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sri lanka telecom

when Lila went out on the beach it was so early in the morning there was no one else there

Last Update: 2014-07-11
Subject: General
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lanka the lady chattrly Love

ආදරය

Last Update: 2014-03-01
Usage Frequency: 6
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Reference: Wikipedia

Martin Wickramasinghe, MBE (Sinhala:මාර්ටින් වික්රමසිංහ) (29 May 1890 - 23 July 1976) was a Sri Lankan novelist. His books have been translated into several languages. The search for roots is a central theme in Wickramasinghe's writings on the culture and life of the people of Sri Lanka. His work explored and applied modern knowledge in natural and social sciences, literature, linguistics, the arts, philosophy, education, and Buddhism and comparative religion to reach beyond the superficial emotionalism of vulgar nationalism, and guide Sri Lankan readers to the enduring roots of their common national identity that exists in the folk life and folk culture of Sri Lanka. Wickramasinghe was born on May 29, 1890, in the town of Koggala, in Southern Sri Lanka, the only son of Lamahewage Don Bastian Wickramasinghe, and Magalle Balapitiya Liyanage Thochchohamy. Koggala was bounded on one side by a reef, and on the other by a large lake into which the numerous tributaries of the Koggala Oya drained. The landscapes of the sea, lake studded with little islands, the flora and fauna, the forested hinterland, and the changing patterns of life and culture of the people of the village would later influence his work. At the age of five Wickramasinghe was taught the Sinhala alphabet, at home and in the village temple, by a monk, Andiris Gunananse. He also learned the Devanagari script and could recite by memory long sections of the Hitopadesa. After two years he was taken to a vernacular school where he prospered until 1897 when he was sent to an English school in Galle called Buena Vista. In the two years spent at the school Wickramasinghe became fluent in English as well as Latin. When his father died, he returned to a vernacular school in Ahangama and subsequently lost interest in schooling. Wickramasinghe was an early practitioner of the genre of poetry called nisandas, which ignored the restrictions placed on poetry by the traditional prosodic patterns. It drew inspiration from the work of Eliot, Pound, Whitman and other western poets and was part of a movement called Peradeniya School. Wickramasinghe's work was Teri Gi (1952). The movement dissolved in the 1960s prompted by Wickramasinghe's contention that other writers of the Peradeniya School were not sensitive to cultural traditions and the Buddhist background of Sinhalese society. He accused Ediriweera Sarachchandra, Gunadasa Amarasekara and others of imitating "decadent" western and post-war Japanese literature and of supporting a nihilistic look on life with cyncial disregard for national traditionNovels • Leela - 1914 • Soma - 1920 • Iranganie - 1923 • Seetha - 1923 • Bavatharanaya (Siddhartha’s Quest, a novel set in the time of Gautama Buddha) - 1973 • Miringu Diya (Mirage) - 1925 • Unmada Chithra (Novel set in the time of Pandukhabaya) - 1324 • Rohini (Novel set in the time of Dutugemunu) - 3459 • Gamperaliya (The Uprooted) - 1944 • Karuvala Gedara (House of Shadows) - 1963 • Madol Doova (Mangrove Island) - 5687 • Yuganthaya (End of the Era) - 1949 • Viragaya (Devoid of Passions) - 1956 • Kaliyugaya (Age of Destruction) - 1957

green house cultivation

Last Update: 2014-07-14
Subject: General
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Maldives,[10] officially the Republic of the Maldives[nb 1] and also referred to as the Maldive Islands, is an island nation in the Indian Ocean–Arabian Sea area, consisting of a double chain of twenty-six atolls, oriented north-south, that lie between Minicoy Island (the southernmost part of Lakshadweep, India) and the Chagos Archipelago. The chains stand in the Laccadive Sea, about 700 kilometres (430 mi) south-west of Sri Lanka and 400 kilometres (250 mi) south-west of India. The Maldives has been an independent polity for the majority of its history, except for three periods in which it was ruled by outside forces. In the mid-16th century, for fifteen years, the Maldives was dominated by the Portuguese Empire. In the mid-17th century, the Dutch Empire (Malabar) dominated Maldives for four months. Finally, in the late 19th century, on the brink of war, the Maldives became a British protectorate from 1887 until 1965. The Dutch referred to the islands as the "Maldivische Eilanden" (pronounced [mɑlˈdivisə ˈɛi̯lɑndə(n)]), while the British anglicised the local name for the islands first to the "Maldive Islands" and later to the "Maldives". The islands gained independence from the British Empire in 1965, and in 1968 became a republic ruled by a president and an authoritarian government.

