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Tagalog

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Info

Tagalog

Management

English

Manager

Last Update: 2014-10-02
Usage Frequency: 13
Quality:

Reference: Wikipedia

Tagalog

Strategic management

English

Strategic management

Last Update: 2014-08-10
Usage Frequency: 20
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Reference:

Tagalog

Nstp management and monitoring

English

NSTP

Last Update: 2014-07-18
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
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Tagalog

ano ibig sabihin ng project management

English

What does the project management

Last Update: 2015-01-25
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
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Reference:

Tagalog

Ano Ang Kahulugan ng pagkuha management

English

ano ang kahulugan ng procurement management

Last Update: 2015-09-11
Subject: History
Usage Frequency: 1
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Reference:

Tagalog

nagtuturo (management function ng entreprenuers)

English

directing(management function of entreprenuers)

Last Update: 2015-06-16
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
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Reference:

Tagalog

anong ibig sabihin ng zero waste management

English

What does zero waste management

Last Update: 2014-11-27
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
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Tagalog

cetralized management helpo in monitoring the network

English

cetralized management.it helpo in monitoring the network.

Last Update: 2016-01-15
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
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Reference:

Tagalog

RapplerMANILA, Philippines – It’s a scene Metro Manila motorists haven’t seen since the early 90s: highway police personnel manning the bustling Philippine capital’s main thoroughfare, apprehending errant drivers and commuters. But on Monday, September 7, the Philippine National Police (PNP)’s Highway Patrol Group (HPG) will be deployed on “Highway 54” or EDSA, as part of the government’s plan to improve the perennially heavy traffic in the Metro that may cost the country P6 billion daily if left unsolved. Some 150 HPG personnel – from the National Capital Region, the PNP headquarters, and nearby regional offices – are now tasked to be the front-linersat 6 identified “choke points,” or areas with especially heavy traffic. EDSA ‘choke points’ • Balintawak • Cubao • Ortigas • Shaw Boulevard • Guadalupe • Taft Avenue It’s been a while since HPG personnel, in their distinctive uniforms and big motorcycles plied EDSA to enforce traffic rules. The last time was in 1994, HPG director Chief Superintendent Arnold Gunnacao told Rappler. Police tasked to now take watch over EDSA recently took refresher courses for traffic rules and regulations in the lead-up to their “new” task. (READ: Palace: No need for traffic czar) But it doesn’t mean only the PNP will lord over EDSA. The Metropolitan Manila Development Authority (MMDA)’s traffic constables and traffic teams under the various Local Government Units (LGUs) will still be in charge of the rest of EDSA, other major highways, and city roads. A matter of discipline Most of these areas, Gunnacao pointed out, are transportation hubs where commuter buses and the occasional jeepney tend to drop of and pick up passengers with disregard for existing traffic rules and regulations. “Yung mga kababayan natin, kung nakikita nila na yung tao sa harap nila walang power, walang semblance of authority, parang binabalewala. Yung mga constable ng MMDA, ang tingin ng mga driver, with due respect, tingin nila ay pwedeng takbuhan. Unlike yung Highway Patrol, naka hagad yan, naka mobile yan [so] pwede sila habulin, pwede sila arrestuhin because they are violating laws,” Gunnacao said. (When our motorists see that the person before them has no power, no semblance of authority, they tend to disregard them. When they see the Metropolitan Manila Development Authority (MMDA) constables – with due respect to them – they think they can get away. Unlike when they see someone from the HPG, he or she has a motorcycle, a mobile patrol car, so they can chase after or arrest people because they are violating laws.) That was how things worked in the 80s, before the PNP came to be. Under the Philippine