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Philippine Army

situation of things in the beginning

Last Update: 2014-11-17
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philippine preamble tagalog

preamble Philippine Tagalog

Last Update: 2015-04-04
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Philippine our flag

philippine flag poem with 5 stanza

Last Update: 2015-07-02
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Philippine palkone

philippine falconet

Last Update: 2014-12-13
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Philippine palkone

falcon

Last Update: 2014-02-04
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palimos philippine folk music

palimos folk music

Last Update: 2015-06-14
Subject: General
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Philippine panitikan drama script

philippine literature drama script

Last Update: 2015-02-03
Subject: History
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Philippine drama script ng rebolusyon

philippine drama script of revolution

Last Update: 2015-01-30
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Halimbawa Philippine drama in-script

example philippine drama in-script

Last Update: 2015-02-01
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Philippine script drama sa ingles halimbawa

philippine drama script in english example

Last Update: 2015-02-01
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Philippine mga istraktura at mga function ng pamahalaan

philippine government structures and functions

Last Update: 2014-12-08
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punong-sabi ng 1987 Philippine saligang-batas

preamble of the 1987 philippine constitution

Last Update: 2014-10-30
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11 pangkalahatang order ng Philippine hukbo

11 general orders of philippine army

Last Update: 2015-07-06
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ang kuwento kanin mitolohiya (Philippine bersyon)

the rice myth story (philippine version)

Last Update: 2015-07-29
Subject: History
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Sa Nobyembre 12, 1936, ang Philippine Pambatasan lumipas Commonwealth Act No. 168, mas kilala bilang ang Civil Aviation Law ng Pilipinas kung saan ginawa ang Bureau of Aeronautics. Pagkatapos ng pagpapalaya ng Pilipinas noong Marso, 1945, ang Bureau ay reorganised at inilagay sa ilalim ng Department of National Defense. Kabilang sa mga pag-andar nito ay upang maglagda ng Civil Aviation Regulations.

On November 12, 1936, the Philippine Legislative passed Commonwealth Act No. 168, better known as the Civil Aviation Law of the Philippines which created the Bureau of Aeronautics. After the liberation of the Philippines in March, 1945, the Bureau was reorganized and placed under the Department of National Defense. Among its functions was to promulgate Civil Aviation Regulations.

Last Update: 2015-07-14
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Pambatasan Act No. 3909 na ipinasa ng Philippine Pambatasan on Nobyembre 20, 1931 na nilikha ng isang Office sa ilalim ng Department of Communications Commerce at upang mapanghawakan ang mga bagay aviation, lalo na ang pagpapatupad ng mga patakaran at regulasyon na namamahala sa commercial aviation pati na rin ang mga pribadong paglipad. Ito ay sinususugan sa pamamagitan ng Act 3996 upang isama ang paglilisensya ng airmen at mga sasakyang panghimpapawid, inspeksyon ng mga sasakyang panghimpapawid na nauukol patakaran air traffic, iskedyul at mga rate at pagpapatupad ng Batas Aviation.

Legislative Act No. 3909 passed by the Philippine Legislative on November 20, 1931 created an Office under the Department of Commerce and Communications to handle aviation matters, particularly the enforcement of rules and regulations governing commercial aviation as well as private flying. It was amended by Act 3996 to include licensing of airmen and aircraft, inspection of aircraft concerning air traffic rules, schedules and rates and enforcement of Aviation Laws.

