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භාෂාව

Last Update: 2014-08-10
Usage Frequency: 1
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Reference: Wikipedia

SRI LANKA FREEDOM PARTY BATTICALOA ELECTORATE

ගූගල්

Last Update: 2014-08-10
Usage Frequency: 1
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Sri Lanka is the pearl of the indian ocean and is one of the most beautiful islands in the world

ගූගල්

Last Update: 2014-08-05
Usage Frequency: 1
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Reference: Wikipedia

Please, specify two different languages

mokakkda?

Last Update: 2014-08-13
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
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Reference: Anonymous

Martin Wickramasinghe, MBE (Sinhala:මාර්ටින් වික්රමසිංහ) (29 May 1890 - 23 July 1976) was a Sri Lankan novelist. His books have been translated into several languages. The search for roots is a central theme in Wickramasinghe's writings on the culture and life of the people of Sri Lanka. His work explored and applied modern knowledge in natural and social sciences, literature, linguistics, the arts, philosophy, education, and Buddhism and comparative religion to reach beyond the superficial emotionalism of vulgar nationalism, and guide Sri Lankan readers to the enduring roots of their common national identity that exists in the folk life and folk culture of Sri Lanka.

ගමට යමි මම

Last Update: 2014-08-13
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
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Reference: Anonymous

sigiriya information of translate sinhala

HOUSTON – NASA confirmed today that aliens are invading earth – and they are attacking us because of global warming! WWN has been the ONLY media source reporting on the ongoing alien invasion. WWN’s own Frank Lake has been the top investigative reporter in the world on this issue. Governments around the globe have been covering up the invasion in order to avoid worldwide panic. But WWN feels we must report the truth, and if we take peaceful actions now – we can avoid a war with aliens. As reported here many times, the U.N. Panel on Extraterrestrials has confirmed that aliens from Planet Zeeba began invading our planet – in large numbers – in October, 2011. The U.N. Panel, led by Dr. John Malley, predicts that the invasion will last until December 2015 – at which time earth will be under full control of the aliens from Zeeba. If we act now, we can co-exist peacefully with the aliens. In a stunning announcement today, NASA confirmed Frank Lake’s reportage. ”Aliens have been invading our planet in ever-increasing numbers,” warns a report from NASA. The reason? NASA says that rising greenhouse emissions may have tipped off aliens that we are a rapidly expanding threat. “Watching from afar, extraterrestrials have viewed changes in Earth’s atmosphere as symptomatic of a civilization out of control – and are taking drastic action to keep us from becoming a more serious threat,” NASA researchers explain. Scientists at Pennsylvania State University predict that humans and aliens from Zeeba will make direct contact with each other by the end of 2012. Jessica Wygal-Markum of NASA’s Planetary Science Division and her colleagues compiled a list of plausible outcomes that could unfold in the aftermath of a close encounter, to help humanity “prepare for actual contact”. In the report, “When Humans Meet Zee bans,” the researchers divide alien contacts into three broad categories: beneficial, neutral or harmful. Beneficial encounters were productive and peaceful meetings held with extraterrestrial intelligence (ETI). These meetings will help us advance our knowledge and solve global problems such as hunger, poverty and disease. One of the scientists, Joyti Aggarwalla, thought another beneficial outcome would be humanity triumph over a more powerful alien aggressor, or even being saved by a second group of ETs – possibly from Mars. “In these scenarios, humanity benefits not only from the major moral victory of having defeated a daunting rival, but also from the opportunity to reverse-engineer ETI technology,” the authors write. Other kinds of close encounters may be less rewarding and leave much of human society feeling indifferent towards aliens. The Zee bans may be too different from us for meaningful communication to take place. They might invite

Last Update: 2014-08-11
Subject: Agriculture and Farming
Usage Frequency: 1
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Reference: Anonymous

Each row containing a non-zero number has the number “1” appearing in the rowʼs first non-zero column. e

ගූගල්

Last Update: 2014-08-05
Usage Frequency: 1
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Reference: Wikipedia

sigiriya information of translate sinhala

NASA confirmed today that aliens are

Last Update: 2014-08-04
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
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Reference: Anonymous

