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Tagalog

the first monkey story

English

The first monkey story

Last Update: 2015-03-30
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
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Tagalog

the first monkey story tagalog maranao version

English

the first monkey story Tagalog maranao version

Last Update: 2015-09-21
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
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Tagalog

he first monkey

English

suck!!!!!!!

Last Update: 2015-11-30
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
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Tagalog

the first monkey tagalog version

English

the first monkey story Tagalog version

Last Update: 2016-10-11
Subject: General
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Tagalog

the first monkey maranao version

English

the first monkey version maranao

Last Update: 2014-12-01
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
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Tagalog

The first boarding schools for spanish girlsin the philippines

English

secondary

Last Update: 2016-06-22
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
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Tagalog

 Information sharing as the first rank of root problem with RII = 0.84. That is the main reason of the small farmers that information sharing is very essential for successful supply chain collaboration. However, the information exchange is very difficult to be realized in collaborative practises since a little bit of market information are shared by the traders to the small farmer

English

im eighth from the ten siblings

Last Update: 2017-02-01
Subject: General
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Tagalog

Just like any other towns in the province of Bulacan, the town got its name from a tree called "Bukawe" found in abundance during that time in the said place. Bocaue was just a mere barrio of the town of Meycauayan until 1606 when it was made into a town with Reverend Padre Delos Santos as the first parish priest and administrator. Fire destroyed a large part of the town in 1818, but was later rehabilitated gradually during the American regime. In 1908-1910, some members of the municipal council headed by Guillermo Puatu unsuccessfully tried to change the name of this town to Balagtas in honor of the Tagalog poet. Francisco "Balagtas" Baltazar. (Bigaa, being the birthplace of the hero merited the name of Balagtas in 1966). The history of Bocaue is not complete without citing the legend of the Holy Cross of Wawa which has a great significance to the residents of this town as to its founding. The celebration of the feast in honor of the Holy Cross has been made a tradition and a yearly affair. The legend says those centuries ago, a woman was saved miraculously fro drowning by an image of the big wooden cross floating along the flooded river in barrio Wawa this town. The woman, the story goes, was about to sink when she caught a glimpse of the image of the cross. She tried to take hold of it but it moved farther. The woman followed the image until she clung to it and then was able to reach safely the riverbank. Every year, every 1st Sunday of July, the residents of Bocaue greeted the visitors with the traditional river festival in honor of the said Holy Cross. Today, Bocaue is thriving with cottage industries and many factories billow with smoke. Once, some foreigners visited this place, and they found out that every home is virtually a busy place. Each home turns out goods and many other products, which contribute greatly to the economy of the town. Religious and industrious, the Bocaue people always look up to the great promise of the future.

English

Just like any other towns in the province of Bulacan, the town got its name from a tree called "Bukawe" found in abundance during that time in the said place. Bocaue was just a mere barrio of the town of Meycauayan until 1606 when it was made into a town with Reverend Padre Delos Santos as the first parish priest and administrator. Fire destroyed a large part of the town in 1818, but was later rehabilitated gradually during the American r

Last Update: 2016-02-04
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
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Warning: Contains invisible HTML formatting

