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Usted buscó: it was just one of those mornings ( Inglés - Tagalo )

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Inglés

Tagalo

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Inglés

literal Velan was a carpenter. He was living in a village. His mother dies a long time back. His aged father, Kuppan, lived with Velan. Kuppan was very weak. He could not even walk well. He was so weak. It was because Velan did not give him enough food. He had given his father a small earthen plate. Even a small quantity of rice in the plate appeared to be much. Velan was a bad man. He was a drunkard also. After taking drinks, he abused his father badly. Velan had a son. His name is Muthu. Muthu was just ten years old. He was a very good boy. He loved his grandfather. He had great respect for his grandfather. He did not like his father’s attitude and character, because his father was treating his grandfather cruelly. One day Kuppan was eating his food out of earthen plate that his son had given to him. The earthen plate fell down. The plate broke into pieces. The food also fell on the floor. Velan was working at the other end of the room. He saw the broken plate. He was very angry with his father and used very harsh words to abuse his father. The old man felt bad about what happened. He was sorry for his mistake. Velan’s words wounded him very deeply. Velan’s son, Muthu, saw this. He did not like his father. His father was ill-treating his grandfather. He was afraid to speak against his father. He was sad about his grandfather. But he was not powerful to stand in support of his grandfather. The next day Muthu took some of his father’s carpentry tools and a piece of wood. He worked with the tools to make a wooden plate. His father saw him working. “What are you making, Muthu?" he asked. “I am making a wooden plate!" replied Muthu. “A wooden plate! What for?" asked his father. “I am making it for you, father. When you grow old, like my grandfather, you will need a plate for food. A plate made from earth mat break very easily. Then I may scold you severely. So, I want to give you a wooden plate. It may not break so easily." The carpenter was shocked to hear this. Only now he realized his mistake. His father was kind to Velan He had looked after Velan very well. Now, he was old. Velan was treating his father severely. Velan was now very sad about his own behavior. He realized his mistakes. He then became a different person. From that day, Velan treated his father with great respect. He gave up drinking too. Velan learnt a lesson from his own son. You should honor your parents at all times. It is your duty. It brings you their blessings.

Tagalo

literal

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Inglés

The girl felt hopeless and began to cry, but the boy put his arms around her, held her tightly and said, "...and I am one of those fools."

Tagalo

Batang babae ang nadama walang pag-asa at nagsimulang sigaw, ngunit ang boy ilagay ang kanyang armas sa paligid sa kanya, gaganapin ang kanyang mahigpit at sinabi, "... at ako ay isa sa mga mangmang."

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Inglés

[narrator] Once upon the last day of a golden summer, there was a boy... and bear. The boy, whom we shall meet in a moment, was called Christopher Robin. The bear was called Winnie the Pooh. And together they had many grand adventures in a remarkable place called the Hundred Acre Wood. But the grandest and most extraordinary of all their adventures was still to begin. T oday, I believe, is a good day for being Pooh. [hums] And here, I should say, is a good place for being Pooh. [hums] Any reason that I think of is a good one for being Pooh. [hums] [Iaughs] But the very best reason of all is... [boy] Pooh Bear. ...being with my very best friend, Christopher Robin. You are just in time for the best part of the day. What part is that? The part when you and me... ...become we. [clattering] Pooh,... there's something I have to tell you. Is it something nice? Not exactly. Then it can wait. It can? For how Iong? For ever and ever. # For ever and ever # Is a very long time, Pooh [chuckles] # Forever isn't long at all # When I'm with you [laughs] # I wanna call your name forever # And you will always answer forever # And both of us will be Forever you and me # For ever and ever [creaking, pop] # I wanna stay like this forever [Pooh Iaughs] # If only I could promise forever [Iaughing echoes] # Then we could just be we # Forever you and me [both] # For ever and ever # For ever and ever # Is a very long time, Pooh [Pooh chuckles] # Forever isn't long at all, Christopher # When I'm with you [Pooh chuckles] # I wanna be with you forever [echoes] # I want you right here beside me forever # One thing you should know # No matter where I go # We'll always be together # For ever and ever # [narrator] And so they stayed together, doing all the things a boy and a bear could do. And when the day began to end, Christopher Robin had quite forgotten he still had something to tell Pooh. [Christopher] Pooh Bear, there's one thing we didn't do today. [Pooh] And what thing might that be? [Christopher] Uh... nothing. Nothing? Christopher Robin, what exactly is "doing nothing"? Well, I'm told it means going along, Iistening to all of the things you can't hear, and not bothering. It's when people say "What are you two doing?" And we say "Oh, nothing." And we do it. This is sort of a nothing thing we're doing right now. I wish it could Iast forever. Well, then we must do it again tomorrow. And the tomorrow after. And the tomorrow following that. Pooh Bear,... what if... some day... there came a tomorrow when we were apart? As Iong as we're apart together we shall certainly be fine. [chuckles] Yes, yes, of course. But if we weren't together? If I were somewhere else? [chuckles] But you really couldn't be, as I would be quite Iost without you. Who would I call... [buzzing] ...on those days when I'm just not strong enough, or brave enough? Well, actually... And who would I ask for advice when I didn't know which way to turn? Pooh, we... We... We simply wouldn't be. [yawns] Oh, Pooh. If ever there's a tomorrow when we're not together, there's something you must remember. [yawns] And what might that be, Christopher Robin? You're braver than you believe, and stronger than you seem, and smarter than you think. [chuckles] Oh, that's easy. [clears throat] We are braver than a bee, and, uh, Ionger than a tree, and taller than a goose. Or was that a moose? [both chuckle] No, silly old bear. You're braver than you believe, and stronger than you seem... and smarter than you think. But the most important thing is... even if we're apart... I'II always be with you. [Pooh chuckles] I'II always be with you. [echoing] AIways be with you. [Pooh moans] [birds twitter] [mutters] [snores] Braver than our beans. [snores] Longer when we gleam. [snores] Hum dee duh de dum. Hm dee duh-duh dee. [mutters] [Iaughs] Hello, Christopher Robin. I can't seem to remember the... To remember the, uh,... It's autumn. It is. It's the first day of autumn. A time of hot-chocolaty mornings and toasty-marshmallow evenings. And best of all.... Ieaping into Ieaves. Oh... [chuckles] Oh, someone's Ieft a honey pot. AII alone and Ionely. [groans] With no one to care for it. I suppose... I should take it. AIthough it might belong to someone. Though, just as easily not. Hmm. Think, think. Think. I believe when a question becomes this sticky, I should ask my very good friend... Christopher Robin. [echoing] Christopher Robin. Are you here? Are you there? Are you... anywhere? [Pooh] Piglet! Piglet! Christopher Robin is gone. Christopher... Chri... Why, Piglet, whatever are you doing... up there? I'm doing just what Christopher Robin said I should do. I'm going to Iook my fear of heights right in the face and conquer it. [creaking] That is, if it doesn't conquer me first. Christopher Robin! Are you Iooking for him, too? [Tigger purrs] Hiya, Pooh! [chuckles] - What's up? - Hello, Tigger. Piglet... is up. Help! Oh, relax, Piglet, old pal. There's no difference between plunging 1 0,000 feet to the jagged rocks below and tumblin' out of bed. Oh, really? Why, sure! [Iaughs] Except for the splat at the end they're practic'Iy similar. Christopher Robin! Hmm. CIutched in the throes of terror, eh? Well, I guess I just better bounce up there and get him down. Stand back, this is gonna take a world's record bounce. What's the matter with you? Being a second-rate bouncer is not what tiggers Iike best. [rumbling] [creaking] [creaking] [strains] [strains] [shrieks] It doesn't matter if you think you're not ripe. This is Rabbit's garden, and Rabbit does his harvesting by the book. As it clearly says in the official almanac, "Today is... [clears throat] the first day of fall following the Iast day of summer." Harvest day. Any questions? [Pooh] Hello. Oh, yes, the rutabaga in the back row, "Hello" what? [rumbling] [shrieks] [Pooh] Hello, Rabbit. Not much of a house. Just right for not much of a donkey. [Rabbit gibbers] [shrieks] Easy come,... easy go. Excuse me, Rabbit,... but would you happen to have a... a, um,... Christopher Robin about you? No! I haven't seen him. - Bother. - [thud] - He isn't where he should be. - [thud] - And wasn't where we were. - [thud] - And seems not to be anywhere... - [thud] ...where he can tell me whose honey this is. [thud] Well, it isn't mine. And I don't have time. It's harvest day! Says so in the book! I have carrots to cut, pumpkins to pick, peas to pluck! Well, of course it's mine. It's got my name scribbled all over it. T-I double g... Honey?! Yuck! P-tooie! BIech! Tiggers do not Iike honey. It isn't mine. Then again, few things are. [grunts and groans] Oh, here! If only I could find Christopher Robin. He could tell me whose it is. Why don't you check the note and find out? A note! Why, Rabbit, how clever of you. I'II just read it. Or would... if I could. Perhaps you can, Rabbit. [harrumphs] I could read this with my eyes closed. [chuckles] It says... [clears throat] [talks nonsense] Well, I could have read it if Tigger hadn't bounced me so. Tar? Jar? Oh, far! "Dear Pooh" it begins. "Worry about me." "I'm going far away." "Help!" And the note is signed "Crelm-flummin Bobbin." [chuckles] Oh, Christopher Robin. Christopher Robin? Gone far away? Oh, what a frightful thought. Wait! Why? When? Who authorized it? Where will we get the strength... to go on without him? [whimpers] [Pooh] Christopher Robin. My very best best friend. It simply cannot be. Whatever will I do? I wonder, Pooh, if... if perhaps u-u-until Christopher Robin gets back... um... I might possibly be your... best best friend. Yeah. [sobs] And when Piglet gets sick of you... [sobs] we can take over. Oh, thank you. But you already are the very best of my best friends. You see, you and I can do anything. But only Christopher Robin and I could do... nothing. Poor guy. His very Iittle brain is half gone with grief. Ah-ha! I've discovered where he went. [Iaughs] An O, another O, and... [gasps] Oh, my. What is it, Owl? Where is it? Somewhere bad, I fear. How bad? On a scale of one to ten... It's not good. [match strikes] [match strikes] He has gone to S-C-H-O-O-L. [gasps] Skull. Skull? What sort of place is that? Well, from the very sound of it, one can tell it's a most forbidding and faraway place. Then we must help Christopher Robin. Help him get back... to here. And us. And me. Then it's a quest, is it? [Iaughs] That's the spirit. Hoo, the nobility of it. A Iong and dangerous journey through the Great Unknown. Of course, you'II need a map. D-d-d-dangerous? Oh, Owl,... you wouldn't suppose we'd meet any, uh... Heffalumps? Oh, thank you, I nearly forgot. Herds of Heffalumps. [mutters] Down here I fancy, in the... southeast corner of the far west portion. W-w-what about W-w-woozles? Woozles! Wonderful! - Jagulars? - Hoo-hoo, just a dozen or three. Here, there and yonder. Not to mention the fabled... [chuckles] Skullasaurus. S-skulla...s-saurus? Oh, come, come, come. Without a monster or two it's hardly a quest. Merely a gaggle of friends wandering about. Hoo-hoo-hoo, how I envy you. Not everyone has the chance to face the unspeakable terrors of the Great Unknown. # Today's the day # In only a matter of moments You'll all be on your way # What lurks around the corner Not a soul can say # But I can guess # More or less # Hidden dangers, great duress # Ah, the moment of glory Is close at hand # Hoo-wee, it's gonna be grand # Adventure is a wonderful thing # Pack only the essentials I'll tell you what to bring # Your strength, your nerve Your hearts, your wits # And for skullasaurus attacks First-aid kits # Adventure is a hoot and a half # You'll face unearthly dangers And look at them and laugh # The claws, the teeth The chase, the thrill # You'll never want to come home Maybe you never will # That's the beauty of adventure It's strictly sink or float # It runs you till you're ragged Then it grabs you by the throat # You'll struggle to survive Although the chances are remote # Hoo-hoo, lucky you Wish I was coming too # Adventure is a wonderful thing I almost forgot the very best part. You not only save your friend from the most dangerous place, namely Skull, but from the most dangerous part of the most dangerous place. The eye of the skull itself. Oh, bother. # And you, General Pooh # Off you go Marching high and low # Your friend waits at the end # Right here # Take a look The map is perfectly clear # With your excellent sense of direction You've nothing to fear # Through the quicksand and the chasms # Tempting fate and fighting spasms # Dodging avalanching boulders # Remember # Christopher Robin's fate Rests completely on your shoulders, Pooh Excuse me. # It's up to you # That's the beauty of adventure # The trembling and the dread # I can't think of another thing I'd rather do instead Perhaps you could join us? # No, no, you go ahead # Hoo-hoo, lucky you Tally-ho and toodle-oo # Ready now? Noble chin Chest out, tummy in # Make a fracas, have a fling # Drop a postcard, give a ring # Get the lead out, time to swing # Whoop-de-doo and ba-da-bing # Adventure # Is a wonderful thing # I salute you. And those of you doomed to never return, I salute you twice. [narrator] And so Pooh and his friends crossed over into... well, that part of the Hundred Acre Wood which Owl called the "Great Unknown. " It was the start of their quest for Christopher Robin. They would find him, Owl said, if they could get through the woods. For the woods, Owl said, were filled with Heffalumps... and Woozles,... and... who knew how much worse? Look! "The Upside Down Rock." "If you've made it this far... you're where... monsters... are." [distant growling] What was that? Sounded too hungry for a Heffalump. [growling continues] Too plump for a Jagular. [growling continues] I'd say it's a... big old... buggy-eyed, saber-toothy skullasaurus. Skullasaurus? - Which way do we run? - Where do we hide? What's the shortest shortcut home? I believe... that way is a good way. [all] Run! [all gibber] AIthough, this way could be better. [Tigger] Give me a break! - If not over here. - [all scream] AIthough... [chuckles] there might be particularly pleasant as well. [all gibber] Stop it! We're getting nowhere fast, Pooh, and that just won't do. A Ieader must be someone Ieaderly, quick-thinking, informed. Someone Iike... - me. - [Iouder growling] Well,... there. Anyone with half a set of smarts can see we Iose the beast by cutting across this Iovely meadow. [squawking] And a Iovely meadow it is. [gasps] Why, Iook. Is that a golden dahlia-daffodilus? Rare for this Iocation. What exactly is this Iocation, Rabbit? And might it be nearer Christopher Robin than farther? Why, we're right here, on course, of course. Where else w-would we be? [squawking] Owl, where are we? "Nice peeceful spot!" Ha! Indeed! [ping] - [ping] - Oh, d-d-dear. This is not the place for a small and frightfully fearful animal... such as myself. Or myself. Or himself. Thanks for noticing. Yes, well, uh, precisely why I chose it. No skullasauruses would dare follow us in here. [chuckles] [distant growling] [screams] Piglet! Come back! I can't Iose you, too. [butterfly squeaks] [Piglet giggles] - [butterfly squeaks] - [Pooh] Oh, my, my. I believe you've made a friend, Piglet. [chuckles] I believe you're right, Pooh. [butterfly squeaks] [whistles] [butterflies squeak] And another, it seems. And also that one. And that one, too,... as well. And he, or her. And her, and him. And they, and them. Face it, Piglet, old pal, you're just plain popular. Some piglets have it,... some donkeys don't. [butterflies squeak] Why, I believe, Piglet, they want to take you home with them. [chuckles] It's very kind of them, I'm sure, but I already have a home. Oh, d-d-dear. Piglet. Don't Ieave. I wouldn't if I couldn't, but I can't. Jump, Piglet. We'II catch you, Iikely as not. I would if I could, but they won't Iet me. Perhaps you can ask your friends to bring you back. Why, yes. But I don't know which way back is. [chuckles] It's down here. Look. I'm afraid I'm too afraid to Iook. Oh, if only Christopher Robin was here. Christopher Robin. Piglet, that's it. He said all I have to do is remember that you are... bigger than a big Ieaf... I mean, uh, bolder when you're not green. [sighs] Or... Is any of this making you feel any Iess afraid, Piglet? I'm afraid not, Pooh. Oh, bother. Hm. How to get a piglet down who is very... up. [butterflies squeak] [Pooh] Oh, bother. E-excuse me, b-but is that you, Pooh? Yes, Piglet, it is. Might we be coming down soon? I believe so, Piglet. Uh, how soon? [Pooh] Very. [mutters] [shrieks] That's throwin' your weight around, Buddy Bear. Imagine, being outnumbered by those buggy boys a zillion to one. What a guy. Brave indeed. Now if you don't mind, Crustopher Ribbon, Ristopher Crobbin, Rustopher Crobbin, is this way. Are you all right, Piglet? Yes, Pooh. Thank you. Saving me was very brave of you. But you're brave, too, Piglet. Braver than... something. I am? Oh, what thing is that? I'm not sure, Piglet. Oh, if only I could remember. [narrator] This way and that way the map led them, to all the places Christopher Robin wasn't. But to none of the places he was. And still Rabbit refused to realize the map didn't know which way it was going. So we first head east by south, then south by east. Of course, minus the magnetic variation, plus the wind drift. We clearly go... this way! I wonder if those rather forbidding Iooking things might be the Forbidden Mountains, where Christopher Robin is. [Piglet] You're right, Pooh. [Tigger] You found 'em, Buddy Bear. Excuse me. The way to there is over here. But, Rabbit, isn't that them, over there? Now, which are you going to believe, this official map or your own eyes? Look for yourself and you'II see we're right on course. It's all right there in black and white. Why would anyone want to wander around wondering which way to go when they have a map to follow? # A map is not a guess An estimation or a hunch # A feeling or a foolish intuition # A map is a dependable, unwavering # Inarguably accurate portrayer # Of your position # Never trust your ears, your nose, your eyes # Putting faith in them is most unwise # Here's a phrase you all must memorize # "In the printed word is where truth lies " Y es, but, Rabbit... # Never trust your tummies, your tails or toes # You can't learn a thing from any of those # Here's another fact I must disclose # From the mighty pen true wisdom flows # If it says so # Then it is so # If it is so, well, so it is # A thought's not fit to think till it's printed in ink # Then it says so So it is Y es, but I think... # Never trust that thing between your ears # Brains will get you nowhere fast My dears # Haven't had a need for mine in years # On the page is where the truth appears # If it says so Then it is so # If it is so So it is # A thought's not fit to think Till it's printed in ink # Never differ from or doubt it - Bother. - # Or go anywhere without it # Thank goodness we've got this # So we don't need to fret about it # If it says so # So it is # [shrieks] Oh, no! The map! Get the map! With only half a map we're... we're Iess than nowhere. After that map! I got it! Don't have it. I had it! I don't have it now. I want it again. I got it! I ain't got it. I don't have it. I got it! Wait, I'II get it... No! I don't... I have it! Hmm. I wonder what's causing this tail to fail. Maybe it just doesn't have what it takes. [creaking] Yikes! Christopher Robin! Tigger, of all the safer places to be... I don't think this is one. - You could fall. - Yeah. Well, you know what they say. What doesn't bounce up has got to fall down. - [Iaughs] - [creaking] Uh... there's no time for this. We've had too many delays. So you just bounce out of there this moment. [Iaughs] No way. The wind isn't right. But there isn't any wind. OK, OK, you've got me. [sobs] The truth is... [whimpers] my tail... just doesn't have... enough strength. [sobs] Oh. [chuckles] Don't worry, Tigger, Christopher Robin said I just have to remember you're... taller than a beam. Really? Or was it "slower than whipped cream?" Do you feel any bouncier now? Nope. Oh... [chuckles] Perhaps your tail just needs a hand. Could you... bounce up this far? Pooh Bear! Ooh. How about now? No, no, no. Thanks for trying. I'm goin' out the way I came in. [sobs] A second-rate bouncer. [creaking] Piglet! [snorts, sobs] Um... Uh, Tigger. Hm? Oh... OK. Look at the biceps on that bear. I don't deserve to dangle from the same precipice. [creaking] [muffled] What's Donkey Boy saying? I said "Ouch." [all scream] [splash] Yike! Now, don't worry, Piglet, it's only me. Oh. Yike! Now, don't worry, Piglet, it's only Tigger and Rabbit and Eeyore. The map! Whoo-hoo, we have it! We can go now! [distant growling] Worry now, Piglet, it's the skullasaurus. I know we went over this way... And I came across... But then I... I Iost my way over... And if I don't... I know... Might you know which way Christopher Robin is from here, Rabbit? Uh, well... Uh, I mean the... There's this way, of course. Not that it's the right way. We obviously want to go this way. Though that way's further than farther and nearer than not. AIthough we can't rule out this way. Now, if Christopher Robin was here, what would he say? Well, he'd say... "That Rabbit can't function in this humidity." "It's not his fault. This fog isn't even on the map." "And that... [sobs] that Rabbit is just not smart enough to know where to go or... what to do." Oh. Christopher Robin says "At a time Iike this... all I have to do is remember..." Remember what? I forget. But it's something Iike... you're smarter when you're pink. Does that help? No. I don't know where we are and where we aren't. And I haven't known for hours. [sighs] I've failed us all. [footsteps] I believe I have as well. Let's face it, without Christopher Robin, we don't have a chance of finding Christopher Robin. Perhaps we might rest in there until this mist is mostly... mistless. [Eeyore] End o

