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Tagalog

to make use of

English

utilised

Last Update: 2014-12-08
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference: Anonymous

Tagalog

But i can not promise to make it easy

English

But i cant promise to make it easy

Last Update: 2016-08-06
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

Tagalog

Neoclassical economics is an economic theory that argues for markets to be free. This means governments should generally not make rules about types of businesses, businesses' behaviour, who may make things, who may sell things, who may buy things, prices, quantities or types of things sold and bought. The theory argues that allowing individual actors (people or businesses) freedom creates better economic outcomes. These outcomes may be a higher average standard of living, higher wages, better average life expectancies, and higher GDP.

English

QUERY LENGTH LIMIT EXCEDEED. MAX ALLOWED QUERY : 500 CHARS

Last Update: 2016-08-01
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

Tagalog

Isabela also produces delicious native delicacies. In demand are the best tasting traditionally made rice cakes or “bibingka” of Ilagan, San Pablo, Echague, and Naguilian, and the much preferred “Pancit Cabagan” with savory toppings of crunchy meat, vegetable and quail egges.In addition are the delectable pasta and pizza of Echague’s Cafѐ by the Park, which is favorite of pasta lovers, and salted duck eggs from San Mateo. The good news is that all these can be yours for the taking! Whether it is for personal pleasure or for your personal pleasure or for some worthwhile business undertakings, these exceptional ISABELA products are abundantly waiting for you! Visit Isabela today to see, taste and experience what Isabelinos have to offer! Snack Food Isabela is home to some of the most delectable and healthy snack foods: rice-mongo chips of Cabagan, San Agustin and Gamu. These yummy snack favorites will make you crave for more. In the town of San Pablo, fresh carabao’s milk are processed into delicious milk candies which are the much-sought after “pasalubong” to frequent visitors. Cabatuan’s delicious muriecos and special peanut-coated cookies, and best-tasting otap biscuit from Reina Mercedes are surely a big hit to food stuff lovers.

English

poem about isabela state university

Last Update: 2016-07-31
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

Tagalog

On that, I was returning home from school. I had few friends with me. Suddenly I found black clouds to the northwest side of the sky. I thought it would rain soon. So I started to walk fast. After a few times, it began to rain cats and dogs. I took shelter in a wayside house. I got drenched thoroughly. I pulled off my shoes and shirt and waited in the hope that the rains would soon cease. But there was no umbrella with me. Finding no other alternative I started for home again. I put my books in a poly bag. I found the path too much muddy and slippery. However, I reached home two hours late. I was wet from head to foot and was shivering with cold. My parents and other family members were astonished to see my condition. They took necessary steps to make fresh instantly. Really, it is a bitter experience in my life

English

english to ilocano translate

Last Update: 2016-06-07
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

Tagalog

woman abuse is any use of psychological, physical or sexual force, actual or theatened, in an intimate relationship.Intimate relationships include a current or former spouse and an intimate, ating parter. Violence is used to intimidate, humalate or frighten victims, or to make them powerless

English

maganda

Last Update: 2016-03-18
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

Tagalog

Too many billion people Running around the planet What is the chance in heaven That you'd find your way to me? Tell me what is this sweet sensation? It's a miracle that's happened Though I search for an explanation Only one thing it could be - That I was born for you It was written in the stars Yes, I was born for you And the choice was never ours It's as if the powers of the universe Conspired to make you mine And til the day I die, I bless the day that I was born for you Too many foolish people Trying to come between us None of them seem to matter When I look into your eyes Now I know why I belong here In your arms I found the answer Somehow nothing would seem so wrong here If they'd only realise That I was born for you And that you were born for me And in this random world, This was clearly meant to be What we have the world could never understand Or ever take away And till the day I die I bless the day that I was born for you What we have the world could never understand Or ever take away And as the years go by Until the day I die I bless the day that I was born for you

