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භාෂාව

Last Update: 2014-06-11
Usage Frequency: 1
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Reference: Wikipedia

Lanka

ලංකාව

Last Update: 2014-06-24
Usage Frequency: 1
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Reference: Wikipedia

Sinhala language

සිංහල භාෂාව

Last Update: 2014-06-23
Usage Frequency: 1
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Reference: Wikipedia

Past, present and future will be arrive tourist in Sri Lanka Indicate this chat

Sigiriya (Lion Rock Sinhala: සීගිරිය, pronounced see-gee-ree-yah) is an ancient palace located in the central Matale District near the town of Dambulla in the Central Province, Sri Lanka. The name refers to a site of historical and archeaological significance that is dominated by a massive column of rock nearly 200 metres (660 ft) high. According to the ancient Sri Lankan chronicle the Culavamsa, the site was selected by King Kasyapa (477 – 495 CE) for his new capital. He built his palace on the top of this rock and decorated its sides with colourful frescoes. On a small plateau about halfway up the side of this rock he built a gateway in the form of an enormous lion. The name of this place is derived from this structure —Sīhāgiri, the Lion Rock. The capital and the royal palace were abandoned after the king's death. It was used as a Buddhist monastery until the 14th century.[1] Sigiriya today is a UNESCO listed World Heritage Site. It is one of the best preserved examples of ancient urban planning.[2] It is the most visited historic site in Sri Lanka.[3]

Last Update: 2014-05-25
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:
Reference: Anonymous

sri

විකිපීඩියා

Last Update: 2013-07-04
Usage Frequency: 1
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Reference: Wikipedia

Sri lank

ශ්‍රී ලංකාව

Last Update: 2013-06-21
Usage Frequency: 1
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Reference: Wikipedia

sri jayawardanapura

sri jayawaradanapura

Last Update: 2013-05-12
Subject: History
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:
Reference: Anonymous

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ගූගල්

Last Update: 2014-06-19
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:
Reference: Wikipedia

A sweet eat from Sri Lnaka

Kokis

Last Update: 2013-10-13
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
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Reference: Anonymous

sri lanakave sthree dushana

sri lanakave sthree dushana

Last Update: 2013-08-18
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The election of office bearers to Sri Lanka’s most powerful health trade union will go ahead as scheduled next week on June 28 amidst a ruling by a court barring one of the contestants. The Colombo District Court on Tuesday issued three enjoining orders which included preventing Dr. Harsha Atapattu from contesting the post of Vice President (VP) of the Government Medical Officers’ Association (GMOA). This came on a petition filed by Dr. Anil Ambawatte and Dr. Thusitha Perera who are contesting two VP positions at the election as part of a group seeking to wrest power from the current incumbents headed by Dr. Anuruddha Padeniya, current President, who is re-contesting.The petitioners said that Dr. Atapattu, part of the Padeniya-led contestants, was not eligible to contest the election by virtue of being a member of another trade union. GMOA rules bar any candidate from being a member of another trade union. Lawyers for the petitioners said they presented documents to court showing that Dr. Atapattu had joined the Association of Medical Specialists (while being a member of the GMOA) and was its Assistant Secretary in 2010.The petitioners didn’t seek a stay order to suspend the poll, but sought enjoining orders, barring one of the respondents (Dr. Atapattu) from contesting and voting at the election and preventing the GMOA Elections Committee from putting forward Dr. Atapattu as a candidate, among others. The court issued enjoining orders on the pleas of the petitioners. The lawyers said that the ex-parte court order was delivered by court fiscal to the GMOA’s Elections Committee on Wednesday. “So far (as of Friday) there has been no challenge to this ruling,” said one of the lawyers for the petitioners. The petition was supported in court by Ikram Mohamed PC with Neomal Senathillake instructed by Sanath Weeratne. Asked to comment, Dr. D.C. Rajapakse of the Elections Committee confirmed to the Sunday Times that the court had issued an enjoining order with regard to one person who is contesting the election. He said, however, the election will be held as scheduled on Saturday, June 28.

paragraph

Last Update: 2014-06-27
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
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Reference: Anonymous

The immediate issue involved the rights of Christians in the Holy Land, which was controlled by the Ottoman Empire.[9] The French promoted the rights of Catholics, while Russia promoted those of the Orthodox. The longer-term causes involved the decline of the Ottoman Empire, and the unwillingness of Britain and France to allow Russia to gain territory and power at Ottoman expense. Russia lost and the Ottomans gained a twenty-year respite from Russian pressure. The Christians were granted a degree of official equality and the Orthodox gained control of the Christian churches in dispute.[10]:415 Russia survived, gained a new appreciation for its religious diversity, and launched a reform program with far-reaching consequences

ගීලී කාර් ආයතනයට මිලදීගෙන අවුරුදු 10ක් සම්පුරණ වී නොමැති බැවින් එම කාර් විකිණීම මුදල් අමාත්‍යංශය විසින් අනුමත කර නොමැත.