Tagalo

Sa sandaling unang sa huling araw ng isang ginintuang tag-init, nagkaroon ng isang batang lalaki ... at bear. Ang batang lalaki na ating masasalubong sa isang sandali, ay tinawag Christopher Robin. Magsilang ng sanggol ay tinawag Winnie ang puwe. At sama-sama sila'y nagkaroon ng maraming enggrandeng pakikipagsapalaran sa isang kapansin-pansin na lugar na tinatawag na ang Hundred Acre Wood. Ngunit ang grandest at pinaka-hindi pangkaraniwang ng lahat ng kanilang mga pakikipagsapalaran ay pa rin para magsimula. T oday, tingin ko, ay isang magandang araw para sa pagiging puwe.

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Inglés

She was one of those pretty and charming girls born, as though fate had blundered over her, into a family of artisans. She had no marriage portion, no expectations, no means of getting known, understood, loved, and wedded by a man of wealth and distinction; and she let herself be married off to a little clerk in the Ministry of Education. Her tastes were simple because she had never been able to afford any other, but she was as unhappy as though she had married beneath her; for women have no caste or class, their beauty, grace, and charm serving them for birth or family, their natural delicacy, their instinctive elegance, their nimbleness of wit, are their only mark of rank, and put the slum girl on a level with the highest lady in the land.

Tagalo

the-kuwintas story

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Inglés

buod sa talambuhay ni isko morenoIn the Philippine entertainment, Isko Moreno is an actor who had turned to politics as is career aside from being a celebrity. His real name is Francisco Domagoso, born in Tondo, Manila on October 24, 1974. He went to Arellano University, Pamantasan ng Lungsod ng Maynila and University of the Philippines for his education and a college degree in Bachelor of Laws. He was an only child to parents Joaquin and Rosario, who tried to raise him in spite of poverty and difficulties in life. His father worked as a stevedore at the North Harbor, and his earnings are barely enough to sustain the daily needs of the family. Isko saw this situation as a challenge and at an early age he tried to help and share in the burden of the family. He gathered all sorts of recyclable and reusable garbage such as plastics, cans, old newspapers and cartons and sold them. He was doing this until he had finished his elementary education at the Rosauro Almario Elementary School. In his high school days, he was a pedicab driver, and this supported him in his schooling at the Tondo High School. He did not mind the hardships and hindrances because he believed that all the hard works would pay off in the future. It is when he was enrolled in Marine Engineering at the Philippine Maritime Institute that luck and fate befalls him. This was the moment that he was discovered by Roxas. From doing bit roles he worked his way to become a good actor and be successful in his acting career. Focus is the right word to describe him, his firm determination to achieve whatever he wants is what makes him going. He used to be a member of German Moreno’s teen oriented show entitled “That’s Entertainment.” Isko used to work as a street vendor with a pushcart while studying until Wowie Roxas spotted and brought him to Kuya Germs (nickname of German Moreno.) That is how his acting and movie career started. Eventually, she married Diana Lynn Ditan and had four children namely, Vincent Patrick, Frances Diane, Joaquin Andre and Franco. It was in 1998 that he decided to enter politics, because of his desire to improve the plight of his community from where he came from. Barely new in the field, his opponents were surprised to see that he landed as one of the top councilors of the 1st District of Manila. He did his job, much to the amazement of the people in the political arena, which gained him a 3-term for the seat. Isko as he promised lived to create resolutions that served the interest of the poor population of Tondo. He did vow to serve the underprivileged people. Isko Moreno had completed his three-term Councilor in Manila and has won as Vice Mayor at the last election. Some of his memorable movie and TV appearances were, “May Minamahal,” “Muntik Na Kitang Minahal,””Sya’y Nagdadalaga,” “Exploitation,” “Mga Babae Sa Isla Azul,””Misteryosa,’ and “Tukso Layuan Mo Ako.” Other TV shows include, “Ligaw Na Bulaklak,””Bakekang,” “Mga Anghel Na Walang Langit,”