English

born for you lyrics tagalog version Too many billion people Running around the planet What is the chance in heaven That you'd find your way to me? Tell me what is this sweet sensation? It's a miracle that's happened Though I search for an explanation Only one thing it could be - That I was born for you It was written in the stars Yes, I was born for you And the choice was never ours It's as if the powers of the universe Conspired to make you mine And til the day I die, I bless the day that I was born for you Too many foolish people Trying to come between us None of them seem to matter When I look into your eyes Now I know why I belong here In your arms I found the answer Somehow nothing would seem so wrong here If they'd only realise That I was born for you And that you were born for me And in this random world, This was clearly meant to be What we have the world could never understand Or ever take away And till the day I die I bless the day that I was born for you What we have the world could never understand Or ever take away And as the years go by Until the day I die I bless the day that I was born for you

Last Update: 2016-03-13
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

Tagalog

two wings don't make a right

English

Interpreters

Last Update: 2015-11-23
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

Tagalog

make sure your footing is firm

English

siguraduhin na ang iyong samahan ay matatag

Last Update: 2015-11-09
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

Tagalog

natawag ko na ang proposal mo hanggang thursday ang settlement ng account mo, pumayag sila but make it sure on that day ma confirm mo sa akin at ma send mo sa email ko ang transaction details ng settlement mo

English

I have called the proposal until thursday the settlement account, but they agreed to make it sure that day could confirm to me and masend you email me the details of the settlement transaction you

Last Update: 2015-10-05
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

Tagalog

nagmamalaki make a sentence

English

boasting make a sentence

Last Update: 2015-10-04
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

Tagalog

I'm new to the group, I am happy to meet you I would not make a mistake in joining this group

English

ako nga pala ang bago sa group masaya ako na makilala kayo sana hindi ako nagkamali sa pagsali sa pangkat na ito

Last Update: 2015-09-30
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

Tagalog

simple message and effort are make you smile

English

simple

Last Update: 2015-09-25
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

Tagalog

One day Monki and Makil carried out a plan. Makil let his wife place a piece of white cloth over his body, cry a kandidiagao (a cry of grief), and say, "Why did Makil die? He was very good to all the people! He planted sweet fruits and plenty of sugarcane." When the monkeys heard Monki's cry, they decided to help her. The leader of the monkeys said, "We shall help Monki, because it is really true that Makil was a good man. He always planted fruits for us." So all the monkeys went to the house of Monki. The leader of the monkeys asked her, "What can we do? Can we help you? Please tell us how we can help you!" Monki replied, "Oh, my friends, Makil will not die if you help him sit up." So they helped Makil sit up. The leader asked, "Can you tell us what else we can do to help you?" "Oh, my friend monkeys, you are very good to me!" continued Monki. "Makil will not die if you help him stand up." So they helped him stand up. "What else can we do, Monki?" asked the leader of the monkeys. "Oh, my friend monkeys, if you give this kampilan (long combat sword) to Makil, I promise you that we shall plant more sugarcane just for you," said Monki. When Amomantaragaga saw the kampilan he became wary and went out of the house. As soon as Makil received the kampilan, Monki closed the door and Makil killed all the monkeys in the house. Only Amomantaragaga escaped. One day Makil and Monki had another good idea. They made a litag (bamboo trap) in order to catch Amomantaragaga. Early in the morning, they went out to see if the trap had caught the monkey. In fact it had caught an animal, but it did not look like a monkey. They were annoyed when they came near and found out that the animal was a heron. This heron was called Tatalaonga. "Why are you here, Tatalaonga?" asked Makil. "I'll kill you because you are the reason why I did not catch Amomantaragaga." "Oh, datu, please don't kill me," pleaded the heron. "If you set me free, I'll go and kill Amomantaragaga myself!" So Makil set the heron free. Tatalaonga asked Makil to make a raft from pieces of sugarcane. When the raft was finished, Makil brought it to the river, and Tatalaonga perched on it. Drifting along, Tatalaonga passed Amomantaragaga by the banks of the river and invited the monkey to go rafting with him. The two continued down the river on the raft. Tatalaonga took a piece of sugarcane to use as a pole to move the raft, and then he took another one and gave it to Amomantaragaga, who greedily ate the pole. The monkey ate one cane after another, until only one piece was left. At that instance, Tatalaonga flew away and left Amomantaragaga to drown in the river. Monki and Makil and the sultan of Agamaniyog and his people were happy to be rid of the pestering monkeys.

