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Tagalog

philippine preamble tagalog

English

preamble Philippine Tagalog

Last Update: 2015-04-04
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference: Anonymous

Tagalog

Philippine Army

English

situation of things in the beginning

Last Update: 2014-11-17
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

Tagalog

Philippine palkone

English

philippine falconet

Last Update: 2014-12-13
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

Tagalog

Philippine palkone

English

falcon

Last Update: 2014-02-04
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

Tagalog

palimos philippine folk music

English

palimos folk music

Last Update: 2015-06-14
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

Tagalog

Philippine script ng komersyal

English

philippine script of commercial

Last Update: 2015-09-02
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

Tagalog

philippine tula na may 2 saknong

English

philippine poem with 2 stanza

Last Update: 2016-08-22
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

Tagalog

Philippine panitikan drama script

English

philippine literature drama script

Last Update: 2015-02-03
Subject: History
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

Tagalog

11 pangkalahatang order ng philippine army

English

11 general orders of philippine army

Last Update: 2016-06-30
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

Tagalog

Philippine drama script ng rebolusyon

English

philippine drama script of revolution

Last Update: 2015-01-30
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

Tagalog

philippine drama script about andres bonifacio

English

Philippine drama script about Andres Bonifacio

Last Update: 2015-12-07
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

Tagalog

Philippine mga istraktura at mga function ng pamahalaan

English

philippine government structures and functions

Last Update: 2014-12-08
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

Tagalog

punong-sabi ng 1987 Philippine saligang-batas

English

preamble of the 1987 philippine constitution

Last Update: 2014-10-30
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

Tagalog

Philippine our flag

English

philippine flag poem with 5 stanza

Last Update: 2015-07-02
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

Tagalog

Halimbawa Philippine drama in-script

English

example philippine drama in-script

Last Update: 2015-02-01
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

Tagalog

Mind anao sumasaklaw sa malaking isla ng Mindanao saka mas maliit na isla sa katimugang Pilipinas. Sa kanyang pinakamalaking city, Davao, ang Philippine Eagle Center at Davao Crocodile Park iskaparate lokal na mga hayop. Ang urban Tao Park Nagtatampok na statuwa ng mga katutubong tao at ang Durian Dome, na pinangalanang matapos ang matinik, mabaho prutas na lumalaki sa kasaganaan sa Mindanao. Southwest, Bundok Apo bulkan ay trails at isang lake.

English

Mindanao encompasses the large island of Mindanao plus smaller islands in the southern Philippines. In its largest city, Davao, the Philippine Eagle Centre and Davao Crocodile Park showcase local wildlife. The urban People's Park features statues of indigenous people and the Durian Dome, named after the spiky, smelly fruit that grows in abundance on Mindanao. Southwest, the Mount Apo volcano has trails and a lake.

Last Update: 2016-07-27
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

Tagalog

Mindanao sumasaklaw sa malaking isla ng Mindanao sasa mas maliit na isla sa katimugang Pilipinas. Sa kanyang pinakamalaking city, Davao, ang Philippine Eagle Center at Davao Crocodile Park iskaparate lokal na mga hayop. Ang urban Tao Park Nagtatampok statues ng mga katutubong tao at ang Durian Dome, na pinangalanang matapos ang matinik, mabaho prutas na lumalaki sa kasaganaan sa Mindanao. Southwest, Bundok Apo bulkan ay trails at isang lake.

English

Mindanao encompasses the large island of Mindanao plus smaller islands in the southern Philippines. In its largest city, Davao, the Philippine Eagle Centre and Davao Crocodile Park showcase local wildlife. The urban People's Park features statues of indigenous people and the Durian Dome, named after the spiky, smelly fruit that grows in abundance on Mindanao. Southwest, the Mount Apo volcano has trails and a lake.

Last Update: 2016-07-27
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

Tagalog

11 pangkalahatang order ng Philippine hukbo

English

11 general orders of philippine army

Last Update: 2015-09-23
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 3
Quality:

Reference:

Tagalog

RapplerMANILA, Philippines – It’s a scene Metro Manila motorists haven’t seen since the early 90s: highway police personnel manning the bustling Philippine capital’s main thoroughfare, apprehending errant drivers and commuters. But on Monday, September 7, the Philippine National Police (PNP)’s Highway Patrol Group (HPG) will be deployed on “Highway 54” or EDSA, as part of the government’s plan to improve the perennially heavy traffic in the Metro that may cost the country P6 billion daily if left unsolved. Some 150 HPG personnel – from the National Capital Region, the PNP headquarters, and nearby regional offices – are now tasked to be the front-linersat 6 identified “choke points,” or areas with especially heavy traffic. EDSA ‘choke points’ • Balintawak • Cubao • Ortigas • Shaw Boulevard • Guadalupe • Taft Avenue It’s been a while since HPG personnel, in their distinctive uniforms and big motorcycles plied EDSA to enforce traffic rules. The last time was in 1994, HPG director Chief Superintendent Arnold Gunnacao told Rappler. Police tasked to now take watch over EDSA recently took refresher courses for traffic rules and regulations in the lead-up to their “new” task. (READ: Palace: No need for traffic czar) But it doesn’t mean only the PNP will lord over EDSA. The Metropolitan Manila Development Authority (MMDA)’s traffic constables and traffic teams under the various Local Government Units (LGUs) will still be in charge of the rest of EDSA, other major highways, and city roads. A matter of discipline Most of these areas, Gunnacao pointed out, are transportation hubs where commuter buses and the occasional jeepney tend to drop of and pick up passengers with disregard for existing traffic rules and regulations. “Yung mga kababayan natin, kung nakikita nila na yung tao sa harap nila walang power, walang semblance of authority, parang binabalewala. Yung mga constable ng MMDA, ang tingin ng mga driver, with due respect, tingin nila ay pwedeng takbuhan. Unlike yung Highway Patrol, naka hagad yan, naka mobile yan [so] pwede sila habulin, pwede sila arrestuhin because they are violating laws,” Gunnacao said. (When our motorists see that the person before them has no power, no semblance of authority, they tend to disregard them. When they see the Metropolitan Manila Development Authority (MMDA) constables – with due respect to them – they think they can get away. Unlike when they see someone from the HPG, he or she has a motorcycle, a mobile patrol car, so they can chase after or arrest people because they are violating laws.) That was how things worked in the 80s, before the PNP came to be. Under the Philippine Constabulary (PC), a unit under the Armed Forces of the Philippines, traffic rules and regulations – particularly along “Highway 54” – were implemented by the Constabulary Highway Patrol Group. “'Pag nakatayo ang highway patrol diyan, yung mga drivers disiplinado talaga. No ifs, no buts, hinihuli talaga sila (When the highway patrol was there, drivers were really disciplined. No ifs or buts, errant drivers are apprehended),” recalled Gunnacao. Unlike the MMDA, the HPG has the authority to literally chase after and arrest violators on-the-spot. Fines for violators can also be higher, particular when it comes to violations by public utility vehicles and buses. Traffic violation tickets from the Land Transportation Office, explained Gunnacao, carry higher fines. “There are a lot of complaints about the penalties but the things is, if you only follow the rules and regulations it doesn’t matter – even