Tagalo

Summary biography of isko moreno

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Inglés

Sophocles was an ancient Greek poet and one of three ancient Greek tragedians whose plays have survived. His plays belonged to the period after Aeschylus and earlier of Euripides. Based on the information provided by Suda, a 10th century encyclopedia, Sophocles wrote 123 plays during his lifetime, out of which only seven have survived in a complete form. These plays are Ajax, Antigone, Trachinian Women, Oedipus the King, Electra, Philoctetes and Oedipus at Colonus. It was believed that he remained the most celebrated playwright in the dramatic competitions of the city-state of Athens held during the religious festivals of the Lenaea and the Dionysia. Sophocles participated in thirty competitions, of which he won 24 and never went below second place in the rest. Among his plays, the two most famous tragedies, Oedipus and Antigone are generally known as the Theban plays, even though each play belonged to a part of a different tetralogy. Sophocles greatly influenced the drama. His main contribution was the addition of third actor which reduced the importance of the chorus in the presentation of the plot. A crater on the surface of Mercury has been after this ace Greek poet and playwright. Sophocles Childhood and Life Sophocles was the son of Sophilus, who was a rich member of the rural deme (small community) of Colonus Hippius. Sophocles was said to have been born in Attica. It is said that he was born few years before the Battle of Marathon in 490 BC, which is probably around 497/6 BC. Sophocles received his first artistic achievement in 468 BC, when he won first prize in the Dionysia theatre competition over the reigning master of Athenian drama, Aeschylus. According to Greek historian Plutarch, this victory was quite unusual. Unlike the usual custom of choosing judges by lot, the archon asked Cimon and the other strategoi present to decide the victor of the contest. According to him after being defeated, Aeschylus left for Sicily. “Triptolemus” was one amongst the plays that Sophocles presented at this festival. When Sophocles was sixteen, he was chosen to lead the paean, a choral chant to a God, celebrating the Greek victory over the Persians at the Battle of Salamis. He was one of the ten strategoi, high executive officials that commanded the armed forces and was the junior colleague of Pericles. In the beginning of his career, Sophocles received patronage from the politician Cimon. Even when Cimon was ostracized by Pericles (Cimon's rival) in 461 BC, Sophocles received no harm. In 443/ 442 he became one of the Hellenotamiai, or treasurers of Athena, and had the role to assist managing the finances of the city during the political ascendancy of Pericles. Based on the accounts of the Vita Sophoclis, he served as a general in the Athenian campaign against Samos in 441 BC. It was believed that Sophocles received this post because of his writing of Antigone. In 420 BC, when Asclepius was introduced to Athens, he welcomed it and set up an altar for the image of deity at his house. In 413, Sophocles was elected one of the commissioners who reacted to the catastrophic destruction of the Athenian expeditionary force in Sicily during the Peloponnesian War. Personal Life Sophocles first married to Nicostrata, with whom he had a son named Iophon. In the later life, he had relationship with a woman of Sicyon. She bore him a son called Ariston. It was believed that he had three more sons, but there is not much information about them. Death In the winter of 406/ 405 BC, Sophocles died at the age of ninety or ninety one. Like the other famous men from the ancient history, his death also inspired many apocryphal stories. One of the stories states that he died from the strain of trying to recite a long sentence from his play, “Antigone” without pausing to take a breath. Whereas the other story suggests that he choked to death while eating grapes at the Anthesteria festival in Athens. The third story accounts that he died due to excessive happiness over winning his final victory at the City Dionysia. Works The earliest contribution of Sophocles to the drama was the introduction of the third actor which immensely reduced the role of the chorus and created better opportunities for character development and conflict between characters. Even his competitor Aeschylus, who dominated Athenian playwrights during Sophocles' early career, accepted the new idea and adopted it into his own work towards the end of his life. Aristotle gave Sophocles the credit of the introduction of skenographia, or scenery-painting. After the death of Aeschylus in 456 BC, Sophocles became the celebrated playwright in Athens. He emerged victorious in different dramatic competitions, 18 at Dionysia and 6 at Lenaea festivals. Apart from making innovations in the dramatic structure, he was also known for his deeper development of characters than the earlier playwrights. His widespread reputation helped him to get invitation from foreign rulers to attend their courts, but unlike other playwrights Aeschylus who died in Sicily, or Euripides who spent time in Macedon, he never accepted any of these invitations. Sophocles works were influential and significant for the Greek culture. Two out of his seven plays can be estimated correctly to their exact dates, which namely are “Philoctetes” (409 BC) and “Oedipus at Colonus” (401 BC, staged after his death by his grandson). From the rest of his plays, “Electra” had striking similarities to these two plays which put forwards the fact that it was written in the later part of his literary career. Again based on the stylistic characteristics of “Oedipus the King” which came in his middle period, “Ajax”, “Antigone” and “The Trachiniae” belonged to his early days. Sophocles had also written three Theban plays namely, “Oedipus the King”, “Oedipus at Colonus” and “Antigone”. All these plays described the fate of Thebes during and after the reign of King Oedipus. These plays were sometimes even published under a single cover. Sophocles had written these plays in separate festival competitions with several years of difference between them. They cannot be called trilogy because of the presence of inconsistencies among them. Apart from these, Sophocles is supposed to have written few more Theban plays such as such as “The Progeny”, which survived in fragments. The majority of his plays depicted the undercurrent of early fatalism and the offset of Socratic logic being the keystone for the long tradition of Greek tragedy.

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Sopokles

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Just like any other towns in the province of Bulacan, the town got its name from a tree called "Bukawe" found in abundance during that time in the said place. Bocaue was just a mere barrio of the town of Meycauayan until 1606 when it was made into a town with Reverend Padre Delos Santos as the first parish priest and administrator. Fire destroyed a large part of the town in 1818, but was later rehabilitated gradually during the American r

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Just like any other towns in the province of Bulacan, the town got its name from a tree called "Bukawe" found in abundance during that time in the said place. Bocaue was just a mere barrio of the town of Meycauayan until 1606 when it was made into a town with Reverend Padre Delos Santos as the first parish priest and administrator. Fire destroyed a large part of the town in 1818, but was later rehabilitated gradually during the American regime. In 1908-1910, some members of the municipal council headed by Guillermo Puatu unsuccessfully tried to change the name of this town to Balagtas in honor of the Tagalog poet. Francisco "Balagtas" Baltazar. (Bigaa, being the birthplace of the hero merited the name of Balagtas in 1966). The history of Bocaue is not complete without citing the legend of the Holy Cross of Wawa which has a great significance to the residents of this town as to its founding. The celebration of the feast in honor of the Holy Cross has been made a tradition and a yearly affair. The legend says those centuries ago, a woman was saved miraculously fro drowning by an image of the big wooden cross floating along the flooded river in barrio Wawa this town. The woman, the story goes, was about to sink when she caught a glimpse of the image of the cross. She tried to take hold of it but it moved farther. The woman followed the image until she clung to it and then was able to reach safely the riverbank. Every year, every 1st Sunday of July, the residents of Bocaue greeted the visitors with the traditional river festival in honor of the said Holy Cross. Today, Bocaue is thriving with cottage industries and many factories billow with smoke. Once, some foreigners visited this place, and they found out that every home is virtually a busy place. Each home turns out goods and many other products, which contribute greatly to the economy of the town. Religious and industrious, the Bocaue people always look up to the great promise of the future.

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ΦΛΕ Phi Lambda Epsilon 1965 Phi Lambda Epsilon was founded in March 8, 1965 by Ret. Col. Wilson Relox a native from Campalingo, San Fernando, Romblon. He became a regional director, WPD Director and NAPOLCOM Chief in his almost 35 years of military and police service. In 1966, we have joined forces with the CrimeBuster Fraternity and in the early 1980’s we have been strongly forged as one together with the rest of Magic-5 in the fortress of Intramuros, Manila. And in 2004, Phi Lambda Epsilon have been incorporated with Magic-5 Brotherhood Association, Inc (M-5BAI) with SEC No. 200406499 in the Securities and Exchange Commission of the Philippines In June 2010, the formation of National Phi Lambda Epsilon was initiated by P/Supt. Ricardo Fidelino and it was successfully registered to the Securities and Exchange Commission in February 2011 with SEC Registration Cert. No. 201102352. Throughout the years, our brotherhood has spread in many different colleges and universities around the Philippines archipelago. THE ESTABLISHMENT OF MINDANAO CHAPTERS Phi Lambda Epsilon in Butuan City was bought by Brod. Rino Canonoy together with Brod. Remus Busa Jr. (aka Tamoy) on December 5, 1980. Their pioneering members were Brod. Nestor Bacon+ and Brod. Toto Gultiano. Brods Rino and Remus are members that survived from University of Cebu on October 5, 1979 thru their sponsor Brod. Ian Makiling (survived 1977) who is now presently residing in Panabo City. The Delta Phi Chapter of Mindanao State University, Marawi City was founded by Danilo Canonoy. They were previously members from Beta Mu Phi (which later became Phi Lambda Epsilon) when they found out that the Beta Mu Phi fraternity was a notorious gang and the organizer could not provide the documents to register the fraternity in the campus. Then, followed by Brod Nestor Villanueva who formed the Cotabato City and Midsayap chapters which includes the Notre Dame University. They invited Rino Canonoy from Butuan to recognize the Phi Lambda Epsilon of MSU Delta Phi Chapter, where Brod Nestor Villanueva of Cotabato also attended the said chapter recognition event and members meeting. Our fraternity ΦΛΕ Phi Lambda Epsilons’ birthplace, Quiapo, Manila was a haven for most of our members who came from the central and southern provinces. We believe that the University of Cebu Chapter where Brod Rino Canonoy et came, were brought by the members from Quiapo, Manila. With these facts, we are still considering the Mindanao Chapters as our very own and that the only missing link was the final acceptance of each other. University of Cebu - Cebu Masbate Colleges, Masbate Silliman University, Dumaguete City Negros Oriental State University, Negros Oriental University Of Mindanao, Davao City University of Southeastern Philippines, Davao City Mindanao State University, Marawi/Gen. Santos/Iligan Agusan Colleges & Butuan City Colleges, Butuan, ADS DANILO BACSAFRA+ Brod. Danilo Bacsafra+ (aka. Lord Buck Zafra) was born in May 20, 1959 in Lumban, Laguna. He was the ΦΛΕ President 1978-79 in our mother chapter Philippine College of Criminology in Quiapo, Manila. He became a very famous Lambda when he established the Avanceña Chapter in Quiapo, Manila. Where most of our members then were moslems and christians that have been the roots of many Junior (HS) Chapters in Metro Manila. Unfortunately, Bacsafra was killed in an ambush by a policeman from a rival fraternity around the vicinity of PCCr in Sept. 17, 1980. That period became one of our deepest moments in ΦΛΕ history, that we are almost at the struggle of extinction. However, we have surpassed the hardship and trials in our mother chapter thru the support of M-5 that vowed to protect and defend one another. He has widowed Sister Tess and left a daughter named Danica. His name became legendary for Phi Lambda Epsilon and Magic-5 that spread throughout the Philippine archipelago.