Last Update: 2015-07-14
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HISTORY OF CAGAYAN DE ORO CITY By ATTY. "TOMMY" C. PACANA CHAIRMAN, HISTORICAL COMMISSION Two thousand years ago, there were already ancient Kagay-anons living around the vicinity of Hulaga, Himologan and Tagbalitang caves around 8 kilometers south of Cagayan de Oro City. Fr. Francisco Demetrio, S.J., noted archeologist and Filipino folklorist of Xavier University had collected tools, implements, potteries and shards from these areas and subjected these to the Carbon dating process at the Philippine Historical Museum to determine their age. It was found that these tools and implements were already used by the ancient Kagay-anons during the Neolithic Age. This shows how old Cagayan de Oro is before the coming of the Spanish "conquistadors" to the Philippines in march 1521. There were three great Sultanates of Mindanao and Sulu. These were Sultanates of Sulu under Sheriff Aljaluddin, the Sultanate of Maguindanao under Sheriff Mawi, and Tagoloan under Sheriff Mohammed Kabungsuwan. The Sultanate of Tagoloan extended from Baloi, Lanao del Sur, to Butuan, Cagayan de Oro (or Kalambaguhan, by which name it was then known), was merely a passageway from Baloi to Butuan, which was already a great trading center like Zugbu, Panay and Manila. Kalambaguhan has a small settlement of Bukidnons who lived along the riverbanks of the Kalambaguhan River. This river (now the Cagayan River) was so known because of the "Lambago" trees that grew profusely along its banks. During this time, however, the Cachel Corralat (Sultan Kudarat) marauding warriors attacked such places as Manticao, Tagnipa, (El Salvador), Iligan and Kalambaguhan to bring these places with their domain. They captured the women, children and working animals of the inhabitants in these places and brought them to their Sultanate. Because of these constant raids, the Bukidnons along the river fled to the hills of Hulaga led by their ruler, Datu Salangsang. Sometime in 1622, long after the Spaniards had established themselves at Butuan, Spanish friars under Fray Agustin de San Pedro known as "El Padre Capitan" went to see Datu Salangsang and sought to invite him and his people to come down to their told settlement at Kalambaguhan under the protection of the Spaniards. Datu Salangsang's aunt, a Christianized woman of influence whose name was Magdalena Bacuya. With a messenger from El Padre Capitan reiterated his offer to Datu Salangsang and convinced him to come down to their ancient settlement of Kalambaguhan. To protect the Bukidnons from the constant raids of the Muslim from Cachel Corralat, El Padre Capitan built a fortification around the settlement, which is now Gaston Park. Several raids of the Maguindanao warriors were repulsed by the courageous El Padre Capitan that the Muslims never returned again to the settlement. It was from this small settlement that the present Cagayan de Oro originated. A small church was built on the site, which later became the present San Agustin Cathedral. Thereby, the fame of El Padre Capitan as an able military strategist, spread far and wide. He vanquished the Muslims around Lake Lanao. The people of Cagayan de Oro come from a blend of two cultures those of the Muslims and Bukidnons. These were the native people that had settled in the region long before the coming of the Spaniards in fact, the first Christians among these natives were the Muslims from Lanao who were the descendants of the Samporna clan. They were the first to be baptized along with the Bato-Batos, the Wagas, Abas, Dagumbals and several families. HOW DID CAGAYAN DE ORO GOT ITS NAME? Pre-War folks said that Cagayan came from "Cagaycay, " an ancient Bukidnon word meaning to rake in the earth either with one's bare hands or with a piece of wood. It also means rocks gathered from the river or ores raked in from the hillside or streams. Gold have always been abundant in the Cagayan River gold ores are still found in the nearby of Cagayan as Tumpagon, Pigsag-an, Tuburan, Taglimao and other nearby places. Before the Spaniards came to Cagayan (or Kalambaguhan), there were already places where on could rake in the earth. ANOTHER VERSION IS MORE ROMANTIC Another version of how Cagayan de Oro got its name is told in of that story of a Bukidnon chieftain on the eastern side of Cagayan River (whose name according to old folks was Mansicampo), once had a quarrel with a Muslim Datu across the river (now the RER Subdivision), his name was Bagongsalibo. The quarrel became intense that the Bukidnon chieftain wanted it settled by war. However, the Muslim Datu across the river wanted to live in peace with his people in that part of Cagayan. Mansicampo then called on all his followers and relatives from the Bukidnon tribes of Daan Lunsod, gathered on the eastern side of the river ready for combat then Mansicampo ordered his son, the Bagani, to go and see Datu Bagongsalibo and arranged for a council of war. Therefore, the young prince went to see the Muslim Datu and confirmed with him. During the conference, however the young prince noted that there was a beautiful young woman who kept on peeping from behind a door looking at him. She was so beautiful that the young prince was immediately captivated and forgot his main purpose in the council. The young prince immediately proposed his intentions to the Muslim Datu who was only too willing to accept his land in marriage as he was not very keen about going to war against a neighbor. When the Bukidnon chieftain heard about his son proposing marriage to the daughter of his enemy. His warriors bid goodbye and left to live near the hills of Lumbia vowing never return to his former settlement which he now call "Kagayha-an" (or in Bukidnon, a place of shame). Since then, Cagayan de Oro has grown into one of the most peaceful and progressive cities in the entire Philippines.

