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get well soon?

अच्छी तरह से जल्दी ठीक हो?

Last Update: 2014-09-03
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:
Reference: Anonymous

Tube well

नलकूप

Last Update: 2014-10-07
Usage Frequency: 6
Quality:
Reference: Wikipedia

come soon

jaldi

Last Update: 2014-10-05
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:
Reference: Anonymous

when i get scold

यू डांटा मिल अभ्यस्त

Last Update: 2014-07-02
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:
Reference: Anonymous

Wells
http://aims.fao.org/standards/agrovoc

कूप या कुआँ
http://aims.fao.org/standards/agrovoc

Last Update: 2013-06-12
Subject: Agriculture and Farming
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:
Reference: fao.org

crow's nest get destroyed

क्रो के घोंसले नष्ट हो

Last Update: 2014-06-15
Subject: Forestry
Usage Frequency: 3
Quality:
Reference: Anonymous

Get up early in the morning

हिंदी में अच्छी आदतें

Last Update: 2014-09-12
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:
Reference: Anonymous

i'll try it soon as soon

मैं इसे जल्द से जल्द कोशिश करूँगा

Last Update: 2014-01-14
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:
Reference: Anonymous

i get up at 8 am in morning

nagta-type buong pangungusap sa iyong langage

Last Update: 2014-09-20
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:
Reference: Anonymous

i didn't get my access card

मैं तुम्हें नहीं मिला

Last Update: 2014-08-12
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:
Reference: Anonymous

let's get to know each other better

आप महिलाओं के लिए फूल पेश करते हैं

Last Update: 2014-10-02
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:
Reference: Anonymous

get up early in the morning

हिंदी में बच्चों के लिए अच्छी आदतें वाक्य

Last Update: 2014-09-12
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:
Reference: Anonymous

the lion saw another lion that its reflection , jumped into the well and died away

एक और शेर कि अपने प्रतिबिंब, अच्छी तरह से में कूद गए और दूर मर गया शेर देखा था

Last Update: 2013-07-29
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:
Reference: Anonymous
Warning: Contains invisible HTML formatting

Murlidhar Devidas Amte, popularly known as ‘Baba Amte’ (‘baba’ is a honorific and his last name is pronounced as Am’tay) was born on December 1914 in Vidharbha, Maharashtra, India in a wealthy family. Educated with a law degree, he setup a successful practice in Warora, and was leading a very prosperous life. One one rainy day, he saw a leper on the street getting drenched in rain and left helpless. Baba Amte thought to himself – ‘What would have happened if I was in his position?‘ This little incident was enough to cause a paradigm shift in his perception of society. The well educated rich professional simply quit his practice and decided to dedicate his life to the cause of social justice. Leprosy was/is probably the most damned disease in India. Plenty of myths and orthodox beliefs existed around leprosy patients. As a result, they were (and still are to some extent) subjected to severe social boycott and condemnation. Baba Amte devoted his life for the cause of the leprosy affected, even allowing his body to be used for medical experiments. With 14 Rupees, two cows and a makeshift building, Baba Amte and his wife established a community project at Anandwan (आनंद वन abode of happiness) near the woods of Nagpur, Maharashtra, central India. Today Anandvan is recognised all over the world and has led the crusade for dispelling prejudice against leprosy in India. It has a sprawling campus of 180 hectors and runs a budget of millions of Rupees. Thousands of patients live in this colony.

essay

Last Update: 2014-10-07
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:
Reference: Anonymous