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pagsasalin

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May Day Eve By Nick Joaquin The old people had ordered that the dancing should stop at ten o’clock but it was almost midnight before the carriages came filing up the departing guests, while the girls who were staying were promptly herded upstairs to the bedrooms, the young men gathering around to wish them a good night and lamenting their ascent with mock signs and moaning, proclaiming themselves disconsolate but straightway going off to finish the punch and the brandy though they were quite drunk already and simply bursting with wild spirits, merriment, arrogance and audacity, for they were young bucks newly arrived from Europe; the ball had been in their honor; and they had waltzed and polka-ed and bragged and swaggered and flirted all night and where in no mood to sleep yet--no, caramba, not on this moist tropic eve! not on this mystic May eve! --with the night still young and so seductive that it was madness not to go out, not to go forth---and serenade the neighbors! cried one; and swim in the Pasid! cried another; and gather fireflies! cried a third—whereupon there arose a great clamor for coats and capes, for hats and canes, and they were a couple of street-lamps flickered and a last carriage rattled away upon the cobbles while the blind black houses muttered hush-hush, their tile roofs looming like sinister chessboards against a wile sky murky with clouds, save where an evil young moon prowled about in a corner or where a murderous wind whirled, whistling and whining, smelling now of the sea and now of the summer orchards and wafting unbearable childhood fragrances or ripe guavas to the young men trooping so uproariously down the street that the girls who were desiring upstairs in the bedrooms catered screaming to the windows, crowded giggling at the windows, but were soon sighing amorously over those young men bawling below; over those wicked young men and their handsome apparel, their proud flashing eyes, and their elegant mustaches so black and vivid in the moonlight that the girls were quite ravished with love, and began crying to one another how carefree were men but how awful to be a girl and what a horrid, horrid world it was, till old Anastasia plucked them off by the ear or the pigtail and chases them off to bed---while from up the street came the clackety-clack of the watchman’s boots on the cobble and the clang-clang of his lantern against his knee, and the mighty roll of his great voice booming through the night, "Guardia serno-o-o! A las doce han dado-o-o. And it was May again, said the old Anastasia. It was the first day of May and witches were abroad in the night, she said--for it was a night of divination, and night of lovers, and those who cared might peer into a mirror and would there behold the face of whoever it was they were fated to marry, said the old Anastasia as she hobble about picking up the piled crinolines and folding up shawls and raking slippers in corner while the girls climbing into four great poster-beds that overwhelmed the room began shrieking with terror, scrambling over each other and imploring the old woman not to frighten them. "Enough, enough, Anastasia! We want to sleep!" "Go scare the boys instead, you old witch!" "She is not a witch, she is a maga. She is a maga. She was born of Christmas Eve!" "St. Anastasia, virgin and martyr." "Huh? Impossible! She has conquered seven husbands! Are you a virgin, Anastasia?" "No, but I am seven times a martyr because of you girls!" "Let her prophesy, let her prophesy! Whom will I marry, old gypsy? Come, tell me." "You may learn in a mirror if you are not afraid." "I am not afraid, I will go," cried the young cousin Agueda, jumping up in bed. "Girls, girls---we are making too much noise! My mother will hear and will come and pinch us all. Agueda, lie down! And you Anastasia, I command you to shut your mouth and go away!""Your mother told me to stay here all night, my grand lady!" "And I will not lie down!" cried the rebellious Agueda, leaping to the floor. "Stay, old woman. Tell me what I have to do." "Tell her! Tell her!" chimed the other girls. The old woman dropped the clothes she had gathered and approached and fixed her eyes on the girl. "You must take a candle," she instructed, "and go into a room that is dark and that has a mirror in it and you must be alone in the room. Go up to the mirror and close your eyes and shy: Mirror, mirror, show to me him whose woman I will be. If all goes right, just above your left shoulder will appear the face of the man you will marry." A silence. Then: "And hat if all does not go right?" asked Agueda. "Ah, then the Lord have mercy on you!" "Why." "Because you may see--the Devil!" The girls screamed and clutched one another, shivering. "But what nonsense!" cried Agueda. "This is the year 1847. There are no devil anymore!" Nevertheless she had turned pale. "But where could I go, hugh? Yes, I know! Down to the sala. It has that big mirror and no one is there now." "No, Agueda, no! It is a mortal sin! You will see the devil!" "I do not care! I am not afraid! I will go!" "Oh, you wicked girl! Oh, you mad girl!" "If you do not come to bed, Agueda, I will call my mother." "And if you do I will tell her who came to visit you at the convent last March. Come, old woman---give me that candle. I go." "Oh girls---give me that candle, I go." But Agueda had already slipped outside; was already tiptoeing across the hall; her feet bare and her dark hair falling down her shoulders and streaming in the wind as she fled down the stairs, the lighted candle sputtering in one hand while with the other she pulled up her white gown from her ankles. She paused breathless in the doorway to the sala and her heart failed her. She tried to imagine the room filled again with lights, laughter, whirling couples, and the jolly jerky music of the fiddlers. But, oh, it was a dark den, a weird cavern for the windows had been closed and the furniture stacked up against the walls. She crossed herself and stepped inside. The mirror hung on the wall before her; a big antique mirror with a gold frame carved into leaves and flowers and mysterious curlicues. She saw herself approaching fearfully in it: a small while ghost that the darkness bodied forth---but not willingly, not completely, for her eyes and hair were so dark that the face approaching in the mirror seemed only a mask that floated forward; a bright mask with two holes gaping in it, blown forward by the white cloud of her gown. But when she stood before the mirror she lifted the candle level with her chin and the dead mask bloomed into her living face. She closed her eyes and whispered the incantation. When she had finished such a terror took hold of her that she felt unable to move, unable to open her eyes and thought she would stand there forever, enchanted. But she heard a step behind her, and a smothered giggle, and instantly opened her eyes. "And what did you see, Mama? Oh, what was it?" But Dona Agueda had forgotten the little girl on her lap: she was staring pass the curly head nestling at her breast and seeing herself in the big mirror hanging in the room. It was the same room and the same mirror out the face she now saw in it was an old face---a hard, bitter, vengeful face, framed in graying hair, and so sadly altered, so sadly different from that other face like a white mask, that fresh young face like a pure mask than she had brought before this mirror one wild May Day midnight years and years ago.... "But what was it Mama? Oh please go on! What did you see?" Dona Agueda looked down at her daughter but her face did not soften though her eyes filled with tears. "I saw the devil." she said bitterly. The child blanched. "The devil, Mama? Oh... Oh..." "Yes, my love. I opened my eyes and there in the mirror, smiling at me over my left shoulder, was the face of the devil." "Oh, my poor little Mama! And were you very frightened?" "You can imagine. And that is why good little girls do not look into mirrors except when their mothers tell them. You must stop this naughty habit, darling, of admiring yourself in every mirror you pass- or you may see something frightful some day." "But the devil, Mama---what did he look like?" "Well, let me see... he has curly hair and a scar on his cheek---" "Like the scar of Papa?" "Well, yes. But this of the devil was a scar of sin, while that of your Papa is a scar of honor. Or so he says." "Go on about the devil." "Well, he had mustaches." "Like those of Papa?" "Oh, no. Those of your Papa are dirty and graying and smell horribly of tobacco, while these of the devil were very black and elegant--oh, how elegant!" "And did he speak to you, Mama?" "Yes… Yes, he spoke to me," said Dona Agueda. And bowing her graying head; she wept. "Charms like yours have no need for a candle, fair one," he had said, smiling at her in the mirror and stepping back to give her a low mocking bow. She had whirled around and glared at him and he had burst into laughter. "But I remember you!" he cried. "You are Agueda, whom I left a mere infant and came home to find a tremendous beauty, and I danced a waltz with you but you would not give me the polka." "Let me pass," she muttered fiercely, for he was barring the way. "But I want to dance the polka with you, fair one," he said. So they stood before the mirror; their panting breath the only sound in the dark room; the candle shining between them and flinging their shadows to the wall. And young Badoy Montiya (who had crept home very drunk to pass out quietly in bed) suddenly found himself cold sober and very much awake and ready for anything. His eyes sparkled and the scar on his face gleamed scarlet. "Let me pass!" she cried again, in a voice of fury, but he grasped her by the wrist. "No," he smiled. "Not until we have danced." "Go to the devil!" "What a temper has my serrana!" "I am not your serrana!" "Whose, then? Someone I know? Someone I have offended grievously? Because you treat me, you treat all my friends like your mortal enemies." "And why not?" she demanded, jerking her wrist away and flashing her teeth in his face. "Oh, how I detest you, you pompous young men! You go to Europe and you come back elegant lords and we poor girls are too tame to please you. We have no grace like the Parisiennes, we have no fire like the Sevillians, and we have no salt, no salt, no salt! Aie, how you weary me, how you bore me, you fastidious men!" "Come, come---how do you know about us?" "I was not admiring myself, sir!" "You were admiring the moon perhaps?" "Oh!" she gasped, and burst into tears. The candle dropped from her hand and she covered her face and sobbed piteously. The candle had gone out and they stood in darkness, and young Badoy was conscience-stricken. "Oh, do not cry, little one!" Oh, please forgive me! Please do not cry! But what a brute I am! I was drunk, little one, I was drunk and knew not what I said." He groped and found her hand and touched it to his lips. She shuddered in her white gown. "Let me go," she moaned, and tugged feebly. "No. Say you forgive me first. Say you forgive me, Agueda." But instead she pulled his hand to her mouth and bit it - bit so sharply in the knuckles that he cried with pain and lashed cut with his other hand--lashed out and hit the air, for she was gone, she had fled, and he heard the rustling of her skirts up the stairs as he furiously sucked his bleeding fingers. Cruel thoughts raced through his head: he would go and tell his mother and make her turn the savage girl out of the house--or he would go himself to the girl’s room and drag her out of bed and slap, slap, slap her silly face! But at the same time he was thinking that they were all going to Antipolo in the morning and was already planning how he would maneuver himself into the same boat with her. Oh, he would have his revenge, he would make her pay, that little harlot! She should suffer for this, he thought greedily, licking his bleeding knuckles. But---Judas! He remembered her bare shoulders: gold in her candlelight and delicately furred. He saw the mobile insolence of her neck, and her taut breasts steady in the fluid gown. Son of a Turk, but she was quite enchanting! How could she think she had no fire or grace? And no salt? An arroba she had of it! "... No lack of salt in the chrism At the moment of thy baptism!" He sang aloud in the dark room and suddenly realized that he had fallen madly in love with her. He ached intensely to see her again---at once! ---to touch her hands and her hair; to hear her harsh voice. He ran to the window and flung open the casements and the beauty of the night struck him back like a blow. It was May, it was summer, and he was young---young! ---and deliriously in love. Such a happiness welled up within him that the tears spurted from his eyes. But he did not forgive her--no! He would still make her pay, he would still have his revenge, he thought viciously, and kissed his wounded fingers. But what a night it had been! "I will never forge this night! he thought aloud in an awed voice, standing by the window in the dark room, the tears in his eyes and the wind in his hair and his bleeding knuckles pressed to his mouth. But, alas, the heart forgets; the heart is distracted; and May time passes; summer lends; the storms break over the rot-tipe orchards and the heart grows old; while the hours, the days, the months, and the years pile up and pile up, till the mind becomes too crowded, too confused: dust gathers in it; cobwebs multiply; the walls darken and fall into ruin and decay; the memory perished...and there came a time when Don Badoy Montiya walked home through a May Day midnight without remembering, without even caring to remember; being merely concerned in feeling his way across the street with his cane; his eyes having grown quite dim and his legs uncertain--for he was old; he was over sixty; he was a very stopped and shivered old man with white hair and mustaches coming home from a secret meeting of conspirators; his mind still resounding with the speeches and his patriot heart still exultant as he picked his way up the steps to the front door and inside into the slumbering darkness of the house; wholly unconscious of the May night, till on his way down the hall, chancing to glance into the sala, he shuddered, he stopped, his blood ran cold-- for he had seen a face in the mirror there---a ghostly candlelight face with the eyes closed and the lips moving, a face that he suddenly felt he had been there before though it was a full minutes before the lost memory came flowing, came tiding back, so overflooding the actual moment and so swiftly washing away the piled hours and days and months and years that he was left suddenly young again; he was a gay young buck again, lately came from Europe; he had been dancing all night; he was very drunk; he s stepped in the doorway; he saw a face in the dark; he called out...and the lad standing before the mirror (for it was a lad in a night go jumped with fright and almost dropped his candle, but looking around and seeing the old man, laughed out with relief and came running. "Oh Grandpa, how you frightened me. Don Badoy had turned very pale. "So it was you, you young bandit! And what is all this, hey? What are you doing down here at this hour?" "Nothing, Grandpa. I was only... I am only ..." "Yes, you are the great Señor only and how delighted I am to make your acquaintance, Señor Only! But if I break this cane on your head you maga wish you were someone else, Sir!" "It was just foolishness, Grandpa. They told me I would see my wife." "Wife? What wife?" "Mine. The boys at school said I would see her if I looked in a mirror tonight and said: Mirror, mirror show to me her whose lover I will be. Don Badoy cackled ruefully. He took the boy by the hair, pulled him along into the room, sat down on a chair, and drew the boy between his knees. "Now, put your cane down the floor, son, and let us talk this over. So you want your wife already, hey? You want to see her in advance, hey? But so you know that these are wicked games and that wicked boys who play them are in danger of seeing horrors?" "Well, the boys did warn me I might see a witch instead." "Exactly! A witch so horrible you may die of fright. And she will be witch you, she will torture you, she will eat your heart and drink your blood!" "Oh, come now Grandpa. This is 1890. There are no witches anymore." "Oh-ho, my young Voltaire! And what if I tell you that I myself have seen a witch. "You? Where? "Right in this room land right in that mirror," said the old man, and his playful voice had turned savage. "When, Grandpa?" "Not so long ago. When I was a bit older than you. Oh, I was a vain fellow and though I was feeling very sick that night and merely wanted to lie down somewhere and die I could not pass that doorway of course without stopping to see in the mirror what I looked like when dying. But when I poked my head in what should I see in the mirror but...but..." "The witch?" "Exactly!" "And then she bewitch you, Grandpa!" "She bewitched me and she tortured me. l She ate my heart and drank my blood." said the old man bitterly. "Oh, my poor little Grandpa! Why have you never told me! And she very horrible? "Horrible? God, no--- she was the most beautiful creature I have ever seen! Her eyes were somewhat like yours but her hair was like black waters and her golden shoulders were bare. My God, she was enchanting! But I should have known---I should have known even then---the dark and fatal creature she was!" A silence. Then: "What a horrid mirror this is, Grandpa," whispered the boy. "What makes you slay that, hey?" "Well, you saw this witch in it. And Mama once told me that Grandma once told her that Grandma once saw the devil in this mirror. Was it of the scare that Grandma died?" Don Badoy started. For a moment he had forgotten that she was dead, that she had perished---the poor Agueda; that they were at peace at last, the two of them, her tired body at rest; her broken body set free at last from the brutal pranks of the earth---from the trap of a May night; from the snare of summer; from the terrible silver nets of the moon. She had been a mere heap of white hair and bones in the end: a whimpering withered consumptive, lashing out with her cruel tongue; her eye like live coals; her face like ashes... Now, nothing--- nothing save a name on a stone; save a stone in a graveyard---nothing! was left of the young girl who had flamed so vividly in a mirror one wild May Day midnight, long, long ago. And remembering how she had sobbed so piteously; remembering how she had bitten his hand and fled and how he had sung aloud in the dark room and surprised his heart in the instant of falling in love: such a grief tore up his throat and eyes that he felt ashamed before the boy; pushed the boy away; stood up and looked out----looked out upon the medieval shadows of the foul street where a couple of street-lamps flickered and a last carriage was rattling away upon the cobbles, while the blind black houses muttered hush-hush, their tiled roofs looming like sinister chessboards against a wild sky murky with clouds, save where an evil old moon prowled about in a corner or where a murderous wind whirled, whistling and whining, smelling now of the sea and now of the summer orchards and wafting unbearable the window; the bowed old man sobbing so bitterly at the window; the tears streaming down his cheeks and the wind in his hair and one hand pressed to his mouth---while from up the street came the clackety-clack of the watchman’s boots on the cobbles, and the clang-clang of his lantern against his knee, and the mighty roll of his voice booming through the night: "Guardia sereno-o-o! A las doce han dado-o-o!" Back to top Back to Philippine Literature in English

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Mayo araw gabi

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In a faraway land named LA-J4, there exist three great tribes who are competing for power and who aspire of ruling the whole kingdom. 11111 is the most powerful of them. They are known for their bravery and greatness in battle. They occupy most of the plains in LA-J4. The other one, 22222, is famous for blacksmith. They live peacefully at the very heart of the forest making fine metals, weapons and armory. Moreover, most of the traders in the kingdom came from their tribe. The least powerful tribe is 33333. They reside in the mountains. Although, they are known to be experts in making potions and concoctions, people in the kingdom do not trust them completely because they live in seclusion and seldom do they get along with other people outside their tribe. One day, a sad news spread across the land as the leader of 11111 tribe was poisoined during the annual feast of the tribe. Along with that, a lot rumors have also spread as to who the culprit of the crime is. Because of what has happened, the 11111 tribe was enraged and wanted to seek revenge. Few weeks after that dreadful incident, while the 22222 tribe is busy preparing for the celebration of their tribe’s yearly tradition, a group of armored men attacked them. The supposedly blissful celebration has turned into fearful mass killings. The armored men furiously killed all the people in the tribe. Men, women, children, and elders were murdered mercilessly. Houses were burned leaving the tribe with no glory and honor but only ashes and dead bodies. The 33333 tribe led by Alfonzo delata Castilla came to aid them, but it was too late already. However, it seems like a miracle that a 7-year old girl has survived that terrible and violent event.They found her crying and very afraid. Her name is Fei-Tah, the daughter of the tribe’s master. She was able to escape the horror, hid in the forest, and helplessly watched her tribesmen being killed one by one. 33333 tribe adopted her and treated her like one of them. In her new tribe, she met Xylan, the son of Alfonzo, who became her closest friend. They grew up together. Fei Tah told Xylan with conviction that one day she will take revenge for her tribe. She spent all her life training in the art of battle and since she came from a tribe known for blacksmith she wanted to create the best weapon that would bring down the 11111 tribe, the tribe that killed her tribesmen. 13 years after, with the help of Xylan, they made Leo Collantes, a cyborg and their strongest weapon. At last her most awaited day of revenge has come. With all their might, they attacked the 11111 tribe. The battle went on for several days until the fortresses of the 11111 tribe had fallen one by one. Leo Collantes indeed is a great help to the tribe. Eventually, the forces of 11111 tribe had weaken and for that they decided to surrender, together with their commander. Alfonzo asked the commander to kneel before him as a sign of respect to the most powerful man and the new ruler of LA-J4. He called Fei Tah and gave her a sword so that she could finally fulfil her promise of revenge for her tribe. When she was about to kill the commander, a 7-year old girl ran towards her. She was crying and begging Fei Tah to spare the life of her father. Then suddenly, as if a flashback, she saw herself in that child years ago. She felt pity for the child and decided to put down the sword. Alfonzo was not happy about what Fei Tah did so he grabbed the sword from Fei Tah’s hand and struck it through the leader’s heart. Fei Tah was shocked as she saw the body of the commander fell to the ground. After that, Alfonzo pointed the sword to Fei Tah and admitted everything that he did. He revealed that he was the one responsible for the death of 11111 tribe’s leader. He made a concoction, a potent poison and hired someone to mix it to the drink of the tribe’s leader during the feast. He is also the one who spread the rumors that 22222 tribe was the culprit of the crime that’s why 11111 tribe was infuriated and attacked Fei Tah’s tribe. Alfonzo did all these because of his ambition to rule the land and to make known to everyone his tribe. Finally, he was able to achieve his dream. After revealing everything, he attacked Fei Tah but before he could reach her, a sword pierced through his body from behind. He fell to the ground and saw that it was Leo Collantes, the cyborg, who was commanded by his own son, Xylan. At last Fei Tah was able to avenge her tribe and from then on, peace in LA-J4 was finally restored.