English

One day Monki and Makil carried out a plan. Makil let his wife place a piece of white cloth over his body, cry a kandidiagao (a cry of grief), and say, "Why did Makil die? He was very good to all the people! He planted sweet fruits and plenty of sugarcane." When the monkeys heard Monki's cry, they decided to help her. The leader of the monkeys said, "We shall help Monki, because it is really true that Makil was a good man. He always planted fruits for us." So all the monkeys went to the house of Monki. The leader of the monkeys asked her, "What can we do? Can we help you? Please tell us how we can help you!" Monki replied, "Oh, my friends, Makil will not die if you help him sit up." So they helped Makil sit up. The leader asked, "Can you tell us what else we can do to help you?" "Oh, my friend monkeys, you are very good to me!" continued Monki. "Makil will not die if you help him stand up." So they helped him stand up. "What else can we do, Monki?" asked the leader of the monkeys. "Oh, my friend monkeys, if you give this kampilan (long combat sword) to Makil, I promise you that we shall plant more sugarcane just for you," said Monki. When Amomantaragaga saw the kampilan he became wary and went out of the house. As soon as Makil received the kampilan, Monki closed the door and Makil killed all the monkeys in the house. Only Amomantaragaga escaped. One day Makil and Monki had another good idea. They made a litag (bamboo trap) in order to catch Amomantaragaga. Early in the morning, they went out to see if the trap had caught the monkey. In fact it had caught an animal, but it did not look like a monkey. They were annoyed when they came near and found out that the animal was a heron. This heron was called Tatalaonga. "Why are you here, Tatalaonga?" asked Makil. "I'll kill you because you are the reason why I did not catch Amomantaragaga." "Oh, datu, please don't kill me," pleaded the heron. "If you set me free, I'll go and kill Amomantaragaga myself!" So Makil set the heron free. Tatalaonga asked Makil to make a raft from pieces of sugarcane. When the raft was finished, Makil brought it to the river, and Tatalaonga perched on it. Drifting along, Tatalaonga passed Amomantaragaga by the banks of the river and invited the monkey to go rafting with him. The two continued down the river on the raft. Tatalaonga took a piece of sugarcane to use as a pole to move the raft, and then he took another one and gave it to Amomantaragaga, who greedily ate the pole. The monkey ate one cane after another, until only one piece was left. At that instance, Tatalaonga flew away and left Amomantaragaga to drown in the river. Monki and Makil and the sultan of Agamaniyog and his people were happy to be rid of the pestering monkeys.

Last Update: 2015-09-06
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:
Warning: Contains invisible HTML formatting