The legend of Cagayan de Oro

Last Update: 2015-06-16
Subject: General
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The former barrio of Basista, now the site of the town proper or poblacion was once the biggest and one of the progressive barrios located in the far south of the mother town, San Carlos (now a city). As early as the year 1918, some of the most influential and prominent citizens of the then barrio of Basista came together and made the first attempt to petition the municipal government and the provincial board of San Carlos and Pangasinan respectively to grant the township of their barrios. Prominent politicians during that time volunteered their help in making representations with the proper authorities, but their request was not granted. Some of those leaders were: General Mamaril, Don Valeriano Perez, father of the late speaker Eugenio Pérez, Buenaventura de Vera, Telesforo de Vera, Gregorio Malicdem, Cayetano Perez, Gaudencio Padua, Gregorio Valdez, Ramon Valdez, Don Roque de Vera, Domingo Resultay, Bernardo Resultay, Liberato Frias, Hipolito Cayabyab, Alejandro de guzman , Pascual Resultay, Raymundo de Guzman, Vicente de Guzman, Domingo de Guzman, Vicente Frias, Florentino Malicdem, Faustino Monzon, Cornelio de Guzman, Felix de Guzman, Juan Malicdem, Federico Cancino, Artemio Frias and several others. On September 5, 1961, President Carlos P. Garcia issued Executive Order No. 446 creating the town of Basista composed of 13 barrios out of the 28 that petitioned. Four years after, however, the Philippine Supreme Court declared the town's creation as without legal basis citing their ruling in the "Emmanuel Pelaez vs. Auditor General" that "municipalities created under Executive Orders are void". It was here that Republic Act No. 4866 filed by Congressman Jack L. Soriano was enacted into law and legally created Basista as a town of Pangasinan

The former barrio of Basista, now the site of the town proper or poblacion was once the biggest and one of the progressive barrios located in the far south of the mother town, San Carlos (now a city). As early as the year 1918, some of the most influential and prominent citizens of the then barrio of Basista came together and made the first attempt to petition the municipal government and the provincial board of San Carlos and Pangasinan respectively to grant the township of their barrios. Prominent politicians during that time volunteered their help in making representations with the proper authorities, but their request was not granted. Some of those leaders were: General Mamaril, Don Valeriano Perez, father of the late speaker Eugenio Pérez, Buenaventura de Vera, Telesforo de Vera, Gregorio Malicdem, Cayetano Perez, Gaudencio Padua, Gregorio Valdez, Ramon Valdez, Don Roque de Vera, Domingo Resultay, Bernardo Resultay, Liberato Frias, Hipolito Cayabyab, Alejandro de guzman , Pascual Resultay, Raymundo de Guzman, Vicente de Guzman, Domingo de Guzman, Vicente Frias, Florentino Malicdem, Faustino Monzon, Cornelio de Guzman, Felix de Guzman, Juan Malicdem, Federico Cancino, Artemio Frias and several others. On September 5, 1961, President Carlos P. Garcia issued Executive Order No. 446 creating the town of Basista composed of 13 barrios out of the 28 that petitioned. Four years after, however, the Philippine Supreme Court declared the town's creation as without legal basis citing their ruling in the "Emmanuel Pelaez vs. Auditor General" that "municipalities created under Executive Orders are void". It was here that Republic Act No. 4866 filed by Congressman Jack L. Soriano was enacted into law and legally created Basista as a town of Pangasinan

