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Tagalog

fables ng ilocano

English

fables of ilocano

Last Update: 2015-08-19
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference: Anonymous

Tagalog

ilocano short poems

English

funny short poems

Last Update: 2015-09-08
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

Tagalog

Short story

English

Short story

Last Update: 2015-03-07
Usage Frequency: 15
Quality:

Reference:

Tagalog

short stories translate in ilocano

English

short stories translated in english

Last Update: 2015-09-29
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

Tagalog

fables ng ilocano bersyon sa ingles

English

first day

Last Update: 2014-10-27
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
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Tagalog

short story telling for pre-schoolers

English

story telling for pre-schoolers

Last Update: 2016-01-07
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
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Tagalog

elements of short story(setting)

English

elements of short story (setting)

Last Update: 2015-05-04
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
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Tagalog

short speech about environment-science

English

short speech about environment, science

Last Update: 2015-01-12
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

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Tagalog

example ng short slogan para sa maka tao

English

slogan makatao

Last Update: 2015-07-08
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

Tagalog

thumbelina short story tagalog

English

Thumbelina short story Tagalog

Last Update: 2016-03-03
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
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Tagalog

Isang napakagandang linggo nanaman ang natapos. Kasabay ng pagtatapos ng january. Mga bagong lessons, at exciting activities ang aming ginawa noong nakaraang linggo. Isa na rito ay yung kumanta kami ng Ebony and Ivory. At ng sumunod na araw ay nagkaroon kami ng short quiz tungkol dito. Mga bagong topics ang na i discuss ni ma'am aloha gaya ng passive voice and active voice. At kung ano ang mga pagkakaiba nito. At siyempre hindi mawawala ang konting kasiyahan habang nagtuturo si ma'am. Nabanggit na rin ni ma'am yung mga requirements na dapat ipasa ngayong 4th Grading. Ito rin ng first ever journal namin sa english. That's all.

English

QUERY LENGTH LIMIT EXCEDEED. MAX ALLOWED QUERY : 500 CHARS

Last Update: 2016-01-31
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

Tagalog

short story script biag ni lam-ang

English

short story script, the jungle book

Last Update: 2016-01-15
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

Tagalog

short stories translate in filipinomouse and lion

English

short stories translated in filipinomouse and lion

Last Update: 2015-11-18
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
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Tagalog

short story script sa pula sa puti

English

short story script in red on white

Last Update: 2015-01-21
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
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Tagalog