Last Update: 2014-06-27
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
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Reference: Anonymous

The immediate issue involved the rights of Christians in the Holy Land, which was controlled by the Ottoman Empire.[9] The French promoted the rights of Catholics, while Russia promoted those of the Orthodox. The longer-term causes involved the decline of the Ottoman Empire, and the unwillingness of Britain and France to allow Russia to gain territory and power at Ottoman expense. Russia lost and the Ottomans gained a twenty-year respite from Russian pressure. The Christians were granted a degree of official equality and the Orthodox gained control of the Christian churches in dispute.[10]:415 Russia survived, gained a new appreciation for its religious diversity, and launched a reform program with far-reaching consequences

paragraph

Last Update: 2014-06-26
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
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Reference: Anonymous

The Sri Lankan Civil War was a conflict fought on the island of Sri Lanka. Beginning on 23 July 1983, there was an intermittent insurgency against the government by the Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam (the LTTE, also known as the Tamil Tigers), an independent militant organisation which fought to create an independent Tamil state called Tamil Eelam in the north and the east of the island. After a 26-year military campaign, the Sri Lankan military defeated the Tamil Tigers in May 2009, bringing the civil war to an end.[1]For over 25 years, the war caused significant hardships for the population, environment and the economy of the country, with an estimated 80,000–100,000 people killed during its course.[14] During the early part of the conflict, the Sri Lankan forces attempted to retake the areas captured by the LTTE. The tactics employed by the Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam against the actions of Government forces resulted in their listing as a terrorist organisation in 32 countries, including the United States, India, Canada and the member nations of the European Union.[17] The Sri Lankan government forces have also been accused of human rights abuses, systematic impunity for serious human rights violations, lack of respect for habeas corpus in arbitrary detentions, and forced disappearances.[18]After two decades of fighting and four failed tries at peace talks, including the unsuccessful deployment of the Indian Army, the Indian Peace Keeping Force from 1987 to 1990, a lasting negotiated settlement to the conflict appeared possible when a cease-fire was declared in December 2001, and a ceasefire agreement signed with international mediation in 2002.[19] However, limited hostilities renewed in late 2005 and the conflict began to escalate until the government launched a number of major military offensives against the LTTE beginning in July 2006, driving the LTTE out of the entire Eastern province of the island. The LTTE then declared they would "resume their freedom struggle to achieve statehood".[20][21]In 2007, the government shifted its offensive to the north of the country, and formally announced its withdrawal from the ceasefire agreement on 2 January 2008, alleging that the LTTE violated the agreement over 10,000 times.[22] Since then, aided by the destruction of a number of large arms smuggling vessels that belonged to the LTTE,[23] and an international crackdown on the funding for the Tamil Tigers, the government took control of the entire area previously controlled by the Tamil Tigers, including their de facto capital Kilinochchi, main military base Mullaitivu and the entire A9 highway,[24] leading the LTTE to finally admit defeat on 17 May 2009.[25] Following the end of the war, the Sri Lankan government claimed Sri Lanka as the first country in the modern world to eradicate terrorism on its own soil.[26] Following the LTTE's defeat, pro-LTTE Tamil National Alliance dropped its demand for a separate state, in favour of a federal solution.[27][28] In May 2010, Mahinda Rajapaksa, the president of Sri Lanka, appointed the Lessons Learnt and Reconciliation Commission (LLRC) to assess the conflict between the time of the ceasefire agreement in 2002 and the defeat of the LTTE in 2009.[29]