Last Update: 2015-02-12
Subject: General
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kombertidorWhile still in the grade school, his mother used to tell him to be a priest, to dignify and ameliorate their state of life; but the father would vehemently counter, no, he should be a lawyer. As always during the eve of the fiesta, Celedonio G. Aguilar earnestly desire to watch the parade with deep interest and enthusiasm especially when the platoon of soldiers march by and roiled in his mind the well-mannered discipline and dignity of mien of the soldiers, that someday, he thought and figured himself to be one of them. So when he enrolled at the Albay High School, after his academic classes, posthaste he would scurry out to his custodial concern, joined the formation of the preparatory military training activities. Through the years he rose from the ranks to become battalion commander. It was October, during his senior year in school that he hide down to the military camp to take the Philippine Military Academy Examination, but the Japanese Imperial forces landed at legazpi on December 14, 1941 thus throwing his ambition to be a soldier to the winds. However during the Japanese occupation, he joined the guerilla movement (NOMETA) Noli Me Tangere Guerilla as 2nd Lieutenant. He was enraptured with much interest when the American Force landed at legazpi on april 1, 1945. And NOMETA unit became 1st. Battalion of Sandico’s 52nd Division Guerilla Unit was re – entrenched to a company and merge to first Regiment Bicol Brigade that include him in the activated regular force of the Philippine Army as First class Private. Utterly disgusted he resigned from the army and applied to teach in the District of camalig as a substitute teacher. After a year of teaching, he became a temporary teacher and was appointed head teacher at Del Rosario Public School. Three years after classroom work, he resigned to pursue a degree in education and Graduated in 1951 at the National University, Manila. He first taught at Libon Private High School, after a year, transferred to St. John’s Academy in Camalig where his former student, Mrs. Minda Grageda Muñoz in their St. John’s Academy Golden Anniversary Souvenir booklet, In Retrospect elucidated; “Mr. Aguilar is a tall respectable man, eloquent and dedicated English instructor. We were all eyes and ears for him when he’s in front of the class, listening intently and spellbound to his interesting lecture. He was forthright and his dignified stature demanded respect.” In the same booklet, Reminiscing Our High School days with our Mentors, Mrs. Josefina Nuas Ramos averred, “Mr. Aguilar was our English teacher. He spoke English fluently. He developed our interest in reading literature and novels. He is a writer. Some of his books are: Shaken Shadows, Time and Sunken Sun, This Season and Night, Pink Sun and Neutral Dust, Readings in Philippine Literature, Speaking and Writing English, Critiques on Poetry, Understanding Poetry through imagery, Thesis Writing Made Easy, Functional Research Techniques, Dimensions in Reading, and Before the Tide Sets In.” Then the Civil Sevice Commission, in a letter, ordered him to report to Marcial O. Rañola Memorial School to teach English, non – compliance will be tantamount to scrapping out his civil service eligibility. Banners in The Quill, student publication of Marcial O. Rañola Memorial School, that new teacher added to MORMS Teaching Force,”one of them was MR. Aguilar of Camalig, Albay who had his first feel of teaching in 1945 when he accepted a teaching position in a barrio elementary school in the District of Camalig. But three years teaching in the elementary, resigned to enroll at National University, where in 1951 obtained his Bachelor of Science degree in Educational major in English and minor in history. He taught for five years at St. John’s Academy. During summer enrolled at U.P. for masteral degree.” He enjoyed immensely his secondary teaching adventure. Especially his literature teaching which spurred in him for more writing for publication in the national magazines: This Week Magazine, Free Press, Sunday Times Magazine, Graphic, Solidarity, etc. Through the suggestion of Bienvenido N. Santos, he organized Albay Writers with membership officials as: Dr. Rodrigo Salazar, Valdemar Olaguer, Jose Ravalo, Vic O. Ballesfin, and 15 other budding writers of Albay with Celedonio G. Aguilar as President and Bienvinido Santos as Adviser. At one instance, through Santos, N.V.M. Gonzales was guest speaker of the group along with Hilario Francia and Petronilo Daroy. To cap it all, he was elected President of the Albay Secondary Teachers Association which perhaps paved the way for his selection for the Master of Art in Teaching Reading Scholarship at the University of the Philippines. In the Class 76 reunion at MORMS of which Dr. Susan Princesa Mallonga was the President presented to him a certificate, which states: “Class 76”presents this certificate of Appreciation to Mr. Celedonio G. Aguilar for his demonstrated patience, hard work and dedication in molding our young minds in the pursuit of our secondary education, most of all, giving us the foundation in academic excellence, and teaching us values of honesty, diligence, sincerity and humility,” After enjoying the