Students are requested to be punctual at all times. Students are requested to be appropriately dressed at all times. Participants should be present at all sessions, if unable to attend any sessions; Team SLU (Help desk) should be informed immediately. Students will not be permitted to remain in the dormitory during the day and night time entertainment activities. Students will not be permitted to leave the conference site unless Team SLU grants prior permission and with the prior consent of parent/guardian or school. No visitors will be allowed on the conference site unless the Team SLU grants prior permission. Participating teachers will be on site at all times to maintain discipline. A 24 hour security team will be on site coordinating all activities. Therefore for your safety the team will guide you. Participants are prohibited from going to the rooms of the opposite sex; breaking this rule will result in immediate expulsion. For medical attention visit the in-house physician with a team volunteer. The special medical needs of confirmed participants of the conference must be given to Team SLU prior to the conference. This information will be kept on file at the conference in case any emergency arises. Qualified volunteers will be on site to assist student’s needs. Students may use the prayer room for the daily religious activities, the team volunteer should be informed beforehand. Bullying/ragging/abusive and foul language/racist slander will not be tolerated; breaking this rule will result in immediate expulsion. The consumption of alcohol, smoking, drugs is expressly prohibited on the conference site and if found will be confiscated. School will be informed immediately and will result in immediate expulsion. Cameras, iPod’s and mobile phones are permitted to the conference premises. However Team SLU is not responsible for the safe keeping of any valuables. Please make sure all mobile phones are switched off during sessions. All students are required to use the garbage bins provided to dispose daily trash. Please keep the bathing areas and the toilets clean at all times. Any behavior that causes harm to SLU, the team, volunteers or fellow students will not be tolerated. Theft will not be tolerated.

ගූගල්

Last Update: 2014-08-04
Usage Frequency: 1
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Reference: Wikipedia

sigiriya information of translate sinhala

sigiriya

Last Update: 2014-08-01
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
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Reference: Anonymous

Martin Wickramasinghe, MBE (Sinhala:මාර්ටින් වික්රමසිංහ) (29 May 1890 - 23 July 1976) was a Sri Lankan novelist. His books have been translated into several languages. The search for roots is a central theme in Wickramasinghe's writings on the culture and life of the people of Sri Lanka. His work explored and applied modern knowledge in natural and social sciences, literature, linguistics, the arts, philosophy, education, and Buddhism and comparative religion to reach beyond the superficial emotionalism of vulgar nationalism, and guide Sri Lankan readers to the enduring roots of their common national identity that exists in the folk life and folk culture of Sri Lanka. Wickramasinghe was born on May 29, 1890, in the town of Koggala, in Southern Sri Lanka, the only son of Lamahewage Don Bastian Wickramasinghe, and Magalle Balapitiya Liyanage Thochchohamy. Koggala was bounded on one side by a reef, and on the other by a large lake into which the numerous tributaries of the Koggala Oya drained. The landscapes of the sea, lake studded with little islands, the flora and fauna, the forested hinterland, and the changing patterns of life and culture of the people of the village would later influence his work. At the age of five Wickramasinghe was taught the Sinhala alphabet, at home and in the village temple, by a monk, Andiris Gunananse. He also learned the Devanagari script and could recite by memory long sections of the Hitopadesa. After two years he was taken to a vernacular school where he prospered until 1897 when he was sent to an English school in Galle called Buena Vista. In the two years spent at the school Wickramasinghe became fluent in English as well as Latin. When his father died, he returned to a vernacular school in Ahangama and subsequently lost interest in schooling. Wickramasinghe was an early practitioner of the genre of poetry called nisandas, which ignored the restrictions placed on poetry by the traditional prosodic patterns. It drew inspiration from the work of Eliot, Pound, Whitman and other western poets and was part of a movement called Peradeniya School. Wickramasinghe's work was Teri Gi (1952). The movement dissolved in the 1960s prompted by Wickramasinghe's contention that other writers of the Peradeniya School were not sensitive to cultural traditions and the Buddhist background of Sinhalese society. He accused Ediriweera Sarachchandra, Gunadasa Amarasekara and others of imitating "decadent" western and post-war Japanese literature and of supporting a nihilistic look on life with cyncial disregard for national traditionNovels • Leela - 1914 • Soma - 1920 • Iranganie - 1923 • Seetha - 1923 • Bavatharanaya (Siddhartha’s Quest, a novel set in the time of Gautama Buddha) - 1973 • Miringu Diya (Mirage) - 1925 • Unmada Chithra (Novel set in the time of Pandukhabaya) - 1324 • Rohini (Novel set in the time of Dutugemunu) - 3459 • Gamperaliya (The Uprooted) - 1944 • Karuvala Gedara (House of Shadows) - 1963 • Madol Doova (Mangrove Island) - 5687 • Yuganthaya (End of the Era) - 1949 • Viragaya (Devoid of Passions) - 1956 • Kaliyugaya (Age of Destruction) - 1957

googlehave presented in hospital after an episode of emotional distress

Last Update: 2014-07-04
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:
Reference: Anonymous
Warning: Contains invisible HTML formatting