Tagalog

The Rizal Monument in Luneta was not the work of a Filipino but a Swiss sculptor named Richard Kissling. Furthermore, Kissling was only the second placer in the international art competition held between 1905 – 1907 for the monument design. The first-prize winner was Professor Carlos Nicoli of Carrara, Italy. His scaled plaster model titled “Al Martir de Bagumbayan” (To the Martyr of Bagumbayan) bested 40 other accepted entries. Among his plans were the use of marble from Italy (in contrast to the unpolished granite now at Luneta) and the incorporation of more elaborate figurative elements. Many accounts explained that the contract was awarded to Dr. Richard Kissling of Zurich, Switzerland for his “Motto Stella” (Guiding Star) because of Nicoli’s inability to post the required performance bond of P20,000 for the duration of the monument’s construction. Some sources say that Nicoli failed to show up at the designated date for the signing of the job contract. Another narrative declared, “parenthetically, the contract was awarded to Richard Kissling because his quotation was lower that that of Prof. Nicoli’s.” A complaint was reportedly filed by Nicoli through the courts of justice. Some of the local press lambasted Kissling’s model. It was satirized in a cartoon and labeled vulgar y tosco, meaning “lousy.” The constituents of the Jury of Awards – all Americans and none of whom were artists, architects nor engineers –were also questioned. (Then Governor James F. Smith headed the jury.) There were plans for the famous Filipino painter Felix Resurreccion Hidalgo to inspect and modify the design. However, the latter was ultimately left “as it is” since the bronze of the statues had already been cast in Switzerland. During Rizal’s (birth) centenary year in 1961, a controversial stainless steel shaft/pylon was superimposed over the granite obelisk. This increased the height of the structure from 12.7 meters to 30. 5 meters. The said remodeling undertaken by the Jose Rizal National Centennial Commission (JRNCC) was widely criticized. It drew derisive remarks of it being “carnivalistic,” “nightmarish,” “commercialized,” “pseudo modern,” “hodgepodge of classic and Hollywood modern,” “fintailed monstrosity,” and “like a futuristic rocket ship about to take off for interstellar space,” to cite some. Many found the gleaming modernistic steel shaft incompatible with the somber granite base. Moreover, the latter seemed to dwarf the much smaller Rizal figure. Others simply dislike the idea of tampering with a popular and traditional image which was already immortalized in stamps, paper currency, books and souvenirs, among others. The designer of the remodeling was Juan F. Nakpil – later to become the country’s first National Artist for Architecture. He quoted former Secretary of Education and JRNCC chair Manuel Lim as the one who “envisioned it as a part of obelisk that will jut out to serve as a convenient guide for incoming boats and ships and for the people lost in their way around the city.” The P145,000 shaft was eventually removed two years later under the request of Secretary of Education Alejandro Roces and Director of Public Libraries Carlos Quirino. It was dismantled during the Holy Week “reportedly to prevent any court injunction from restraining them as government offices were closed during holidays. Until a few years ago, the pylon stood on Roxas Boulevard to mark the Pasay-Parañaque boundary. Its present whereabouts are uncertain.

English

correct grammar on translations

Last Update: 2015-11-20
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
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Tagalog

Padcal mine, which Philex Mining Corp. has been operating since 1958, is the first underground block cave operation in the Far East. It produces copper concentrates containing copper, gold, and silver. A majority of the copper concentrates are shipped to Saganoseki, Japan, for smelting by Pan Pacific Copper Company Limited, a joint venture between Nippon Mining Co. Ltd. and Mitsui Mining and Smelting Co. Ltd. The Padcal mine is under 12 mineral holdings, with an aggregate 95 hectares in Benguet province which are subject to royalty agreements with claim owners

English

QUERY LENGTH LIMIT EXCEDEED. MAX ALLOWED QUERY : 500 CHARS

Last Update: 2015-09-23
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
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Tagalog