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uyam ay walang limitasyon

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Traditional Japanese clothing distinguishes Japan from all other countries around the world. The Japanese word kimono means "something one wears" and they are the traditional garments of Japan. Originally, the word kimono was used for all types of clothing, but eventually, it came to refer specifically to the full-length garment also known as the naga-gi, meaning "long-wear", that is still worn today on special occasions by women, men, and children. The earliest kimonos were heavily influenced by traditional Han Chinese clothing, known today as hanfu (漢服, kanfuku in Japanese), through Japanese embassies to China which resulted in extensive Chinese culture adoptions by Japan, as early as the 5th century AD.[10] It was during the 8th century, however, that Chinese fashions came into style among the Japanese, and the overlapping collar became particularly women's fashion.[10] Kimono in this meaning plus all other items of traditional Japanese clothing is known collectively as wafuku which means "Japanese clothes" as opposed to yofuku (Western-style clothing). Kimonos come in a variety of colors, styles, and sizes. Men mainly wear darker or more muted colors, while women tend to wear brighter colors and pastels, and, especially for younger women, often with complicated abstract or floral patterns. The kimono of a woman who is married (tomesode) differs from the kimono of a woman who is not married (furisode). The tomesode sets itself apart because the patterns do not go above the waistline. The furisode can be recognized by its extremely long sleeves spanning anywhere from 39 to 42 inches, it is also the most formal kimono an unwed woman wears. The furisode advertises that a woman is not only of age but also single. The style of kimono also changes with the season, in spring kimonos are vibrantly colored with springtime flowers embroidered on them. In the fall, kimono colors are not as bright, with fall patterns. Flannel kimonos are ideal for winter, they are a heavier material to help keep you warm. One of the more elegant kimonos is the uchikake, a long silk overgarment worn by the bride in a wedding ceremony. The uchikake is commonly embellished with birds or flowers using silver and gold thread.

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kultura Ng japan

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The policeman on the beat moved up the avenue impressively. The impressiveness was habitual and not for show, for spectators were few. The time was barely 10 o'clock at night, but chilly gusts of wind with a taste of rain in them had well nigh depeopled the streets. Trying doors as he went, twirling his club with many intricate and artful movements, turning now and then to cast his watchful eye adown the pacific thoroughfare, the officer, with his stalwart form and slight swagger, made a fine picture of a guardian of the peace. The vicinity was one that kept early hours. Now and then you might see the lights of a cigar store or of an all-night lunch counter; but the majority of the doors belonged to business places that had long since been closed. When about midway of a certain block the policeman suddenly slowed his walk. In the doorway of a darkened hardware store a man leaned, with an unlighted cigar in his mouth. As the policeman walked up to him the man spoke up quickly. "It's all right, officer," he said, reassuringly. "I'm just waiting for a friend. It's an appointment made twenty years ago. Sounds a little funny to you, doesn't it? Well, I'll explain if you'd like to make certain it's all straight. About that long ago there used to be a restaurant where this store stands--'Big Joe' Brady's restaurant." "Until five years ago," said the policeman. "It was torn down then." The man in the doorway struck a match and lit his cigar. The light showed a pale, square-jawed face with keen eyes, and a little white scar near his right eyebrow. His scarfpin was a large diamond, oddly set. "Twenty years ago to-night," said the man, "I dined here at 'Big Joe' Brady's with Jimmy Wells, my best chum, and the finest chap in the world. He and I were raised here in New York, just like two brothers, together. I was eighteen and Jimmy was twenty. The next morning I was to start for the West to make my fortune. You couldn't have dragged Jimmy out of New York; he thought it was the only place on earth. Well, we agreed that night that we would meet here again exactly twenty years from that date and time, no matter what our conditions might be or from what distance we might have to come. We figured that in twenty years each of us ought to have our destiny worked out and our fortunes made, whatever they were going to be." "It sounds pretty interesting," said the policeman. "Rather a long time between meets, though, it seems to me. Haven't you heard from your friend since you left?" "Well, yes, for a time we corresponded," said the other. "But after a year or two we lost track of each other. You see, the West is a pretty big proposition, and I kept hustling around over it pretty lively. But I know Jimmy will meet me here if he's alive, for he always was the truest, stanchest old chap in the world. He'll never forget. I came a thousand miles to stand in this door to-night, and it's worth it if my old partner turns up." The waiting man pulled out a handsome watch, the lids of it set with small diamonds. "Three minutes to ten," he announced. "It was exactly ten o'clock when we parted here at the restaurant door."__ "Did pretty well out West, didn't you?" asked the policeman. "You bet! I hope Jimmy has done half as well. He was a kind of plodder, though, good fellow as he was. I've had to compete with some of the sharpest wits going to get my pile. A man gets in a groove in New York. It takes the West to put a razor-edge on him." The policeman twirled his club and took a step or two. "I'll be on my way. Hope your friend comes around all right. Going to call time on him sharp?" "I should say not!" said the other. "I'll give him half an hour at least. If Jimmy is alive on earth he'll be here by that time. So long, officer." "Good-night, sir," said the policeman, passing on along his beat, trying doors as he went. There was now a fine, cold drizzle falling, and the wind had risen from its uncertain puffs into a steady blow. The few foot passengers astir in that quarter hurried dismally and silently along with coat collars turned high and pocketed hands. And in the door of the hardware store the man who had come a thousand miles to fill an appointment, uncertain almost to absurdity, with the friend of his youth, smoked his cigar and waited. About twenty minutes he waited, and then a tall man in a long overcoat, with collar turned up to his ears, hurried across from the opposite side of the street. He went directly to the waiting man. "Is that you, Bob?" he asked, doubtfully. "Is that you, Jimmy Wells?" cried the man in the door. "Bless my heart!" exclaimed the new arrival, grasping both the other's hands with his own. "It's Bob, sure as fate. I was certain I'd find you here if you were still in existence. Well, well, well! --twenty years is a long time. The old gone, Bob; I wish it had lasted, so we could have had another dinner there. How has the West treated you, old man?" "Bully; it has given me everything I asked it for. You've changed lots, Jimmy. I never thought you were so tall by two or three inches." "Oh, I grew a bit after I was twenty." "Doing well in New York, Jimmy?" "Moderately. I have a position in one of the city departments. Come on, Bob; we'll go around to a place I know of, and have a good long talk about old times." The two men started up the street, arm in arm. The man from the West, his egotism enlarged by success, was beginning to outline the history of his career. The other, submerged in his overcoat, listened with interest. At the corner stood a drug store, brilliant with electric lights. When they came into this glare each of them turned simultaneously to gaze upon the other's face. The man from the West stopped suddenly and released his arm. "You're not Jimmy Wells," he snapped. "Twenty years is a long time, but not long enough to change a man's nose from a Roman to a pug." "It sometimes changes a good man into a bad one, said the tall man. "You've been under arrest for ten minutes, 'Silky' Bob. Chicago thinks you may have dropped over our way and wires us she wants to have a chat with you. Going quietly, are you? That's sensible. Now, before we go on to the station here's a note I was asked to hand you. You may read it here at the window. It's from Patrolman Wells." The man from the West unfolded the little piece of paper handed him. His hand was steady when he began to read, but it trembled a little by the time he had finished. The note was rather short. ~"Bob: I was at the appointed place on time. When you struck the match to light your cigar I saw it was the face of the man wanted in Chicago. Somehow I couldn't do it myself, so I went around and got a plain clothes man to do the job.

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okupasyon

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Pygmalion and Galatea Pygmalion and Galatea The story of Pygmalion and Galatea is found in Greek Mythology, and in the famous work "Metamorphoses", by the great Roman poet Ovid. Their love was so unique that it is difficult to define it. But from this legendary love story, one thing is clear, man can never love an inanimate object with as much passion as he loves a living, breathing being. Love gives rise to desire and without this passion any love remains unfulfilled. Pygmalion was a master sculptor in the ancient city of Greece. All day he sculpted beautiful statues from huge pieces of rock. In fact, his creations were so wonderful that whoever saw them were mesmerised by their sheer artistic beauty and exact finish. Pygmalion himself was a fine and handsome young man. He was liked by all men and women. Many women loved him for his great skill and looks. But Pygmalion never paid attention to any of these women. He saw so much to blame in women that he came at last to abhor the sex, and resolved to live unmarried. He was a sculptor, and with his with wonderful skill he sculpted a beautiful ivory statue which was so lifelike that it was difficult to believe that it was lifeless at the first glance. The beauty was such that no living woman could compete with it. It was indeed the perfect semblance of a maiden that seemed to be alive, and only prevented from moving by modesty. His art was so perfect that it concealed itself and its product looked like the workmanship of nature. Pygmalion spent hours admiring his creation. By and by Pygmalion's admiration for his own sculpture turned to love. Oftentimes he laid his hand upon it as if to assure himself whether it were living or not, and could not, even then, believe that it was only ivory. He caressed it, and gave it such presents as young girls love - bright shells and polished stones, little birds and flowers of various hues, beads and amber. He adorned his ivory maiden with jewels. He put rainment on its limbs, and jewels on its fingers, and a necklace about its neck. To the ears he hung earrings and strings of pearls upon the breast. Her dress became her, and she looked not less charming than when unattired. He laid her on a couch spread with cloths of Tyrian dye, and called her his wife, and put her head upon a pillow of the softest feathers, as if she could enjoy their softness. He gave the statue a name: "Galatea", meaning "sleeping love'. But what will be the consequence of falling in love with a lifeless ivory maiden? The festival of Aphrodite was at hand - a festival celebrated with great pomp at Cyprus. Victims were offered, the altars smoked, and the odor of incense filled the air. When the festivities of Aphrodite started, Pygmalion took part in the ceremonies. He went to the temple of Aphrodite to ask forgiveness for all the years he had shunned her. When Pygmalion had performed his part in the solemnities, he hesitantly prayed for a wife like his ivory virgin statue. He stood before the altar of Aphrodite and timidly said, "Ye gods, who can do all things, give me, I pray you, for my wife" - he dared not utter "my ivory virgin," but said instead - "one like my ivory virgin." But Goddess Aphrodite understood what the poor man was trying to say. She was curious. How can a man love a lifeless thing so much? Was it so beautiful that Pygmalion fell in love with his own creation? So she visited the studio of the sculptor while he was away. What she saw greatly amazed her. For the sculpture had a perfect likeness to her. In fact, it would not have been wrong to say that the sculpture was an image of Aphrodite herself. Goddess Aphrodite was charmed by Pygmalion's creation. She brought the statue to life. When Pygmalion returned to his home, he went before Galatea and knelt down before the woman of his dreams. He looked at her lovingly, with a lover's ardour. It seemed to him that Galatea was looking at her lovingly too. For a moment, it seemed to Pygmalion that it was just a figment of his imagination. He rubbed his eyes and looked again. But no. There was no mistake this time. Galatea was smiling at him. He laid his hand upon the limbs; the ivory felt soft to his touch and yielded to his fingers like the wax of Hymettus. It seemed to be warm. He stood up; his mind oscillated between doubt and joy. Fearing he may be mistaken, again and again with a lover's ardor he touches the object of his hopes. It was indeed alive! The veins when pressed yielded to the finger and again resumed their roundness. Slowly it dawned on Pygmalion that the animation of his sculpture was the result of his prayer to Goddess Aphrodite who knew his desire. At last, the votary of Aphrodite found words to thank the goddess. Pygmalion humbled himself at the Goddess' feet. Soon Pygmalion and Galatea were wed, and Pygmalion never forgot to thank Aphrodite for the gift she had given him. Aphrodite blessed the nuptials she had formed, and this union between Pygmalion and Galatea produced a son named Paphos, from whom the city Paphos, sacred to Aphrodite, received its name. He and Galatea brought gifts to her temple throughout their life and Aphrodite blessed them with happiness and love in return. The unusual love that blossomed between Pygmalion and Galatea enthralls all. Falling in love with one's creation and then getting the desired object as wife- perhaps this was destined for Pygmalion. Even to this day, countless people and young lovers are mesmerized by this exceptional love that existed between two persons at a time when civilization was in its infancy.