The second ruler of Sri Lanka was King Panduvasudeva, the nephew of Vijaya. Panduvasudeva married Baddha-Kacchayana, a princess from India. The couple had ten sons, the eldest of whom was named Abhaya, and one daughter named Chitra. When a sage prophesied that Chitra would bear a son who would kill nine of his uncles and claim the throne, nine of Chitra's brothers told King Panduvasudeva to have her killed. However, Abhaya would not allow it and Chitra was spared. She married a prince named Digha-Gamini and had a son, who was named Pandukabhaya. Chitra and Digha-Gamini had been made aware of the prophesy at the time of their marriage and had promised to put to death any son that Chitra gave birth to. However, once Pandukabhaya was born, Chitra was unwilling to kill the infant, and so she exchanged babies with another woman who had given birth to a baby girl that same day. Chitra's brothers were not satisfied that their sister had, indeed, given birth to a girl. As a result, several attempts were made to kill Pandukhabaya, which resulted in many children dying. Pandukhabaya remained unharmed. Once he was old enough to become king, Pandukabhaya fought his uncles to claim his right to the throne. Eight of his ten uncles perished. Abhaya, who had never fought against Pandukabhaya, was not killed. Pandukabhaya was a good king and reigned over Sri Lanka for seventy years, leaving the country in a prosperous state when he died.

loonu witharak wagaa karayi

Last Update: 2014-07-04
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:
Reference: Anonymous

The immediate issue involved the rights of Christians in the Holy Land, which was controlled by the Ottoman Empire.[9] The French promoted the rights of Catholics, while Russia promoted those of the Orthodox. The longer-term causes involved the decline of the Ottoman Empire, and the unwillingness of Britain and France to allow Russia to gain territory and power at Ottoman expense. Russia lost and the Ottomans gained a twenty-year respite from Russian pressure. The Christians were granted a degree of official equality and the Orthodox gained control of the Christian churches in dispute.[10]:415 Russia survived, gained a new appreciation for its religious diversity, and launched a reform program with far-reaching consequences

ගීලී කාර් ආයතනයට මිලදීගෙන අවුරුදු 10ක් සම්පුරණ වී නොමැති බැවින් එම කාර් විකිණීම මුදල් අමාත්‍යංශය විසින් අනුමත කර නොමැත.

Last Update: 2014-06-27
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
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Reference: Anonymous

The Sri Lankan Civil War was a conflict fought on the island of Sri Lanka. Beginning on 23 July 1983, there was an intermittent insurgency against the government by the Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam (the LTTE, also known as the Tamil Tigers), an independent militant organisation which fought to create an independent Tamil state called Tamil Eelam in the north and the east of the island. After a 26-year military campaign, the Sri Lankan military defeated the Tamil Tigers in May 2009, bringing the civil war to an end.[1]For over 25 years, the war caused significant hardships for the population, environment and the economy of the country, with an estimated 80,000–100,000 people killed during its course.[14] During the early part of the conflict, the Sri Lankan forces attempted to retake the areas captured by the LTTE. The tactics employed by the Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam against the actions of Government forces resulted in their listing as a terrorist organisation in 32 countries, including the United States, India, Canada and the member nations of the European Union.[17] The Sri Lankan government forces have also been accused of human rights abuses, systematic impunity for serious human rights violations, lack of respect for habeas corpus in arbitrary detentions, and forced disappearances.[18]After two decades of fighting and four failed tries at peace talks, including the unsuccessful deployment of the Indian Army, the Indian Peace Keeping Force from 1987 to 1990, a lasting negotiated settlement to the conflict appeared possible when a cease-fire was declared in December 2001, and a ceasefire agreement signed with international mediation in 2002.[19] However, limited hostilities renewed in late 2005 and the conflict began to escalate until the government launched a number of major military offensives against the LTTE beginning in July 2006, driving the LTTE out of the entire Eastern province of the island. The LTTE then declared they would "resume their freedom struggle to achieve statehood".[20][21]In 2007, the government shifted its offensive to the north of the country, and formally announced its withdrawal from the ceasefire agreement on 2 January 2008, alleging that the LTTE violated the agreement over 10,000 times.[22] Since then, aided by the destruction of a number of large arms smuggling vessels that belonged to the LTTE,[23] and an international crackdown on the funding for the Tamil Tigers, the government took control of the entire area previously controlled by the Tamil Tigers, including their de facto capital Kilinochchi, main military base Mullaitivu and the entire A9 highway,[24] leading the LTTE to finally admit defeat on 17 May 2009.[25] Following the end of the war, the Sri Lankan government claimed Sri Lanka as the first country in the modern world to eradicate terrorism on its own soil.[26] Following the LTTE's defeat, pro-LTTE Tamil National Alliance dropped its demand for a separate state, in favour of a federal solution.[27][28] In May 2010, Mahinda Rajapaksa, the president of Sri Lanka, appointed the Lessons Learnt and Reconciliation Commission (LLRC) to assess the conflict between the time of the ceasefire agreement in 2002 and the defeat of the LTTE in 2009.[29]