HISTORY OF CAGAYAN DE ORO CITY By ATTY. "TOMMY" C. PACANA CHAIRMAN, HISTORICAL COMMISSION Two thousand years ago, there were already ancient Kagay-anons living around the vicinity of Hulaga, Himologan and Tagbalitang caves around 8 kilometers south of Cagayan de Oro City. Fr. Francisco Demetrio, S.J., noted archeologist and Filipino folklorist of Xavier University had collected tools, implements, potteries and shards from these areas and subjected these to the Carbon dating process at the Philippine Historical Museum to determine their age. It was found that these tools and implements were already used by the ancient Kagay-anons during the Neolithic Age. This shows how old Cagayan de Oro is before the coming of the Spanish "conquistadors" to the Philippines in march 1521. There were three great Sultanates of Mindanao and Sulu. These were Sultanates of Sulu under Sheriff Aljaluddin, the Sultanate of Maguindanao under Sheriff Mawi, and Tagoloan under Sheriff Mohammed Kabungsuwan. The Sultanate of Tagoloan extended from Baloi, Lanao del Sur, to Butuan, Cagayan de Oro (or Kalambaguhan, by which name it was then known), was merely a passageway from Baloi to Butuan, which was already a great trading center like Zugbu, Panay and Manila. Kalambaguhan has a small settlement of Bukidnons who lived along the riverbanks of the Kalambaguhan River. This river (now the Cagayan River) was so known because of the "Lambago" trees that grew profusely along its banks. During this time, however, the Cachel Corralat (Sultan Kudarat) marauding warriors attacked such places as Manticao, Tagnipa, (El Salvador), Iligan and Kalambaguhan to bring these places with their domain. They captured the women, children and working animals of the inhabitants in these places and brought them to their Sultanate. Because of these constant raids, the Bukidnons along the river fled to the hills of Hulaga led by their ruler, Datu Salangsang. Sometime in 1622, long after the Spaniards had established themselves at Butuan, Spanish friars under Fray Agustin de San Pedro known as "El Padre Capitan" went to see Datu Salangsang and sought to invite him and his people to come down to their told settlement at Kalambaguhan under the protection of the Spaniards. Datu Salangsang's aunt, a Christianized woman of influence whose name was Magdalena Bacuya. With a messenger from El Padre Capitan reiterated his offer to Datu Salangsang and convinced him to come down to their ancient settlement of Kalambaguhan. To protect the Bukidnons from the constant raids of the Muslim from Cachel Corralat, El Padre Capitan built a fortification around the settlement, which is now Gaston Park. Several raids of the Maguindanao warriors were repulsed by the courageous El Padre Capitan that the Muslims never returned again to the settlement. It was from this small settlement that the present Cagayan de Oro originated. A small church was built on the site, which later became the present San Agustin Cathedral. Thereby, the fame of El Padre Capitan as an able military strategist, spread far and wide. He vanquished the Muslims around Lake Lanao. The people of Cagayan de Oro come from a blend of two cultures those of the Muslims and Bukidnons. These were the native people that had settled in the region long before the coming of the Spaniards in fact, the first Christians among these natives were the Muslims from Lanao who were the descendants of the Samporna clan. They were the first to be baptized along with the Bato-Batos, the Wagas, Abas, Dagumbals and several families. HOW DID CAGAYAN DE ORO GOT ITS NAME? Pre-War folks said that Cagayan came from "Cagaycay, " an ancient Bukidnon word meaning to rake in the earth either with one's bare hands or with a piece of wood. It also means rocks gathered from the river or ores raked in from the hillside or streams. Gold have always been abundant in the Cagayan River gold ores are still found in the nearby of Cagayan as Tumpagon, Pigsag-an, Tuburan, Taglimao and other nearby places. Before the Spaniards came to Cagayan (or Kalambaguhan), there were already places where on could rake in the earth. ANOTHER VERSION IS MORE ROMANTIC Another version of how Cagayan de Oro got its name is told in of that story of a Bukidnon chieftain on the eastern side of Cagayan River (whose name according to old folks was Mansicampo), once had a quarrel with a Muslim Datu across the river (now the RER Subdivision), his name was Bagongsalibo. The quarrel became intense that the Bukidnon chieftain wanted it settled by war. However, the Muslim Datu across the river wanted to live in peace with his people in that part of Cagayan. Mansicampo then called on all his followers and relatives from the Bukidnon tribes of Daan Lunsod, gathered on the eastern side of the river ready for combat then Mansicampo ordered his son, the Bagani, to go and see Datu Bagongsalibo and arranged for a council of war. Therefore, the young prince went to see the Muslim Datu and confirmed with him. During the conference, however the young prince noted that there was a beautiful young woman who kept on peeping from behind a door looking at him. She was so beautiful that the young prince was immediately captivated and forgot his main purpose in the council. The young prince immediately proposed his intentions to the Muslim Datu who was only too willing to accept his land in marriage as he was not very keen about going to war against a neighbor. When the Bukidnon chieftain heard about his son proposing marriage to the daughter of his enemy. His warriors bid goodbye and left to live near the hills of Lumbia vowing never return to his former settlement which he now call "Kagayha-an" (or in Bukidnon, a place of shame). Since then, Cagayan de Oro has grown into one of the most peaceful and progressive cities in the entire Philippines.