Constabulary (PC), a unit under the Armed Forces of the Philippines, traffic rules and regulations – particularly along “Highway 54” – were implemented by the Constabulary Highway Patrol Group. “'Pag nakatayo ang highway patrol diyan, yung mga drivers disiplinado talaga. No ifs, no buts, hinihuli talaga sila (When the highway patrol was there, drivers were really disciplined. No ifs or buts, errant drivers are apprehended),” recalled Gunnacao. Unlike the MMDA, the HPG has the authority to literally chase after and arrest violators on-the-spot. Fines for violators can also be higher, particular when it comes to violations by public utility vehicles and buses. Traffic violation tickets from the Land Transportation Office, explained Gunnacao, carry higher fines. “There are a lot of complaints about the penalties but the things is, if you only follow the rules and regulations it doesn’t matter – even if the penalty is a million, it shouldn’t matter,” he added. The Constabulary Highway Patrol Groups transformed into the Traffic Management Group in 1991, when the PC and Integrated National Police (INP) were merged into the PNP. A few years later, enforcement of traffic laws were removed from the PNP’s tasks and given to the MMDA and LGUs. Still, Gunnacao said, traffic accident investigation and management courses are still part of HPG personnel’s education. Today, the 1,216-strong HPG is tasked mainly for anti-carnapping, anti-highway robbery, and anti-carjacking operations. Teams assigned for those operations are unaffected by the EDSA deployment. Around 20 cops a shift – half from the HPG and the rest from the local police districts – will be deployed at the so-called choke points. The MMDA will continue to man other parts of EDSA and the rest of Metro Manila’s national highways. Not just vehicles The typical Metro Manila commuter knows this all too much – leave for work or school a few minutes later than planned and you’re sure to encounter the infamous gridlock of Manila traffic. The decongestion of the Philippine capital’s roads is the priority, with emphasis on the “stricter enforcement of the bus lanes along EDSA, clearing of obstructions on EDSA and alternate routes, and the continuing consultations with bus and public utility operators, truckers and port users, and other stakeholders,” according to Palace spokesman Secretary Herminio Coloma, Jr. One rule the HPG will be enforcing, said Gunnacao, is the length of time public busses are allowed to drop off and pick up passengers. “The MMDA has a rule that you’re only allowed 30 seconds. If one bus takes 1 minute to load and unload, the rest of the buses will need to line up behind it,” he said. “We’ll make sure they stay where they’re supposed to say,” he added. Commuters won’t be spared as well – those who occupy vehicle lanes in hopes of catching a bus ahead of others will be “educated as well.” Gunnacao is also aware of many commuter and motorists’ concerns – that deploying cops on EDSA also opens up avenues of corruption. It’s why negotiations between erring motorists and police will be frowned upon. “Strict enforcement talaga. Kapag violator, huli. Sabi nga nila, less exposure, less prone to corruption,” he said. (It’s about strict enforcement of the law. If you violate the law, you’ll be arrested. Like what they say, less exposure, less prone to corruption) Teams will also be rotated regularly to “avoid familiarity with the sector.” Aside from the teams assigned to man the choke points, there will be a team of supervisors going around to monitor personnel. The supervisors will also be rotated to avoid familiarity. Will deploying the HPG be enough to fix horrendous EDSA traffic? For the Palace, the solution lies with the cooperation of different stakeholders. “Mas mahalaga na tingnan natin kung paano nag-uugnayan, kung paano pinagtutulungan ng iba’t ibang ahensya, kaagapay ‘yung ating mga stakeholders sa hanay ng civil society, business community, port users, road users, mamamayan. Lahat po tayo ay sangkot at may lahok po tayo diyan sa pagresolba ng problema,” said Coloma. (We should look at how the different agencies, including stakeholders from civil society, the business community, port users, road users, regular citizens work together. All of us have a role in solving this problem.) More HPG personnel are set to be deployed to man EDSA, when more than 100 HPG-NCR personnel return from their APEC assignments in Cebu City. – Rappler.com