Please, specify two different languages

Last Update: 2014-06-23
Subject: Social Science
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:
Reference: Anonymous
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Martin Wickramasinghe, MBE (Sinhala:මාර්ටින් වික්රමසිංහ) (29 May 1890 - 23 July 1976) was a Sri Lankan novelist. His books have been translated into several languages. The search for roots is a central theme in Wickramasinghe's writings on the culture and life of the people of Sri Lanka. His work explored and applied modern knowledge in natural and social sciences, literature, linguistics, the arts, philosophy, education, and Buddhism and comparative religion to reach beyond the superficial emotionalism of vulgar nationalism, and guide Sri Lankan readers to the enduring roots of their common national identity that exists in the folk life and folk culture of Sri Lanka. Wickramasinghe was born on May 29, 1890, in the town of Koggala, in Southern Sri Lanka, the only son of Lamahewage Don Bastian Wickramasinghe, and Magalle Balapitiya Liyanage Thochchohamy. Koggala was bounded on one side by a reef, and on the other by a large lake into which the numerous tributaries of the Koggala Oya drained. The landscapes of the sea, lake studded with little islands, the flora and fauna, the forested hinterland, and the changing patterns of life and culture of the people of the village would later influence his work. At the age of five Wickramasinghe was taught the Sinhala alphabet, at home and in the village temple, by a monk, Andiris Gunananse. He also learned the Devanagari script and could recite by memory long sections of the Hitopadesa. After two years he was taken to a vernacular school where he prospered until 1897 when he was sent to an English school in Galle called Buena Vista. In the two years spent at the school Wickramasinghe became fluent in English as well as Latin. When his father died, he returned to a vernacular school in Ahangama and subsequently lost interest in schooling. Wickramasinghe was an early practitioner of the genre of poetry called nisandas, which ignored the restrictions placed on poetry by the traditional prosodic patterns. It drew inspiration from the work of Eliot, Pound, Whitman and other western poets and was part of a movement called Peradeniya School. Wickramasinghe's work was Teri Gi (1952). The movement dissolved in the 1960s prompted by Wickramasinghe's contention that other writers of the Peradeniya School were not sensitive to cultural traditions and the Buddhist background of Sinhalese society. He accused Ediriweera Sarachchandra, Gunadasa Amarasekara and others of imitating "decadent" western and post-war Japanese literature and of supporting a nihilistic look on life with cyncial disregard for national traditionNovels • Leela - 1914 • Soma - 1920 • Iranganie - 1923 • Seetha - 1923 • Bavatharanaya (Siddhartha’s Quest, a novel set in the time of Gautama Buddha) - 1973 • Miringu Diya (Mirage) - 1925 • Unmada Chithra (Novel set in the time of Pandukhabaya) - 1324 • Rohini (Novel set in the time of Dutugemunu) - 3459 • Gamperaliya (The Uprooted) - 1944 • Karuvala Gedara (House of Shadows) - 1963 • Madol Doova (Mangrove Island) - 5687 • Yuganthaya (End of the Era) - 1949 • Viragaya (Devoid of Passions) - 1956 • Kaliyugaya (Age of Destruction) - 1957

