MyMemory, World's Largest Translation Memory
Click to expand

Language pair: Click to swap content  Subject   
Ask Google

You searched for: menterjemahkan ( Malay - English )

    [ Turn off colors ]

Human contributions

From professional translators, enterprises, web pages and freely available translation repositories.

Add a translation

Malay

English

Info

Malay

menterjemahkan

English

ang loong ee

Last Update: 2014-05-01
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference: Anonymous

Malay

menterjemahkan

English

translate

Last Update: 2015-04-19
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

Malay

menterjemahkan

English

YOU ARE NOT ALONE IN TELLING THE TRUTH

Last Update: 2015-04-19
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

Malay

menterjemahkan

English

commited

Last Update: 2014-08-18
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

Malay

menterjemahkan

English

kinesthetic

Last Update: 2014-04-15
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

Malay

menterjemahkan

English

biofeedback modalities

Last Update: 2014-03-21
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

Malay

chat cit menterjemahkan

English

anxiety

Last Update: 2017-03-11
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

Malay

chat cit menterjemahkan

English

in designing & implementing IT solutions. Born in the midst of the implementation of MCMC’s National Broadband Plan, iKenanga’s strengths revolve around broadband technology and its applications. iKenanga’s philosophy is to encourage broadband usage by making it an intergral part of everyone’s lives. With solutions for both the business sector and the mass market, iKenanga has been actively marketing various broadband solutions as a part of iKenanga’s product portfolio. Complementing iKenanga’s broadband solutions, iKenanga’s business area also encompasses a variety of IT, telecommunications, engineering & security system solutions. Through these services, iKenanga has positioned itself as a comprehensive business solutions provider that is capable of catering to the customers’ every need.

Last Update: 2016-05-20
Subject: Marketing
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:
Warning: Contains invisible HTML formatting

