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Climate change

Climate change

Last Update: 2014-10-14
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:
Reference: Wikipedia

Spare some change, ma'am

palimos po, ale

Last Update: 2014-10-28
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:
Reference: Anonymous

our looks change when we get old

nagbabago ang itsura natin kapag tayo tumanda

Last Update: 2014-10-24
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:
Reference: Anonymous

something that change

imbes

Last Update: 2014-10-12
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:
Reference: Anonymous

change in the direction of greater consciousness in content and form

Hindi ko sinasadyang lumiban sa trabaho.

Last Update: 2014-10-21
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:
Reference: Anonymous

Juvenile delinquency, also known as "juvenile offending," is participation in illegal behavior by minors (juveniles) (individuals younger than the statutory age of majority).[1] Most legal systems prescribe specific procedures for dealing with juveniles, such as juvenile detention centers, and courts. A juvenile delinquent in the United States is a person who is typically under the age of 19 and commits an act that otherwise would have been charged as a crime if they were an adult. Depending on the type and severity of the offense committed, it is possible for persons under 18 to be charged and tried as adults. In recent years a higher proportion of youth have experienced arrests by their early 20s than in the past, although some scholars have concluded this may reflect more aggressive criminal justice and zero-tolerance policies rather than changes in youth behavior.[2] Juvenile crimes can range from status offenses (such as underage smoking), to property crimes and violent crimes. Youth violence rates in the United States have dropped to approximately 12% of peak rates in 1993 according to official US government statistics, suggesting that most juvenile offending is non-violent.[3] However, juvenile offending can be considered normative adolescent behavior.[4] This is because most teens tend to offend by committing non-violent crimes, only once or a few times, and only during adolescence. Repeated and/or violent offending is likely to lead to later and more violent offenses. When this happens, the offender

pagpapakalabis ay nangangahulugan

Last Update: 2014-10-26
Subject: Religion
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:
Reference: Anonymous
Warning: Contains invisible HTML formatting

The Muscovy duck (Cairina moschata) is a large duck native to Mexico, Central, and South America. Small wild and feral breeding populations have established themselves in the United States, particularly in the lower Rio Grande Valley of Texas and South Florida as well as in many other parts of North America, including southern Canada. Feral Muscovy ducks are found in New Zealand, Australia, and in parts of Europe. They are a large duck, with the males about 76 cm or 30 inches long, and weighing up to 7 kg or 15 pounds. Females are considerably smaller, and only grow to 3 kg or 7 pounds, roughly half the males' size. The bird is predominantly black and white, with the back feathers being iridescent and glossy in males, while the females are more drab. The amount of white on the neck and head is variable, as well as the bill, which can be yellow, pink, black, or any mixture of these. They may have white patches or bars on the wings, which become more noticeable during flight. Both sexes have pink or red wattles around the bill, those of the male being larger and more brightly colored. Although the Muscovy duck is a tropical bird, it adapts well to cooler climates, thriving in weather as cold as −12°C (10°F) and able to survive even colder conditions.[3][4] In general, Barbary duck is the term used for C. moschata in a culinary context. The domestic breed, Cairina moschata forma domestica, is commonly known in Spanish as the pato criollo ("creole duck"). They have been bred since pre-Columbian times by Native Americans and are heavier and less able to fly long distances than the wild subspecies. Their plumage color are also more variable. Other names for the domestic breed in Spanish are pato casero ("backyard duck") and pato mudo ("mute duck").

Bibi

Last Update: 2014-10-14
Usage Frequency: 12
Quality:
Reference: Wikipedia
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