DECS scholarships, he was promoted to Junior College Instructor and assigned to School for Philippine a Craftsmen, Polangui, Albay. In The Craftlet official student publication of School for Philippine Craftsmen, in Campus Tidbits by June Ailes where she spot lighted and enunciated campus personalities, she articulated on Mr. Aguilar as “our beloved English instructor and his being very energetic to drill us in writing as if he was ink in his veins, for he has several collection of poetry which he considers his vice: together with his scholarships at U.P. and Silliman University. Indeed how lucky we are to be our instructor.” On School visitation of the Regional Director at SPC observing teachers, he spotted Mr. Aguilar for promotion to Regional General Education Supervisor, at which instance, he devoted his time after office hours to teaching at Bicol College and then to Divine Word College of Legazpi. Then retired from the government service. Outrightly, Bicol College took him to be Dean of the College of Education with only secondary teaching as the course offered. So he formalized the opening of the elementary grades in preparation for the opening of Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education (BSEed). At point and time, Mr. Manuel T. Javier, Bicol College Faculty and Adviser of Bicol Collegian, Student Publication of the School, wrote a feature which said: If the Colossus of Rhodes has been one wonders of the world in the days of antiquity, it has its equal in our present time at our school at that. We are referring to Dr. Celedonio G. Aguilar as the mighty colossus. Aside from being Dean of the College of Education, he is also Secretary of the Graduate School, twin positions enough to stymie the most intrepid of men, but not this titan. He savors these burdens with gusto. His student is the living witness to his pedagogical virtuosity. They would swear to high heaven how this man could change adrab classroom into exciting arena of intellectual combat where educational myths and heresies are blasted and intellectual pursuits are probed and defend.” Eventually a year after, he became the Dean of the Graduated School. As Dean of the Graduate School, he worked for the opening of the doctoral program subsequently a year later, through the help of his friend in the Higher Education Division, Manila, its recognition, a help exerted to boost Bicol College’s headway to educational permanence. But resigned later on when University of Santo Thomas called him for interview in connection to his application to teach at that school. But Fr. Reyes, President of Divine Word College of Legazpi and was to be promoted to higher position in Manila, sweet talked him to teach rather the King Seminary in Quezon City, which he accepted. He only taught half – day at the Seminary which gave him ample time for research, and call to mind, the dearth of specific books for the subject he taught in college, such as Philippine Literature, so Readings in Philippines Literature was written, Grammar and Composition, for Speaking and writing English, literary Criticism, for Critiques on Poetry, Poetry and Drama, for Understanding Poetry through Imagery, and for Graduate Students, Thesis Writing Made Easy, and Functional Research Techniques, for teacher and would be teacher, Dimension in Reading and Before the Tide Sets In. He also included in foreign and local anthologies: World Poetry by Kim Young Sam (Korea), East – West Voices by Dr. V.S. Skanda Prasad, (Mangalore, India), Edicao Commemorativo by Wilson Oliviera Jasa, (Sao Paulo, Brazil), and National Library of Poetry: Walk Through Paradise 1995, Portraits of Life 1996, Owing Mills, Maryland, USA, Bicol Voice Anthology by Merito B. Espinas, Bicol of the Philippines by Lilia Realubit, Ani by Cultural Center of the Philippines, Palihan by U.P. Creative Writing Center. On the outset of June, a letter from Mayor’s Office, requested all occupational pursuits an Camalig to submit their Bio – Data emphasizing their significant accomplishments in their chosen job career, such as: Civic Action Movement, business enterprises, inventions, constructions, mentors to take from classroom teacher, principals, (district, division, regional) supervisors, college professors, and Deans of schools who are legitimate Camaligueños. In view of his teaching feat, scholarship, written books that benefited college and graduates students throughout the country and his Doctor of Education degree from Bicol University, prompted the award as outstanding Camaligueños in the field of EDUCATION (along with other professional pursuits) June 24, 2005 camalig’s town fiesta by the Camalig Council on Arts, Culture and Tourism to Dr. Celedonio G. Aguilar. Apathetically he muttered, if only there is a school who would avail of his expertise on the subjects corresponding to his written books, he is still willing to teach, for teaching to him is a life time endeavor, not anymore for remuneration, with life and Comfort, but to deciminate and share the knowledge he has learned from his scholarships by the DECS in Master of Arts in Teaching Reading at U.P. Diliman, QC, Master of fine Art in Creative Writing a Silliman University under the Tiempos (Edilberto and Edith) and William Sweet, Master of Arts in Educational Management.