n the turbulent days in which France was transitioning away from Napoleonic rule, Edmond Dantes (Caviezel) and his closest friend, Fernand Mondego (Pearce), aspire to gain the same two things: the next captaincy of a ship in Morel's (Godfrey) Marseille-based shipping business and the hands of the lovely Mercedes Iguanada (Dominczyk). Dantes and Mondego are diverted to Elba on a shipping mission because their captain requires medical attention. Assistance comes, unexpectedly, in the form of the personal physician of the exiled Napoleon (Norton). In return for the use of his doctor, Napoleon demands that Dantes deliver a letter for him and that the mission and the letter be kept a secret. Unknown to the illiterate Dantes, the letter will provide Bonapartists in Marseille information of pertinence to a possible rescue of Napoleon. Also unknown to him, Fernand has discovered and read the letter and has full knowledge of its contents. On his return to France, Dantes' fortunes peak as Morel names him captain of one of his ships and an improved station in life prompts Edmond to propose to Mercedes, who accepts the offer. In the process of being beaten out of the two things that matter most to him in life, the jealous Fernand knows that the letter Dantes is carrying can be used to falsely implicate him in an act that might be viewed by local authorities as treasonous. Fernand, and his confidant, shipping colleague Danglars (Woodington), betray Dantes by making the magistrate Villefort (Frain) aware of the letter. Dantes is taken by local authorities in front of Villefort. Despite his determination that Dantes is innocent of any crime, he becomes edgy upon learning that the letter was addressed to Noirtier Villefort, a known Bonpartist, and, consequently, a politically inconvenient father for a young man aspiring to a prominent law career in post-Napoleonic France. To eliminate all evidence that his father was involved in plans for an escape attempt by Napoleon from Elba, Villefort burns the letter and has Dantes arrested and taken to the Chateau D'If, a maximum security prison, where Dantes rots for over a decade, with no prospects of getting out in the imaginable future. Dantes befriends a fellow prisoner named Abbe Faria (Harris), who is a great scholar and who, very gradually, transforms the unworldly Dantes into a wise, learned and cultivated man. Faria is an old man, however, and when he comes to realize that he is fatally ill, he tells Dantes of a great treasure and where it is buried. Secretly placing himself in Faria's burial sack, which is to be thrown over the cliffs and into the river alongside the prison, Dantes manages to escape. After a dangerous ordeal in which he mingles with, but ultimately befriends, an enterprising, yet violent, group of smugglers led by Luigi Vampa (Blanc), he makes his way back to Marseille. Dantes now turns his attention to claiming the treasure Abbe Faria had referred to. After locating the treasure, Dantes' riches are suddenly boundless, but rather than retiring to a life of leisure, his new raison d'etre is vengeance, with the objects of his revenge being Fernand (now a count), Danglars (now a baron), and Villefort (now a chief prosecutor), all of whom live in Paris. As they are now members of Parisian high society, Dantes realizes that to gain access to them, he'll need to reinvent himself, and uses some of his newfound riches to purchase a huge estate near Paris. He then proclaims himself to be the Count of Monte Cristo, and although nobody knows of him, his claim is very credible in view of his visibly substantial wealth. The Count plans a party at his new estate and invites many members of Parisian high society, including all the objects of his vengeance. Now having considerable access to each of them, one at a time, he successfully sets them up for failure. Danglars is tricked into an act of embezzlement and Villefort is tricked into confessing to conspiracy to have his own father murdered within earshot of local authorities. The Count gains close access to Fernand and Mercedes, who are now husband and wife, by paying the smuggler Luigi Vampa to pretend to kidnap their son, Albert. This enables the Count himself to save Albert. Having saved their son, the Count is now welcome in the home of Fernand and Mercedes. Taking note of his mannerisms, Mercedes soon works out that the Count is actually Edmond Dantes, but the Count still has a bone to pick with her, as she married Fernand very shortly after his arrest and had Fernand's son, Albert (Cavill), not long after that. This seemed a sign of her infidelity, but the Count ultimately learns that Villefort had announced that Dantes was dead shortly after the onset of his imprisonment. Fernand, it turns out, had bargained for this announcement, from which he hoped to gain the hand of Mercedes, by murdering, at Villefort's request, Villefort's father. Now understanding that Mercedes had believed him dead, the Count is less incensed by her marriage to Fernand, but still finds the very short period of time between his imprisonment and their marriage very unsettling. The Count is about to turn his back completely on Mercedes. But then, Fernand's financial ruin from compulsive gambling compels him to leave Paris to evade his debtors, against whom he has committed crimes. Unwilling to follow Fernand with their son, Mercedes, finally, tells the Count the truth ---- she had married Fernand because she had, unknown to the Count, been impregnated by Dantes shortly before he was arrested. She wanted Albert to have a father. In truth, however, Albert's biological father is the Count himself. Finally willing to forgive her, the Count falls in love all over again with Mercedes, and, with those who had betrayed them out of the way, they resolve to live their lives, casting aside the dark and regrettable episodes which had robbed them of so many happy times with each other and with their son Albert.