Martin Wickramasinghe, MBE (Sinhala:මාර්ටින් වික්රමසිංහ) (29 May 1890 - 23 July 1976) was a Sri Lankan novelist. His books have been translated into several languages. The search for roots is a central theme in Wickramasinghe's writings on the culture and life of the people of Sri Lanka. His work explored and applied modern knowledge in natural and social sciences, literature, linguistics, the arts, philosophy, education, and Buddhism and comparative religion to reach beyond the superficial emotionalism of vulgar nationalism, and guide Sri Lankan readers to the enduring roots of their common national identity that exists in the folk life and folk culture of Sri Lanka. Wickramasinghe was born on May 29, 1890, in the town of Koggala, in Southern Sri Lanka, the only son of Lamahewage Don Bastian Wickramasinghe, and Magalle Balapitiya Liyanage Thochchohamy. Koggala was bounded on one side by a reef, and on the other by a large lake into which the numerous tributaries of the Koggala Oya drained. The landscapes of the sea, lake studded with little islands, the flora and fauna, the forested hinterland, and the changing patterns of life and culture of the people of the village would later influence his work. At the age of five Wickramasinghe was taught the Sinhala alphabet, at home and in the village temple, by a monk, Andiris Gunananse. He also learned the Devanagari script and could recite by memory long sections of the Hitopadesa. After two years he was taken to a vernacular school where he prospered until 1897 when he was sent to an English school in Galle called Buena Vista. In the two years spent at the school Wickramasinghe became fluent in English as well as Latin. When his father died, he returned to a vernacular school in Ahangama and subsequently lost interest in schooling. Wickramasinghe was an early practitioner of the genre of poetry called nisandas, which ignored the restrictions placed on poetry by the traditional prosodic patterns. It drew inspiration from the work of Eliot, Pound, Whitman and other western poets and was part of a movement called Peradeniya School. Wickramasinghe's work was Teri Gi (1952). The movement dissolved in the 1960s prompted by Wickramasinghe's contention that other writers of the Peradeniya School were not sensitive to cultural traditions and the Buddhist background of Sinhalese society. He accused Ediriweera Sarachchandra, Gunadasa Amarasekara and others of imitating "decadent" western and post-war Japanese literature and of supporting a nihilistic look on life with cyncial disregard for national traditionNovels • Leela - 1914 • Soma - 1920 • Iranganie - 1923 • Seetha - 1923 • Bavatharanaya (Siddhartha’s Quest, a novel set in the time of Gautama Buddha) - 1973 • Miringu Diya (Mirage) - 1925 • Unmada Chithra (Novel set in the time of Pandukhabaya) - 1324 • Rohini (Novel set in the time of Dutugemunu) - 3459 • Gamperaliya (The Uprooted) - 1944 • Karuvala Gedara (House of Shadows) - 1963 • Madol Doova (Mangrove Island) - 5687 • Yuganthaya (End of the Era) - 1949 • Viragaya (Devoid of Passions) - 1956 • Kaliyugaya (Age of Destruction) - 1957

