen, working from the novel by Nicholas Sparks, have an unforced trust in the material that redeems, even justifies the broad strokes. They go wrong only three times: (1) The subplot involving the paralyzed boy should have either been dealt with, or dropped; (2) It's tiresome to make the black teenager use "brother" in every sentence, as if he is not their peer but was ported in from another world; (3) As Kuleshov proved more than 80 years ago in a famous experiment, when an audience sees an impassive closeup, it supplies the necessary emotion from the context. It can be fatal for an actor to try to "act" in a closeup, and Landon's little smile at the end is a distraction at a crucial moment. Those are small flaws in a touching movie. The performances by Moore and West are so quietly convincing we're reminded that many teenagers in movies seem to think like 30-year-old standup comics. That Jamie and Landon base their romance on values and respect will blindside some viewers of the film, especially since the first five or 10 minutes seem to be headed down a familiar teenage movie trail. "A Walk to Remember" is a small treasure.

Tagalog

isang maglakad sa tandaan buod ng pelikula

Last Update: 2014-12-04
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English

lets see the treasures in our sea

Tagalog

tumitingin sa ating kayamanan sa karagatan

Last Update: 2014-11-06
Subject: Forestry
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English

The treasures of the people

Tagalog

Ang mga kayamanan ng mga tao

Last Update: 2014-09-29
Subject: General
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