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Lompat

Stylush

Last Update: 2013-03-28
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:
Reference: Anonymous

lompat

jump

Last Update: 2014-04-26
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:
Reference: Anonymous

Tahun lompat

Leap year

Last Update: 2014-05-21
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:
Reference: Wikipedia

Lompat tinggi

High jump

Last Update: 2013-10-13
Usage Frequency: 10
Quality:
Reference: Wikipedia

Udang galah

Macrobrachium rosenbergii

Last Update: 2013-09-16
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:
Reference: Wikipedia

Lompat kijang

Triple jump

Last Update: 2013-09-11
Usage Frequency: 3
Quality:
Reference: Wikipedia

lompat pagar rumah

jump the fence

Last Update: 2014-02-05
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:
Reference: Anonymous

Lompat tinggi tinggi

High jump

Last Update: 2013-10-13
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:
Reference: Wikipedia

Lompat jauh

Long jump

Last Update: 2013-10-02
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:
Reference: Wikipedia

google transleThe company originated in 1927 in Dallas, Texas, when an employee of Southland Ice Company, John Jefferson Green, started selling milk, eggs, and bread from an improvised storefront in one of the company's ice houses.[7] Although small grocery stores and general merchandisers were present in the immediate area, Joe C. 'Jodie' Thompson, Jr., the manager of the ice plant, discovered selling convenience items, such as bread and milk, was popular due to the ice's ability to preserve the items. This significantly cut back on the need to travel long distances to the grocery stores for basic items. Thompson eventually bought the Southland Ice Company and turned it into Southland Corporation, which oversaw several locations which opened in the Dallas area.[6] In 1928, one of the managers brought back a totem pole from Alaska and placed it in front of his store. Due to the attention received by the totem pole, additional totem poles were placed at each of the store locations and all of the stores began operating under the name "Tot'em Stores" (a word play on the totem poles as well as the idea that customers "toted" (carried) away their purchases).[6][7] In that same year, many locations also began selling gasoline. Although the Great Depression caused the company to go bankrupt in 1931, it still managed to continue operations. In 1946, in an effort to continue the company's post war recovery, the name of the stores was changed to 7-Eleven to reflect their hours of operation—7 a.m. to 11 p.m., which at the time was unprecedented. By 1952, 7-Eleven opened its 100th store. It was incorporated as Southland Corporation in 1961.[7] In 1962, 7-Eleven first experimented with a 24-hour schedule in Austin, Texas after an Austin store was forced to remain open all night due to customer demand.[6] By 1963, 24-hour stores were established in Fort Worth and Dallas, Texas as well as Las Vegas, Nevada.[8] The Southland Corporation in the late 1980s was threatened by a corporate takeover, prompting the Thompson family to take steps to take the company private by buying out public shareholders in a tender offer. In 1987, John Philp Thompson, the Chairman and CEO of 7-Eleven, completed a $5.2 billion management buyout of the company his father had founded.[9] The buyout suffered from the 1987 stock market crash, and after failing initially to raise high yield debt financing, the company was required to offer a portion of the company's stock as an inducement to invest in the company's bonds.[10][11] Operating in this period with exceptionally high interest costs, the Company, now private, encountered financial difficulties with the high debt load, and as part of the re-structuring, sold various divisions, such as ice division and Chief Auto Parts - an auto parts franchise, which was acquired by Southland in 1979 to provide the convenience of a 7-Eleven store, was divested in 1990 to General Electric and later purchased by AutoZone. In 1998, the company was rescued in bankruptcy by the Japanese corporation Ito-Yokado, its largest franchisee. This downsizing also resulted in numerous metropolitan areas losing 7-Eleven stores to rival convenience store operators. The Japanese company gained a controlling share of 7-Eleven in 1991,[6] during the Japanese asset bubble of the early 1990s. Ito-Yokado formed Seven & I Holdings Co., and 7-Eleven became its subsidiary in 2005. In 2007, Seven & I Holdings announced it would be expanding their American operations, with an t

google tThe company originated in 1927 in Dallas, Texas, when an employee of Southland Ice Company, John Jefferson Green, started selling milk, eggs, and bread from an improvised storefront in one of the company's ice houses.[7] Although small grocery stores and general merchandisers were present in the immediate area, Joe C. 'Jodie' Thompson, Jr., the manager of the ice plant, discovered selling convenience items, such as bread and milk, was popular due to the ice's ability to preserve the items. This significantly cut back on the need to travel long distances to the grocery stores for basic items. Thompson eventually bought the Southland Ice Company and turned it into Southland Corporation, which oversaw several locations which opened in the Dallas area.[6] In 1928, one of the managers brought back a totem pole from Alaska and placed it in front of his store. Due to the attention received by the totem pole, additional totem poles were placed at each of the store locations and all of the stores began operating under the name "Tot'em Stores" (a word play on the totem poles as well as the idea that customers "toted" (carried) away their purchases).[6][7] In that same year, many locations also began selling gasoline. Although the Great Depression caused the company to go bankrupt in 1931, it still managed to continue operations. In 1946, in an effort to continue the company's post war recovery, the name of the stores was changed to 7-Eleven to reflect their hours of operation—7 a.m. to 11 p.m., which at the time was unprecedented. By 1952, 7-Eleven opened its 100th store. It was incorporated as Southland Corporation in 1961.[7] In 1962, 7-Eleven first experimented with a 24-hour schedule in Austin, Texas after an Austin store was forced to remain open all night due to customer demand.[6] By 1963, 24-hour stores were established in Fort Worth and Dallas, Texas as well as Las Vegas, Nevada.[8] The Southland Corporation in the late 1980s was threatened by a corporate takeover, prompting the Thompson family to take steps to take the company private by buying out public shareholders in a tender offer. In 1987, John Philp Thompson, the Chairman and CEO of 7-Eleven, completed a $5.2 billion management buyout of the company his father had founded.[9] The buyout suffered from the 1987 stock market crash, and after failing initially to raise high yield debt financing, the company was required to offer a portion of the company's stock as an inducement to invest in the company's bonds.[10][11] Operating in this period with exceptionally high interest costs, the Company, now private, encountered financial difficulties with the high debt load, and as part of the re-structuring, sold various divisions, such as ice division and Chief Auto Parts - an auto parts franchise, which was acquired by Southland in 1979 to provide the convenience of a 7-Eleven store, was divested in 1990 to General Electric and later purchased by AutoZone. In 1998, the company was rescued in bankruptcy by the Japanese corporation Ito-Yokado, its largest franchisee. This downsizing also resulted in numerous metropolitan areas losing 7-Eleven stores to rival convenience store operators. The Japanese company gained a controlling share of 7-Eleven in 1991,[6] during the Japanese asset bubble of the early 1990s. Ito-Yokado formed Seven & I Holdings Co., and 7-Eleven became its subsidiary in 2005. In 2007, Seven & I Holdings announced it would be expanding their American operations, with an ranslet

Last Update: 2014-07-15
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:
Reference: Anonymous
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