Last week, an IITian committed suicide. People who commit suicide do it when they feel there’s no future. But wait, isn’t IIT the one place where a bright and shining future is a foregone conclusion? It just doesn’t add up, does it? Why would a young, hardworking, bright student who has the world ahead of him do something like this? But the answer is this-in our constant reverence for the great institution (and I do believe IITs are great), we forget the dark side. And the dark side is that the IITs are afflicted by the quintessential Indian phenomenon of academic pressure, probably the highest in the world. I can rant about the educational system and how it requires serious fixing, or I can address the immediate-try my best to prevent such suicides. For this column I have chosen the latter, and I do so with a personal story. News of a suicide always brings back one particular childhood memory. I was 14 years old when I first seriously contemplated suicide. I had done badly in chemistry in the Class X half yearly exam. I was an IIT aspirant, and 68% was nowhere near what an IIT candidate should be getting. I don’t know what had made me screw up the exam, but I did know this, I was going to kill myself. The only debate was about method. Ironically, chemistry offered a way. I had read about copper sulphate, and that it was both cheap and poisonous. Copper sulphate was available at the kirana store. I had it all worked out. My rationale for killing myself was simple-nobody loved me, my chemistry score was awful, I had no future and what difference would it make to the world if I was not there. I bought the copper sulphate for two rupees-probably the cheapest exit strategy in the world. I didn’t do it for two reasons. One, I had a casual chat with the aunty next door about copper sulphate, and my knowledgeable aunty knew about a woman who had died that way. She said it was the most painful death possible, all your veins burst and you suffer for hours. This tale made my insides shudder. Second, on the day I was to do it, I noticed a street dog outside my house being teased by the neighborhood kids as he hunted for scraps of food. Nobody loved him. It would make no difference to the world if the dog wasn’t there. And I was pretty sure that its chemistry score would be awful. Yet, the dog wasn’t trotting off to the kirana store. He was only interested in figuring out a strategy for his next meal. And when he was full, he merely curled up in a corner with one eye open, clearly content and not giving a damn about the world. If he wasn’t planning to die anytime soon what the hell was I ranting about? I threw the copper sulphate in the bin. It was the best two bucks I ever wasted. So why did I tell you this story? Because sometimes the pressure gets too much; like it did for the IITian who couldn’t take it no more. On the day he took that dreadful decision, his family and friends were shattered, and India lost a wonderful, bright child. And as the silly but true copper sulphate story tells you-it could happen to any of us or those around us. So please be on the lookout, if you see a distressed young soul, lend a supportive, non-judgmental ear. When I look back, I thank that aunt and that dog for unwittingly saving my life. If God wanted us to take our own life, he would have provided a power off button. He didn’t, so have faith and let his plan for you unfold. Because no matter how tough life gets and how much it hurts, if street dogs don’t give up, there is no reason why we, the smart species, should. Makes sense right?

अनुवाद

Last Update: 2014-10-02
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:
Reference: Wikipedia

Murlidhar Devidas Amte, popularly known as ‘Baba Amte’ (‘baba’ is a honorific and his last name is pronounced as Am’tay) was born on December 1914 in Vidharbha, Maharashtra, India in a wealthy family. Educated with a law degree, he setup a successful practice in Warora, and was leading a very prosperous life. One one rainy day, he saw a leper on the street getting drenched in rain and left helpless. Baba Amte thought to himself – ‘What would have happened if I was in his position?‘ This little incident was enough to cause a paradigm shift in his perception of society. The well educated rich professional simply quit his practice and decided to dedicate his life to the cause of social justice. Leprosy was/is probably the most damned disease in India. Plenty of myths and orthodox beliefs existed around leprosy patients. As a result, they were (and still are to some extent) subjected to severe social boycott and condemnation. Baba Amte devoted his life for the cause of the leprosy affected, even allowing his body to be used for medical experiments. With 14 Rupees, two cows and a makeshift building, Baba Amte and his wife established a community project at Anandwan (आनंद वन abode of happiness) near the woods of Nagpur, Maharashtra, central India. Today Anandvan is recognised all over the world and has led the crusade for dispelling prejudice against leprosy in India. It has a sprawling campus of 180 hectors and runs a budget of millions of Rupees. Thousands of patients live in this colony.

बाबा आम्टे के बारे में मराठी निबंध

Last Update: 2014-09-30
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:
Reference: Anonymous

Rainbow appears in the sky at the end of the rain. It is a long and wide band of seven colours. It forms a semi­circle going from one end of the earth to the other. Scientists say that when sunlight passes through a thin medium to a denser medium, all the seven colours which are present in the white light form a semi-circular rainbow. The seven colours are violet, indigo, blue, green, yellow, orange and red. People believe that if a rainbow appears after the rain, it is an indication that there will be no more rains. In Hindi, rainbow is called 'Indra Dhanush' which means the Bow of Lord Indra. According to Hindu mythology Lord Indra is the god of rain. The rainbow looks miraculously beautiful. Its sight is very soothing to the eye. Small children get very excited when they see a rainbow.

इंद्रधनुष के बारे में 5 की सजा

Last Update: 2014-09-27
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:
Reference: Anonymous