English

rapplerMANILA, Philippines – It’s a scene Metro Manila motorists haven’t seen since the early 90s: highway police personnel manning the bustling Philippine capital’s main thoroughfare, apprehending errant drivers and commuters. But on Monday, September 7, the Philippine National Police (PNP)’s Highway Patrol Group (HPG) will be deployed on “Highway 54” or EDSA, as part of the government’s plan to improve the perennially heavy traffic in the Metro that may cost the country P6 billion daily if left unsolved. Some 150 HPG personnel – from the National Capital Region, the PNP headquarters, and nearby regional offices – are now tasked to be the front-linersat 6 identified “choke points,” or areas with especially heavy traffic. EDSA ‘choke points’ • Balintawak • Cubao • Ortigas • Shaw Boulevard • Guadalupe • Taft Avenue It’s been a while since HPG personnel, in their distinctive uniforms and big motorcycles plied EDSA to enforce traffic rules. The last time was in 1994, HPG director Chief Superintendent Arnold Gunnacao told Rappler. Police tasked to now take watch over EDSA recently took refresher courses for traffic rules and regulations in the lead-up to their “new” task. (READ: Palace: No need for traffic czar) But it doesn’t mean only the PNP will lord over EDSA. The Metropolitan Manila Development Authority (MMDA)’s traffic constables and traffic teams under the various Local Government Units (LGUs) will still be in charge of the rest of EDSA, other major highways, and city roads. A matter of discipline Most of these areas, Gunnacao pointed out, are transportation hubs where commuter buses and the occasional jeepney tend to drop of and pick up passengers with disregard for existing traffic rules and regulations. “Yung mga kababayan natin, kung nakikita nila na yung tao sa harap nila walang power, walang semblance of authority, parang binabalewala. Yung mga constable ng MMDA, ang tingin ng mga driver, with due respect, tingin nila ay pwedeng takbuhan. Unlike yung Highway Patrol, naka hagad yan, naka mobile yan [so] pwede sila habulin, pwede sila arrestuhin because they are violating laws,” Gunnacao said. (When our motorists see that the person before them has no power, no semblance of authority, they tend to disregard them. When they see the Metropolitan Manila Development Authority (MMDA) constables – with due respect to them – they think they can get away. Unlike when they see someone from the HPG, he or she has a motorcycle, a mobile patrol car, so they can chase after or arrest people because they are violating laws.) That was how things worked in the 80s, before the PNP came to be. Under the Philippine Constabulary (PC), a unit under the Armed Forces of the Philippines, traffic rules and regulations – particularly along “Highway 54” – were implemented by the Constabulary Highway Patrol Group. “'Pag nakatayo ang highway patrol diyan, yung mga drivers disiplinado talaga. No ifs, no buts, hinihuli talaga sila (When the highway patrol was there, drivers were really disciplined. No ifs or buts, errant drivers are apprehended),” recalled Gunnacao. Unlike the MMDA, the HPG has the authority to literally chase after and arrest violators on-the-spot. Fines for violators can also be higher, particular when it comes to violations by public utility vehicles and buses. Traffic violation tickets from the Land Transportation Office, explained Gunnacao, carry higher fines. “There are a lot of complaints about the penalties but the things is, if you only follow the rules and regulations it doesn’t matter – even if the penalty is a million, it shouldn’t matter,” he added. The Constabulary Highway Patrol Groups transformed into the Traffic Management Group in 1991, when the PC and Integrated National Police (INP) were merged into the PNP. A few years later, enforcement of traffic laws were removed from the PNP’s tasks and given to the MMDA and LGUs. Still, Gunnacao said, traffic accident investigation and management courses are still part of HPG personnel’s education. Today, the 1,216-strong HPG is tasked mainly for anti-carnapping, anti-highway robbery, and anti-carjacking operations. Teams assigned for those operations are unaffected by the EDSA deployment. Around 20 cops a shift – half from the HPG and the rest from the local police districts – will be deployed at the so-called choke points. The MMDA will continue to man other parts of EDSA and the rest of Metro Manila’s national highways. Not just vehicles The typical Metro Manila commuter knows this all too much – leave for work or school a few minutes later than planned and you’re sure to encounter the infamous gridlock of Manila traffic. The decongestion of the Philippine capital’s roads is the priority, with emphasis on the “stricter enforcement of the bus lanes along EDSA, clearing of obstructions on EDSA and alternate routes, and the continuing consultations with bus and public utility operators, truckers and port users, and other stakeholders,” according to Palace spokesman Secretary Herminio Coloma, Jr. One rule the HPG will be enforcing, said Gunnacao, is the length of time public busses are allowed to drop off and pick up passengers. “The MMDA has a rule that you’re only allowed 30 seconds. If one bus takes 1 minute to load and unload, the rest of the buses will need to line up behind it,” he said. “We’ll make sure they stay where they’re supposed to say,” he added. Commuters won’t be spared as well – those who occupy vehicle lanes in hopes of catching a bus ahead of others will be “educated as well.” Gunnacao is also aware of many commuter and motorists’ concerns – that deploying cops on EDSA also opens up avenues of corruption. It’s why negotiations between erring motorists and police will be frowned upon. “Strict enforcement talaga. Kapag violator, huli. Sabi nga nila, less exposure, less prone to corruption,” he said. (It’s about strict enforcement of the law. If you violate the law, you’ll be arrested. Like what they say, less exposure, less prone to corruption) Teams will also be rotated regularly to “avoid familiarity with the sector.” Aside from the teams assigned to man the choke points, there will be a team of supervisors going around to monitor personnel. The supervisors will also be rotated to avoid familiarity. Will deploying the HPG be enough to fix horrendous EDSA traffic? For the Palace, the solution lies with the cooperation of different stakeholders. “Mas mahalaga na tingnan natin kung paano nag-uugnayan, kung paano pinagtutulungan ng iba’t ibang ahensya, kaagapay ‘yung ating mga stakeholders sa hanay ng civil society, business community, port users, road users, mamamayan. Lahat po tayo ay sangkot at may lahok po tayo diyan sa pagresolba ng problema,” said Coloma. (We should look at how the different agencies, including stakeholders from civil society, the business community, port users, road users, regular citizens work together. All of us have a role in solving this problem.) More HPG personnel are set to be deployed to man EDSA, when more than 100 HPG-NCR personnel return from their APEC assignments in Cebu City. – Rappler.com