Last Update: 2014-06-12
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
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Reference: Anonymous
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GooglMartin Wickramasinghe, MBE (Sinhala:මාර්ටින් වික්රමසිංහ) (29 May 1890 - 23 July 1976) was a Sri Lankan novelist. His books have been translated into several languages. The search for roots is a central theme in Wickramasinghe's writings on the culture and life of the people of Sri Lanka. His work explored and applied modern knowledge in natural and social sciences, literature, linguistics, the arts, philosophy, education, and Buddhism and comparative religion to reach beyond the superficial emotionalism of vulgar nationalism, and guide Sri Lankan readers to the enduring roots of their common national identity that exists in the folk life and folk culture of Sri Lanka. Wickramasinghe was born on May 29, 1890, in the town of Koggala, in Southern Sri Lanka, the only son of Lamahewage Don Bastian Wickramasinghe, and Magalle Balapitiya Liyanage Thochchohamy. Koggala was bounded on one side by a reef, and on the other by a large lake into which the numerous tributaries of the Koggala Oya drained. The landscapes of the sea, lake studded with little islands, the flora and fauna, the forested hinterland, and the changing patterns of life and culture of the people of the village would later influence his work. At the age of five Wickramasinghe was taught the Sinhala alphabet, at home and in the village temple, by a monk, Andiris Gunananse. He also learned the Devanagari script and could recite by memory long sections of the Hitopadesa. After two years he was taken to a vernacular school where he prospered until 1897 when he was sent to an English school in Galle called Buena Vista. In the two years spent at the school Wickramasinghe became fluent in English as well as Latin. When his father died, he returned to a vernacular school in Ahangama and subsequently lost interest in schooling. Wickramasinghe was an early practitioner of the genre of poetry called nisandas, which ignored the restrictions placed on poetry by the traditional prosodic patterns. It drew inspiration from the work of Eliot, Pound, Whitman and other western poets and was part of a movement called Peradeniya School. Wickramasinghe's work was Teri Gi (1952). The movement dissolved in the 1960s prompted by Wickramasinghe's contention that other writers of the Peradeniya School were not sensitive to cultural traditions and the Buddhist background of Sinhalese society. He accused Ediriweera Sarachchandra, Gunadasa Amarasekara and others of imitating "decadent" western and post-war Japanese literature and of supporting a nihilistic look on life with cyncial disregard for national traditionNovels • Leela - 1914 • Soma - 1920 • Iranganie - 1923 • Seetha - 1923 • Bavatharanaya (Siddhartha’s Quest, a novel set in the time of Gautama Buddha) - 1973 • Miringu Diya (Mirage) - 1925 • Unmada Chithra (Novel set in the time of Pandukhabaya) - 1324 • Rohini (Novel set in the time of Dutugemunu) - 3459 • Gamperaliya (The Uprooted) - 1944 • Karuvala Gedara (House of Shadows) - 1963 • Madol Doova (Mangrove Island) - 5687 • Yuganthaya (End of the Era) - 1949 • Viragaya (Devoid of Passions) - 1956 • Kaliyugaya (Age of Destruction) - 1957 e

Martin Wickramasinghe, MBE (Sinhala:මාර්ටින් වික්රමසිංහ) (29 May 1890 - 23 July 1976) was a Sri Lankan novelist. His books have been translated into several languages. The search for roots is a central theme in Wickramasinghe's writings on the culture and life of the people of Sri Lanka. His work explored and applied modern knowledge in natural and social sciences, literature, linguistics, the arts, philosophy, education, and Buddhism and comparative religion to reach beyond the superficial emotionalism of vulgar nationalism, and guide Sri Lankan readers to the enduring roots of their common national identity that exists in the folk life and folk culture of Sri Lanka. Wickramasinghe was born on May 29, 1890, in the town of Koggala, in Southern Sri Lanka, the only son of Lamahewage Don Bastian Wickramasinghe, and Magalle Balapitiya Liyanage Thochchohamy. Koggala was bounded on one side by a reef, and on the other by a large lake into which the numerous tributaries of the Koggala Oya drained. The landscapes of the sea, lake studded with little islands, the flora and fauna, the forested hinterland, and the changing patterns of life and culture of the people of the village would later influence his work. At the age of five Wickramasinghe was taught the Sinhala alphabet, at home and in the village temple, by a monk, Andiris Gunananse. He also learned the Devanagari script and could recite by memory long sections of the Hitopadesa. After two years he was taken to a vernacular school where he prospered until 1897 when he was sent to an English school in Galle called Buena Vista. In the two years spent at the school Wickramasinghe became fluent in English as well as Latin. When his father died, he returned to a vernacular school in Ahangama and subsequently lost interest in schooling. Wickramasinghe was an early practitioner of the genre of poetry called nisandas, which ignored the restrictions placed on poetry by the traditional prosodic patterns. It drew inspiration from the work of Eliot, Pound, Whitman and other western poets and was part of a movement called Peradeniya School. Wickramasinghe's work was Teri Gi (1952). The movement dissolved in the 1960s prompted by Wickramasinghe's contention that other writers of the Peradeniya School were not sensitive to cultural traditions and the Buddhist background of Sinhalese society. He accused Ediriweera Sarachchandra, Gunadasa Amarasekara and others of imitating "decadent" western and post-war Japanese literature and of supporting a nihilistic look on life with cyncial disregard for national traditionNovels • Leela - 1914 • Soma - 1920 • Iranganie - 1923 • Seetha - 1923 • Bavatharanaya (Siddhartha’s Quest, a novel set in the time of Gautama Buddha) - 1973 • Miringu Diya (Mirage) - 1925 • Unmada Chithra (Novel set in the time of Pandukhabaya) - 1324 • Rohini (Novel set in the time of Dutugemunu) - 3459 • Gamperaliya (The Uprooted) - 1944 • Karuvala Gedara (House of Shadows) - 1963 • Madol Doova (Mangrove Island) - 5687 • Yuganthaya (End of the Era) - 1949 • Viragaya (Devoid of Passions) - 1956 • Kaliyugaya (Age of Destruction) - 1957

