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ete Indonesia to English

Penelitian ini dilatar belakangi oleh rendahnya hasil belajar dan kurangnya aktivitas di dalam pembelajaran matematika dikelas VIII SMP Negeri 2 Seputih Banyak. hal ini disebabkan oleh kurangnya partisipasi dan keaktifan siswa dalam pembelajaran. Penelitian ini dilakukan terhadap dua kelas sampel yang diberikan perlakuan yang berbeda. Data penelitian diperoleh dengan memberikan test kepada kedua kelas sampel. Dari Hasil penelitian rata-rata hasil belajar yang diperoleh kelas yang menggunakan pembelajaran metode Collabotative Learning adalah 79,06. Dan rata-rata hasil belajar yang diperoleh kelas yang menggunakan pembelajaran metode Ekspositori adalah 65,82. Dari hasil penelitian dapat disimpulkan bahwa hasil belajar matematika siswa yang menggunkan pembelajran metode Collaborative Learning lebih tinggi dari pada hasil belajar siswa yang menggunakan pembelajaran Ekspositori.

Last Update: 2014-10-28
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google perjemahan Indonesia to english

apa

Last Update: 2014-10-31
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google translete Indonesia to English

WARTAWAN

Last Update: 2014-10-31
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google translete Indonesia to English

Kura-kura dan Sepasang Itik

Last Update: 2014-10-22
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Indonesia

Mah mungkin terlalu banyak ke salahan caca yng udah caca lakuin sama mamah caca minta maaf sama mamah tetap semangat mah semua ini pasti aka berakhir bahagia jangan lupa terus berdoa sama allah caca sayang sama mamah caca kangen mamah

Last Update: 2014-10-30
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indonesia

Find your yahoo I'd Enter your email or mobile number

Last Update: 2014-10-25
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english