Last Update: 2015-09-07
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

Tagalog

Duties: Serving as an Expeditionary Disposal Remediation in Contingency Operations Enduring Freedom providing disposition services to forward operating bases through all Afghanistan. Ensuring units achieve an operational readiness status. Performing periodic staff visits on site for assessing, training and removal assistance at all levels of leadership ensuring proper procedures and correct handling of military and civilian contracting property. Recommend redistribution of excess equipment and material. Responsible of providing technical expertise and knowledge of logistics management, property, segregation/ identification and scrap removal. Provide knowledge of logistical guidance, reutilization and advice to staff members; reviewing requisitions against authorized allowances; making recommendations concerning movement of equipment and material to meet activity requirements and, analyzing recurring reports. Monitor the budget for logistical requirements. Performing effectively in a good working environment with multiple security forces (Special Forces, Delta Forces, Seabees) give then support in many levels as NCOIC in charge of reutilization section. Served as a Safety NCO ensuring OSHA requirements and Department of Defense safety measures were performed accordingly. Monitor the budget for logistical requirements. Assisted in actual aspects of the DLA Logistics Management Program by providing necessary feeder data and performing some of the less complex coordinating and executing logistical requirements. I reviewed requisitions against authorized allowances according to the appropriate authorization document and reviewed force modernization initiatives and actions. In addition, I coordinated and implemented appropriate actions to obtain material and equipment and update or change authorization documents.

English

past tense

Last Update: 2015-06-14
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

Tagalog

past tense,Duties: Serving as an Expeditionary Disposal Remediation in Contingency Operations Enduring Freedom providing disposition services to forward operating bases through all Afghanistan. Ensuring units achieve an operational readiness status. Performing periodic staff visits on site for assessing, training and removal assistance at all levels of leadership ensuring proper procedures and correct handling of military and civilian contracting property. Recommend redistribution of excess equipment and material. Responsible of providing technical expertise and knowledge of logistics management, property, segregation/ identification and scrap removal. Provide knowledge of logistical guidance, reutilization and advice to staff members; reviewing requisitions against authorized allowances; making recommendations concerning movement of equipment and material to meet activity requirements and, analyzing recurring reports. Monitor the budget for logistical requirements. Performing effectively in a good working environment with multiple security forces (Special Forces, Delta Forces, Seabees) give then support in many levels as NCOIC in charge of reutilization section. Served as a Safety NCO ensuring OSHA requirements and Department of Defense safety measures were performed accordingly. Monitor the budget for logistical requirements. Assisted in actual aspects of the DLA Logistics Management Program by providing necessary feeder data and performing some of the less complex coordinating and executing logistical requirements. I reviewed requisitions against authorized allowances according to the appropriate authorization document and reviewed force modernization initiatives and actions. In addition, I coordinated and implemented appropriate actions to obtain material and equipment and update or change authorization documents. present tense,future tense

English

past tense

Last Update: 2015-06-14
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

Tagalog

VOikonomia (also spelled oikonomeia, economia or economy) literally means "household management," the "law of the house," or "house building," and refers primarily to two related concepts in the Orthodox Church—the divine plan for man's salvation and the specific episcopal application of the canons in the life of the Church. The latter usage is a derivation of the former. Oikonomia is one of two ways of observing the Canons of the Church, the other is Akriveia or strict adherence (precision, exactness). Whereas the application of Oikonomia is generally regarded as being a more flexible application or interpretation of the Canons, the application of Akriveia is regarded as being a more precise and strict one. Pastoral Discretion is of key importance in either application.