English

summary of the count of Monte Cristo

Last Update: 2015-01-13
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
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Tagalog

maikling kwento ni pagong at kuneho Short story of the tortoise and hare Isang araw habang naglalakad si Kuneho ay nakasalubong niya si Pagong. Palibhasa makupad maglakad ang pagong kaya pinagtawanan ito ng kuneho at nilibak. "Napakaiksi ng mga paa mo Pagong, kaya ubod ka ng bagal maglakad, wala kang mararating niyan." At sinundan iyon ng malulutong na tawa. Labis na nainsulto ang Pagong sa mga sinabi ng Kuneho. Para patunayan na nagkakamali ito ng akala ay hinamon nya ang Kuneho. "Maaaring mabagal nga akong maglakad, subalit matibay ang katawan ko, hindi mo ako matatalo." Lalo lamang siyang pinagtawanan. "nabibigla ka yata Pagong, baka mapahiya ka lamang," wika ni Kuneho. "Para magkasubukan tayo, magkarera tayo patungo sa ituktok ng bulubunduling iyon." Itinuro ni Pagong ang abot-tanaw na bundok. Ganoon na lamang ang katuwaan ng mayabang na Kuneho sa hamon na iyon ni Pagong. Nagtawag pa ito ng mga kaibigan para manood sa gagawin nilang karera. Gusto niyang lalong libakin si Pagong sa harap ng kanyang mga kaibigan oras na matalo niya ito. Nakapaligid sa kanila ang mga kaibigang hayop. Si matsing ang nagbilang para sa pag-uumpisa ng paligsahan. "Handa na ba kayo". Magkasabay na tumugon sina pagong at kuneho. "Handa na kami!". "Isa..Dalawa..Tatlo.!.takbo", sigaw ni matsing. Magkasabay ngang humakbang ang dalawa mula sa lugar ng pag-uumpisahan. Mabilis na nagpalundag-lundag si Kuneho. Halos sandaling minuto lamang ay naroroon na siya sa paanan ng bundok. Ng lumingon siya ay nakita niyang malayung- malayo ang agwat niya kay pagong. Patuloy sa kanyang mabagal na paglakad si pagong, habang pinagtatawanan siya ng mga nakapaligid na hayop. Hindi pansin ni Pagong ang panunuya ng mga ito. Patuloy siya sa paglakad, walang lingun-lingon. Samantala, si Kuneho ay halos mainip na sa paghihintay na makita si pagong sa kanyang likuran. Ilang ulit na ba siyang nagpahinto-hinto, pero wala ni anino ni pagong. Palibhasa malaki ang tiwala niya sa sarili, alam niya ang kakayahan tumakbo ng mabilis, ipinasya niyang maidlip muna ng makarating na siya sa kalagitnaan ng bundok. Tutal nakatitiyak naman siya ng panalo. Patuloy naman sa kanyang mabagal na paglakad si pagong paakyat, hanggang sa marating niya ang kalagitnaan ng bundok, naraanan pa niya si kuneho na mahimbing na natutulog at malakas na naghihilik. Nilampasan niya ito at nagpatuloy siya sa paglakad hanggang sa marating niya ang hangganan ng kanilang karera. Ng magising naman si kuneho ay muli itong tumingin sa ibaba ng bundok, subalit hindi pa din makita si pagong. Humanda na siyang maglakad muli paakyat ng bundok, subalit ganoon na lamang ang gulat niya ng matanaw si pagong na naroroon na sa ituktok ng bundok. Naunahan na pala siya. Minsan sa aking pagmomotor naisip ko lagi na lang akong nagmamadali. Lagi na lang gusto ko mabilis akong makarating sa aming opisina. Madami pala akong nakakaligtaaan. Katulad ng isang kuneho minsan nakakatulog din ako sa daan. Pagtulog na hindi literal kundi panlarawan. Kung ihahalintulad ko ang sarili ko noon at ngayun maari kong sabihin isa akong kuneho na palagi na lang talon ng talon at pagnapagod na ay matutulog. Marahil mas mabuti pang maging isang mabagal na pagong. Isang pagong na matyaga nasa bawat paglakad ay nararamdaman ang saya ng paglalakbay. Magiting na pagong na alam nya sa sariling wala syang magagawa kung tatayo lamang sya at panonooring libak libakin lamang ng kanyang mga Kuneho sa buhay.