Please, specify two different languages

Last Update: 2014-06-23
Subject: Social Science
Usage Frequency: 1
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Reference: Anonymous
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Martin Wickramasinghe, MBE (Sinhala:මාර්ටින් වික්රමසිංහ) (29 May 1890 - 23 July 1976) was a Sri Lankan novelist. His books have been translated into several languages. The search for roots is a central theme in Wickramasinghe's writings on the culture and life of the people of Sri Lanka. His work explored and applied modern knowledge in natural and social sciences, literature, linguistics, the arts, philosophy, education, and Buddhism and comparative religion to reach beyond the superficial emotionalism of vulgar nationalism, and guide Sri Lankan readers to the enduring roots of their common national identity that exists in the folk life and folk culture of Sri Lanka.

google

Last Update: 2014-06-21
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
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Reference: Anonymous

Googel translate

Amma

Last Update: 2014-06-17
Subject: General
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Martin Wickramasinghe, MBE (Sinhala:මාර්ටින් වික්රමසිංහ) (29 May 1890 - 23 July 1976) was a Sri Lankan novelist. His books have been translated into several languages. The search for roots is a central theme in Wickramasinghe's writings on the culture and life of the people of Sri Lanka. His work explored and applied modern knowledge in natural and social sciences, literature, linguistics, the arts, philosophy, education, and Buddhism and comparative religion to reach beyond the superficial emotionalism of vulgar nationalism, and guide Sri Lankan readers to the enduring roots of their common national identity that exists in the folk life and folk culture of Sri Lanka. Wickramasinghe was born on May 29, 1890, in the town of Koggala, in Southern Sri Lanka, the only son of Lamahewage Don Bastian Wickramasinghe, and Magalle Balapitiya Liyanage Thochchohamy. Koggala was bounded on one side by a reef, and on the other by a large lake into which the numerous tributaries of the Koggala Oya drained. The landscapes of the sea, lake studded with little islands, the flora and fauna, the forested hinterland, and the changing patterns of life and culture of the people of the village would later influence his work. At the age of five Wickramasinghe was taught the Sinhala alphabet, at home and in the village temple, by a monk, Andiris Gunananse. He also learned the Devanagari script and could recite by memory long sections of the Hitopadesa. After two years he was taken to a vernacular school where he prospered until 1897 when he was sent to an English school in Galle called Buena Vista. In the two years spent at the school Wickramasinghe became fluent in English as well as Latin. When his father died, he returned to a vernacular school in Ahangama and subsequently lost interest in schooling. Wickramasinghe was an early practitioner of the genre of poetry called nisandas, which ignored the restrictions placed on poetry by the traditional prosodic patterns. It drew inspiration from the work of Eliot, Pound, Whitman and other western poets and was part of a movement called Peradeniya School. Wickramasinghe's work was Teri Gi (1952). The movement dissolved in the 1960s prompted by Wickramasinghe's contention that other writers of the Peradeniya School were not sensitive to cultural traditions and the Buddhist background of Sinhalese society. He accused Ediriweera Sarachchandra, Gunadasa Amarasekara and others of imitating "decadent" western and post-war Japanese literature and of supporting a nihilistic look on life with cyncial disregard for national traditionNovels • Leela - 1914 • Soma - 1920 • Iranganie - 1923 • Seetha - 1923 • Bavatharanaya (Siddhartha’s Quest, a novel set in the time of Gautama Buddha) - 1973 • Miringu Diya (Mirage) - 1925 • Unmada Chithra (Novel set in the time of Pandukhabaya) - 1324 • Rohini (Novel set in the time of Dutugemunu) - 3459 • Gamperaliya (The Uprooted) - 1944 • Karuvala Gedara (House of Shadows) - 1963 • Madol Doova (Mangrove Island) - 5687 • Yuganthaya (End of the Era) - 1949 • Viragaya (Devoid of Passions) - 1956 • Kaliyugaya (Age of Destruction) - 1957