The Evolving Information Systems Strategy 35 3 The focus of the DP planning and control activity (moving from a primarily internal focus in the first three stages to an external focus in the latter stages), and 4 The level of user awareness [moving from a primarily reactive stance (reactive, that is, to centralized DP initiatives) in the first two stages, to being a driving force for change in the middle stages, through to a partnership in maturity]. Nolan argues that the information systems management focus is very much concerned with technology per se during the earlier stages of growth, with a transformation point occurring at the completion of stage three, after which the focus is on managing the organization’s data resources, utilizing database technology and methods. As indicated earlier, the model has been criticized because it has not proved possible to substantiate its claims to represent reality, either as a means to describe the phases through which organizations pass when utilizing IT, or as a predictor of change (Benbasat et al., 1984; King and Kraemer, 1984). In addition, its focus on database technology clearly dates the model. Earl (1989), for example, argues that organizations will pass through a number of different learning curves with respect to different ITs, as illustrated in Figure 2.3. In addition, it is now clear that different parts of a single organization may well be at different stages of growth with respect to a particular IT. Figure 2.2 Nolan’s six-stage growth model (amended from Nolan, 1979) 36 Strategic Information Management The Earl model Unlike Nolan’s model, Earl’s concentrates attention on the stages through which organizations pass in planning their information systems. First described in 1983 (Earl, 1983), the model has been revised on a number of occasions (Earl, 1986, 1988, 1989). The version presented here is based on the two earlier versions, as amended by Galliers (1987a, 1989), bearing in mind Earl’s own subsequent changes. As can be seen from Table 2.1, Earl illustrates the changing agenda for information systems planning by concentrating attention on what is seen as the primary task of the process: its major objective, the driving forces of the planning process (in terms of those involved), the methodological emphasis, and the context within which the planning takes place. Following research on current information systems planning practice, Galliers adds to this a supplementary early stage of planning (which is essentially ad hoc in nature) and an additional factor, concerning the focus of the planning effort. In the latter context, he argues that the focus has tended to change over the years from a predominantly isolated, Information Systems function orientation, through an organizational focus, to a competitive, environmental focus. Earl’s argument is essentially that organizations begin their planning efforts by the first attempting to assess the current ‘state of play’ with respect to information systems coverage and IT utilization. Increasingly, the focus shifts Figure 2.3 Multiple learning curves (amended from Earl, 1989, p.31) Table 2.1 Earl’s planning in stages model (amended from Earl, 1986, 1988, 1989) and Galliers (1987a, 1989) Factor Stages I II III IV V VI Task Meeting demands IS/IT audit Business support Detailed planning Strategic advantage Business-IT strategy linkage Objective Provide service Limit demand Agree priorities Balance IS portfolio Pursue opportunities Integrate strategies Driving force IS reaction IS led Senior management led User/IS partnership IS/executive led; user involvement Strategic coalitions Methological emphasis Ad hoc Bottom-up survey Top-down analysis Two-way prototyping Environmental scanning Multiple methods Context User/IS inexperience Inadequate IS resources Inadequate business/IS plans Complexity apparent IS for competitive advantage Maturity, collaboration Focus IS department Organization-wide Environment 38 Strategic Information Management to management concern for a stronger linkage with business objectives. Finally, the orientation shifts to a strategic focus, with a balance being maintained in relation to the make-up of planning teams (between information systems staff, management and users), environmental and organizational information (with the likelihood of inter-organizational systems being developed, cf. Cash and Konsynski, 1985), and the range of approaches adopted (with multiple methods being accepted). The Bhabuta model Based on earlier work by Gluck et al. (1980), which proposes a four-stage process of evolution towards strategic planning, and a somewhat similar model of IT assimilation and diffusion postulated by McFarlan et al. (1982, 1983), Bhabuta (1988) developed a model which attempts to map the progress towards formal strategic planning of information systems. This is illustrated in Table 2.2. Underpinning Bhabuta’s argument is the contention that strategies based on productivity improvement (and the information systems needed to support them) ‘will become the dominant paradigm in the turbulent and fiercely competitive markets of the next decade’ (Bhabuta, 1988, p.1.72). His model is more widely focused than either the Nolan or Earl models, in that it attempts to bring together elements of, for example, strategy formulation, information systems, and the mechanisms by which the information systems function is managed. The value systems associated with each phase of the model are also identified (cf. Ackoff, 1981). In interpreting the Bhabuta model, it should be noted that the categories used are not distinct nor absolute. With the maturing of IT utilization, and managerial sophistication with respect to IT, it can be expected that some of the attributes associated with, for example, Phase 3 and 4 organizations will emerge within Phase 1 and 2 organizations. This point takes account of some of the criticism of the Nolan model (Benbasat et al., 1984), which is itself based on earlier work by Greiner (1972), regarding the discontinuities that organizations experience in growth. The Hirschheim et al. model The Hirschheim et al. (1988) model also builds on the earlier work of Nolan (1979) and arises from research, undertaken during the first half of 1986, into the evolution and management of the IT function in a number of British organizations. As a result of this research. Hirschheim and his colleagues contend that in companies where top management had begun to realize that information systems are vital to their business, organizations move through three evolutionary phases in their management of the IS/IT function. The three Table 2.2 Bhabuta’s model linking the evaluation of strategic planning with information systems and the organization of the information systems function (amended from Bhabuta, 1988, p.1.76; Sutherland and Galliers, 1989, p.10) Phase 1 Phase 2 Phase 3 Phase 4 Evolutionary phases of strategic planning Basic financial planning Forecast-based planning Externally oriented planning Strategic management Value System Meet the budget Predict the future Think strategically Create the future Competitive strategy mechanisms Operational level productivity and diffuse innovation Focused (niche) innovation and operational/tactical level productivity Focused innovation and strategic productivity (quality focus) Systemic innovation and productivity Led by Top management Top and senior management Entrepreneurial managers (top/senior/middle) Corporate-wide employees Application of IT/IS Resource management Efficient operations Transaction processing Exception monitoring Planning and analysis Effectiveness of divisional operations IT infrastructure Support key division makers IT-based products and services Communications network Direct competitive tool Inter-organizational IS (link buyers, suppliers, manufacturers, consumers). Facilitate organizational learning Formalized IS and decision making Processing of internal data Ad hoc processing of external data Systematic external data analysis Link tactical/operational activities to external data analysis Management of IT, location in hierarchy and scope Technology management Individual projects Middle management responsibility Formal planning of IS Data sharing and administration Focus on IT infusion Senior management responsibility Couple IT and business planning IT planning at SBU/ corporate level Senior/Top management responsibility Systemic support of organizational processes IT planning at SBU/ portfolio level Top management responsibility 40 Strategic Information Management phases are labelled ‘delivery’, ‘reorientation’ and ‘reorganization’ (see also Earl, 1989, p.197). The ‘delivery’ phase is characterized by top management concern about the ability of the IS/IT function to ‘deliver the goods’. Senior executives have begun to take the subject very seriously, but there is often dissatisfaction with the quality of the available information systems and the efficiency of the IS/IT function, together with mounting concern regarding IT expenditure and the consistency of hardware and infrastructure policies. It would appear that often this phase is initiated by replacing the DP manager with an external recruit with a good track record and substantial computing experience. The emphasis in this phase is on the ‘delivery’ of information systems and, accordingly, the newly appointed IS executive spends most of the time on matters internal to the IS department. The primary role is to restore credibility to the function and/or to create confidence in user/top management that the function really is supporting current needs and is run efficiently. During this phase, IS education is sparse, but where it is provided, it is targeted on DP personnel with a view to improving skills, techniques and project management. In the ‘reorientation’ phase, top management (or the Director ultimately responsible for IS) changes the focus of attention from the delivery of basic IS services to the exploitation of IT for competitive advantage. An attempt is made to align IS/IT investment with business strategy. In short, it is in this ‘reorientation’ phase that ‘the business is put into computing’. With this change of direction/emphasis, it is common to appoint an IS executive over the DP Manager. The new post is filled, typically, by an insider: a senior executive who has run a business unit or been active in a corporate role, such as marketing or strategy formulation. They are likely to have only limited experience of DP, but are respected by top management for an ability to bring about change. The focus during this second phase is on the marketplace; on the external environment of the enterprise; on using IT for competitive advantage, and in extending the value chain through inter-organizational systems (cf. Cash and Konsynski, 1985). In the ‘reorganization’ phase, the senior IS executive (by now the IT Director) is concerned with managing the interfaces or relationships between the IS function and the rest of the organization. Some areas will be strategically dependent on IS, others will be looking to IS more in a support role. Some will have significant IT capability, particularly with the advance of end-user computing, and some business executives will be driving IT and IS development. Increasingly IS will be managed along ‘federal’ lines (Edwards et al., 1989) with IS capability in the centre and in business units/functions. These changed and changing relationships require careful management and often ‘reorganization’, and once again attention is focused on internal (organizational), as opposed to external (marketplace), concerns. The Evolving Information Systems Strategy 41 The concerns and considerations associated with each of the phases of the Hirschheim et al. model are summarized in Table 2.3. Towards a revised ‘stages of growth’ model The major inadequacies of the early Nolan models relate to their lack of organizational and management focus, and the overly simplistic