While still in the grade school, his mother used to tell him to be a priest, to dignify and ameliorate their state of life; but the father would vehemently counter, no, he should be a lawyer. As always during the eve of the fiesta, Celedonio G. Aguilar earnestly desire to watch the parade with deep interest and enthusiasm especially when the platoon of soldiers march by and roiled in his mind the well-mannered discipline and dignity of mien of the soldiers, that someday, he thought and figured himself to be one of them. So when he enrolled at the Albay High School, after his academic classes, posthaste he would scurry out to his custodial concern, joined the formation of the preparatory military training activities. Through the years he rose from the ranks to become battalion commander. It was October, during his senior year in school that he hide down to the military camp to take the Philippine Military Academy Examination, but the Japanese Imperial forces landed at legazpi on December 14, 1941 thus throwing his ambition to be a soldier to the winds. However during the Japanese occupation, he joined the guerilla movement (NOMETA) Noli Me Tangere Guerilla as 2nd Lieutenant. He was enraptured with much interest when the American Force landed at legazpi on april 1, 1945. And NOMETA unit became 1st. Battalion of Sandico’s 52nd Division Guerilla Unit was re – entrenched to a company and merge to first Regiment Bicol Brigade that include him in the activated regular force of the Philippine Army as First class Private. Utterly disgusted he resigned from the army and applied to teach in the District of camalig as a substitute teacher. After a year of teaching, he became a temporary teacher and was appointed head teacher at Del Rosario Public School. Three years after classroom work, he resigned to pursue a degree in education and Graduated in 1951 at the National University, Manila. He first taught at Libon Private High School, after a year, transferred to St. John’s Academy in Camalig where his former student, Mrs. Minda Grageda Muñoz in their St. John’s Academy Golden Anniversary Souvenir booklet, In Retrospect elucidated; “Mr. Aguilar is a tall respectable man, eloquent and dedicated English instructor. We were all eyes and ears for him when he’s in front of the class, listening intently and spellbound to his interesting lecture. He was forthright and his dignified stature demanded respect.” In the same booklet, Reminiscing Our High School days with our Mentors, Mrs. Josefina Nuas Ramos averred, “Mr. Aguilar was our English teacher. He spoke English fluently. He developed our interest in reading literature and novels. He is a writer. Some of his books are: Shaken Shadows, Time and Sunken Sun, This Season and Night, Pink Sun and Neutral Dust, Readings in Philippine Literature, Speaking and Writing English, Critiques on Poetry, Understanding Poetry through imagery, Thesis Writing Made Easy, Functional Research Techniques, Dimensions in Reading, and Before the Tide Sets In.” Then the Civil Sevice Commission, in a letter, ordered him to report to Marcial O. Rañola Memorial School to teach English, non – compliance will be tantamount to scrapping out his civil service eligibility. Banners in The Quill, student publication of Marcial O. Rañola Memorial School, that new teacher added to MORMS Teaching Force,”one of them was MR. Aguilar of Camalig, Albay who had his first feel of teaching in 1945 when he accepted a teaching position in a barrio elementary school in the District of Camalig. But three years teaching in the elementary, resigned to enroll at National University, where in 1951 obtained his Bachelor of Science degree in Educational major in English and minor in history. He taught for five years at St. John’s Academy. During summer enrolled at U.P. for masteral degree.” He enjoyed immensely his secondary teaching adventure. Especially his literature teaching which spurred in him for more writing for publication in the national magazines: This