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pygmalion sa galatea

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Plato was born around the year 428 BCE in Athens. His father died while Plato was young, and his mother remarried to Pyrilampes, in whose house Plato would grow up. Plato's birth name was Aristocles, and he gained the nickname Platon, meaning broad, because of his broad build. His family had a history in politics, and Plato was destined to a life in keeping with this history. He studied at a gymnasium owned by Dionysios, and at the palaistra of Ariston of Argos. When he was young he studied music and poetry. According to Aristotle, Plato developed the foundations of his metaphysics and epistemology by studying the doctrines of Cratylus, and the work of Pythagoras and Parmenides. When Plato met Socrates, however, he had met his definitive teacher. As Socrates' disciple, Plato adopted his philosophy and style of debate, and directed his studies toward the question of virtue and the formation of a noble character. Plato was in military service from 409 BC to 404 BC. When the Peloponnesian War ended in 404 BC he joined the Athenian oligarchy of the Thirty Tyrants, one of whose leaders was his uncle Charmides. The violence of this group quickly prompted Plato to leave it. In 403 BC, when democracy was restored in Athens, he had hopes of pursuing his original goal of a political career. Socrates' execution in 399 BC had a profound effect on Plato, and was perhaps the final event that would convince him to leave Athenian politics forever. Plato left Attica along with other friends of Socrates and traveled for the next twelve years. To all accounts it appears that he left Athens with Euclides for Megara, then went to visit Theodorus in Cyrene, moved on to study with the Pythagoreans in Italy, and finally to Egypt. During this period he studied the philosophy of his contemporaries, geometry, geology, astronomy and religion. After 399 BC Plato began to write extensively. It is still up for debate whether he was writing before Socrates' death, and the order in which he wrote his major texts is also uncertain. However, most scholars agree to divide Plato's major work into three distinct groups. The first of these is known as the Socratic Dialogues because of how close he stays within the text to Socrates' teachings. They were probably written during the years of his travels between 399 and 387 BC. One of the texts in this group called the Apology seems to have been written shortly after Socrates' death. Other texts relegated to this group include the Crito, Laches, Lysis, Charmides, Euthyphro, and Hippias Minor and Major. Plato returned to Athens in 387 BC and, on land that had once belonged to Academos, he founded a school of learning which he called the Academy. Plato's school is often described at the first European university. Its curriculum offered subjects including astronomy, biology, mathematics, political theory, and philosophy. Plato hoped the Academy would provide a place where thinkers could work toward better government in the Grecian cities. He would preside over the Academy until his death. The period from 387 to 361 BC is often called Plato's "middle" or transitional period. It is thought that he may have written the Meno, Euthydemus, Menexenus, Cratylus, Repuglic, Phaedrus, Syposium and Phaedo during this time. The major difference between these texts and his earlier works is that he tends toward grander metaphysical themes and begins to establish his own voice in philosophy. Socrates still has a presence, however, sometimes as a fictional character. In the Meno for example Plato writes of the Socratic idea that no one knowingly does wrong, and adds the new doctrine of recollection questioning whether virtue can be taught. In the Phaedo we are introduced to the Platonic doctrine of the Forms, in which Plato makes claims as to the immortality of the human soul. The middle dialogues also reveal Plato's method of hypothesis. Plato's most influential work, The Republic, is also a part of his middle dialogues. It is a discussion of the virtues of justice, courage, wisdom, and moderation, of the individual and in society. It works with the central question of how to live a good life, asking what an ideal State would be like, and what defines a just individual. These lead to more questions regarding the education of citizens, how government should be formed, the nature of the soul, and the afterlife. The dialogue finishes by reviewing various forms of government and describing the ideal state, where only philosophers are fit to rule. The Republic covers almost every aspect of Plato's thought. In 367 BC Plato was invited to be the personal tutor to Dionysus II, the new ruler of Syracuse. Plato accepted the invitation, but found on his arrival that the situation was not conducive for philosophy. He continued to teach the young ruler until 365 BC when Syracuse entered into war. Plato returned to Athens, and it was around this time that Plato's famous pupil Aristotle began to study at the Academy. In 361 BC Plato returned to Syracuse in response to a letter from Dion, the uncle and guardian of Dionysus II, begging him to come back. However, finding the situation even more unpleasant than his first visit, he returned to Athens almost as fast as he had come. Back at the Academy, Plato probably spent the rest of his life writing and conversing. The way he ran the Academy and his ideas of what constitutes an educated individual have been a major influence to education theory. His work has also been influential in the areas of logic and legal philosophy. His beliefs on the importance of mathematics in education has had a lasting influence on the subject, and his insistence on accurate definitions and clear hypotheses formed the foundations for Euclid's system of mathematics. His final years at the Academy may be the years when he wrote the "Later" dialogues, including the Parmenides, Theatetus, Sophist,Statesmas,Timaeus,Critias,Philebus, and Laws. Socrates has been delegated a minor role in these texts. Plato uses these dialogues to take a closer look at his earlier metaphysical speculations. He discusses art, including dance, music, poetry, architecture and drama, and ethics in regards to immortality, the mind, and Realism. He also works with the philosophy of mathematics, politics and religion, covering such specifics as censorship, atheism, and pantheism. In the area of epistemology he discusses a priori knowledge and Rationalism. In his theory of Forms, Plato suggests that the world of ideas is constant and true, opposing it to the world we perceive through our senses, which is deceptive and changeable. In 347 Plato died, leaving the Academy to his sister's son Speusippus. The Academy remained a model for institutions of higher learning until it was closed, in 529 CE, by the Emperor Justinian.

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talambuhay ni Plato

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The former barrio of Basista, now the site of the town proper or poblacion was once the biggest and one of the progressive barrios located in the far south of the mother town, San Carlos (now a city). As early as the year 1918, some of the most influential and prominent citizens of the then barrio of Basista came together and made the first attempt to petition the municipal government and the provincial board of San Carlos and Pangasinan respectively to grant the township of their barrios. Prominent politicians during that time volunteered their help in making representations with the proper authorities, but their request was not granted. Some of those leaders were: General Mamaril, Don Valeriano Perez, father of the late speaker Eugenio Pérez, Buenaventura de Vera, Telesforo de Vera, Gregorio Malicdem, Cayetano Perez, Gaudencio Padua, Gregorio Valdez, Ramon Valdez, Don Roque de Vera, Domingo Resultay, Bernardo Resultay, Liberato Frias, Hipolito Cayabyab, Alejandro de guzman , Pascual Resultay, Raymundo de Guzman, Vicente de Guzman, Domingo de Guzman, Vicente Frias, Florentino Malicdem, Faustino Monzon, Cornelio de Guzman, Felix de Guzman, Juan Malicdem, Federico Cancino, Artemio Frias and several others. On September 5, 1961, President Carlos P. Garcia issued Executive Order No. 446 creating the town of Basista composed of 13 barrios out of the 28 that petitioned. Four years after, however, the Philippine Supreme Court declared the town's creation as without legal basis citing their ruling in the "Emmanuel Pelaez vs. Auditor General" that "municipalities created under Executive Orders are void". It was here that Republic Act No. 4866 filed by Congressman Jack L. Soriano was enacted into law and legally created Basista as a town of Pangasinan

Tagalo

The former barrio of Basista, now the site of the town proper or poblacion was once the biggest and one of the progressive barrios located in the far south of the mother town, San Carlos (now a city). As early as the year 1918, some of the most influential and prominent citizens of the then barrio of Basista came together and made the first attempt to petition the municipal government and the provincial board of San Carlos and Pangasinan respectively to grant the township of their barrios. Prominent politicians during that time volunteered their help in making representations with the proper authorities, but their request was not granted. Some of those leaders were: General Mamaril, Don Valeriano Perez, father of the late speaker Eugenio Pérez, Buenaventura de Vera, Telesforo de Vera, Gregorio Malicdem, Cayetano Perez, Gaudencio Padua, Gregorio Valdez, Ramon Valdez, Don Roque de Vera, Domingo Resultay, Bernardo Resultay, Liberato Frias, Hipolito Cayabyab, Alejandro de guzman , Pascual Resultay, Raymundo de Guzman, Vicente de Guzman, Domingo de Guzman, Vicente Frias, Florentino Malicdem, Faustino Monzon, Cornelio de Guzman, Felix de Guzman, Juan Malicdem, Federico Cancino, Artemio Frias and several others. On September 5, 1961, President Carlos P. Garcia issued Executive Order No. 446 creating the town of Basista composed of 13 barrios out of the 28 that petitioned. Four years after, however, the Philippine Supreme Court declared the town's creation as without legal basis citing their ruling in the "Emmanuel Pelaez vs. Auditor General" that "municipalities created under Executive Orders are void". It was here that Republic Act No. 4866 filed by Congressman Jack L. Soriano was enacted into law and legally created Basista as a town of Pangasinan

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"Graft and corruption" refer to unethical practices that lead to the advancement of those who are willing to cheat to get by. These two ideas have been a part of government almost as long as power structures have existed, as those who are in power use that power to get additional financial and other advantages. In particular, it was graft and corruption that brought the utopian experiment known as the Soviet Union to a crashing halt.