English

zzzzzzzz

Last Update: 2015-08-27
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:
Warning: Contains invisible HTML formatting

Tagalog

the road not taken by robert frost Two roads diverged in a yellow wood, And sorry I could not travel both And be one traveler, long I stood And looked down one as far as I could To where it bent in the undergrowth; Then took the other, as just as fair And having perhaps the better claim, Because it was grassy and wanted wear; Though as for that the passing there Had worn them really about the same, And both that morning equally lay In leaves no step had trodden black. Oh, I kept the first for another day! Yet knowing how way leads on to way, I doubted if I should ever come back. I shall be telling this with a sigh Somewhere ages and ages hence: Two roads diverged in a wood, and I — I took the one less traveled by, And that has made all the difference.

English

the road not taken

Last Update: 2015-07-05
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

Tagalog

In 1769, the Scotsman James Watt patented an improved version of the steam engine that ushered in the Industrial Revolution. The idea of using steam power to propel boats occurred to inventors soon after the potential of Watt's new engine became known. The era of the steamboat began in America in 1787 when John Fitch (1743-1798) made the first successful trial of a forty-five-foot steamboat on the Delaware River on August 22, 1787, in the presence of members of the Constitutional Convention. Fitch later built a larger vessel that carried passengers and freight between Philadelphia and Burlington, New Jersey. John Fitch was granted his first United States patent for a steamboat on August 26, 1791. However, he was granted his patent only after a battle with James Rumsey over claims to the same invention. Both men had similar designs. .

English

Namiss ko lang ang conversation natin

Last Update: 2015-03-01
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
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Tagalog

The former barrio of Basista, now the site of the town proper or poblacion was once the biggest and one of the progressive barrios located in the far south of the mother town, San Carlos (now a city). As early as the year 1918, some of the most influential and prominent citizens of the then barrio of Basista came together and made the first attempt to petition the municipal government and the provincial board of San Carlos and Pangasinan respectively to grant the township of their barrios. Prominent politicians during that time volunteered their help in making representations with the proper authorities, but their request was not granted. Some of those leaders were: General Mamaril, Don Valeriano Perez, father of the late speaker Eugenio Pérez, Buenaventura de Vera, Telesforo de Vera, Gregorio Malicdem, Cayetano Perez, Gaudencio Padua, Gregorio Valdez, Ramon Valdez, Don Roque de Vera, Domingo Resultay, Bernardo Resultay, Liberato Frias, Hipolito Cayabyab, Alejandro de guzman , Pascual Resultay, Raymundo de Guzman, Vicente de Guzman, Domingo de Guzman, Vicente Frias, Florentino Malicdem, Faustino Monzon, Cornelio de Guzman, Felix de Guzman, Juan Malicdem, Federico Cancino, Artemio Frias and several others. On September 5, 1961, President Carlos P. Garcia issued Executive Order No. 446 creating the town of Basista composed of 13 barrios out of the 28 that petitioned. Four years after, however, the Philippine Supreme Court declared the town's creation as without legal basis citing their ruling in the "Emmanuel Pelaez vs. Auditor General" that "municipalities created under Executive Orders are void". It was here that Republic Act No. 4866 filed by Congressman Jack L. Soriano was enacted into law and legally created Basista as a town of Pangasinan