English

oikonomia

Last Update: 2015-01-01
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:
Warning: Contains invisible HTML formatting

Tagalog

kombertidorWhile still in the grade school, his mother used to tell him to be a priest, to dignify and ameliorate their state of life; but the father would vehemently counter, no, he should be a lawyer. As always during the eve of the fiesta, Celedonio G. Aguilar earnestly desire to watch the parade with deep interest and enthusiasm especially when the platoon of soldiers march by and roiled in his mind the well-mannered discipline and dignity of mien of the soldiers, that someday, he thought and figured himself to be one of them. So when he enrolled at the Albay High School, after his academic classes, posthaste he would scurry out to his custodial concern, joined the formation of the preparatory military training activities. Through the years he rose from the ranks to become battalion commander. It was October, during his senior year in school that he hide down to the military camp to take the Philippine Military Academy Examination, but the Japanese Imperial forces landed at legazpi on December 14, 1941 thus throwing his ambition to be a soldier to the winds. However during the Japanese occupation, he joined the guerilla movement (NOMETA) Noli Me Tangere Guerilla as 2nd Lieutenant. He was enraptured with much interest when the American Force landed at legazpi on april 1, 1945. And NOMETA unit became 1st. Battalion of Sandico’s 52nd Division Guerilla Unit was re – entrenched to a company and merge to first Regiment Bicol Brigade that include him in the activated regular force of the Philippine Army as First class Private. Utterly disgusted he resigned from the army and applied to teach in the District of camalig as a substitute teacher. After a year of teaching, he became a temporary teacher and was appointed head teacher at Del Rosario Public School. Three years after classroom work, he resigned to pursue a degree in education and Graduated in 1951 at the National University, Manila. He first taught at Libon Private High School, after a year, transferred to St. John’s Academy in Camalig where his former student, Mrs. Minda Grageda Muñoz in their St. John’s Academy Golden Anniversary Souvenir booklet, In Retrospect elucidated; “Mr. Aguilar is a tall respectable man, eloquent and dedicated English instructor. We were all eyes and ears for him when he’s in front of the class, listening intently and spellbound to his interesting lecture. He was forthright and his dignified stature demanded respect.” In the same booklet, Reminiscing Our High School days with our Mentors, Mrs. Josefina Nuas Ramos averred, “Mr. Aguilar was our English teacher. He spoke English fluently. He developed our interest in reading literature and novels. He is a writer. Some of his books are: Shaken Shadows, Time and Sunken Sun, This Season and Night, Pink Sun and Neutral Dust, Readings in Philippine Literature, Speaking and Writing English, Critiques on Poetry, Understanding Poetry through imagery, Thesis Writing Made Easy, Functional Research Techniques, Dimensions in Reading, and Before the Tide Sets In.” Then the Civil Sevice Commission, in a letter, ordered him to report to Marcial O. Rañola Memorial School to teach English, non – compliance will be tantamount to scrapping out his civil service eligibility. Banners in The Quill, student publication of Marcial O. Rañola Memorial School, that new teacher added to MORMS Teaching Force,”one of them was MR. Aguilar of Camalig, Albay who had his first feel of teaching in 1945 when he accepted a teaching position in a barrio elementary school in the District of Camalig. But three years teaching in the elementary, resigned to enroll at National University, where in 1951 obtained his Bachelor of Science degree in Educational major in English and minor in history. He taught for five years at St. John’s Academy. During summer enrolled at U.P. for masteral degree.” He enjoyed immensely his secondary teaching adventure. Especially his literature teaching which spurred in him for more writing for publication in the national magazines: This Week Magazine, Free Press, Sunday Times Magazine, Graphic, Solidarity, etc. Through the suggestion of Bienvenido N. Santos, he organized Albay Writers with membership officials as: Dr. Rodrigo Salazar, Valdemar Olaguer, Jose Ravalo, Vic O. Ballesfin, and 15 other budding writers of Albay with Celedonio G. Aguilar as President and Bienvinido Santos as Adviser. At one instance, through Santos, N.V.M. Gonzales was guest speaker of the group along with Hilario Francia and Petronilo Daroy. To cap it all, he was elected President of the Albay Secondary Teachers Association which perhaps paved the way for his selection for the Master of Art in Teaching Reading Scholarship at the University of the Philippines. In the Class 76 reunion at MORMS of which Dr. Susan Princesa Mallonga was the President presented to him a certificate, which states: “Class 76”presents this certificate of Appreciation to Mr. Celedonio G. Aguilar for his demonstrated patience, hard work and dedication in molding our young minds in the pursuit of our secondary education, most of all, giving us the foundation in academic excellence, and teaching us values of honesty, diligence, sincerity and