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pangunguwalta at katiwalian

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The culture of Thailand incorporates cultural beliefs and characteristics indigenous to the area known as modern-day Thailand coupled with much influence from ancient China, Cambodia, Laos, India along with the neighboring pre-historic cultures of Southeast Asia.[1] It is influenced primarily by animism, Hinduism, Buddhism, as well as by later migrations from China, and northern India. Contents 1 Religion 2 Customs 2.1 Traditional clothing 3 Marriage 4 Birth traditions and beliefs 5 Funerals 6 Arts 7 Holidays 8 Sports 9 Traditional Games of Thailand 9.1 Kratai Kha Deow(One Legged Rabbit) 9.2 Banana rib hobbyhorse riding 10 Nicknames 11 See also 12 Notes and references 13 External links Religion Buddhist novices receiving joss sticks. Main article: Religion in Thailand Thailand is nearly 94%-95% Theravada Buddhist (which includes the Thai Forest Tradition and the Dhammayuttika Nikaya and Santi Asoke sects), with minorities of Muslims (5-6%), Christians (1%), Mahayana Buddhists, and other religions.[2] Thai Theravada Buddhism is supported and overseen by the government, with monks receiving a number of government benefits, such as free use of the public transportation infrastructure. Buddhism in Thailand is strongly influenced by traditional beliefs regarding ancestral and natural spirits, which have been incorporated into Buddhist cosmology. Most Thai people own spirit houses, miniature wooden houses in which they believe household spirits live. They present offerings of food and drink to these spirits to keep them happy. If these spirits aren't happy, it is believed that they will inhabit the larger household of the Thai, and cause chaos. These spirit houses can be found in public places and in the streets of Thailand, where the public make offerings.[3] Prior to the rise of Theravada Buddhism, both Indian Brahmanic religion and Mahayana Buddhism were present in Thailand. Influences from both these traditions can still be seen in present day Thai folklore. Brahmanist shrines play an important role in Thai folk religion, and the Mahayana Buddhist influence is reflected in the presence of figures like Lokesvara, a form of the bodhisattva Avalokitesvara sometimes incorporated into Thailand's iconography.[4][5] Customs See also: Thai folklore Thai greeting, the smile is an important symbol of refinement in Thai culture. The traditional customs and the folklore of Thai people were gathered and described by Phya Anuman Rajadhon in the 20th century, at a time when modernity changed the face of Thailand and a great number of traditions disappeared or became adapted to modern life. Still, the striving towards refinement, rooted in ancient Siamese culture, consisting of promoting that which is refined and avoiding coarseness is a major focus of the daily life of Thai people and high on their scale of values.[6] One of the most distinctive Thai customs is the wai. Used in greetings, leave-taking, or as an acknowledgement, it comes in many forms, reflecting the relative status of those involved. Generally the salutation involves a prayer-like gesture with the hands, similar to the Añjali Mudrā of the Indian subcontinent, and it also may include a slight bow of the head. This salutation is often accompanied by a serene smile symbolizing a welcoming disposition and a pleasant attitude. Thailand is often referred to as the "land of smiles" in tourist brochures. Public displays of affection is not overly common in traditional Thai society, especially between lovers.[7] It is becoming more common, especially among the younger generation. A notable social norm holds that touching someone on the head may be considered rude. It is also considered rude to place one's feet at a level above someone else's head, especially if that person is of higher social standing. This is because the Thai people consider the foot to be the dirtiest and lowliest part of the body, and the head the most respected and highest part of the body. This also influences how Thais sit when on the ground—their feet always pointing away from others, tucked to the side or behind them. Pointing at or touching something with the feet is also considered rude. Display of respect of the younger towards the elder is a cornerstone value in Thailand. A family during the Buddhist ceremony for young men who are to be ordained as monks. Since serene detachment is valued, conflict and sudden displays of anger are eschewed in Thai culture and, as is many Asian cultures, the notion of face is extremely important. For these reasons, visitors should take care not to create conflict, to display anger or to cause a Thai person to lose face. Disagreements or disputes should be handled with a smile and no attempt should be made to assign blame to another. In everyday life in Thailand, there is a strong emphasis on the concept of sanuk; the idea that life should be fun. Because of this, Thais can be quite playful at work and during day-to-day activities. Displaying positive emotions in social interactions is also important in Thai culture. Often, Thais will deal with disagreements, minor mistakes, or misfortunes by using the phrase mai pen rai, translated as "it doesn't matter". The ubiquitous use of this phrase in Thailand reflects a disposition towards minimizing conflict, disagreements or complaints. A smile and the sentence "mai pen rai" indicates that the incident is not important and therefore there is no conflict or shame involved. Respect for hierarchy is a very important value for Thai people. The custom of bun khun emphasizes the indebtedness towards parents, as well as towards guardians, teachers, and caretakers. It describes the feelings and practices involved in certain relationships organized around generalized reciprocity, the slow-acting accounting of an exchange calculated according to locally interpreted scales and measures.[8] It is also considered rude to step on any type of Thai currency (Thai coin or banknote) as they include a likeness of the king. The 1941-42 Thai cultural mandates, promulgated by Plaek Pibulsonggram, made sweeping changes in Thai culture. Modernization efforts discouraged the wearing of women's traditional costumes, in favour of more modern forms of dress . There are a number of Thai customs relating to the special status of monks in Thai society. Thai monks are forbidden physical contact with women. Women are therefore expected to make way for passing monks to ensure that accidental contact does not occur. A variety of methods are employed to ensure that no incidental contact (or the appearance of such contact) between women and monks occurs. Women making offerings to monks place their donation at the feet of the monk, or on a cloth laid on the ground or a table. Powders or unguents intended to carry a blessing are applied to Thai women by monks using the end of a candle or stick. Laypersons are expected to sit or stand with their heads at a lower level than that of a monk. Within a temple, monks may sit on a raised platform during ceremonies to make this easier to achieve. When sitting in a temple, one is expected to point one's feet away from images of the Buddha. Shrines inside Thai residences are arranged so as to ensure that the feet are not pointed towards the religious icons, such as placing the shrine on the same wall as the head of a bed, if a house is too small to remove the shrine from the bedroom entirely. It is also customary to remove one's footwear before entering a home or the sacred areas within a temple, and not to step on the threshold. Traditional clothing A woman wearing a chut Thai Main article: Chut thai Traditional Thai clothing is called chut thai (Thai: ชุดไทย Thai pronunciation: [tɕʰút.tʰaj]) which literally means "Thai outfit". It can be worn by men, women, and children. Chut thai for women usually consists of a pha nung or a chong kraben, a blouse, and a sabai. Northern and northeastern women may wear a sinh instead of a pha nung and a chong kraben with either a blouse or a suea pat. Chut thai for men includes a chong kraben or pants, a Raj pattern shirt, with optional knee-length white socks and a sabai. Chut thai for northern Thai men is composed of a sado, a white Manchu styled jacket, and sometimes a khian hua. In formal occasions, people may choose to wear a chut thai phraratchaniyom. Marriage A traditional wedding in Thailand. Main article: Thai marriage Thai Buddhist marriage ceremonies are generally divided into two parts: a Buddhist component, which includes the recitation of prayers and the offering of food and other gifts to monks and images of the Buddha, and a non-Buddhist component rooted in folk traditions, which centers on the couple's families. In former times, it was unknown for Buddhist monks to be present at any stage of the marriage ceremony itself. As monks were required to attend to the dead during funerals, their presence at a marriage (which was associated with fertility, and intended to produce children) was considered a bad omen. A couple would seek a blessing from their local temple before or after being married, and might consult a monk for astrological advice in setting an auspicious date for the wedding. The non-Buddhist portions of the wedding would take place away from the temple, and would often take place on a separate day. In modern times, these prohibitions have been significantly relaxed. It is not uncommon for a visit to a temple to be made on the same day as the non-Buddhist portions of a wedding, or even for the wedding to take place within the temple. While a division is still commonly observed between the "religious" and "secular" portions of a wedding service, it may be as simple as the monks present for the Buddhist ceremony departing to take lunch once their role is complete. During the Buddhist component of the wedding service, the couple first bow before the image of the Buddha. They then recite certain basic Buddhist prayers or chants (typically including taking the Three Refuges and the Five Precepts), and light incense and candles before the image. The parents of the couple may then be called upon to "connect" them, by placing upon the heads of the bride and groom twin loops of string or thread that link the couple together. The couple may then make offerings of food, flowers, and medicine to the monks present. Cash gifts (usually placed in an envelope) may also be presented to the temple at this time. The monks may then unwind a small length of thread that is held between the hands of the assembled monks. They begin a series of recitations of Pali scriptures intended to bring merit and blessings to the new couple. The string terminates with the lead monk, who may connect it to a container of water that will be "sanctified" for the ceremony. Merit is said to travel through the string and be conveyed to the water. A similar arrangement is used to transfer merit to the dead at a funeral, further evidence of the weakening of the taboo on mixing funerary imagery and trappings with marriage ceremonies. Blessed water may be mixed with wax drippings from a candle lit before the Buddha image and other unguents and herbs to create a paste that is then applied to the foreheads of the bride and groom to create a small dot, similar to the marking made with red ochre on Hindu devotees. The bride's mark is created with the butt end of the candle rather than the monk's thumb, in keeping with the Vinaya prohibition against touching women. The highest-ranking monk present may elect to say a few words to the couple, offering advice or encouragement. The couple may then make offerings of food to the monks, at which point the Buddhist portion of the ceremony is concluded. The Thai dowry system is known as the sin sodt Thai: สินสอด. Traditionally, the groom will be expected to pay a sum of money to the family, to compensate them and to demonstrate that the groom is financially capable of taking care of their daughter. Sometimes, this sum is purely symbolic, and will be returned to the bride and groom after the wedding has taken place. The religious component of marriage ceremonies between Thai Muslims are markedly different from that described above. The Imam of the local mosque, the groom, the father of the bride, men in the immediate family, and important men in the community sit in a circle during the ceremony, conducted by the Imam. All the women, including the bride, sit in a separate room and do not have any direct participation in the ceremony. The secular component of the ceremony, however, is often nearly identical to the secular part of Thai Buddhist wedding ceremonies. The only notable difference here is the type of meat served to guests (goat and/or beef instead of pork). Thai Muslims frequently, though not always, also follow the conventions of the Thai dowry system. Birth traditions and beliefs Main article: Birth in Thailand Traditional principles concerning pregnancy and childbirth are largely influenced by folk beliefs, especially in rural areas of central and north Thailand. Modern practices follow the Western medical model. Funerals See also: Funeral (Buddhism) Funeral pyre of Chan Kusalo, the patriarch-abbot of northern Thailand. Traditionally, funerals last for at least one week. Crying is discouraged during the funeral, so as not to worry the spirit of the deceased. Many activities surrounding the funeral are intended to make merit for the deceased. Copies of Buddhist scriptures may be printed and distributed in the name of the deceased, and gifts are usually given to a local temple. Monks are invited to chant prayers that are intended to provide merit for the deceased, as well as to provide protection against the possibility of the dead relative returning as a malicious spirit. A picture of the deceased from his/her best days will often be displayed next to the coffin. Often, a thread is connected to the corpse or coffin which is held by the chanting monks during their recitation; this thread is intended to transfer the merit of the monks' recitation to the deceased. The corpse is cremated, and the urn with the ash is usually kept in a chedi in the local temple. Thai Chinese and Thai Muslim minorities bury their deceased according to the rituals of their respective communities. Arts A depiction of a white elephant in 19th century Thai art. Main articles: Thai art and Music of Thailand Thai visual arts were traditionally Buddhist. Thai Buddha images from different periods have a number of distinctive styles. Thai temple art and architecture evolved from a number of sources, one of them being Khmer architecture. Contemporary Thai art often combines traditional Thai elements with modern techniques. Literature in Thailand is heavily influenced by Indian Hindu culture. The most notable works of Thai literature are a version of the Ramayana, a Hindu religious epic, called the Ramakien, written in part by Kings Rama I and Rama II, and the poetry of Sunthorn Phu. There is no tradition of spoken drama in Thailand, the role instead being filled by Thai dance. This is divided into three categories: khon, lakhon, and likay, khon being the most elaborate and likay the most popular. Nang drama, a form of shadow play, is found in the south. The music of Thailand includes classical and folk music traditions, e.g., piphat and mor lam, respectively) as well as string or pop music. Holidays Main article: Public holidays in Thailand Important holidays in Thai culture include Thai New Year, or Songkran, which is officially observed from 13–15 April each year. Falling at the end of the dry season and during the hot season in Thailand, the celebrations notoriously feature boisterous water throwing. The water throwing stemmed from washing Buddha images and lightly sprinkling scented water on the hands of elderly people. Small amounts of scented talcum powder were also used in the annual cleansing rite. In recent decades, water fights have been increasingly industrialised with use of hoses, barrels, squirt guns, water-filled surgical tubing, and copious amounts of powder. Loi Krathong is held on the 12th full moon of the Thai lunar calendar, usually early-November. While not a government-observed holiday, it is nonetheless an auspicious day in Thai culture, in which Thai people "loi", meaning "to float" a "krathong", a small raft traditionally made from elaborately folded banana leaves and including flowers, candles, incense sticks, and small offerings. The act of floating away the candle raft is symbolic of letting go of all one's grudges, anger, and defilements so that one can start life afresh on a better footing. Sports Thai boxing is the indigenous national sport in Thailand.[citation needed] Football is perhaps the most-watched sport. The English Premier League is surprisingly popular.[citation needed] Traditional Games of Thailand Kratai Kha Deow(One Legged Rabbit) “Kratai Kha Deow” or “One Legged Rabbit” is one type of catch game. The catcher will call the rabbit, and the rabbit must stand on one leg and jump or tiptoe to catch the other players and switch to rabbit instead. This game will exercise your legs and practice balancing on one leg. The number of players are divided into two teams, or may not have a team at all. Normally, there are two or more players. At the first time, the player will select the rabbit or team by “Rock-Paper-Scissors”. The loser would have to be a rabbit. In the case of solo player, the rabbit must stand on one leg, then jump to chase and touch any part of the body of other children who have run away. Everyone must stay within the designated area. A player who runs out of space loses the game and must be switched to rabbit, but if the rabbit is exhausted and cannot stand on one leg, it was that defeated and must be punished. In team play, the rules are similar to the solo player, but the rabbit team will send a representative to catch the other team to all the people. Those arrested will have to wait outside until the rabbit team can catch all of the rival teams. Rabbit team can switch to teammates to catch on until they are exhausted, and if the all of the members in rabbit team are exhausted and cannot stand on one leg, the rabbit team lose the game and must be punished too. Banana rib hobbyhorse riding Banana rib hobbyhorse riding or "Khee Ma Khan Kluay" in Thai is a traditional game of Thailand that Thai kids frequently played in the past. They use a banana rib to make the parts of a horse such as head, ear, and horsetail. The kids can make a horse on their own by using banana rib from banana trees irrelevant. This game makes kids enjoy their imagination by assume themselves as a rider, and an exercise. That is a local traditional which is the kids can spent time together. The materials for making a banana rib hobbyhorse are banana rib, knife, small bamboo pin, and string. First, find a rib of a banana around 1.5 is long (1 meter = 2 wa). Cut it in a form of the head, neck, and ears then use a small bamboo pin to connect the ear to the head of a horse. The remaining part of a banana rib, becomes a horsetail. Attach a string between the head and the tail of this banana rib horse and place on the shoulder of the rider. How to play banana rib hobbyhorse riding. Kids will sit on the horse and behave like they are riding a real horse shouting ‘hee hee’ or ‘yee haaah’(making the usual sounds people shout when controlling their horses). They may race with other friends if they have player more than 2 players. Which team runs faster, will be the winner or continuously ride around a wide open space and have fun. Nicknames See also: Thai names Thai people universally have one, or occasionally more, short nicknames (Thai: ชื่อเล่น name-play) that they use with friends a

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nilalaman

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Benjamin "Benjie" Santos VIII (Vice Ganda) comes from a long line of warriors and soldiers. His grandfather, Benjamin Santos VI (Eddie Garcia), expects him to be in the army and to be like his ancestors who fought every battle in the country. He lives with his parents and two sisters named Jesamine (Angelie Urquico) and Anjamin (Abby Bautista). His father, Benjamin Santos VII (Jimmy Santos), gave up being a military soldier to be what he wants to be, a scientist and an inventor. Benjie's grandfather did not agree with his decision, so they were forced to leave his grandfather's house and to never come back. They now live in a cramped house, where they started a new life. His father, as expected, followed what makes him happy. He invented gadgets and unique deadly weapons. Some examples are the Fart-gun, or the Utot-gun in Tagalog, a fan that shoots bullets, and a tiara that can kill thousands of people. A few years later they were invited to his grandfather's 75th birthday by a relative. His grandfather finds out Benjie is gay. They were asked to leave and to never show their faces again for they are a disgrace to the Santos family. When a civil war in the Philippines breaks out, Benjie is forced to enlist in place of his ailing father, who was said to have high blood pressure and diabetes. After a long time training, Benjie's group was to be dissolved for being not good enough. His group decides to train at night, and show their improvement in the morning. A rival group, incensed with constantly losing to Benjie's group during training, sought to reveal Benjie's sexuality by getting Benjie drunk and filming a sex video of him. The following morning, the High-General calls Benjie because of the video, and makes him leave the army. When Benjamin was about to leave, his friends joined him saying, "Hindi kami masaya kung wala ka!" ("We are not happy without you!"). They left the army, and while travelling through a wooded area, they heard some trucks and cars moving. They wake up, and followed the cars, resulting in them discovering the location of the enemy base by accident. They went back to the army, and told the High-General about what they saw, but he wouldn't believe them. They believed the real enemy base was in Tanay, based on the army's gathered information and decided to attack there instead. While the army searched for enemy forces at the Tanay base, they were ambushed by hundreds of terrorists. Meanwhile, Benjie's group returns to the enemy's real base, where they saw the terrorist's trucks with the captured forces, including Benjie's grandfather and Brandon Estolas (Derek Ramsay)—the group's former commander in the army and Benjie's love-interest. They then make plans to rescue their allies by dressing up as girls to trick the enemy guards into letting them inside their base. Once inside, the group kills many people with the tiara, fan, and Fart-gun that Benjie's father invented. As they enter the base, the group split up in different ways. When one of the terrorists spots what he thought was Benjie hiding in a metal barrel, he then tells Abe Sayyep (named after the Abu Sayyaf), the squadron commander, about what he saw. Abe Sayyep pulls out the wig Benjie put in the barrel, only to find out it was some sort of trickery. Benjie finds his grandfather, Brandon, and the other generals. Benjie's grandfather thanks him and asks for forgiveness for treating him so badly. Benjie is then reunited with his group, where Abe Sayyep appears and shoots Benjie's grandfather. Benjie jumps in front of his grandfather in order to save him. He sees himself in heaven, and sees his great-grandfathers, who tell him that he did very well and it is not yet the time for him to die. He is soon revived, and the group returns home, where they celebrate their victory with a party

