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biodata form na

Given Name

Last Update: 2014-11-23
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference: Anonymous

biodata form na

Civil status

Last Update: 2014-10-27
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

biodata form na

biodata form

Last Update: 2015-03-09
Subject: Culinary
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

release waiver at quitclaim form na

release waiver and quitclaim form

Last Update: 2014-11-26
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

pangako tala form sa wikang tagalog halimbawa

promissory note form wikang tagalog example

Last Update: 2015-02-16
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

oathtaking sample mga form para sa mga opisyal

oathtaking sample forms for officers

Last Update: 2015-02-06
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

form ng paaralan 137 trancript ofrecord may dry seal

school form 137 trancript ofrecord with dry seal

Last Update: 2014-11-21
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

biodata form na

BIO-DATA

Last Update: 2014-11-18
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
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Reference:

at ang mga hindi ko natutunan ay yung form of waveskasi hindi ako nakikinig sa inyo kaya hindi ko siya masyadong natutunan at di ko rin po kung paano ang wave ng malakas at wave ng mahina.pero may kopya ako ng form of wave pero hindi ko sha maintindihan

and I learned is what form of waveskasi I am not listening to you so I know him very learned and I also wonder how the wave of wave of weakly.pero strong and have a copy of the form of the wave but I sha understand

Last Update: 2015-03-01
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
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Reference:

The Filipino term for a ghost is multo, which is derived from the Spanish word muerto, meaning dead. The multo is the soul of a dead person that has returned to the mortal world. It may want to finish an incomplete task or promise, or take revenge, it may return because of in improper burial or an unusually violent death or suicide. The ghost may be seeking a replacement so that it can live again.[1] Manananggal The Manananggal is a vampire who can separate her upper torso from her lower body in order to fly in the night with huge bat-like wings to prey on unsuspecting, pregnant women in their homes, using an elongated proboscis-like tongue to reach their unborn fetus.[2] The Manananggal has some similarities to the Penanggalan of Malay legend, a floating female head with trailing entrails.[3] Beliefs in the origin of manananggals vary. One story says that heredity or contamination by physical or supernatural means can turn someone into a manananggal. For example, contaminating someone's meal with an old manananggal's saliva or human flesh can pass it on.[4] In some ways the manananggal resembles the tik-tik, a type of aswang that takes the form of a black bird which makes a "tik-tik-tik" sound. It has a long proboscis that reaches through the roof and sucks the fetus inside the womb of pregnant women.[5] The tik-tik may be related to the Indonesian Kuntilanak, a vampire bird that makes a "ke-ke-ke" sound as it flies.[6] The tiyanak is a malevolent creature that may be found in remote grassy fields. It appears as a helpless infant. When someone takes pity and picks it up, it turns into a demon, scratching and biting or devouring its victim. In the south, the tiyanak is known as a patianak or muntianak, and is thought to be the ghost child of a woman who died in the forest during childbirth. In Malaysia and Indonesia it is the pontianak, or the mother who died in childbirth, who appears as a normal person, then turns into a fiend when the passerby approaches.[1] Urban legends[edit] Common themes[edit] Common themes in ghost legends include the White Lady, the headless priest and the phantom hitchhiker. The white lady appears in lonely places, dressed in white, with no visible face or with a disfigured face. Apparently she has died a violent death and is still haunting the vicinity, but with no ill intent. The headless priest prowls at night in a graveyard or ruined place, either carrying his severed head or searching for his head.[7] One of the hitchhiker stories tells of three boys who pick

What is the meaning of fear

Last Update: 2015-03-05
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
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Reference:
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Ng resume form na halimbawa

halimbawa ng resume form

Last Update: 2015-02-06
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

The steady-state theory is a view that the universe is always expanding but maintaining a constant average density, matter being continuously created to form new stars and galaxies at the same rate that old ones become unobservable as a consequence of their increasing distance and velocity of recession. A steady-state universe has no beginning or end in time; and from any point within it the view on the grand scale--i.e., the average density and arrangement of galaxies--is the same. Galaxies of all possible ages are intermingled. The theory was first put forward by Sir James Jeans in about 1920 and again in revised form in 1948 by Hermann Bondi and Thomas Gold. It was further developed by Sir Fred Hoyle to deal with problems that had arisen in connection with the alternative big-bang hypothesis. Observations since the 1950s have produced much evidence contradictory to the steady-state picture and supportive of the big-bang model