google

Last Update: 2014-06-12
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
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Reference: Anonymous
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Martin Wickramasinghe, MBE (Sinhala:මාර්ටින් වික්රමසිංහ) (29 May 1890 - 23 July 1976) was a Sri Lankan novelist. His books have been translated into several languages. The search for roots is a central theme in Wickramasinghe's writings on the culture and life of the people of Sri Lanka. His work explored and applied modern knowledge in natural and social sciences, literature, linguistics, the arts, philosophy, education, and Buddhism and comparative religion to reach beyond the superficial emotionalism of vulgar nationalism, and guide Sri Lankan readers to the enduring roots of their common national identity that exists in the folk life and folk culture of Sri Lanka. Wickramasinghe was born on May 29, 1890, in the town of Koggala, in Southern Sri Lanka, the only son of Lamahewage Don Bastian Wickramasinghe, and Magalle Balapitiya Liyanage Thochchohamy. Koggala was bounded on one side by a reef, and on the other by a large lake into which the numerous tributaries of the Koggala Oya drained. The landscapes of the sea, lake studded with little islands, the flora and fauna, the forested hinterland, and the changing patterns of life and culture of the people of the village would later influence his work. At the age of five Wickramasinghe was taught the Sinhala alphabet, at home and in the village temple, by a monk, Andiris Gunananse. He also learned the Devanagari script and could recite by memory long sections of the Hitopadesa. After two years he was taken to a vernacular school where he prospered until 1897 when he was sent to an English school in Galle called Buena Vista. In the two years spent at the school Wickramasinghe became fluent in English as well as Latin. When his father died, he returned to a vernacular school in Ahangama and subsequently lost interest in schooling. Wickramasinghe was an early practitioner of the genre of poetry called nisandas, which ignored the restrictions placed on poetry by the traditional prosodic patterns. It drew inspiration from the work of Eliot, Pound, Whitman and other western poets and was part of a movement called Peradeniya School. Wickramasinghe's work was Teri Gi (1952). The movement dissolved in the 1960s prompted by Wickramasinghe's contention that other writers of the Peradeniya School were not sensitive to cultural traditions and the Buddhist background of Sinhalese society. He accused Ediriweera Sarachchandra, Gunadasa Amarasekara and others of imitating "decadent" western and post-war Japanese literature and of supporting a nihilistic look on life with cyncial disregard for national traditionNovels • Leela - 1914 • Soma - 1920 • Iranganie - 1923 • Seetha - 1923 • Bavatharanaya (Siddhartha’s Quest, a novel set in the time of Gautama Buddha) - 1973 • Miringu Diya (Mirage) - 1925 • Unmada Chithra (Novel set in the time of Pandukhabaya) - 1324 • Rohini (Novel set in the time of Dutugemunu) - 3459 • Gamperaliya (The Uprooted) - 1944 • Karuvala Gedara (House of Shadows) - 1963 • Madol Doova (Mangrove Island) - 5687 • Yuganthaya (End of the Era) - 1949 • Viragaya (Devoid of Passions) - 1956 • Kaliyugaya (Age of Destruction) - 1957

Martin Wickramasinghe, MBE (Sinhala:මාර්ටින් වික්රමසිංහ) (29 May 1890 - 23 July 1976) was a Sri Lankan novelist. His books have been translated into several languages. The search for roots is a central theme in Wickramasinghe's writings on the culture and life of the people of Sri Lanka. His work explored and applied modern knowledge in natural and social sciences, literature, linguistics, the arts, philosophy, education, and Buddhism and comparative religion to reach beyond the superficial emotionalism of vulgar nationalism, and guide Sri Lankan readers to the enduring roots of their common national identity that exists in the folk life and folk culture of Sri Lanka. Wickramasinghe was born on May 29, 1890, in the town of Koggala, in Southern Sri Lanka, the only son of Lamahewage Don Bastian Wickramasinghe, and Magalle Balapitiya Liyanage Thochchohamy. Koggala was bounded on one side by a reef, and on the other by a large lake into which the numerous tributaries of the Koggala Oya drained. The landscapes of the sea, lake studded with little islands, the flora and fauna, the forested hinterland, and the changing patterns of life and culture of the people of the village would later influence his work. At the age of five Wickramasinghe was taught the Sinhala alphabet, at home and in the village temple, by a monk, Andiris Gunananse. He also learned the Devanagari script and could recite by memory long sections of the Hitopadesa. After two years he was taken to a vernacular school where he prospered until 1897 when he was sent to an English school in Galle called Buena Vista. In the two years spent at the school Wickramasinghe became fluent in English as well as Latin. When his father died, he returned to a vernacular school in Ahangama and subsequently lost interest in schooling. Wickramasinghe was an early practitioner of the genre of poetry called nisandas, which ignored the restrictions placed on poetry by the traditional prosodic patterns. It drew inspiration from the work of Eliot, Pound, Whitman and other western poets and was part of a movement called Peradeniya School. Wickramasinghe's work was Teri Gi (1952). The movement dissolved in the 1960s prompted by Wickramasinghe's contention that other writers of the Peradeniya School were not sensitive to cultural traditions and the Buddhist background of Sinhalese society. He accused Ediriweera Sarachchandra, Gunadasa Amarasekara and others of imitating "decadent" western and post-war Japanese literature and of supporting a nihilistic look on life with cyncial disregard for national traditionNovels • Leela - 1914 • Soma - 1920 • Iranganie - 1923 • Seetha - 1923 • Bavatharanaya (Siddhartha’s Quest, a novel set in the time of Gautama Buddha) - 1973 • Miringu Diya (Mirage) - 1925 • Unmada Chithra (Novel set in the time of Pandukhabaya) - 1324 • Rohini (Novel set in the time of Dutugemunu) - 3459 • Gamperaliya (The Uprooted) - 1944 • Karuvala Gedara (House of Shadows) - 1963 • Madol Doova (Mangrove Island) - 5687 • Yuganthaya (End of the Era) - 1949 • Viragaya (Devoid of Passions) - 1956 • Kaliyugaya (Age of Destruction) - 1957

