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Pook na rural

Rural area

Last Update: 2015-03-11
Usage Frequency: 224
Quality:
Reference: Wikipedia

Urban area

Urban area

Last Update: 2014-07-21
Usage Frequency: 16
Quality:
Reference: Wikipedia

urban mahihirap

subjectivity, in this specifically humanist construction, was still perdicated on a model of interior selfhood of identity as psychic depth, and these people invariably appeales to it when they justifies their declarations of their own homosexuality as a search for authenticity.

Last Update: 2015-01-23
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:
Reference: Anonymous

halimbawa ng pook pook

Examples of Place Place

Last Update: 2015-02-15
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:
Reference: Anonymous

Pook na urbano

Urban area

Last Update: 2015-03-23
Usage Frequency: 91
Quality:
Reference: Wikipedia

pook-gawaan

workplace

Last Update: 2014-09-23
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:
Reference: Anonymous

Pook na urbano

Pook na urbano

Last Update: 2014-09-04
Usage Frequency: 12
Quality:
Reference: Wikipedia

Pook na urbano

Urban areaskjj

Last Update: 2014-07-08
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:
Reference: Wikipedia

nasa lahat ng pook

ubiquitous

Last Update: 2014-11-02
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:
Reference: Anonymous

makasaysayang pook sa kazakhstan

historical places in Kazakhstan

Last Update: 2014-10-20
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:
Reference: Anonymous

nasa lahat ng pook tagalog

their origin vary

Last Update: 2015-03-14
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:
Reference: Anonymous

The Filipino term for a ghost is multo, which is derived from the Spanish word muerto, meaning dead. The multo is the soul of a dead person that has returned to the mortal world. It may want to finish an incomplete task or promise, or take revenge, it may return because of in improper burial or an unusually violent death or suicide. The ghost may be seeking a replacement so that it can live again.[1] Manananggal The Manananggal is a vampire who can separate her upper torso from her lower body in order to fly in the night with huge bat-like wings to prey on unsuspecting, pregnant women in their homes, using an elongated proboscis-like tongue to reach their unborn fetus.[2] The Manananggal has some similarities to the Penanggalan of Malay legend, a floating female head with trailing entrails.[3] Beliefs in the origin of manananggals vary. One story says that heredity or contamination by physical or supernatural means can turn someone into a manananggal. For example, contaminating someone's meal with an old manananggal's saliva or human flesh can pass it on.[4] In some ways the manananggal resembles the tik-tik, a type of aswang that takes the form of a black bird which makes a "tik-tik-tik" sound. It has a long proboscis that reaches through the roof and sucks the fetus inside the womb of pregnant women.[5] The tik-tik may be related to the Indonesian Kuntilanak, a vampire bird that makes a "ke-ke-ke" sound as it flies.[6] The tiyanak is a malevolent creature that may be found in remote grassy fields. It appears as a helpless infant. When someone takes pity and picks it up, it turns into a demon, scratching and biting or devouring its victim. In the south, the tiyanak is known as a patianak or muntianak, and is thought to be the ghost child of a woman who died in the forest during childbirth. In Malaysia and Indonesia it is the pontianak, or the mother who died in childbirth, who appears as a normal person, then turns into a fiend when the passerby approaches.[1] Urban legends[edit] Common themes[edit] Common themes in ghost legends include the White Lady, the headless priest and the phantom hitchhiker. The white lady appears in lonely places, dressed in white, with no visible face or with a disfigured face. Apparently she has died a violent death and is still haunting the vicinity, but with no ill intent. The headless priest prowls at night in a graveyard or ruined place, either carrying his severed head or searching for his head.[7] One of the hitchhiker stories tells of three boys who pick

What is the meaning of fear

Last Update: 2015-03-05
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:
Reference: Anonymous
Warning: Contains invisible HTML formatting

Education in India is provided by the public sector as well as the private sector, with control and funding coming from three levels: central, state, and local. Under various articles of the Indian Constitution, free and compulsory education is provided as a fundamental right to children between the ages of 6 and 14. India has made progress in terms of increasing the primary education attendance rate and expanding literacy to approximately three-quarters of the population in the 7-100 age group, by 2011.[4] India's improved education system is often cited as one of the main contributors to its economic development.[5] Much of the progress, especially in higher education and scientific research, has been credited to various public institutions. At the primary and secondary level, India has a large private school system complementing the government run schools, with 29% of students receiving private education in the 6 to 14 age group.[6] Certain post-secondary technical schools are also private. The private education market in India had a revenue of US$450 million in 2008, but is projected to be a US$40 billion market.[7] As per the Annual Status of Education Report (ASER) 2012, 96.5% of all rural children between the ages of 6-14 were enrolled in school. This is the fourth annual survey to report enrollment above 96%. Another report from 2013 stated that there were 229 million students enrolled in different accredited urban and rural schools of India, from Class I to XII, representing an increase of 2.3 million students over 2002 total enrollment, and a 19% increase in girl's enrollment.[8] While quantitatively India is inching closer to universal education, the quality of its education has been questioned particularly in its government run school system. Some of the reasons for the poor quality include absence of around 25 percent of teachers everyday.[9] States of India have introduced tests and education assessment system to identify and improve such schools.[10] It is important to clarify that while there are private schools in India, they are highly regulated in terms of what they can teach, in what form they can operate (must be a non-profit to run any accredited educational institution) and all other aspects of operation. Hence, the differentiation of government schools and private schools can be misguiding.[11] In India's education system, a significant number of seats are reserved under affirmative action policies for the historically disadvantaged Scheduled Castes and Scheduled Tribes and Other Backward Classes. In universities, colleges, and similar institutions affiliated to the federal government, there is a minimum 50% of reservations applicable to these disadvantaged groups, at the state level it can vary. Maharashtra had 73% reservation in 2014, which is the highest percentage of reservations in India.

Education in India

Last Update: 2014-12-04
Subject: History
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:
Reference: Anonymous

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