The steady-state theory is a view that the universe is always expanding but maintaining a constant average density, matter being continuously created to form new stars and galaxies at the same rate that old ones become unobservable as a consequence of their increasing distance and velocity of recession. A steady-state universe has no beginning or end in time; and from any point within it the view on the grand scale--i.e., the average density and arrangement of galaxies--is the same. Galaxies of all possible ages are intermingled. The theory was first put forward by Sir James Jeans in about 1920 and again in revised form in 1948 by Hermann Bondi and Thomas Gold. It was further developed by Sir Fred Hoyle to deal with problems that had arisen in connection with the alternative big-bang hypothesis. Observations since the 1950s have produced much evidence contradictory to the steady-state picture and supportive of the big-bang model

Last Update: 2015-01-17
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
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n the turbulent days in which France was transitioning away from Napoleonic rule, Edmond Dantes (Caviezel) and his closest friend, Fernand Mondego (Pearce), aspire to gain the same two things: the next captaincy of a ship in Morel's (Godfrey) Marseille-based shipping business and the hands of the lovely Mercedes Iguanada (Dominczyk). Dantes and Mondego are diverted to Elba on a shipping mission because their captain requires medical attention. Assistance comes, unexpectedly, in the form of the personal physician of the exiled Napoleon (Norton). In return for the use of his doctor, Napoleon demands that Dantes deliver a letter for him and that the mission and the letter be kept a secret. Unknown to the illiterate Dantes, the letter will provide Bonapartists in Marseille information of pertinence to a possible rescue of Napoleon. Also unknown to him, Fernand has discovered and read the letter and has full knowledge of its contents. On his return to France, Dantes' fortunes peak as Morel names him captain of one of his ships and an improved station in life prompts Edmond to propose to Mercedes, who accepts the offer. In the process of being beaten out of the two things that matter most to him in life, the jealous Fernand knows that the letter Dantes is carrying can be used to falsely implicate him in an act that might be viewed by local authorities as treasonous. Fernand, and his confidant, shipping colleague Danglars (Woodington), betray Dantes by making the magistrate Villefort (Frain) aware of the letter. Dantes is taken by local authorities in front of Villefort. Despite his determination that Dantes is innocent of any crime, he becomes edgy upon learning that the letter was addressed to Noirtier Villefort, a known Bonpartist, and, consequently, a politically inconvenient father for a young man aspiring to a prominent law career in post-Napoleonic France. To eliminate all evidence that his father was involved in plans for an escape attempt by Napoleon from Elba, Villefort burns the letter and has Dantes arrested and taken to the Chateau D'If, a maximum security prison, where Dantes rots for over a decade, with no prospects of getting out in the imaginable future. Dantes befriends a fellow prisoner named Abbe Faria (Harris), who is a great scholar and who, very gradually, transforms the unworldly Dantes into a wise, learned and cultivated man. Faria is an old man, however, and when he comes to realize that he is fatally ill, he tells Dantes of a great treasure and where it is buried. Secretly placing himself in Faria's burial sack, which is to be thrown over the cliffs and into the river alongside the prison, Dantes manages to escape. After a dangerous ordeal in which he mingles with, but ultimately befriends, an enterprising, yet violent, group of smugglers led by Luigi Vampa (Blanc), he makes his way back to Marseille. Dantes now turns his attention to claiming the treasure Abbe Faria had referred to. After locating the treasure, Dantes' riches are suddenly boundless, but rather than retiring to a life of leisure, his new raison d'etre is vengeance, with the objects of his revenge being Fernand (now a count), Danglars (now a baron), and Villefort (now a chief prosecutor), all of whom live in Paris. As they are now members of Parisian high society, Dantes realizes that to gain access to them, he'll need to reinvent himself, and uses some of his newfound riches to purchase a huge estate near Paris. He then proclaims himself to be the Count of Monte Cristo, and although nobody knows of him, his claim is very credible in view of his visibly substantial wealth. The Count plans a party at his new estate and invites many members of Parisian high society, including all the objects of his vengeance. Now having considerable access to each of them, one at a time, he successfully sets them up for failure. Danglars is tricked into an act of embezzlement and Villefort is tricked into confessing to conspiracy to have his own father murdered within earshot of local authorities. The Count gains close access to Fernand and Mercedes, who are now husband and wife, by paying the smuggler Luigi Vampa to pretend to kidnap their son, Albert. This enables the Count himself to save Albert. Having saved their son, the Count is now welcome in the home of Fernand and Mercedes. Taking note of his mannerisms, Mercedes soon works out that the Count is actually Edmond Dantes, but the Count still has a bone to pick with her, as she married Fernand very shortly after his arrest and had Fernand's son, Albert (Cavill), not long after that. This seemed a sign of her infidelity, but the Count ultimately learns that Villefort had announced that Dantes was dead shortly after the onset of his imprisonment. Fernand, it turns out, had bargained for this announcement, from which he hoped to gain the hand of Mercedes, by murdering, at Villefort's request, Villefort's father. Now understanding that Mercedes had believed him dead, the Count is less incensed by her marriage to Fernand, but still finds the very short period of time between his imprisonment and their marriage very unsettling. The Count is about to turn his back completely on Mercedes. But then, Fernand's financial ruin from compulsive gambling compels him to leave Paris to evade his debtors, against whom he has committed crimes. Unwilling to follow Fernand with their son, Mercedes, finally, tells the Count the truth ---- she had married Fernand because she had, unknown to the Count, been impregnated by Dantes shortly before he was arrested. She wanted Albert to have a father. In truth, however, Albert's biological father is the Count himself. Finally willing to forgive her, the Count falls in love all over again with Mercedes, and, with those who had betrayed them out of the way, they resolve to live their lives, casting aside the dark and regrettable episodes which had robbed them of so many happy times with each other and with their son Albert.