Malay

chat cit menterjemahkan

English

WITH the ringgit weakening over the past year or so, those of you who haven’t already, are probably starting to toy with the idea of investing overseas. Diversification across markets, asset classes and currencies is one of the basic tenets of investing. Those who follow this strategy religiously would likely have seen their investment portfolios perform better than those who remained entrenched in the local market. What used to be considered fairly robust returns – such as ASB dividends of 8% per annum and EPF dividends of 6.5% per annum – now seem menial if you take into account the 30% drop in the value of our ringgit. It is no surprise then that by now, many Malaysians have accepted the fact that the ringgit may not bounce back to RM3.20 to US$1 anytime soon, and that it is time to diversify their assets by means of foreign investments. This is good. But before putting your money into foreign investments, you need to know what you are getting yourself into, and carefully consider your decisions before making your moves. Firstly, how much of your investable assets should you allocate to foreign investments? The rule of thumb is to allocate not more than 30% of your investable assets into foreign currency investments. The reason for this is that your daily life still revolves around the Malaysian currency, and your foreign investment is merely a means of bolstering your net worth. Besides, if the US currency weakens, you run the risk of losing a significant amount of money if your primary invested assets were in US dollars. In recent months, anyone who bought into the pessimistic view out of fear that the ringgit would touch RM5 to US$1 would have seen the value of their foreign investment shrink owing to the strengthening of the Malaysian currency. Therefore, putting more than 30% of investable assets into foreign investments would be over-investing, not to mention highly risky. The second point to consider is, how do foreign investment markets fare in comparison to Malaysia? If you have not had any experience investing overseas, you may be in for a big surprise. Many Malaysians assume that the investment market overseas works more or less the same way as it does locally. However, this is not the case. Unlike Malaysia, foreign investment markets such as US, Singapore and Hong Kong are far more open and have fewer regulatory restrictions. There’s also less government support for their market. As such, while these markets enjoy higher levels of global portfolio fund flows, they also experience higher levels of volatility and price fluctuations. Let us take the example of bonds. In Malaysia, bond investments behave almost like a fixed deposit type of investment – steadily up and predictable (partly due to the accreting value of bond coupons recognised by the fund over time). However, the same can’t be said in other countries. In the graph, you can see that a Malaysian bond fund (Fund A) moved up steadily over the period of comparison whereas the US (Fund B) and European (Fund C) bond funds experienced higher levels of price volatility and underperformed Fund A. All three funds invest in somewhat similar investment grade papers, only that they invest in different markets. This is mind blowing for most Malaysian investors. In fact, I had a client who once lost up to 20% of his investment in an Asian bond fund domiciled in Singapore. What made him very upset was that he wasn’t properly advised by the banker of the risk exposure of such a fund. Had he done a little more due diligence or consulted an independent financial advisor before investing into the fund, he would not have been caught off-guard and suffered such a significant loss. The same applies to equity investment overseas. Many investors would have a hard time trying to adapt to markets that are more volatile than our FTSE Bursa Malaysia KL Composite Index. The next point to consider is this: How safe is your capital when investing in foreign products? If things are not going well, will you be able to retain your capital at the least? Let me highlight the example of an offshore commodity product that I once came across. This product focused on physical trading of commodities like timber, metals, aquaculture, rice, plant-based oil, crude oil and biofuel. It supposedly had an attractive track record, yielding double-digit annualised returns for more than two years since its inception. It targets to provide investors with a fixed 2.25% quarterly distribution (i.e. a total of 9% per year). One of the most common mistakes made by Malaysian investors, however, is the tendency to look at foreign investments through the lenses of their local perspective and experience. At first glance, you might think this investment is no different than any other equity unit trust funds available in Malaysia – a credible alternative investment with good diversification credentials worthy of consideration. However, the product turned out to be a scam and the investors lost all their money. This is not an isolated case. Due to their limited knowledge and experience, many Malaysian investors fail to differentiate genuine investments from scams. That costs them a lot of money. Cashflow needs Thus when investing in foreign markets, it is always better to stick to licensed and reputable fund managers that invest in regulated investments and markets. Lastly, before putting your money into foreign investments, you should thoroughly assess your cashflow needs in order to maximise the holding power of your investments. A good cashflow management practice is to establish one’s ideal cash reserve before dabbling in investments. For working adults, this emergency fund should be able to cover six months of one’s cashflow needs such as living expenses, loan repayments and any other lump sum cash requirements over the next three years. I recall an incident where a client of mine underestimated the amount of cash he would need to execute his plans of building a bungalow on a plot of land he owned. Only midway through the construction process did he realise that he was short of cash, after having invested the remainder of his liquid assets in foreign investments. In the end, in order to complete his dream home, he was forced to withdraw his foreign investments at a loss. A situation like this could have been easily avoided with a little bit more cashflow planning and foresight. Make the necessary provisions for your short-term cashflow needs and you will position yourself to better withstand any unexpected investment market volatility. Diversification of investments across markets, asset classes and currencies is a recommended risk management strategy for any investor and should be diligently pursued. However, never assume that investing overseas is similar to investing in your home ground. In the case of Malaysia’s relatively stable investment environment, entering into foreign investment markets could be akin to stepping into rough sea from a calm bay – it might come as a shock if you are unprepared. Conduct your research thoroughly – find out more about the investment environment, the country’s regulations, and study the investment product carefully. Consult a professional if required, such as an independent financial advisor, to address any concerns you may have. Once you’ve considered the above and decided to invest, make sure that you monitor the performance of your investment closely. The more volatile a market, the faster you’ll need to take action on your profits or losses. Park your profits somewhere safe to prevent losing it to the fluctuating market. If your investment is making a loss, then act fast with a contingency plan at hand. Remember, the more prepared you are, the more likely you are to succeed. All the best! Yap Ming Hui (yapmh@whitman.com.my) is a bestselling author, TV personality, columnist and coach on money optimisation. He heads Whitman Independent Advisors, a licensed independent financial advisory firm. For more information, please visit his website at www.whitman.com.my

Last Update: 2016-03-29
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

Malay

chat cit menterjemahkan

English

Packaged drinking water With hygiene becoming a major factor in the consumption of water, Packaged drinking water has found its way into peoples mind. Coca cola has a presence in the packed drinking water segment though Kinley. Although Kinleys expansion is slow as of now, Kinley has a huge potential of expansion. Thus Coca cola as a company should focus on the expansion of Kinley as a brand and take it up to Bisleri ‘s level of trust.