humility,” After enjoying the DECS scholarships, he was promoted to Junior College Instructor and assigned to School for Philippine a Craftsmen, Polangui, Albay. In The Craftlet official student publication of School for Philippine Craftsmen, in Campus Tidbits by June Ailes where she spot lighted and enunciated campus personalities, she articulated on Mr. Aguilar as “our beloved English instructor and his being very energetic to drill us in writing as if he was ink in his veins, for he has several collection of poetry which he considers his vice: together with his scholarships at U.P. and Silliman University. Indeed how lucky we are to be our instructor.” On School visitation of the Regional Director at SPC observing teachers, he spotted Mr. Aguilar for promotion to Regional General Education Supervisor, at which instance, he devoted his time after office hours to teaching at Bicol College and then to Divine Word College of Legazpi. Then retired from the government service. Outrightly, Bicol College took him to be Dean of the College of Education with only secondary teaching as the course offered. So he formalized the opening of the elementary grades in preparation for the opening of Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education (BSEed). At point and time, Mr. Manuel T. Javier, Bicol College Faculty and Adviser of Bicol Collegian, Student Publication of the School, wrote a feature which said: If the Colossus of Rhodes has been one wonders of the world in the days of antiquity, it has its equal in our present time at our school at that. We are referring to Dr. Celedonio G. Aguilar as the mighty colossus. Aside from being Dean of the College of Education, he is also Secretary of the Graduate School, twin positions enough to stymie the most intrepid of men, but not this titan. He savors these burdens with gusto. His student is the living witness to his pedagogical virtuosity. They would swear to high heaven how this man could change adrab classroom into exciting arena of intellectual combat where educational myths and heresies are blasted and intellectual pursuits are probed and defend.” Eventually a year after, he became the Dean of the Graduated School. As Dean of the Graduate School, he worked for the opening of the doctoral program subsequently a year later, through the help of his friend in the Higher Education Division, Manila, its recognition, a help exerted to boost Bicol College’s headway to educational permanence. But resigned later on when University of Santo Thomas called him for interview in connection to his application to teach at that school. But Fr. Reyes, President of Divine Word College of Legazpi and was to be promoted to higher position in Manila, sweet talked him to teach rather the King Seminary in Quezon City, which he accepted. He only taught half – day at the Seminary which gave him ample time for research, and call to mind, the dearth of specific books for the subject he taught in college, such as Philippine Literature, so Readings in Philippines Literature was written, Grammar and Composition, for Speaking and writing English, literary Criticism, for Critiques on Poetry, Poetry and Drama, for Understanding Poetry through Imagery, and for Graduate Students, Thesis Writing Made Easy, and Functional Research Techniques, for teacher and would be teacher, Dimension in Reading and Before the Tide Sets In. He also included in foreign and local anthologies: World Poetry by Kim Young Sam (Korea), East – West Voices by Dr. V.S. Skanda Prasad, (Mangalore, India), Edicao Commemorativo by Wilson Oliviera Jasa, (Sao Paulo, Brazil), and National Library of Poetry: Walk Through Paradise 1995, Portraits of Life 1996, Owing Mills, Maryland, USA, Bicol Voice Anthology by Merito B. Espinas, Bicol of the Philippines by Lilia Realubit, Ani by Cultural Center of the Philippines, Palihan by U.P. Creative Writing Center. On the outset of June, a letter from Mayor’s Office, requested all occupational pursuits an Camalig to submit their Bio – Data emphasizing their significant accomplishments in their chosen job career, such as: Civic Action Movement, business enterprises, inventions, constructions, mentors to take from classroom teacher, principals, (district, division, regional) supervisors, college professors, and Deans of schools who are legitimate Camaligueños. In view of his teaching feat, scholarship, written books that benefited college and graduates students throughout the country and his Doctor of Education degree from Bicol University, prompted the award as outstanding Camaligueños in the field of EDUCATION (along with other professional pursuits) June 24, 2005 camalig’s town fiesta by the Camalig Council on Arts, Culture and Tourism to Dr. Celedonio G. Aguilar. Apathetically he muttered, if only there is a school who would avail of his expertise on the subjects corresponding to his written books, he is still willing to teach, for teaching to him is a life time endeavor, not anymore for remuneration, with life and Comfort, but to deciminate and share the knowledge he has learned from his scholarships by the DECS in Master of Arts in Teaching Reading at U.P. Diliman, QC, Master of fine Art in Creative Writing a Silliman University under the Tiempos (Edilberto and Edith) and William Sweet, Master of Arts in Educational Management.