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Scene 2: An Angel Visits Mary MARY enters from the side and stands near the BASKET OF CLOTHES. MARY begins folding the clothes. NARRATOR God sent the angel Gabriel to Nazareth, a town in Galilee. ANGEL begins sneakily tip-toeing from the side, making their way to stand behind MARY, who doesn’t notice. NARRATOR He was sent to a girl named Mary. The angel greeted her and said... ANGEL 1 (Jumps out from behind MARY) Mary! MARY throws the piece of clothing she was folding in the air. MARY takes a few steps away and hides behind the RECTANGULAR BOX. ANGEL 1 The Lord has given you special favor. He is with you. NARRATOR Mary was very upset because of his words. Mary wondered... MARY stands up and scratches her head. MARY What kind of greeting this could be? NARRATOR But the angel said to her... ANGEL 1 (Holds out a hand out) Do not be afraid, Mary. God is very pleased with you. NARRATOR Then the angel said... The ANGEL reaches into their sash, pulls out the FOLDED LETTER, walks over to the NARRATOR, and hands it to them. The NARRATOR unfolds the letter and glances over it, then looks at the ANGEL quizzically. The ANGEL leans over and whispers in the NARRATOR’S ear. The NARRATOR nods. NARRATOR Ladies and Gentlemen, the angel has informed me that, after a long and tiring trip from heaven, they’d like a little help delivering their long message from God. Any volunteers? (Waits a second.) Ah, yes, you over there. The ANGEL’S MOM OR DAD comes and stands next to the NARRATOR. The NARRATOR hands the LETTER to the ANGEL’S MOM OR DAD. The ANGEL returns to where they were onstage. NARRATOR The angel continued... PARENT NARRATOR You will become pregnant... The ANGEL pats their belly a few times. PARENT NARRATOR And give birth to a son. You must name him Jesus. The ANGEL grabs the JESUS SIGN from the back of the stage, holds it up for the audience to see, and hands it to MARY, who holds it in one hand. PARENT NARRATOR He will be great and will be called the Son of the Most High God. The ANGEL flexes their muscles several times like a body builder. PARENT NARRATOR The Lord God will make him a king like his father David of long ago. The ANGEL grabs the CROWN SIGN from the back of the stage, holds it up for the audience to see, and hands it to MARY, who holds it in her other hand. PARENT NARRATOR He will rule forever over his people, who came from Jacob's family. His kingdom will never end. NARRATOR Mary asked the angel... PARENT NARRATOR How can this happen? MARY shrugs. NARRATOR The angel answered... PARENT NARRATOR The Holy Spirit will come to you. The ANGEL reaches up to the sky and slowly lowers their hands to waist level while wiggling their fingers. PARENT NARRATOR The power of the Most High God will cover you. So the holy one that is born will be called the Son of God. ANGEL 1 Nothing is impossible with God. NARRATOR Mary answered... MARY I serve the Lord. May it happen to me just as you said it would. NARRATOR Then the angel left her. The ANGEL exits to the side of the stage. MARY sets the SIGNS back on the back of the stage. MARY puts the clothes in the basket and exits to the side of the stage. Scene 3: An Angel Visits Joseph in a Dream NARRATOR This is how the birth of Jesus Christ came about. JOSEPH enters from the side of the stage, holding a BOUQUET OF FLOWERS. NARRATOR His mother Mary and Joseph had promised to get married. JOSEPH gestures over to the side of the stage for someone to come over. MARY enters in slowly from the side of the stage with a noticeably pregnant belly, holding one hand against the small of her back. NARRATOR But before they started to live together, it became clear that she was going to have a baby. She became pregnant by the power of the Holy Spirit. JOSEPH stares with his mouth open, throws the FLOWERS in the air, and puts his head in his hands. MARY covers her face, crying, and runs, exiting to the side of the stage. NARRATOR Her husband Joseph was a godly man. JOSEPH paces back and forth, pretending to talk to himself. NARRATOR He did not want to put her to shame in public. So he planned to divorce her quietly. NARRATOR But as Joseph was thinking about this... JOSEPH sits down on the RECTANGULAR BOX and poses like the thinker. He slowly leans his head and lays down on the RECTANGULAR BOX to sleep. NARRATOR ...an angel of the Lord appeared to him in a dream. The ANGEL runs in from the side, does a somersault, and jumps up with arms outstretched. NARRATOR The angel said... ANGEL 2 (Holding out one hand to Joseph) Joseph, son of David... JOSEPH sits up, startled. He hides behind the RECTANGULAR BOX. ANGEL 2 Don't be afraid to take Mary home as your wife. PARENT NARRATOR The baby inside her... The ANGEL pats their belly a few times. PARENT NARRATOR ...is from the Holy Spirit. The ANGEL holds out their hands up to the sky and wiggles his fingers while hopping from foot to foot. PARENT NARRATOR She is going to have a son. You must give him the name Jesus. The ANGEL grabs the JESUS SIGN from the back of the stage, holds it up for the audience to see, and hands it to JOSEPH, who holds it in one hand. PARENT NARRATOR That is because he will save his people from their sins. The ANGEL grabs the SAVIOR SIGN from the back of the stage, holds it up for the audience to see, and hands it to JOSEPH, who holds it in one hand. After a beat, the ANGEL takes the SIGNS back and sets the where they were before. The ANGEL helps JOSEPH lay back down on the RECTANGULAR BOX. The ANGEL grabs the BLANKET from behind the RECTANGULAR BOX and lays it on JOSEPH. The ANGEL then exits to the side of the stage, doing another somersault as they leave. NARRATOR Joseph woke up. JOSEPH sits up, pulls off the BLANKET, and sets it behind the RECTANGULAR BOX. JOSEPH rubs his eyes with his palms, pinches himself, and stands up. NARRATOR He did what the angel of the Lord commanded him to do. JOSEPH Mary! MARY does a pregnant-style run over to JOSEPH. JOSEPH pats down his torso, as if feeling in his pockets. He then does a “COME ON” gesture towards the NARRATOR. The NARRATOR walks over to JOSEPH and hands him a ring. JOSEPH bows down on one knee. MARY holds a hand, and JOSEPH puts a ring on it. NARRATOR He took Mary home as his wife. JOSEPH and MARY hold hands and exit to the side of the stage. Scene 4: Mary and Joseph Travel to Bethlehem NARRATOR In those days, Caesar Augustus made a law. CAESAR AUGUSTUS enters from the side holding a SCROLL and stands in the center of the stage. CAESAR AUGUSTUS lets the SCROLL roll to the ground and pretends to read it. CAESAR AUGUSTUS Hear ye, hear ye! Let there be a list be made of everyone in the whole Roman world. CAESAR AUGUSTUS exits to the side of the stage. NARRATOR All went to their own towns to be listed. So Joseph went also. He went from the town of Nazareth in Galilee to Judea. The INNKEEPERS enter from the side of stage, holding INNKEEPER SIGNS, with their heads poking out from the cutout of the sign. They stand, spread out in a long line. NARRATOR That is where Bethlehem, the town of David, was. JOSEPH enters from the side, pulling a WAGON with MARY riding in it. MARY is looking very pregnant. NARRATOR He went there with Mary to be listed. Mary was engaged to him. She was expecting a baby. JOSEPH pulls the wagon up to INNKEEPER 1 and knocks on their INNKEEPER SIGN. INNKEEPER 1 No room! JOSEPH pulls the wagon up to INNKEEPER 2 and knocks on their INNKEEPER SIGN. INNKEEPER 2 No room! JOSEPH pulls the wagon up to INNKEEPER 3 and knocks on their INNKEEPER SIGN. INNKEEPER 3 No room! NARRATOR There was no room for them in the inn. The INNKEEPERS exit to the side of the stage. The STABLEKEEPER enters from the side carrying the STABLEKEEPER SIGN and stands in the center of the stage, in front of the RECTANGULAR BOX. JOSEPH pulls the wagon over to the STABLEKEEPER and KNOCKS on their STABLEKEEPER SIGN. STABLEKEEPER There’s room in the barn! JOSEPH gives the STABLEKEEPER a bow of thanks. The STABLEKEEPER exits to the side of the stage. JOSEPH and MARY sit on the RECTANGULAR BOX. The STAGE HANDS carry the MANGER and set it in the middle of the stage. Scene 5: Jesus is Born in a Stable NARRATOR While Joseph and Mary were there, the time came for the child to be born. JOSEPH kneels next to MARY and grabs her hand. He rubs his hand once along her hair. NARRATOR She gave birth to her first baby. JOSEPH reaches behind the RECTANGULAR BOX and grabs the BABY. JOSPEH (Holding the BABY up) It’s a boy! MARY grabs the BLANKET from behind the RECTANGULAR BOX . JOSEPH hands the BABY to MARY. NARRATOR She wrapped him in large strips of cloth. MARY wraps the BABY in the BLANKET. NARRATOR Then she placed him in a manger. MARY places the BABY in the manger. MARY and JOSEPH exit to the side of the stage, taking the WAGON with them. Scene 6: The Angels Visit Shepherds NARRATOR There were shepherds living out in the fields nearby. A group of SHEPHERDS enter from the side of the stage. NARRATOR They were looking after their sheep. A group of children dressed as SHEEP enter from the side of the stage wearing SHEEP HATS and sit down, scattered near the center. NARRATOR It was night. The SHEEP yawn and stretch. The SHEPHERDS run to the side of the stage and grab blankets and pillows. The SHEPHERDS proceed to tuck each of the sheep in by laying then down on the floor, placing a pillow under their heads, and pulling a blanket over them. When the SHEPHERDS are finished, they sit down on or near the RECTANGULAR BOX . NARRATOR An angel of the Lord appeared to them. ANGEL 3 jumps out from the side of the stage with their hands up and stands near the SHEPHERDS. NARRATOR And the glory of the Lord shone around them and they were terrified. The SHEPHERDS kneel and cower in fear, hiding behind the RECTANGULAR BOX. NARRATOR But the angel said to them... ANGEL 3 (Holding out a hand) Do not be afraid. I bring you good news of great joy. PARENT NARRATOR It is for all the people. The ANGEL gestures out toward the audience. PARENT NARRATOR Today in the town of David a Savior has been born to you. He is Christ the Lord. The ANGEL makes the baseball “Safe!” sign with their arms. PARENT NARRATOR Here is how you will know I am telling you the truth. You will find a baby wrapped in strips of cloth... The ANGEL grabs the BABY SIGN from the back of the stage, holds it up for the audience to see, and hands it to one of the SHEPHERDS, who holds it in their hand. PARENT NARRATOR And lying in a manger. The ANGEL grabs the MANGER SIGN from the back of the stage, holds it up for the audience to see, and hands it to one of the SHEPHERDS, who holds it in their hand. NARRATOR Suddenly a large group of angels from heaven also appeared. ANGEL 1 and ANGEL 2 run on stage and stand next to ANGEL 1. NARRATOR They were praising God. They said... ANGELS 1, 2 AND 3 (Raising their hands to the sky) Glory to God in heaven! PARENT NARRATOR And may peace be given to those he is pleased with on earth! NARRATOR The angels left and went into heaven. The ANGELS exit to the side of the stage. NARRATOR Then the shepherds said to one another... SHEPHERDS Let's go to Bethlehem. PARENT NARRATOR Let's see this thing that has happened, which the Lord has told us about." NARRATOR So they hurried off... The SHEPHERDS and all of the SHEEP exit to the right of the stage. NARRATOR They found Mary and Joseph and the baby. MARY and JOSEPH enter from the side of the stage and sit on the RECTANGULAR BOX. NARRATOR The baby was lying in the manger. The SHEPHERDS enter from the side of the stage and kneel around the manger. NARRATOR After the shepherds had seen him, they told everyone. They reported what the angel had said about this child. The SHEPHERDS run all over into the audience, going to various people, putting their hands on their shoulders and saying, “Jesus is born!” After 30 seconds of this, they run to the back of the auditorium and wait. NARRATOR Everyone who heard it were amazed at what the shepherds said to them. (Pauses) I said, everyone who heard it were amazed at what the shepherds said to them. (Gestures to the congregation) CONGREGATION Oooooh! Aaaaaah! NARRATOR But Mary kept all these things like a secret treasure in her heart. MARY picks up the BABY and walks off the side of the stage, looking up contemplatively. JOSEPH exits to the side of the stage after her. NARRATOR She thought about them over and over. NARRATOR The shepherds returned. The SHEPHERDS run from the back on the auditorium and onto the stage. NARRATOR They gave glory and praise to God. The SHEPHERDS to a brief, silly dance of celebration. NARRATOR Everything they had seen and heard was just as they had been told. The SHEPHERDS exit to the side of the stage. THE END

Tagalo

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Última actualización: 2014-12-27
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Inglés

sorry i haven't written for a while, but i've just got back from a weeks holiday in Buenos Aires. we stayed in one of the city's best hotels on the Plaza de Mayo, right in the hurt of the city. it was ideal to sightseeing and shoping. Buenos Aires is an amazing place. it's the larger city in the Argentina, veryu modern and exciting, but relaxing and cultured at the same time. did you knew it has the world's widest street? there's plenty to do there, too. we spent more of our time shopping and visiting the main sight, like the 'Casa Rosada' - it is one of the more beautiful buildings i've ever seen! unfortunately, i had mishap on the last day. while i was shopping, my passport i lost. as you can imagine, i was realy upset, but when i went to police station to report it, some kind person already had handed it in. what relief! well, all my news is that. hope you are ok. see you soon. yours sincerely, Barry

Tagalo

correct grammar on translations

Última actualización: 2014-12-15
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