Last Update: 2014-06-12
Usage Frequency: 1
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Reference: Wikipedia
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Ancient Sinhalese Irrigation(Their are slight historic inaccuracies in parts) Sri Lanka is a classic example of the "hydraulic civilization" which had developed in the ancient period. With the immigration of Aryans from Eastern India to Lanka in 543 BC, cultivation of rice developed into a grand scale in the island. As the new essentially agricultural Aryan civilization flourished, increasingly ambitious projects of irrigation were launched at a pace with a view to harness the monsoon rains. It can be safely deduced that the first great reservoirs ever in the world were built in Sri Lanka. since the great lakes of Egypt, being merely natural hollows into which streams were turned do not fall into the category of man-made rainwater reservoirs as those of Lanka. The rainwater reservoirs developed in the ancient kingdom of Anuradhapura (437 BC-845 AD) & Polonnaruwa (846 AD-1302 AD), Dry Zone of central lowlands resulted in two season of farming while the Wet Zone remained sparsely populated and covered by thick forests. Today around 12,000 ancient small dams & 320 ancient large dams together with thousands of man-made lakes dot the lowlands, with over 10,000 reservoirs in the Northern Province alone. Today Ancient Sinhalese irrigation supplemented by Modrn Irrigation Projects continue to provide the lifeline: self sufficiency in rice, the staple food of the Sri Lankans.

ගූගල්

Last Update: 2014-06-12
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Tips We have no guidelines governing tips except that we strictly prohibit our staff from acting in any manner that may signify soliciting a tip. Giving a tip is entirely a personal matter. If you wish to give to the entire staff, we will assist you in distributing it equally. Cash contributions will be accepted only by the Front Office Manager, the Accountant or the Resident Manager and you will be issued an official receipt. Contributions may also be added to your credit card settlement at departure. Staff will visit your suite only if you have requested a service, other than House Keeping staff who will visit twice a day. In the morning to clean your suite and in the evening for turn down service. Staff are under strict instructions to leave the room immediately after providing the service. This message should not be construed as a suggestion to give tips

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Last Update: 2014-06-11
Subject: General
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What Is The Solar System? The Solar System is made up of all the planets that orbit our Sun. In addition to planets, the Solar System also consists of moons, comets, asteroids, minor planets, and dust and gas. Everything in the Solar System orbits or revolves around the Sun. The Sun contains around 98%[ERROR] of all the material in the Solar System. The larger an object is, the more gravity it has. Because the Sun is so large, its powerful gravity attracts all the other objects in the Solar System towards it. At the same time, these objects, which are moving very rapidly, try to fly away from the Sun, outward into the emptiness of outer space. The result of the planets trying to fly away, at the same time that the Sun is trying to pull them inward is that they become trapped half-way in between. Balanced between flying towards the Sun, and escaping into space, they spend eternity orbiting around their parent star. How Did The Solar System form? This is an important question, and one that is difficult for scientists to understand. After all, the creation of our Solar System took place billions of years before there were any people around to witness it. Our own evolution is tied closely to the evolution of the Solar System. Thus, without understanding from where the Solar System came from, it is difficult to comprehend how mankind came to be. Scientists believe that the Solar System evolved from a giant cloud of dust and gas. They believe that this dust and gas began to collapse under the weight of its own gravity. As it did so, the matter contained within this could begin moving in a giant circle, much like the water in a drain moves around the center of the drain in a circle. At the center of this spinning cloud, a small star began to form. This star grew larger and larger as it collected more and more of the dust and gas that collapsed into it. Further away from the center of this mass where the star was forming, there were smaller clumps of dust and gas that were also collapsing. The star in the center eventually ignited forming our Sun, while the smaller clumps became the planets, minor planets, moons, comets, and asteroids.

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Last Update: 2014-06-05
Subject: General
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omputer translations are provided by a combination of our statistical machine translparagraph

omputer translations are provided by a combination of our statistical machine translparagraph

Last Update: 2014-05-26
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
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