Week Magazine, Free Press, Sunday Times Magazine, Graphic, Solidarity, etc. Through the suggestion of Bienvenido N. Santos, he organized Albay Writers with membership officials as: Dr. Rodrigo Salazar, Valdemar Olaguer, Jose Ravalo, Vic O. Ballesfin, and 15 other budding writers of Albay with Celedonio G. Aguilar as President and Bienvinido Santos as Adviser. At one instance, through Santos, N.V.M. Gonzales was guest speaker of the group along with Hilario Francia and Petronilo Daroy. To cap it all, he was elected President of the Albay Secondary Teachers Association which perhaps paved the way for his selection for the Master of Art in Teaching Reading Scholarship at the University of the Philippines. In the Class 76 reunion at MORMS of which Dr. Susan Princesa Mallonga was the President presented to him a certificate, which states: “Class 76”presents this certificate of Appreciation to Mr. Celedonio G. Aguilar for his demonstrated patience, hard work and dedication in molding our young minds in the pursuit of our secondary education, most of all, giving us the foundation in academic excellence, and teaching us values of honesty, diligence, sincerity and humility,” After enjoying the DECS scholarships, he was promoted to Junior College Instructor and assigned to School for Philippine a Craftsmen, Polangui, Albay. In The Craftlet official student publication of School for Philippine Craftsmen, in Campus Tidbits by June Ailes where she spot lighted and enunciated campus personalities, she articulated on Mr. Aguilar as “our beloved English instructor and his being very energetic to drill us in writing as if he was ink in his veins, for he has several collection of poetry which he considers his vice: together with his scholarships at U.P. and Silliman University. Indeed how lucky we are to be our instructor.” On School visitation of the Regional Director at SPC observing teachers, he spotted Mr. Aguilar for promotion to Regional General Education Supervisor, at which instance, he devoted his time after office hours to teaching at Bicol College and then to Divine Word College of Legazpi. Then retired from the government service. Outrightly, Bicol College took him to be Dean of the College of Education with only secondary teaching as the course offered. So he formalized the opening of the elementary grades in preparation for the opening of Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education (BSEed). At point and time, Mr. Manuel T. Javier, Bicol College Faculty and Adviser of Bicol Collegian, Student Publication of the School, wrote a feature which said: If the Colossus of Rhodes has been one wonders of the world in the days of antiquity, it has its equal in our present time at our school at that. We are referring to Dr. Celedonio G. Aguilar as the mighty colossus. Aside from being Dean of the College of Education, he is also Secretary of the Graduate School, twin positions enough to stymie the most intrepid of men, but not this titan. He savors these burdens with gusto. His student is the living witness to his pedagogical virtuosity. They would swear to high heaven how this man could change adrab classroom into exciting arena of intellectual combat where educational myths and heresies are blasted and intellectual pursuits are probed and defend.” Eventually a year after, he became the Dean of the Graduated School. As Dean of the Graduate School, he worked for the opening of the doctoral program subsequently a year later, through the help of his friend in the Higher Education Division, Manila, its recognition, a help exerted to boost Bicol College’s headway to educational permanence. But resigned later on when University of Santo Thomas called him for interview in connection to his application to teach at that school. But Fr. Reyes, President of Divine Word College of Legazpi and was to be promoted to higher position in Manila, sweet talked him to teach rather the King Seminary in Quezon City, which he accepted. He only taught half – day