English

Short story of the tortoise and hare

Last Update: 2015-01-10
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:
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Tagalog

Joseph Rudyard Kipling (/ˈrʌdjərd ˈkɪplɪŋ/ RUD-yəd KIP-ling; 30 December 1865 – 18 January 1936)[1] was an English short-story writer, poet, and novelist. He wrote tales and poems of British soldiers in India and stories for children. He was born in Bombay, in the Bombay Presidency of British India, and was taken by his family to England when he was five years old.[2] Kipling's works of fiction include The Jungle Book (1894), Kim (1901), and many short stories, including "The Man Who Would Be King" (1888).[3] His poems include "Mandalay" (1890), "Gunga Din" (1890), "The Gods of the Copybook Headings" (1919), "The White Man's Burden" (1899), and "If—" (1910). He is regarded as a major innovator in the art of the short story;[4] his children's books are enduring classics of children's literature; and one critic described his work as exhibiting "a versatile and luminous narrative gift".[5][6] Kipling was one of the most popular writers in England, in both prose and verse, in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.[4] Henry James said: "Kipling strikes me personally as the most complete man of genius (as distinct from fine intelligence) that I have ever known."[4] In 1907, he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature, making him the first English-language writer to receive the prize, and its youngest recipient to date.[7] Among other honours, he was sounded out for the British Poet Laureateship and on several occasions for a knighthood, all of which he declined.[8] Kipling's subsequent reputation has changed according to the political and social climate of the age[9][10] and the resulting contrasting views about him continued for much of the 20th century.[11][12] George Orwell called him a "prophet of British imperialism".[13] Literary critic Douglas Kerr wrote: "He [Kipling] is still an author who can inspire passionate disagreement and his place in literary and cultural history is far from settled. But as the age of the European empires recedes, he is recognised as an incomparable, if controversial, interpreter of how empire was experienced. That, and an increasing recognition of his extraordinary narrative gifts, make him a force to be reckoned with."[14]pamatnubay

English

Joseph Rudyard Kipling (/ˈrʌdjərd ˈkɪplɪŋ/ RUD-yəd KIP-ling; 30 December 1865 – 18 January 1936)[1] was an English short-story writer, poet, and novelist. He wrote tales and poems of British soldiers in India and stories for children. He was born in Bombay, in the Bombay Presidency of British India, and was taken by his family to England when he was five years old.[2] Kipling's works of fiction include The Jungle Book (1894), Kim (1901), and many short stories, including "The Man Who Would Be King" (1888).[3] His poems include "Mandalay" (1890), "Gunga Din" (1890), "The Gods of the Copybook Headings" (1919), "The White Man's Burden" (1899), and "If—" (1910). He is regarded as a major innovator in the art of the short story;[4] his children's books are enduring classics of children's literature; and one critic described his work as exhibiting "a versatile and luminous narrative gift".[5][6] Kipling was one of the most popular writers in England, in both prose and verse, in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.[4] Henry James said: "Kipling strikes me personally as the most complete man of genius (as distinct from fine intelligence) that I have ever known."[4] In 1907, he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature, making him the first English-language writer to receive the prize, and its youngest recipient to date.[7] Among other honours, he was sounded out for the British Poet Laureateship and on several occasions for a knighthood, all of which he declined.[8] Kipling's subsequent reputation has changed according to the political and social climate of the age[9][10] and the resulting contrasting views about him continued for much of the 20th century.[11][12] George Orwell called him a "prophet of British imperialism".[13] Literary critic Douglas Kerr wrote: "He [Kipling] is still an author who can inspire passionate disagreement and his place in literary and cultural history is far from settled. But as the age of the European empires recedes, he is recognised as an incomparable, if controversial, interpreter of how empire was experienced. That, and an increasing recognition of his extraordinary narrative gifts, make him a force to be reckoned with."[14]

Last Update: 2015-01-08
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:
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Tagalog

SAPATOS MO ADIDAS SHORT NI ADIDAS T-SHIRT MO ADIDAS MUKHA MO PARANG HUDAS,,,

English

sapatos mo check short mo check t-shirt mo check mukha mo parang SHREK

Last Update: 2014-11-12
Subject: Chemical
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

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