Last Update: 2016-03-09
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

Malay

chat cit menterjemahkan

English

cit chat Ion exchange is a proven, well known technology that has been used commercially in a wide variety of applications for over 50 years. Ion exchange has been designated as a "Best Available Technology" by the EPA for the removal of arsenic from drinking water sources. Envirogen deploys a range of ion exchange system designs to remove a target contaminant or a combination of contaminants. Particular benefits may be found when multiple anionic contaminants are present (i.e., perchlorate, nitrate, uranium), as the treatment problem might be effectively addressed with a single technology. Ion exchange is the process of removing ionic compounds from a water or solvent stream by employing the greater affinity that a particular ion has for the resin than for remaining in solution. The result is "capture" of the ion on the resin. When the capacity of the resin to hold a particular ion is reached, the resin is "exhausted." Some designs call for single-use resin; others for the resin to be regenerated. The regeneration process involves passing a regenerant solution over the resin to mobilize the targeted contaminant ions through reaching the level of solubility required to liberate the ion from the resin bead into solution. The regeneration process can involve a salt or an acid or base. We have developed designs to meet the conditions found at municipal water well sites. Considerations include varying water treatment volume, start-up/shut-down type operations, protection from the elements, security, quiet operation, and safe delivery and handling of materials in and out of the site. Our proprietary multi-bed system configuration can be sequenced in and out of service automatically using our proven process control software to produce very low waste rates while meeting a wide range of volume requirements. We employ remote monitoring and communication capability to enable our customers and field service technicians to ensure proper performance and attend the unit as needed. The designs we employ are aimed at minimizing cost and maximizing efficiency by supporting compliant blending processes.

Last Update: 2016-02-14
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:
Warning: Contains invisible HTML formatting

Malay

chat cit menterjemahkan

English

one of FMIS staff

Last Update: 2016-01-18
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

Malay

chat cit menterjemahkan

English

honeymoon or tourist phase

Last Update: 2016-01-12
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

Malay

chat cit menterjemahkan

English

Social accounting in Islamic political economy

Last Update: 2015-08-17
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

Malay

cit cat menterjemahkan

English

available

Last Update: 2015-05-18
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

Malay

cit cat menterjemahkan

English

incorporation

Last Update: 2015-05-11
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

Malay

Berudu menterjemahkan

English

level of student engagement through body languange

Last Update: 2015-05-08
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

Malay

Berudu menterjemahkan

English

cemburu atau sakit hati

Last Update: 2015-05-07
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

Malay

chat cit menterjemahkan

English

Experiences of teacher reflection: Reggio inspired practices in the studio

Last Update: 2015-03-24
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

Malay

Berudu menterjemahkan

English

BALL

Last Update: 2015-03-02
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

Add a translation

Search human translated sentences



Users are now asking for help:goiaba (Portuguese>Italian) | viel gemacht (German>Spanish) | doseringspumpen (Danish>German) | yung kanina (Tagalog>English) | mutazione (Italian>Japanese) | chameli (Hindi>English) | cucina boffi (Italian>German) | walvis (French>English) | affari (English>Italian) | setdnsserversearchorder (Italian>English) | semper ad astra (Latin>English) | discutevano (Italian>Kabylian) | paquebots (French>Dutch) | friede (English>French) | indices of marriages (English>Tagalog)


Report Abuse  | About MyMemory   | Contact Us


MyMemory in your language: English  | ItalianoEspañolFrançaisDeutschPortuguêsNederlandsSvenskaРусский日本語汉语한국어Türkçe

We use cookies to enhance your experience. By continuing to visit this site you agree to our use of cookies. Learn more. OK