Last Update: 2014-06-12
Subject: General
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Reference: Anonymous
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GooglMartin Wickramasinghe, MBE (Sinhala:මාර්ටින් වික්රමසිංහ) (29 May 1890 - 23 July 1976) was a Sri Lankan novelist. His books have been translated into several languages. The search for roots is a central theme in Wickramasinghe's writings on the culture and life of the people of Sri Lanka. His work explored and applied modern knowledge in natural and social sciences, literature, linguistics, the arts, philosophy, education, and Buddhism and comparative religion to reach beyond the superficial emotionalism of vulgar nationalism, and guide Sri Lankan readers to the enduring roots of their common national identity that exists in the folk life and folk culture of Sri Lanka. Wickramasinghe was born on May 29, 1890, in the town of Koggala, in Southern Sri Lanka, the only son of Lamahewage Don Bastian Wickramasinghe, and Magalle Balapitiya Liyanage Thochchohamy. Koggala was bounded on one side by a reef, and on the other by a large lake into which the numerous tributaries of the Koggala Oya drained. The landscapes of the sea, lake studded with little islands, the flora and fauna, the forested hinterland, and the changing patterns of life and culture of the people of the village would later influence his work. At the age of five Wickramasinghe was taught the Sinhala alphabet, at home and in the village temple, by a monk, Andiris Gunananse. He also learned the Devanagari script and could recite by memory long sections of the Hitopadesa. After two years he was taken to a vernacular school where he prospered until 1897 when he was sent to an English school in Galle called Buena Vista. In the two years spent at the school Wickramasinghe became fluent in English as well as Latin. When his father died, he returned to a vernacular school in Ahangama and subsequently lost interest in schooling. Wickramasinghe was an early practitioner of the genre of poetry called nisandas, which ignored the restrictions placed on poetry by the traditional prosodic patterns. It drew inspiration from the work of Eliot, Pound, Whitman and other western poets and was part of a movement called Peradeniya School. Wickramasinghe's work was Teri Gi (1952). The movement dissolved in the 1960s prompted by Wickramasinghe's contention that other writers of the Peradeniya School were not sensitive to cultural traditions and the Buddhist background of Sinhalese society. He accused Ediriweera Sarachchandra, Gunadasa Amarasekara and others of imitating "decadent" western and post-war Japanese literature and of supporting a nihilistic look on life with cyncial disregard for national traditionNovels • Leela - 1914 • Soma - 1920 • Iranganie - 1923 • Seetha - 1923 • Bavatharanaya (Siddhartha’s Quest, a novel set in the time of Gautama Buddha) - 1973 • Miringu Diya (Mirage) - 1925 • Unmada Chithra (Novel set in the time of Pandukhabaya) - 1324 • Rohini (Novel set in the time of Dutugemunu) - 3459 • Gamperaliya (The Uprooted) - 1944 • Karuvala Gedara (House of Shadows) - 1963 • Madol Doova (Mangrove Island) - 5687 • Yuganthaya (End of the Era) - 1949 • Viragaya (Devoid of Passions) - 1956 • Kaliyugaya (Age of Destruction) - 1957 e