summary of the count of Monte Cristo

Last Update: 2015-01-13
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

Education in India is provided by the public sector as well as the private sector, with control and funding coming from three levels: central, state, and local. Under various articles of the Indian Constitution, free and compulsory education is provided as a fundamental right to children between the ages of 6 and 14. India has made progress in terms of increasing the primary education attendance rate and expanding literacy to approximately three-quarters of the population in the 7-100 age group, by 2011.[4] India's improved education system is often cited as one of the main contributors to its economic development.[5] Much of the progress, especially in higher education and scientific research, has been credited to various public institutions. At the primary and secondary level, India has a large private school system complementing the government run schools, with 29% of students receiving private education in the 6 to 14 age group.[6] Certain post-secondary technical schools are also private. The private education market in India had a revenue of US$450 million in 2008, but is projected to be a US$40 billion market.[7] As per the Annual Status of Education Report (ASER) 2012, 96.5% of all rural children between the ages of 6-14 were enrolled in school. This is the fourth annual survey to report enrollment above 96%. Another report from 2013 stated that there were 229 million students enrolled in different accredited urban and rural schools of India, from Class I to XII, representing an increase of 2.3 million students over 2002 total enrollment, and a 19% increase in girl's enrollment.[8] While quantitatively India is inching closer to universal education, the quality of its education has been questioned particularly in its government run school system. Some of the reasons for the poor quality include absence of around 25 percent of teachers everyday.[9] States of India have introduced tests and education assessment system to identify and improve such schools.[10] It is important to clarify that while there are private schools in India, they are highly regulated in terms of what they can teach, in what form they can operate (must be a non-profit to run any accredited educational institution) and all other aspects of operation. Hence, the differentiation of government schools and private schools can be misguiding.[11] In India's education system, a significant number of seats are reserved under affirmative action policies for the historically disadvantaged Scheduled Castes and Scheduled Tribes and Other Backward Classes. In universities, colleges, and similar institutions affiliated to the federal government, there is a minimum 50% of reservations applicable to these disadvantaged groups, at the state level it can vary. Maharashtra had 73% reservation in 2014, which is the highest percentage of reservations in India.

Education in India

Last Update: 2014-12-04
Subject: History
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

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