English

The former barrio of Basista, now the site of the town proper or poblacion was once the biggest and one of the progressive barrios located in the far south of the mother town, San Carlos (now a city). As early as the year 1918, some of the most influential and prominent citizens of the then barrio of Basista came together and made the first attempt to petition the municipal government and the provincial board of San Carlos and Pangasinan respectively to grant the township of their barrios. Prominent politicians during that time volunteered their help in making representations with the proper authorities, but their request was not granted. Some of those leaders were: General Mamaril, Don Valeriano Perez, father of the late speaker Eugenio Pérez, Buenaventura de Vera, Telesforo de Vera, Gregorio Malicdem, Cayetano Perez, Gaudencio Padua, Gregorio Valdez, Ramon Valdez, Don Roque de Vera, Domingo Resultay, Bernardo Resultay, Liberato Frias, Hipolito Cayabyab, Alejandro de guzman , Pascual Resultay, Raymundo de Guzman, Vicente de Guzman, Domingo de Guzman, Vicente Frias, Florentino Malicdem, Faustino Monzon, Cornelio de Guzman, Felix de Guzman, Juan Malicdem, Federico Cancino, Artemio Frias and several others. On September 5, 1961, President Carlos P. Garcia issued Executive Order No. 446 creating the town of Basista composed of 13 barrios out of the 28 that petitioned. Four years after, however, the Philippine Supreme Court declared the town's creation as without legal basis citing their ruling in the "Emmanuel Pelaez vs. Auditor General" that "municipalities created under Executive Orders are void". It was here that Republic Act No. 4866 filed by Congressman Jack L. Soriano was enacted into law and legally created Basista as a town of Pangasinan

Last Update: 2015-02-12
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:
Warning: Contains invisible HTML formatting

Tagalog

In the 1870s, Captain Nathan Algren, a cynical veteran of the American Civil war who will work for anyone, is hired by Americans who want lucrative contracts with the Emperor of Japan to train the peasant conscripts for the first standing imperial army in modern warfare using firearms. The imperial Omura cabinet's first priority is to repress a rebellion of traditionalist Samurai -hereditary warriors- who remain devoted to the sacred dynasty but reject the Westernizing policy and even refuse firearms. Yet when his ill-prepared superior force sets out too soon, their panic allows the sword-wielding samurai to crush them. Badly wounded Algren's courageous stand makes the samurai leader Katsumoto spare his life; once nursed to health he learns to know and respect the old Japanese way, and participates as advisor in Katsumoto's failed attempt to save the Bushido tradition, but Omura gets repressive laws enacted- he must now choose to honor his loyalty to one of the embittered sides when

English

In the 1870s, Captain Nathan Algren, a cynical veteran of the American Civil war who will work for anyone, is hired by Americans who want lucrative contracts with the Emperor of Japan to train the peasant conscripts for the first standing imperial army in modern warfare using firearms. The imperial Omura cabinet's first priority is to repress a rebellion of traditionalist Samurai- hereditary warriors- who remain devoted to the sacred dynasty but reject the Westernizing policy and even refuse firearms. Yet when his ill-prepared superior force sets out too soon, their panic allows the sword-wielding samurai to crush them. Badly wounded Algren's courageous stand makes the samurai leader Katsumoto spare his life; once nursed to health he learns to know and respect the old Japanese way, and participates as advisor in Katsumoto's failed attempt to save the Bushido tradition, but Omura gets repressive laws enacted- he must now choose to honor his loyalty to one of the embittered sides when

Last Update: 2015-02-08
Subject: History
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

Tagalog

Joseph Rudyard Kipling (/ˈrʌdjərd ˈkɪplɪŋ/ RUD-yəd KIP-ling; 30 December 1865 – 18 January 1936)[1] was an English short-story writer, poet, and novelist. He wrote tales and poems of British soldiers in India and stories for children. He was born in Bombay, in the Bombay Presidency of British India, and was taken by his family to England when he was five years old.[2] Kipling's works of fiction include The Jungle Book (1894), Kim (1901), and many short stories, including "The Man Who Would Be King" (1888).[3] His poems include "Mandalay" (1890), "Gunga Din" (1890), "The Gods of the Copybook Headings" (1919), "The White Man's Burden" (1899), and "If—" (1910). He is regarded as a major innovator in the art of the short story;[4] his children's books are enduring classics of children's literature; and one critic described his work as exhibiting "a versatile and luminous narrative gift".[5][6] Kipling was one of the most popular writers in England, in both prose and verse, in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.[4] Henry James said: "Kipling strikes me personally as the most complete man of genius (as distinct from fine intelligence) that I have ever known."[4] In 1907, he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature, making him the first English-language writer to receive the prize, and its youngest recipient to date.[7] Among other honours, he was sounded out for the British Poet Laureateship and on several occasions for a knighthood, all of which he declined.[8] Kipling's subsequent reputation has changed according to the political and social climate of the age[9][10] and the resulting contrasting views about him continued for much of the 20th century.[11][12] George Orwell called him a "prophet of British imperialism".[13] Literary critic Douglas Kerr wrote: "He [Kipling] is still an author who can inspire passionate disagreement and his place in literary and cultural history is far from settled. But as the age of the European empires recedes, he is recognised as an incomparable, if controversial, interpreter of how empire was experienced. That, and an increasing recognition of his extraordinary narrative gifts, make him a force to be reckoned with."[14]pamatnubay

