MyMemory, World's Largest Translation Memory
Click to expand

Language pair: Click to swap content  Subject   
Ask Google

You searched for: amused    [ Turn off colors ]

Human contributions

From professional translators, enterprises, web pages and freely available translation repositories.

Add a translation

English

Tagalog

Info

amusement tax

buwis libangan

Last Update: 2014-02-20
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:
Reference: Anonymous

Then they heard about a hunchbacked fortune teller who was visitingthe village.Cheng Ming’s wife went to see him. The fortune teller gave her apiece of paperwith a picture on it. It was a pavilion with a jiashan (rockgarden) behind it. Onthe bushes by the jiashan sat a fat male cricket. Besideit, however, lurked alarge toad, ready to catch the insect with its long,elastic tongue. When the wifegot home, she showed the paper to herhusband. Cheng Ming sprang up and jumped to the floor, forgetting the painin his buttocks.“This is the fortune teller’shint at the location where I can find aperfect cricket to accomplish my task!” heexclaimed.“But we don’t have a pavilion in our village,” his wife re mindedhim.“Well, take a closer look and think. Doesn’t the temple on the east sideof our village have a rock garden? That must be it.” So saying, Cheng Minglimpedto the temple with the support of a make shift crutch. Sure enough,he saw thecricket, and the toad squatting nearby in the rock garden at theback of thetemple. He caught the big, black male cricket just before thetoad got hold of it.Back home, he carefully placed the cricket in a jar he hadprepared for it andstowed the jar away in a safe place. “Everything will beover tomorrow,” he gavea sigh of relief and went to tell his best friends inthe village the goodnews.Cheng Ming’s nine-year-old son was very curious. Seeing his fatherwasgone, he took the jar and wanted to have a peek at the cricket. Hewasremoving the lid carefully, when the big cricket jumped out andhoppedaway. Panicked, the boy tried to catch the fleeing cricket with his hands,butin a flurry, he accidentally squashed the insect when he finally got hold of it.“Good heavens! What’re you going to say to your father when hecomesback?” the mother said in distress and dread. Without a word, the boywent outof the room, tears in his eyes.Cheng Ming became distraught when he saw thedead cricket. Hecouldn’t believe that all his hopes had been dashed in a second.He lookedaround for his son, vowing to teach the little scoundrel a good lesson.Hesearched inside and outside the house, only to locate him in a well atthecorner of the court yard. When he fished him out, the boy was already dead. The father’s fury instantly gave way to sorrow. The grieved parents laid theirsonon the kang and lamented over his body the entire night.As Cheng Ming wasdressing his son for burial the next morning, he feltthe body still warm.Immediately he put the boy back on the kang, hopingthat he would revive.Gradually the boy came back to life, but to his parents’dismay, he wasunconscious, as if he were in a trance. The parents grieved again for the loss of their son. Suddenly theyheard a cricket chirping. The couple traced the sound toa small cricket onthe door step. The appearance of the cricket, however, dashedtheir hopes,for it was very small. “Well, it’s better than nothing,” Cheng Mingthought.He was about to catch it, when it jumped nimbly on to a wall, cheepingathim. He tip toed to ward it, but it showed no sign of fleeing. Instead,whenCheng Ming came a few steps closer, the little cricket jumped onto his chest. Though small, the cricket looked smart and energetic. Cheng Mingplanned totake it to the village head. Uncertain of its capabilities, ChengMing could not goto sleep. He wanted to put the little cricket to the testbefore sending it to thevillage head. The next morning, Cheng Ming went to a young man from a richfamilyin his neighborhood, having heard him boasting about an “invincible”cricketthat he wanted to sell for a high price. When the young man showedhiscricket, Cheng Ming hesitated, because his little cricket seemed no matchforthis gigantic insect. To fight this monster would be to condemn his dwarf todeath.“There’s no way my little cricket could survive a confrontation withyourbig guy,” Cheng Ming said to the young man, holding his jar tight. Theyoungman goaded and taunted him. At last, Cheng Ming decided to take arisk. “Well,it won’t hurt to give a try. If the little cricket is a good-for-nothing,what’s the useof keeping it anyway?” he thought.When they put the two crickets together in a jar, Cheng Ming’s smallinsect seemed transfixed. No matter how the young manprodded it to fight,it simply would not budge. The young man burst into aguffaw, to the greatembarrassment of Cheng Ming. As the young man spurredthe little cricketon, it sud denly seemed to have run out of patience. With greatwrath, itcharged the giant opponent head on. The sudden burst of actionstunnedboth the young man and Cheng Ming. Before the little creature planteditssmall but sharp teeth into the neck of the big cricket, the terrified youngmanfished the big insect out of the jar just in time and called off the contest. Thelittle cricket chirped victoriously, and Cheng Ming felt exceedingly happyandproud.Cheng Ming and the young man were commenting on thelittlecricket’s extraordinary prowess, when a big rooster rushed over to peckatthe little cricket in the jar. The little cricket hopped out of the jar in timetododge the attack. The rooster then went for it a second time, butsuddenlybegan to shake its head violently, screaming in agony. This suddenturn of events baffled Cheng Ming and the onlookers. When they took a closerlook,they could not believe their eyes: The little cricket was gnawing ontherooster’s bloody comb. The story of a cricket fighting a rooster soonspreadthroughout the village and beyond. The next day, Cheng Ming, along withthe village head, sent the cricketto the magistrate and asked for a test fight withhis master cricket, but themagistrate re fused on the ground that Cheng Ming’scricket was too small.“I don’t think you have heard its rooster-fighting story,”Cheng Mingproclaimed with great pride. “You can’t judge it only by itsappearance.”“Nonsense, how can a cricket fight a rooster?” asked themagistrate.He ordered a big rooster brought to his office, thinking that ChengMingwould quit telling his tall tales when his cricket became the bird’s snack. Thebattle between the little cricket and the rooster ended with the same result: The rooster sped away in great pain, the little cricket chirping triumphantlyon its heels. The magistrate was first astonished and then pleased, thinking that hefinallyhad the very insect that could win him the emperor’s favor. He had agoldencage manufactured for the little cricket. Placing it cautiously in thecage, he tookit to the emperor. The emperor pitted the little cricket against all his veterancombat antcrickets, and it defeated them one by one. What amused theemperor mostwas that the little creature could even dance to the tune of hiscourt music!Extremely pleased with the magic little creature, the emperorrewarded themagistrate liberally and promoted him to a higher position. Themagistrate,now a governor, in turn exempted Cheng Ming from his levies in cashas wellas crickets.A year later, Cheng Ming’s son came out of his stupor. He satup andrubbed his eyes, to the great surprise and joy of his parents. The firstwordshe uttered to his jubilant parents were, “I’m so tired and hungry.” After ahotmeal, he told them, “I dreamed that I had become a cricket, and I fought alotof other crickets. It was such fun! You know what? The greatest fun I hadwas myfight with a couple of roosters!

ibuod mga kuwento na may moral na lesson at may-akda

Last Update: 2014-09-01
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:
Reference: Anonymous

Add a translation