Tagalog

FRENCH HOLIDAYS & FESTIVALS Les fetes (festivals) The French enjoy 11 national jours feriés (holidays) annually. The civic calendar was first instituted in 1582; Bastille Day was incorporated in 1789, Armistice Day in 1918, Labor Day in 1935, and Victory Day in 1945. During the month of May, there is a holiday nearly every week, so be prepared for stores, banks and museums to shut their doors for days at a time. It is a good idea to call museums, restaurants and hotels in advance to make sure they will be open. Frenchman caricature Trains and roads near major cities tend to get busy around the national holidays. Not coincidentally, this also happens to be the time when service unions (such as transporters, railroad workers, etc.) like to go on strike – something of a tradition, in fact. Travelers would do well to check ahead, particularly when planning a trip for the last week of June or first week of July! There are also many regional festivals throughout France which are not included in our calendar. ViaFrance hosts an excellent site which lists fairs and festivals, traditional ceremonies, as well as sporting events, concerts, and trade shows for all regions throughout France. Use the interactive search form below to choose a region and range of dates for a listing of special events, to help plan your itinerary. Under the law, every French citizen is entitled to 5 weeks of vacation. Most of the natives take their summer vacations in July or August, and many major businesses are then closed. All of France takes to the roads, railroads, boats, and airways. Consequently, traveling in France during August is generally not recommended for foreigners. Public Holidays 1 January New Year's Day (Jour de l'an) 1 May Labor Day (Fête du premier mai) 8 May WWII Victory Day (Fête de la Victoire 1945; Fête du huitième mai) 14 July Bastille Day (Fête nationale) 15 August Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary (Assomption) 1 November All Saints Day (La Toussaint) 11 November Armistice Day (Jour d'armistice) 25 December Christmas Day (Noël) 26 December 2nd Day of Christmas (in Alsace and Lorraine only)

English

FRENCH HOLIDAYS & FESTIVALS Les fetes (festivals) The French enjoy 11 national jours feriés (holidays) annually. The civic calendar was first instituted in 1582; Bastille Day was incorporated in 1789, Armistice Day in 1918, Labor Day in 1935, and Victory Day in 1945. During the month of May, there is a holiday nearly every week, so be prepared for stores, banks and museums to shut their doors for days at a time. It is a good idea to call museums, restaurants and hotels in advance to make sure they will be open. Frenchman caricature Trains and roads near major cities tend to get busy around the national holidays. Not coincidentally, this also happens to be the time when service unions (such as transporters, railroad workers, etc.) like to go on strike – something of a tradition, in fact. Travelers would do well to check ahead, particularly when planning a trip for the last week of June or first week of July! There are also many regional festivals throughout France which are not included in our calendar. ViaFrance hosts an excellent site which lists fairs and festivals, traditional ceremonies, as well as sporting events, concerts, and trade shows for all regions throughout France. Use the interactive search form below to choose a region and range of dates for a listing of special events, to help plan your itinerary. Under the law, every French citizen is entitled to 5 weeks of vacation. Most of the natives take their summer vacations in July or August, and many major businesses are then closed. All of France takes to the roads, railroads, boats, and airways. Consequently, traveling in France during August is generally not recommended for foreigners. Public Holidays 1 January New Year's Day (Jour de l'an) 1 May Labor Day (Fête du premier mai) 8 May WWII Victory Day (Fête de la Victoire 1945; Fête du huitième mai) 14 July Bastille Day (Fête nationale) 15 August Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary (Assomption) 1 November All Saints Day (La Toussaint) 11 November Armistice Day (Jour d'armistice) 25 December Christmas Day (Noël) 26 December 2nd Day of Christmas (in Alsace and Lorraine only)

Last Update: 2015-07-14
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:
Warning: Contains invisible HTML formatting