if the penalty is a million, it shouldn’t matter,” he added. The Constabulary Highway Patrol Groups transformed into the Traffic Management Group in 1991, when the PC and Integrated National Police (INP) were merged into the PNP. A few years later, enforcement of traffic laws were removed from the PNP’s tasks and given to the MMDA and LGUs. Still, Gunnacao said, traffic accident investigation and management courses are still part of HPG personnel’s education. Today, the 1,216-strong HPG is tasked mainly for anti-carnapping, anti-highway robbery, and anti-carjacking operations. Teams assigned for those operations are unaffected by the EDSA deployment. Around 20 cops a shift – half from the HPG and the rest from the local police districts – will be deployed at the so-called choke points. The MMDA will continue to man other parts of EDSA and the rest of Metro Manila’s national highways. Not just vehicles The typical Metro Manila commuter knows this all too much – leave for work or school a few minutes later than planned and you’re sure to encounter the infamous gridlock of Manila traffic. The decongestion of the Philippine capital’s roads is the priority, with emphasis on the “stricter enforcement of the bus lanes along EDSA, clearing of obstructions on EDSA and alternate routes, and the continuing consultations with bus and public utility operators, truckers and port users, and other stakeholders,” according to Palace spokesman Secretary Herminio Coloma, Jr. One rule the HPG will be enforcing, said Gunnacao, is the length of time public busses are allowed to drop off and pick up passengers. “The MMDA has a rule that you’re only allowed 30 seconds. If one bus takes 1 minute to load and unload, the rest of the buses will need to line up behind it,” he said. “We’ll make sure they stay where they’re supposed to say,” he added. Commuters won’t be spared as well – those who occupy vehicle lanes in hopes of catching a bus ahead of others will be “educated as well.” Gunnacao is also aware of many commuter and motorists’ concerns – that deploying cops on EDSA also opens up avenues of corruption. It’s why negotiations between erring motorists and police will be frowned upon. “Strict enforcement talaga. Kapag violator, huli. Sabi nga nila, less exposure, less prone to corruption,” he said. (It’s about strict enforcement of the law. If you violate the law, you’ll be arrested. Like what they say, less exposure, less prone to corruption) Teams will also be rotated regularly to “avoid familiarity with the sector.” Aside from the teams assigned to man the choke points, there will be a team of supervisors going around to monitor personnel. The supervisors will also be rotated to avoid familiarity. Will deploying the HPG be enough to fix horrendous EDSA traffic? For the Palace, the solution lies with the cooperation of different stakeholders. “Mas mahalaga na tingnan natin kung paano nag-uugnayan, kung paano pinagtutulungan ng iba’t ibang ahensya, kaagapay ‘yung ating mga stakeholders sa hanay ng civil society, business community, port users, road users, mamamayan. Lahat po tayo ay sangkot at may lahok po tayo diyan sa pagresolba ng problema,” said Coloma. (We should look at how the different agencies, including stakeholders from civil society, the business community, port users, road users, regular citizens work together. All of us have a role in solving this problem.) More HPG personnel are set to be deployed to man EDSA, when more than 100 HPG-NCR personnel return from their APEC assignments in Cebu City. – Rappler.com