English

Joseph Rudyard Kipling (/ˈrʌdjərd ˈkɪplɪŋ/ RUD-yəd KIP-ling; 30 December 1865 – 18 January 1936)[1] was an English short-story writer, poet, and novelist. He wrote tales and poems of British soldiers in India and stories for children. He was born in Bombay, in the Bombay Presidency of British India, and was taken by his family to England when he was five years old.[2] Kipling's works of fiction include The Jungle Book (1894), Kim (1901), and many short stories, including "The Man Who Would Be King" (1888).[3] His poems include "Mandalay" (1890), "Gunga Din" (1890), "The Gods of the Copybook Headings" (1919), "The White Man's Burden" (1899), and "If—" (1910). He is regarded as a major innovator in the art of the short story;[4] his children's books are enduring classics of children's literature; and one critic described his work as exhibiting "a versatile and luminous narrative gift".[5][6] Kipling was one of the most popular writers in England, in both prose and verse, in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.[4] Henry James said: "Kipling strikes me personally as the most complete man of genius (as distinct from fine intelligence) that I have ever known."[4] In 1907, he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature, making him the first English-language writer to receive the prize, and its youngest recipient to date.[7] Among other honours, he was sounded out for the British Poet Laureateship and on several occasions for a knighthood, all of which he declined.[8] Kipling's subsequent reputation has changed according to the political and social climate of the age[9][10] and the resulting contrasting views about him continued for much of the 20th century.[11][12] George Orwell called him a "prophet of British imperialism".[13] Literary critic Douglas Kerr wrote: "He [Kipling] is still an author who can inspire passionate disagreement and his place in literary and cultural history is far from settled. But as the age of the European empires recedes, he is recognised as an incomparable, if controversial, interpreter of how empire was experienced. That, and an increasing recognition of his extraordinary narrative gifts, make him a force to be reckoned with."[14]

Last Update: 2015-01-08
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:
Warning: Contains invisible HTML formatting

Tagalog

the road not taken by robert frost Two roads diverged in a yellow wood, And sorry I could not travel both And be one traveler, long I stood And looked down one as far as I could To where it bent in the undergrowth; Then took the other, as just as fair And having perhaps the better claim, Because it was grassy and wanted wear; Though as for that the passing there Had worn them really about the same, And both that morning equally lay In leaves no step had trodden black. Oh, I kept the first for another day! Yet knowing how way leads on to way, I doubted if I should ever come back. I shall be telling this with a sigh Somewhere ages and ages hence: Two roads diverged in a wood, and I — I took the one less traveled by, And that has made all the difference.

English

the road not taken by robert frost

Last Update: 2014-12-09
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

Tagalog

A performance appraisal interview is the first stage of the performance appraisal process and involves the employee and his or her manager sitting face to face to discuss threadbare all aspects of the employee’s performance and thrash out any differences in perception or evaluation. The performance appraisal interview provides the employee with a chance to defend himself or herself against poor evaluation by the manager and also gives the manager a chance to explain what he or she thinks about the employee’s performance.

English

QUERY LENGTH LIMIT EXCEDEED. MAX ALLOWED QUERY : 500 CHARS

Last Update: 2014-11-23
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference:

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