and subjective assumptions on which they were based. More importantly, they provided little help for the beleaguered DP manager attempting to create a successful IS function within the organization. This, as has been demonstrated, has been remedied in part by the subsequent work of Earl, Bhabuta and Hirschheim et al. In all but the latter case, however, the models described how an organization could place itself within a particular stage of IT planning maturity, rather than describing what is needed to be done in order to progress through to the more mature stages of growth. The models that have been discussed thus far describe elements (technical, managerial and organizational) in the growth of ‘computing’ within an organization. Were these to be arranged and combined with a structure describing the important elements of an organization generally, then a model depicting the kinds of activities and organizational structures needed for an enterprise to move through IT growth stages (a more comprehensive and useful model) would result. Such a model, dealing as it would with the growing maturity in the management and use of IT in an organization, would indicate how an organization might develop its use of the technology and its organization of the IS function. However, a means has to be found of bringing together a range of key elements associated with the operation and management of an organization generally in order that the revised model could be developed. Table 2.3 The Hirschheim et al. model of changing considerations towards information systems management (amended from Hirschheim et al., 1988, p.4.33; Sutherland and Galliers, 1989, p.11) Phase/factor Delivery Reorientation Reorganization IS executive External IS recruit Inside business Same person Management focus Within IS/DP Into the business The interfaces Education needs Credibility Strategy Relationship CEO posture Concerned Visionary/champion Involved Leadership The board The function Coalition 42 Strategic Information Management After some considerable literature searching, the so-called Seven ‘S’s used by McKinsey & Company in their management consultancy (Pascale and Athos, 1981) were used to assist in the development of the model. The Seven ‘S’s used in analysis of organizational processes and management are summarized in Table 2.4. Research method As a first step, the elements of each of the Seven ‘Ss’ were considered in the context of each stage in the growth of IT utilization and management, according to the models described. In other words, a description of each of the ‘S’ elements was attempted in terms of the IT function and the provision of IT services generally, rather than the organization overall. Following a description of each of the ‘S’ elements in each stage of the model, an indication of what might be done to move into the next stage of the model can be provided. These indicators are based on what constitutes the Seven ‘S’s in the next stage. Having produced a tentative model, it was then applied to four Perth-based organizations, and amendments made. The approach was to interview four or five senior executives from different areas in each of the organizations studied. These executives were, typically: Table 2.4 The Seven ‘S’s (Pascale and Athos, 1981, p.81) Strategy Plan or course of action leading to the allocation of a firm’s scarce resources, over time, to reach identified goals Structure Characterization of the organization chart (i.e. functional, decentralized, etc.) Systems Procedural reports and routine processes such as meeting formats Staff ‘Demographic’ description of important personnel categories within the firm (i.e. engineers, entrepreneurs, MBAs, etc.). ‘Staff’ is not meant in line-staff terms Style Characterization of how key managers behave in achieving the organization’s goals; also the cultural style of the organization Skills Distinctive capabilities of key personnel or the firm as a whole Superordinate goals The significant meanings or guiding concepts that an organization imbues in its members. Superordinate goals can be also described as the shared values or culture of the organization The Evolving Information Systems Strategy 43 (a) the Chief Executive Officer, or the Deputy (b) the Head of a Strategic Business Unit (SBU) (c) the IT Director, or Head of the IS function (d) the Head of Corporate Planning, or equivalent. In some instances, for example, where the particular circumstances warranted broader coverage, more than one SBU head was interviewed. The interviews focused on the experiences of each organization in planning, managing and utilizing IT, and on their preparedness to utilize IT strategically. As a result of these interviews, the tentative model was continually refined and each organization eventually assessed in the context of the revised model. As a result of this assessment, conclusions were drawn as to what steps each organization might take (in relation to each of the Seven ‘S’s) in order to move on to later growth stages. Since then, the model has been ‘tested’ by numerous participants at conferences and short courses, and by clients both in the UK and Australia. As a result it has been further refined. Revised stages of growth model The growth in IT maturity in an organization can be represented as six stages, each with its particular set of conditions associated with the Seven ‘S’s. These stages are described in Table 2.5. The following sections describe each of the stages in the model in detail, using each of the Seven ‘S’s as a basis for the description. Each of the elements constitute an important aspect of how the IT function within the organization might operate at different stages of growth. The stages described are not intended to include any overt (nor covert) negative overtones associated with the early stages of the model. Some of the descriptions may Table 2.5 Stages of IT growth in organizations (Sutherland and Galliers, 1989, p.14) Stage Description One ‘Ad Hocracy’ Two