English

rapplerMANILA, Philippines – It’s a scene Metro Manila motorists haven’t seen since the early 90s: highway police personnel manning the bustling Philippine capital’s main thoroughfare, apprehending errant drivers and commuters. But on Monday, September 7, the Philippine National Police (PNP)’s Highway Patrol Group (HPG) will be deployed on “Highway 54” or EDSA, as part of the government’s plan to improve the perennially heavy traffic in the Metro that may cost the country P6 billion daily if left unsolved. Some 150 HPG personnel – from the National Capital Region, the PNP headquarters, and nearby regional offices – are now tasked to be the front-linersat 6 identified “choke points,” or areas with especially heavy traffic. EDSA ‘choke points’ • Balintawak • Cubao • Ortigas • Shaw Boulevard • Guadalupe • Taft Avenue It’s been a while since HPG personnel, in their distinctive uniforms and big motorcycles plied EDSA to enforce traffic rules. The last time was in 1994, HPG director Chief Superintendent Arnold Gunnacao told Rappler. Police tasked to now take watch over EDSA recently took refresher courses for traffic rules and regulations in the lead-up to their “new” task. (READ: Palace: No need for traffic czar) But it doesn’t mean only the PNP will lord over EDSA. The Metropolitan Manila Development Authority (MMDA)’s traffic constables and traffic teams under the various Local Government Units (LGUs) will still be in charge of the rest of EDSA, other major highways, and city roads. A matter of discipline Most of these areas, Gunnacao pointed out, are transportation hubs where commuter buses and the occasional jeepney tend to drop of and pick up passengers with disregard for existing traffic rules and regulations. “Yung mga kababayan natin, kung nakikita nila na yung tao sa harap nila walang power, walang semblance of authority, parang binabalewala. Yung mga constable ng MMDA, ang tingin ng mga driver, with due respect, tingin nila ay pwedeng takbuhan. Unlike yung Highway Patrol, naka hagad yan, naka mobile yan [so] pwede sila habulin, pwede sila arrestuhin because they are violating laws,” Gunnacao said. (When our motorists see that the person before them has no power, no semblance of authority, they tend to disregard them. When they see the Metropolitan Manila Development Authority (MMDA) constables – with due respect to them – they think they can get away. Unlike when they see someone from the HPG, he or she has a motorcycle, a mobile patrol car, so they can chase after or arrest people because they are violating laws.) That was how things worked in the 80s, before the PNP came to be. Under the Philippine Constabulary (PC), a unit under the Armed Forces of the Philippines, traffic rules and regulations – particularly along “Highway 54” – were implemented by the Constabulary Highway Patrol Group. “'Pag nakatayo ang highway patrol diyan, yung mga drivers disiplinado talaga. No ifs, no buts, hinihuli talaga sila (When the highway patrol was there, drivers were really disciplined. No ifs or buts, errant drivers are apprehended),” recalled Gunnacao. Unlike the MMDA, the HPG has the authority to literally chase after and arrest violators on-the-spot. Fines for violators can also be higher, particular when it comes to violations by public utility vehicles and buses. Traffic violation tickets from the Land Transportation Office, explained Gunnacao, carry higher fines. “There are a lot of complaints about the penalties but the things is, if you only follow the rules and regulations it doesn’t matter – even if the penalty is a million, it shouldn’t matter,” he added. The Constabulary Highway Patrol Groups transformed into the Traffic Management Group in 1991, when the PC and Integrated National Police (INP) were merged into the PNP. A few years later, enforcement of traffic laws were removed from the PNP’s tasks and given to the MMDA and LGUs. Still, Gunnacao said, traffic accident investigation and management courses are still part of HPG personnel’s education. Today, the 1,216-strong HPG is tasked mainly for anti-carnapping, anti-highway robbery, and anti-carjacking operations. Teams assigned for those operations are unaffected by the EDSA deployment. Around 20 cops a shift – half from the HPG and the rest from the local police districts – will be deployed at the so-called choke points. The MMDA will continue to man other parts of EDSA and the rest of Metro Manila’s national highways. Not just vehicles The typical Metro Manila commuter knows this all too much – leave for work or school a few minutes later than planned and you’re sure to encounter the infamous gridlock of Manila traffic. The decongestion of the Philippine capital’s roads is the priority, with emphasis on the “stricter enforcement of the bus lanes along EDSA, clearing of obstructions on EDSA and alternate routes, and the continuing consultations with bus and public utility operators, truckers and port users, and other stakeholders,” according to Palace spokesman Secretary Herminio Coloma, Jr. One rule the HPG will be enforcing, said Gunnacao, is the length of time public busses are allowed to drop off and pick up passengers. “The MMDA has a rule that you’re only allowed 30 seconds. If one bus takes 1 minute to load and unload, the rest of the buses will need to line up behind it,” he said. “We’ll make sure they stay where they’re supposed to say,” he added. Commuters won’t be spared as well – those who occupy vehicle lanes in hopes of catching a bus ahead of others will be “educated as well.” Gunnacao is also aware of many commuter and motorists’ concerns – that deploying cops on EDSA also opens up avenues of corruption. It’s why negotiations between erring motorists and police will be frowned upon. “Strict enforcement talaga. Kapag violator, huli. Sabi nga nila, less exposure, less prone to corruption,” he said. (It’s about strict enforcement of the law. If you violate the law, you’ll be arrested. Like what they say, less exposure, less prone to corruption) Teams will also be rotated regularly to “avoid familiarity with the sector.” Aside from the teams assigned to man the choke points, there will be a team of supervisors going around to monitor personnel. The supervisors will also be rotated to avoid familiarity. Will deploying the HPG be enough to fix horrendous EDSA traffic? For the Palace, the solution lies with the cooperation of different stakeholders. “Mas mahalaga na tingnan natin kung paano nag-uugnayan, kung paano pinagtutulungan ng iba’t ibang ahensya, kaagapay ‘yung ating mga stakeholders sa hanay ng civil society, business community, port users, road users, mamamayan. Lahat po tayo ay sangkot at may lahok po tayo diyan sa pagresolba ng problema,” said Coloma. (We should look at how the different agencies, including stakeholders from civil society, the business community, port users, road users, regular citizens work together. All of us have a role in solving this problem.) More HPG personnel are set to be deployed to man EDSA, when more than 100 HPG-NCR personnel return from their APEC assignments in Cebu City. – Rappler.com