English

While still in the grade school, his mother used to tell him to be a priest, to dignify and ameliorate their state of life; but the father would vehemently counter, no, he should be a lawyer. As always during the eve of the fiesta, Celedonio G. Aguilar earnestly desire to watch the parade with deep interest and enthusiasm especially when the platoon of soldiers march by and roiled in his mind the well-mannered discipline and dignity of mien of the soldiers, that someday, he thought and figured himself to be one of them. So when he enrolled at the Albay High School, after his academic classes, posthaste he would scurry out to his custodial concern, joined the formation of the preparatory military training activities. Through the years he rose from the ranks to become battalion commander. It was October, during his senior year in school that he hide down to the military camp to take the Philippine Military Academy Examination, but the Japanese Imperial forces landed at legazpi on December 14, 1941 thus throwing his ambition to be a soldier to the winds. However during the Japanese occupation, he joined the guerilla movement (NOMETA) Noli Me Tangere Guerilla as 2nd Lieutenant. He was enraptured with much interest when the American Force landed at legazpi on april 1, 1945. And NOMETA unit became 1st. Battalion of Sandico’s 52nd Division Guerilla Unit was re – entrenched to a company and merge to first Regiment Bicol Brigade that include him in the activated regular force of the Philippine Army as First class Private. Utterly disgusted he resigned from the army and applied to teach in the District of camalig as a substitute teacher. After a year of teaching, he became a temporary teacher and was appointed head teacher at Del Rosario Public School. Three years after classroom work, he resigned to pursue a degree in education and Graduated in 1951 at the National University, Manila. He first taught at Libon Private High School, after a year, transferred to St. John’s Academy in Camalig where his former student, Mrs. Minda Grageda Muñoz in their St. John’s Academy Golden Anniversary Souvenir booklet, In Retrospect elucidated; “Mr. Aguilar is a tall respectable man, eloquent and dedicated English instructor. We were all eyes and ears for him when he’s in front of the class, listening intently and spellbound to his interesting lecture. He was forthright and his dignified stature demanded respect.” In the same booklet, Reminiscing Our High School days with our Mentors, Mrs. Josefina Nuas Ramos averred, “Mr. Aguilar was our English teacher. He spoke English fluently. He developed our interest in reading literature and novels. He is a writer. Some of his books are: Shaken Shadows, Time and Sunken Sun, This Season and Night, Pink Sun and Neutral Dust, Readings in Philippine Literature, Speaking and Writing English, Critiques on Poetry, Understanding Poetry through imagery, Thesis Writing Made Easy, Functional Research Techniques, Dimensions in Reading, and Before the Tide Sets In.” Then the Civil Sevice Commission, in a letter, ordered him to report to Marcial O. Rañola Memorial School to teach English, non – compliance will be tantamount to scrapping out his civil service eligibility. Banners in The Quill, student publication of Marcial O. Rañola Memorial School, that new teacher added to MORMS Teaching Force,”one of them was MR. Aguilar of Camalig, Albay who had his first feel of teaching in 1945 when he accepted a teaching position in a barrio elementary school in the District of Camalig. But three years teaching in the elementary, resigned to enroll at National University, where in 1951 obtained his Bachelor of Science degree in Educational major in English and minor in history. He taught for five years at St. John’s Academy. During summer enrolled at U.P. for masteral degree.” He enjoyed immensely his secondary teaching adventure. Especially his literature teaching which spurred in him for more writing for publication in the national magazines: This Week Magazine, Free Press, Sunday Times Magazine, Graphic, Solidarity, etc. Through the suggestion of Bienvenido N. Santos, he organized Albay Writers with membership officials as: Dr. Rodrigo Salazar, Valdemar Olaguer, Jose Ravalo, Vic O. Ballesfin, and 15 other budding writers of Albay with Celedonio G. Aguilar as President and Bienvinido Santos as Adviser. At one instance, through Santos, N.V.M. Gonzales was guest speaker of the group along with Hilario Francia and Petronilo Daroy. To cap it all, he was elected President of the Albay Secondary Teachers Association which perhaps paved the way for his selection for the Master of Art in Teaching Reading Scholarship at the University of the Philippines. In the Class 76 reunion at MORMS of which Dr. Susan Princesa Mallonga was the President presented to him a certificate, which states: “Class 76”presents this certificate of Appreciation to Mr. Celedonio G. Aguilar for his demonstrated patience, hard work and dedication in molding our young minds in the pursuit of our secondary education, most of all, giving us the foundation in academic excellence, and teaching us values of honesty, diligence, sincerity and humility,” After enjoying the DECS scholarships, he was promoted to Junior College Instructor and assigned