at the Seminary which gave him ample time for research, and call to mind, the dearth of specific books for the subject he taught in college, such as Philippine Literature, so Readings in Philippines Literature was written, Grammar and Composition, for Speaking and writing English, literary Criticism, for Critiques on Poetry, Poetry and Drama, for Understanding Poetry through Imagery, and for Graduate Students, Thesis Writing Made Easy, and Functional Research Techniques, for teacher and would be teacher, Dimension in Reading and Before the Tide Sets In. He also included in foreign and local anthologies: World Poetry by Kim Young Sam (Korea), East – West Voices by Dr. V.S. Skanda Prasad, (Mangalore, India), Edicao Commemorativo by Wilson Oliviera Jasa, (Sao Paulo, Brazil), and National Library of Poetry: Walk Through Paradise 1995, Portraits of Life 1996, Owing Mills, Maryland, USA, Bicol Voice Anthology by Merito B. Espinas, Bicol of the Philippines by Lilia Realubit, Ani by Cultural Center of the Philippines, Palihan by U.P. Creative Writing Center. On the outset of June, a letter from Mayor’s Office, requested all occupational pursuits an Camalig to submit their Bio – Data emphasizing their significant accomplishments in their chosen job career, such as: Civic Action Movement, business enterprises, inventions, constructions, mentors to take from classroom teacher, principals, (district, division, regional) supervisors, college professors, and Deans of schools who are legitimate Camaligueños. In view of his teaching feat, scholarship, written books that benefited college and graduates students throughout the country and his Doctor of Education degree from Bicol University, prompted the award as outstanding Camaligueños in the field of EDUCATION (along with other professional pursuits) June 24, 2005 camalig’s town fiesta by the Camalig Council on Arts, Culture and Tourism to Dr. Celedonio G. Aguilar. Apathetically he muttered, if only there is a school who would avail of his expertise on the subjects corresponding to his written books, he is still willing to teach, for teaching to him is a life time endeavor, not anymore for remuneration, with life and Comfort, but to deciminate and share the knowledge he has learned from his scholarships by the DECS in Master of Arts in Teaching Reading at U.P. Diliman, QC, Master of fine Art in Creative Writing a Silliman University under the Tiempos (Edilberto and Edith) and William Sweet, Master of Arts in Educational Management.

Last Update: 2014-11-23
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Position: Associate Director Philippine Address: Parc Royale Conone of only foreigners living in China honored with carrying the torch during the 2008 Olympics. He bested over 260 foreigners which included CEO’s and ambassadors in the process. In winning the award, Marco united all Filipinos into a positive cause, thus, having a Filipino carry the Olympic torch for the 1st time since the 1964 Tokyo Olympics. As an OFW, he has earned the respect, trust and confidence of his employer, superiors and co-workers. Marco is an effective role model employee. Proof of his competence is his growth from a mere Marketing Manager to Senior Marketing Manger to Business Development manager, then Associate, then Associate Director and now Associate Director-Asia Pacific all in just 5 years. He achieved this because despite having no contacts and no Chinese speaking skills, he strived to better himself. Now, this Filipino is an ambassador to his company’s international clients. Because of Marco’s shining example, companies want to hire more professionals from the Philippines. As a Managing Partner and correspondent of his own lifestyle magazine in Beijing, Metrostyle, Marco has written about the Philippines in countless occasions. Philippine Airlines acknowledges Marco’s contributions cause.

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Last Update: 2014-11-07
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