Last week, an IITian committed suicide. People who commit suicide do it when they feel there’s no future. But wait, isn’t IIT the one place where a bright and shining future is a foregone conclusion? It just doesn’t add up, does it? Why would a young, hardworking, bright student who has the world ahead of him do something like this? But the answer is this-in our constant reverence for the great institution (and I do believe IITs are great), we forget the dark side. And the dark side is that the IITs are afflicted by the quintessential Indian phenomenon of academic pressure, probably the highest in the world. I can rant about the educational system and how it requires serious fixing, or I can address the immediate-try my best to prevent such suicides. For this column I have chosen the latter, and I do so with a personal story. News of a suicide always brings back one particular childhood memory. I was 14 years old when I first seriously contemplated suicide. I had done badly in chemistry in the Class X half yearly exam. I was an IIT aspirant, and 68% was nowhere near what an IIT candidate should be getting. I don’t know what had made me screw up the exam, but I did know this, I was going to kill myself. The only debate was about method. Ironically, chemistry offered a way. I had read about copper sulphate, and that it was both cheap and poisonous. Copper sulphate was available at the kirana store. I had it all worked out. My rationale for killing myself was simple-nobody loved me, my chemistry score was awful, I had no future and what difference would it make to the world if I was not there. I bought the copper sulphate for two rupees-probably the cheapest exit strategy in the world. I didn’t do it for two reasons. One, I had a casual chat with the aunty next door about copper sulphate, and my knowledgeable aunty knew about a woman who had died that way. She said it was the most painful death possible, all your veins burst and you suffer for hours. This tale made my insides shudder. Second, on the day I was to do it, I noticed a street dog outside my house being teased by the neighborhood kids as he hunted for scraps of food. Nobody loved him. It would make no difference to the world if the dog wasn’t there. And I was pretty sure that its chemistry score would be awful. Yet, the dog wasn’t trotting off to the kirana store. He was only interested in figuring out a strategy for his next meal. And when he was full, he merely curled up in a corner with one eye open, clearly content and not giving a damn about the world. If he wasn’t planning to die anytime soon what the hell was I ranting about? I threw the copper sulphate in the bin. It was the best two bucks I ever wasted. So why did I tell you this story? Because sometimes the pressure gets too much; like it did for the IITian who couldn’t take it no more. On the day he took that dreadful decision, his family and friends were shattered, and India lost a wonderful, bright child. And as the silly but true copper sulphate story tells you-it could happen to any of us or those around us. So please be on the lookout, if you see a distressed young soul, lend a supportive, non-judgmental ear. When I look back, I thank that aunt and that dog for unwittingly saving my life. If God wanted us to take our own life, he would have provided a power off button. He didn’t, so have faith and let his plan for you unfold. Because no matter how tough life gets and how much it hurts, if street dogs don’t give up, there is no reason why we, the smart species, should. Makes sense right?

details

Last Update: 2014-09-24
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:
Reference: Anonymous

In today’s perspective, literacy does not mean about the writing and reading capabilities only. It has gained a broader meaning. It claims to guide people towards awareness and the change which is needed in order to achieve a better way of living. The National Literacy Mission was set up by Govt. of India on May 5th, 1988 with the aim to eradicate illiteracy from the country. The targeted group for the same was people belonging to the age group of 15 to 35 years. The literacy rate of India has been recorded 64.84% (2001 census) against 52.21% in 1991. It has been increased by more than 12% in a decade. Also, the literacy rate is supposed to be around 70-72% by the end of 2010 (As estimated by National Sample Survey). But the goal is yet to be achieved completely (i.e. to obtain 100% literacy). Right to education is one of the fundamental rights for the people. Education for all is the mission of UNESCO that has to be achieved by 2015. Currently, India falls below the threshold level of literacy rate i.e.75%. The National Literacy Mission Authority has been working to achieve its goal since its establishment. NLMA (National Literacy Mission Authority) works under the ministry of Human Resource & Development. The Govt. of India has launched several schemes to achieve the goals of NLM. The initial target for NLM was to focus on the people belonging to the age group of 15 to 25 years. There were 80 million people falling under this age group. It was a big challenge to address such a huge lot of people about literacy and its benefits. In a way, it was quite different from all technology based or economic missions. It was conceived as a social mission by all and that helped NLM to achieve the success. The other significant factor was the political will of leaders at different levels at that time. The politicians and bureaucrats understood the importance of this mission and it has gained a whole hearted success in several states viz. Kerala, Tamilnadu, Rajasthan, Manipur etc. The idea was to convince people about their active participation, mobilization of social forces. Soon it became a national consensus. Thanks to the advertisements, sensitization of local leaders and people’s participation. Given below are some of the pioneers of success for National Literacy Mission: Literacy campaigns have been launched in almost 600 districts of India.

पेड़ों के महत्व के बारे में हिंदी निबंध

Last Update: 2014-09-24
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:
Reference: Anonymous
Warning: Contains invisible HTML formatting

It requires companies to implement adequate procedures to ensure that its employees, as well as third party agents and contractors don't pay bribes on its behalf.

इसकी आवश्यकता है कि कंपनियाँ यह सुनिश्चित करने के लिए पर्याप्त कार्यविधियाँ स्थापित करें कि उसके कर्मचारियों के साथ ही तीसरे पक्ष के एजेंट और ठेकेदार उनकी ओर से रिश्वत न दें।

Last Update: 2014-09-20
Subject: Unknown
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:
Reference: santosh.1743

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