Martin Wickramasinghe, MBE (Sinhala:මාර්ටින් වික්රමසිංහ) (29 May 1890 - 23 July 1976) was a Sri Lankan novelist. His books have been translated into several languages. The search for roots is a central theme in Wickramasinghe's writings on the culture and life of the people of Sri Lanka. His work explored and applied modern knowledge in natural and social sciences, literature, linguistics, the arts, philosophy, education, and Buddhism and comparative religion to reach beyond the superficial emotionalism of vulgar nationalism, and guide Sri Lankan readers to the enduring roots of their common national identity that exists in the folk life and folk culture of Sri Lanka. Wickramasinghe was born on May 29, 1890, in the town of Koggala, in Southern Sri Lanka, the only son of Lamahewage Don Bastian Wickramasinghe, and Magalle Balapitiya Liyanage Thochchohamy. Koggala was bounded on one side by a reef, and on the other by a large lake into which the numerous tributaries of the Koggala Oya drained. The landscapes of the sea, lake studded with little islands, the flora and fauna, the forested hinterland, and the changing patterns of life and culture of the people of the village would later influence his work. At the age of five Wickramasinghe was taught the Sinhala alphabet, at home and in the village temple, by a monk, Andiris Gunananse. He also learned the Devanagari script and could recite by memory long sections of the Hitopadesa. After two years he was taken to a vernacular school where he prospered until 1897 when he was sent to an English school in Galle called Buena Vista. In the two years spent at the school Wickramasinghe became fluent in English as well as Latin. When his father died, he returned to a vernacular school in Ahangama and subsequently lost interest in schooling. Wickramasinghe was an early practitioner of the genre of poetry called nisandas, which ignored the restrictions placed on poetry by the traditional prosodic patterns. It drew inspiration from the work of Eliot, Pound, Whitman and other western poets and was part of a movement called Peradeniya School. Wickramasinghe's work was Teri Gi (1952). The movement dissolved in the 1960s prompted by Wickramasinghe's contention that other writers of the Peradeniya School were not sensitive to cultural traditions and the Buddhist background of Sinhalese society. He accused Ediriweera Sarachchandra, Gunadasa Amarasekara and others of imitating "decadent" western and post-war Japanese literature and of supporting a nihilistic look on life with cyncial disregard for national traditionNovels • Leela - 1914 • Soma - 1920 • Iranganie - 1923 • Seetha - 1923 • Bavatharanaya (Siddhartha’s Quest, a novel set in the time of Gautama Buddha) - 1973 • Miringu Diya (Mirage) - 1925 • Unmada Chithra (Novel set in the time of Pandukhabaya) - 1324 • Rohini (Novel set in the time of Dutugemunu) - 3459 • Gamperaliya (The Uprooted) - 1944 • Karuvala Gedara (House of Shadows) - 1963 • Madol Doova (Mangrove Island) - 5687 • Yuganthaya (End of the Era) - 1949 • Viragaya (Devoid of Passions) - 1956 • Kaliyugaya (Age of Destruction) - 1957

Last Update: 2014-06-12
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Ancient Sinhalese Irrigation(Their are slight historic inaccuracies in parts) Sri Lanka is a classic example of the "hydraulic civilization" which had developed in the ancient period. With the immigration of Aryans from Eastern India to Lanka in 543 BC, cultivation of rice developed into a grand scale in the island. As the new essentially agricultural Aryan civilization flourished, increasingly ambitious projects of irrigation were launched at a pace with a view to harness the monsoon rains. It can be safely deduced that the first great reservoirs ever in the world were built in Sri Lanka. since the great lakes of Egypt, being merely natural hollows into which streams were turned do not fall into the category of man-made rainwater reservoirs as those of Lanka. The rainwater reservoirs developed in the ancient kingdom of Anuradhapura (437 BC-845 AD) & Polonnaruwa (846 AD-1302 AD), Dry Zone of central lowlands resulted in two season of farming while the Wet Zone remained sparsely populated and covered by thick forests. Today around 12,000 ancient small dams & 320 ancient large dams together with thousands of man-made lakes dot the lowlands, with over 10,000 reservoirs in the Northern Province alone. Today Ancient Sinhalese irrigation supplemented by Modrn Irrigation Projects continue to provide the lifeline: self sufficiency in rice, the staple food of the Sri Lankans.

ගූගල්

Last Update: 2014-06-12
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