Last Update: 2014-10-25
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Indonesia

Saya berharap semoga

Last Update: 2014-10-22
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English

Tabah sampai akhir

Last Update: 2014-10-15
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nxgx Indonesia

Selamat datang bulAn kelahiran :) semoga lebih baik dari yang sebelumnya :)

Last Update: 2014-10-31
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Indonesia Raya

Aku sayang kamu

Last Update: 2014-10-21
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bahasa indonesia

tiang

Last Update: 2014-10-28
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geogle translate

sejarah pendirian

Last Update: 2014-10-27
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Indonesia to Madura

Api nan tak kunjung padam pada " DHANGKA " memiliki latar belakang kisah dari suatu legenda " KI MOKO ". Konon kira-kira pada abad XVI sekitar tahun 1605 saka atau tahun 1683 Masehi hiduplah seorang pengelana penyebar agama Islam yang memiliki kesaktian yang bernama KI MOKO dengan nama aslinya R. WIGNYO KENONGO. Di tengah-tengah hutan yang tandus dimana dia bertempat tinggal, KI MOKO yang pekerjaannya sehari-hari mencari ikan di laut, berhasil menciptakan sumber-sumber kebutuhan hidup yang diupayakan guna memenuhi kebutuhan yang mendesak yaitu pada saat ia harus menyambut atau menjamu tamu dari kerajaan dalam rangka perayaan pernikahan dirinya dengan putri raja. Kisah ini bermula ketika KI MOKO mendengar berita bahwa Raja Kerajaan Palembang sedang dirundung kesedihan karena seorang putrinya tengah menderita sakit yang tak kunjung sembuh, meski telah banyak tabib yang mengobatinya. Pada kesempatan itu KI MOKO terpanggil untuk mencoba membantu mengobati penderitaan putri raja KI MOKO mempersembahkan sesuatu kepada Sang raja berupa tabung-tabung bambu yang penuh berbagai mata ikan dan dikirimkan melalui utusan, menerima persembahan dari KI MOKO Raja sangat terkejut karena barang yang semula dianggap kurang berharga menjelma menjadi barang berharga berupa Permata Intan dan Berlian. Sang raja sangat terkeut dan gembira begitu pula Sang Putri yang pada akhinya membuat ia sembuh dari sakitnya. Melihat kejadian ini Sang Raja merasa berhutang budi kepada KI MOKO dan sesuai janjinya Sang Raja menganugerahkan hadiah berupa sebuah peti kepada KI MOKO dan dikirim melalui utusan, setelah peti tersebut sampai ke tangan KI MOKO dan dibukanya ternyata dari dalamnya terjelma seorang Putri yang amat cantik jelita, itulah SITI SUMENTEN Putri Raja yang sengaja dianugerahkan kepada KI MOKO untuk dijadikan istri, menghadapi kenyataan ini KI MOKO sangat masqul dan gembira hatinya. Namun kegembiraan itu sejenak berubah menjadi rasa risau karena kebersamaan dengan itu pula tersirat suatu berita bahwa tak lama lagi rombongan dari Kerajaan akan segera datang ke tempat kediaman KI MOKO untuk melangsungkan perayaan pernikahan. Kerisauan KI MOKO disebabkan karena tempat kediaman serta segala kebutuhan perayaan sangat tidak memungkinkan. Namun kerisauan tersebut akhirnya sirna setelah KI MOKO memusatkan batin melalui semedinya untuk memohon pertolongan kepada Tuhan Yang Maha Kuasa. Dengan menancapkan tongkat saktinya berdirilah bangunan istana yang sangat megah ( bangunan tersebut sirna setelah kegiatan perayaan selesai ). Demikian pula untuk memenuhi kebutuhan yang lain seperti kebutuhan sumber air dan seterusnya dengan cara yang sama KI MOKO menancapkan tongkatnya pada tanah. Pada saat itulah tercipta sumber air yang akhirnya menjadi sebuah telaga serta pancaran kobaran api yang senantiasa menyala dan akan berguna untuk kebutuhan manusia. Dengan demikian puaslah hati KI MOKO dan pelaksanaan pesta pernikahan dapat berjalan dengan lancar. Sampai saat ini, semburan api alam tersebut masih tetap abadi hingga dikenal dengan istilah " API NAN TAK KUNJUNG PADAM " "DHANGKA". Dhangka artinya rumah tempat kediaman / Istana yang kemudian sirna yang lokasinya terdapat di dusun Asem manis II Desa Larangan Tokol, Kec. Tlanakan, Kab. Pamekasan. Sedangkan Patilasan / makam KI MOKO terletak di dusun Palanggaran Desa Branta Tinggi Kecamatan Tlanakan Kab. Pamekasan yang sampai saat ini oleh masyarakat sekitar masih dikeramatkan. Untuk merawat / menjaga sumber api dan sumber air tersebut, maka KI MOKO mengutus Ki Rahma dan Nyi Rahma ( Buju'Tonggah ) yang artinya sebagai penunggu yang kuburannya / astanya terletak di Pojok Barat Laut Lokasi Api Ala Mini.