Last Update: 2015-09-07
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

Tagalog

HISTORY OF CAGAYAN DE ORO CITY By ATTY. "TOMMY" C. PACANA CHAIRMAN, HISTORICAL COMMISSION Two thousand years ago, there were already ancient Kagay-anons living around the vicinity of Hulaga, Himologan and Tagbalitang caves around 8 kilometers south of Cagayan de Oro City. Fr. Francisco Demetrio, S.J., noted archeologist and Filipino folklorist of Xavier University had collected tools, implements, potteries and shards from these areas and subjected these to the Carbon dating process at the Philippine Historical Museum to determine their age. It was found that these tools and implements were already used by the ancient Kagay-anons during the Neolithic Age. This shows how old Cagayan de Oro is before the coming of the Spanish "conquistadors" to the Philippines in march 1521. There were three great Sultanates of Mindanao and Sulu. These were Sultanates of Sulu under Sheriff Aljaluddin, the Sultanate of Maguindanao under Sheriff Mawi, and Tagoloan under Sheriff Mohammed Kabungsuwan. The Sultanate of Tagoloan extended from Baloi, Lanao del Sur, to Butuan, Cagayan de Oro (or Kalambaguhan, by which name it was then known), was merely a passageway from Baloi to Butuan, which was already a great trading center like Zugbu, Panay and Manila. Kalambaguhan has a small settlement of Bukidnons who lived along the riverbanks of the Kalambaguhan River. This river (now the Cagayan River) was so known because of the "Lambago" trees that grew profusely along its banks. During this time, however, the Cachel Corralat (Sultan Kudarat) marauding warriors attacked such places as Manticao, Tagnipa, (El Salvador), Iligan and Kalambaguhan to bring these places with their domain. They captured the women, children and working animals of the inhabitants in these places and brought them to their Sultanate. Because of these constant raids, the Bukidnons along the river fled to the hills of Hulaga led by their ruler, Datu Salangsang. Sometime in 1622, long after the Spaniards had established themselves at Butuan, Spanish friars under Fray Agustin de San Pedro known as "El Padre Capitan" went to see Datu Salangsang and sought to invite him and his people to come down to their told settlement at Kalambaguhan under the protection of the Spaniards. Datu Salangsang's aunt, a Christianized woman of influence whose name was Magdalena Bacuya. With a messenger from El Padre Capitan reiterated his offer to Datu Salangsang and convinced him to come down to their ancient settlement of Kalambaguhan. To protect the Bukidnons from the constant raids of the Muslim from Cachel Corralat, El Padre Capitan built a fortification around the settlement, which is now Gaston Park. Several raids of the Maguindanao warriors were repulsed by the courageous El Padre Capitan that the Muslims never returned again to the settlement. It was from this small settlement that the present Cagayan de Oro originated. A small church was built on the site, which later became the present San Agustin Cathedral. Thereby, the fame of El Padre Capitan as an able military strategist, spread far and wide. He vanquished the Muslims around Lake Lanao. The people of Cagayan de Oro come from a blend of two cultures those of the Muslims and Bukidnons. These were the native people that had settled in the region long before the coming of the Spaniards in fact, the first Christians among these natives were the Muslims from Lanao who were the descendants of the Samporna clan. They were the first to be baptized along with the Bato-Batos, the Wagas, Abas, Dagumbals and several families. HOW DID CAGAYAN DE ORO GOT ITS NAME? Pre-War folks said that Cagayan came from "Cagaycay, " an ancient Bukidnon word meaning to rake in the earth either with one's bare hands or with a piece of wood. It also means rocks gathered from the river or ores raked in from the hillside or streams. Gold have always been abundant in the Cagayan River gold ores are still found in the nearby of Cagayan as Tumpagon, Pigsag-an, Tuburan, Taglimao and other nearby places. Before the Spaniards came to Cagayan (or Kalambaguhan), there were already places where on could rake in the earth. ANOTHER VERSION IS MORE ROMANTIC Another version of how Cagayan de Oro got its name is told in of that story of a Bukidnon chieftain on the eastern side of Cagayan River (whose name according to old folks was Mansicampo), once had a quarrel with a Muslim Datu across the river (now the RER Subdivision), his name was Bagongsalibo. The quarrel became intense that the Bukidnon chieftain wanted it settled by war. However, the Muslim Datu across the river wanted to live in peace with his people in that part of Cagayan. Mansicampo then called on all his followers and relatives from the Bukidnon tribes of Daan Lunsod, gathered on the eastern side of the river ready for combat then Mansicampo ordered his son, the Bagani, to go and see Datu Bagongsalibo and arranged for a council of war. Therefore, the young prince went to see the Muslim Datu and confirmed with him. During the conference, however the young prince noted that there was a beautiful young woman who kept on peeping from behind a door looking at him. She was so beautiful that the young prince was immediately captivated and forgot his main purpose in the council. The young prince immediately proposed his intentions to the Muslim Datu who was only too willing to accept his land in marriage as he was not very keen about going to war against a neighbor. When the Bukidnon chieftain heard about his son proposing marriage to the daughter of his enemy. His warriors bid goodbye and left to live near the hills of Lumbia vowing never return to his former settlement which he now call "Kagayha-an" (or in Bukidnon, a place of shame). Since then, Cagayan de Oro has grown into one of the most peaceful and progressive cities in the entire Philippines.

English

zzzzzzzz

Last Update: 2015-08-27
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:
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