to School for Philippine a Craftsmen, Polangui, Albay. In The Craftlet official student publication of School for Philippine Craftsmen, in Campus Tidbits by June Ailes where she spot lighted and enunciated campus personalities, she articulated on Mr. Aguilar as “our beloved English instructor and his being very energetic to drill us in writing as if he was ink in his veins, for he has several collection of poetry which he considers his vice: together with his scholarships at U.P. and Silliman University. Indeed how lucky we are to be our instructor.” On School visitation of the Regional Director at SPC observing teachers, he spotted Mr. Aguilar for promotion to Regional General Education Supervisor, at which instance, he devoted his time after office hours to teaching at Bicol College and then to Divine Word College of Legazpi. Then retired from the government service. Outrightly, Bicol College took him to be Dean of the College of Education with only secondary teaching as the course offered. So he formalized the opening of the elementary grades in preparation for the opening of Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education (BSEed). At point and time, Mr. Manuel T. Javier, Bicol College Faculty and Adviser of Bicol Collegian, Student Publication of the School, wrote a feature which said: If the Colossus of Rhodes has been one wonders of the world in the days of antiquity, it has its equal in our present time at our school at that. We are referring to Dr. Celedonio G. Aguilar as the mighty colossus. Aside from being Dean of the College of Education, he is also Secretary of the Graduate School, twin positions enough to stymie the most intrepid of men, but not this titan. He savors these burdens with gusto. His student is the living witness to his pedagogical virtuosity. They would swear to high heaven how this man could change adrab classroom into exciting arena of intellectual combat where educational myths and heresies are blasted and intellectual pursuits are probed and defend.” Eventually a year after, he became the Dean of the Graduated School. As Dean of the Graduate School, he worked for the opening of the doctoral program subsequently a year later, through the help of his friend in the Higher Education Division, Manila, its recognition, a help exerted to boost Bicol College’s headway to educational permanence. But resigned later on when University of Santo Thomas called him for interview in connection to his application to teach at that school. But Fr. Reyes, President of Divine Word College of Legazpi and was to be promoted to higher position in Manila, sweet talked him to teach rather the King Seminary in Quezon City, which he accepted. He only taught half – day at the Seminary which gave him ample time for research, and call to mind, the dearth of specific books for the subject he taught in college, such as Philippine Literature, so Readings in Philippines Literature was written, Grammar and Composition, for Speaking and writing English, literary Criticism, for Critiques on Poetry, Poetry and Drama, for Understanding Poetry through Imagery, and for Graduate Students, Thesis Writing Made Easy, and Functional Research Techniques, for teacher and would be teacher, Dimension in Reading and Before the Tide Sets In. He also included in foreign and local anthologies: World Poetry by Kim Young Sam (Korea), East – West Voices by Dr. V.S. Skanda Prasad, (Mangalore, India), Edicao Commemorativo by Wilson Oliviera Jasa, (Sao Paulo, Brazil), and National Library of Poetry: Walk Through Paradise 1995, Portraits of Life 1996, Owing Mills, Maryland, USA, Bicol Voice Anthology by Merito B. Espinas, Bicol of the Philippines by Lilia Realubit, Ani by Cultural Center of the Philippines, Palihan by U.P. Creative Writing Center. On the outset of June, a letter from Mayor’s Office, requested all occupational pursuits an Camalig to submit their Bio – Data emphasizing their significant accomplishments in their chosen job career, such as: Civic Action Movement, business enterprises, inventions, constructions, mentors to take from classroom teacher, principals, (district, division, regional) supervisors, college professors, and Deans of schools who are legitimate Camaligueños. In view of his teaching feat, scholarship, written books that benefited college and graduates students throughout the country and his Doctor of Education degree from Bicol University, prompted the award as outstanding Camaligueños in the field of EDUCATION (along with other professional pursuits) June 24, 2005 camalig’s town fiesta by the Camalig Council on Arts, Culture and Tourism to Dr. Celedonio G. Aguilar. Apathetically he muttered, if only there is a school who would avail of his expertise on the subjects corresponding to his written books, he is still willing to teach, for teaching to him is a life time endeavor, not anymore for remuneration, with life and Comfort, but to deciminate and share the knowledge he has learned from his scholarships by the DECS in Master of Arts in Teaching Reading at U.P. Diliman, QC, Master of fine Art in Creative Writing a Silliman University under the Tiempos (Edilberto and Edith) and William Sweet, Master of Arts in Educational Management.

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