Last Update: 2014-11-01
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Indonesia

sepuluh tahun yang akan datang. saya menjadi orang yang sukses dalam bidang perhotelan. mempunyai restoran sendiri dan mempunyai usaha sendiri.Dan berkeluarga, dengan mempunyai dua anak.merawat orang tua dengan kasih sayang, seperti dia merawat dan menjagaku di masa kecil. selalu menyantuni anak-anak yatim dan piatu. mengikuti organisasi di masyarakat.

Last Update: 2014-06-06
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google translation english to Indonesia

The Honorable Juries of the English Speech Contest Teacher , My friends , and all the audiences Good Morning and prosperous greeting to you all First of all,let say thanks to our God , because of God’s blessing we can stand here at this place with good condition without any troubles. And also for my friends , because they are I can stand here. Secondly, I would like to introduce my self . My name is Ferdiyan Fendi Cahyono , But you can call me Ferdiyan. Let me tell you , how pleased I’m to have an opportunity to stand here and deliver a speech in front of you. Today, I would talk about “How Important is English for me and for us”. English is an International Language. Because this language is very universal and used for communicate among people around the world. English is the window to acquire knowledge. As we know, a lot of book, like ensiklopedia, discoveries,and inventions are written and published in English. we will not be separated from the English language, because this language can exist everywhere. like, on the computer, the internet, even in mobilephone. From this statement we can know that english is exactly beneficial for our life. For me , English is very important. Because English allows me to develop and interact as social beings. In this case, developing means to follow the modern era of globalization. And compete for success as a student. And also , in this case the interaction is where we can communicate with the other people around the world. So, Its very important . Do you agreewith me ? I hope so … That’s means English is very important for us There is a saying, “If you can speak English, you will be able to control the world so easily”. However, there are still many people who can not speak english. The main reason is they are lazy to learn english , because it’s not used in their daily lives. Some of Indonesian people may be think that it’s not necessary to be able to master english , because we live in indonesia,we speak indonesian language, and all our families are indonesian people. The others think that english is difficult lesson, so they are reluctant to learn english. But from now, we have to change our mind . Why ? Because we lives in modern era ,we have to compete with the other people. We have to reach our dream. It will be happen if can communicate in english, right ? there so many information we can get from the Internet. Its very useful for us as students. By internet , we can find information about everything to support our school. It will be easier if we know english well. I think that’s all of my speech. We can conclude, that the English is very important. So,learn English is also important.Those are some of the ways that I can suggest for you. If you are interested in one of them or some of them, why don’t you try to do it from now? I believe we can develop our English soon. Well, ladies and gentlemen, thank you for your attention and have a nice day!

Last Update: 2014-10-25
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google terjemahan bahasa daerah lampung

kampang

Last Update: 2014-10-28
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Indonesia translation into English Idioms

pemerkosaan

Last Update: 2012-09-23
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Indonesia translation into English Idioms

Murahan

Last Update: 2012-09-14
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Jangan kita pernah lupakan masa-masa kenangan indah,hidup yang hakiki adalah menghargai,menghormati satu sama lain !Indonesia translation into English Idioms

jaga kondisi

Last Update: 2013-08-18
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