Tagalog

how to make tawpe wrapper

English

how to make tawpe wrap

Last Update: 2015-05-22
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

Tagalog

ano Sa tagalog ang make-up

English

ano sa tagalog ang make-up

Last Update: 2015-02-15
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

Tagalog

Joseph Rudyard Kipling (/ˈrʌdjərd ˈkɪplɪŋ/ RUD-yəd KIP-ling; 30 December 1865 – 18 January 1936)[1] was an English short-story writer, poet, and novelist. He wrote tales and poems of British soldiers in India and stories for children. He was born in Bombay, in the Bombay Presidency of British India, and was taken by his family to England when he was five years old.[2] Kipling's works of fiction include The Jungle Book (1894), Kim (1901), and many short stories, including "The Man Who Would Be King" (1888).[3] His poems include "Mandalay" (1890), "Gunga Din" (1890), "The Gods of the Copybook Headings" (1919), "The White Man's Burden" (1899), and "If—" (1910). He is regarded as a major innovator in the art of the short story;[4] his children's books are enduring classics of children's literature; and one critic described his work as exhibiting "a versatile and luminous narrative gift".[5][6] Kipling was one of the most popular writers in England, in both prose and verse, in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.[4] Henry James said: "Kipling strikes me personally as the most complete man of genius (as distinct from fine intelligence) that I have ever known."[4] In 1907, he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature, making him the first English-language writer to receive the prize, and its youngest recipient to date.[7] Among other honours, he was sounded out for the British Poet Laureateship and on several occasions for a knighthood, all of which he declined.[8] Kipling's subsequent reputation has changed according to the political and social climate of the age[9][10] and the resulting contrasting views about him continued for much of the 20th century.[11][12] George Orwell called him a "prophet of British imperialism".[13] Literary critic Douglas Kerr wrote: "He [Kipling] is still an author who can inspire passionate disagreement and his place in literary and cultural history is far from settled. But as the age of the European empires recedes, he is recognised as an incomparable, if controversial, interpreter of how empire was experienced. That, and an increasing recognition of his extraordinary narrative gifts, make him a force to be reckoned with."[14]pamatnubay

English

Joseph Rudyard Kipling (/ˈrʌdjərd ˈkɪplɪŋ/ RUD-yəd KIP-ling; 30 December 1865 – 18 January 1936)[1] was an English short-story writer, poet, and novelist. He wrote tales and poems of British soldiers in India and stories for children. He was born in Bombay, in the Bombay Presidency of British India, and was taken by his family to England when he was five years old.[2] Kipling's works of fiction include The Jungle Book (1894), Kim (1901), and many short stories, including "The Man Who Would Be King" (1888).[3] His poems include "Mandalay" (1890), "Gunga Din" (1890), "The Gods of the Copybook Headings" (1919), "The White Man's Burden" (1899), and "If—" (1910). He is regarded as a major innovator in the art of the short story;[4] his children's books are enduring classics of children's literature; and one critic described his work as exhibiting "a versatile and luminous narrative gift".[5][6] Kipling was one of the most popular writers in England, in both prose and verse, in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.[4] Henry James said: "Kipling strikes me personally as the most complete man of genius (as distinct from fine intelligence) that I have ever known."[4] In 1907, he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature, making him the first English-language writer to receive the prize, and its youngest recipient to date.[7] Among other honours, he was sounded out for the British Poet Laureateship and on several occasions for a knighthood, all of which he declined.[8] Kipling's subsequent reputation has changed according to the political and social climate of the age[9][10] and the resulting contrasting views about him continued for much of the 20th century.[11][12] George Orwell called him a "prophet of British imperialism".[13] Literary critic Douglas Kerr wrote: "He [Kipling] is still an author who can inspire passionate disagreement and his place in literary and cultural history is far from settled. But as the age of the European empires recedes, he is recognised as an incomparable, if controversial, interpreter of how empire was experienced. That, and an increasing recognition of his extraordinary narrative gifts, make him a force to be reckoned with."[14]

Last Update: 2015-01-08
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:
Warning: Contains invisible HTML formatting

Tagalog

God's not dead Let love explode and bring the dead to life A love so bold to see a revolution somehow Let love explode and bring the dead to life A love so bold to bring a revolution somehow Now I'm lost in Your freedom And this world I'll overcome (Chorus) My God is not dead He's surely alive He's living on the inside Roaring like a lion (X2) Let hope arise and make the darkness hide My faith is dead I need a resurrection somehow Now I'm lost in Your freedom And this world I'll overcome Chorus Let Heaven roar and fire fall Come shake the ground With the sound of revival (X3) Chorus (X2)

English

Language

Last Update: 2014-11-18
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

Tagalog

make an acrostic using the word lowel kem plazos

English

market

Last Update: 2014-10-02
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

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