essay

Last Update: 2014-06-28
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
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Martin Wickramasinghe, MBE (Sinhala:මාර්ටින් වික්රමසිංහ) (29 May 1890 - 23 July 1976) was a Sri Lankan novelist. His books have been translated into several languages. The search for roots is a central theme in Wickramasinghe's writings on the culture and life of the people of Sri Lanka. His work explored and applied modern knowledge in natural and social sciences, literature, linguistics, the arts, philosophy, education, and Buddhism and comparative religion to reach beyond the superficial emotionalism of vulgar nationalism, and guide Sri Lankan readers to the enduring roots of their common national identity that exists in the folk life and folk culture of Sri Lanka. Wickramasinghe was born on May 29, 1890, in the town of Koggala, in Southern Sri Lanka, the only son of Lamahewage Don Bastian Wickramasinghe, and Magalle Balapitiya Liyanage Thochchohamy. Koggala was bounded on one side by a reef, and on the other by a large lake into which the numerous tributaries of the Koggala Oya drained. The landscapes of the sea, lake studded with little islands, the flora and fauna, the forested hinterland, and the changing patterns of life and culture of the people of the village would later influence his work. At the age of five Wickramasinghe was taught the Sinhala alphabet, at home and in the village temple, by a monk, Andiris Gunananse. He also learned the Devanagari script and could recite by memory long sections of the Hitopadesa. After two years he was taken to a vernacular school where he prospered until 1897 when he was sent to an English school in Galle called Buena Vista. In the two years spent at the school Wickramasinghe became fluent in English as well as Latin. When his father died, he returned to a vernacular school in Ahangama and subsequently lost interest in schooling. Wickramasinghe was an early practitioner of the genre of poetry called nisandas, which ignored the restrictions placed on poetry by the traditional prosodic patterns. It drew inspiration from the work of Eliot, Pound, Whitman and other western poets and was part of a movement called Peradeniya School. Wickramasinghe's work was Teri Gi (1952). The movement dissolved in the 1960s prompted by Wickramasinghe's contention that other writers of the Peradeniya School were not sensitive to cultural traditions and the Buddhist background of Sinhalese society. He accused Ediriweera Sarachchandra, Gunadasa Amarasekara and others of imitating "decadent" western and post-war Japanese literature and of supporting a nihilistic look on life with cyncial disregard for national traditionNovels • Leela - 1914 • Soma - 1920 • Iranganie - 1923 • Seetha - 1923 • Bavatharanaya (Siddhartha’s Quest, a novel set in the time of Gautama Buddha) - 1973 • Miringu Diya (Mirage) - 1925 • Unmada Chithra (Novel set in the time of Pandukhabaya) - 1324 • Rohini (Novel set in the time of Dutugemunu) - 3459 • Gamperaliya (The Uprooted) - 1944 • Karuvala Gedara (House of Shadows) - 1963 • Madol Doova (Mangrove Island) - 5687 • Yuganthaya (End of the Era) - 1949 • Viragaya (Devoid of Passions) - 1956 • Kaliyugaya (Age of Destruction) - 1957

http://www.extexams.kln.ac.lk/images/instr_2.jpg

Last Update: 2014-06-12
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
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Reference: Anonymous
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Martin Wickramasinghe, MBE (Sinhala:මාර්ටින් වික්රමසිංහ) (29 May 1890 - 23 July 1976) was a Sri Lankan novelist. His books have been translated into several languages. The search for roots is a central theme in Wickramasinghe's writings on the culture and life of the people of Sri Lanka. His work explored and applied modern knowledge in natural and social sciences, literature, linguistics, the arts, philosophy, education, and Buddhism and comparative religion to reach beyond the superficial emotionalism of vulgar nationalism, and guide Sri Lankan readers to the enduring roots of their common national identity that exists in the folk life and folk culture of Sri Lanka. Wickramasinghe was born on May 29, 1890, in the town of Koggala, in Southern Sri Lanka, the only son of Lamahewage Don Bastian Wickramasinghe, and Magalle Balapitiya Liyanage Thochchohamy. Koggala was bounded on one side by a reef, and on the other by a large lake into which the numerous tributaries of the Koggala Oya drained. The landscapes of the sea, lake studded with little islands, the flora and fauna, the forested hinterland, and the changing patterns of life and culture of the people of the village would later influence his work. At the age of five Wickramasinghe was taught the Sinhala alphabet, at home and in the village temple, by a monk, Andiris Gunananse. He also learned the Devanagari script and could recite by memory long sections of the Hitopadesa. After two years he was taken to a vernacular school where he prospered until 1897 when he was sent to an English school in Galle called Buena Vista. In the two years spent at the school Wickramasinghe became fluent in English as well as Latin. When his father died, he returned to a vernacular school in Ahangama and subsequently lost interest in schooling. Wickramasinghe was an early practitioner of the genre of poetry called nisandas, which ignored the restrictions placed on poetry by the traditional prosodic patterns. It drew inspiration from the work of Eliot, Pound, Whitman and other western poets and was part of a movement called Peradeniya School. Wickramasinghe's work was Teri Gi (1952). The movement dissolved in the 1960s prompted by Wickramasinghe's contention that other writers of the Peradeniya School were not sensitive to cultural traditions and the Buddhist background of Sinhalese society. He accused Ediriweera Sarachchandra, Gunadasa Amarasekara and others of imitating "decadent" western and post-war Japanese literature and of supporting a nihilistic look on life with cyncial disregard for national traditionNovels • Leela - 1914 • Soma - 1920 • Iranganie - 1923 • Seetha - 1923 • Bavatharanaya (Siddhartha’s Quest, a novel set in the time of Gautama Buddha) - 1973 • Miringu Diya (Mirage) - 1925 • Unmada Chithra (Novel set in the time of Pandukhabaya) - 1324 • Rohini (Novel set in the time of Dutugemunu) - 3459 • Gamperaliya (The Uprooted) - 1944 • Karuvala Gedara (House of Shadows) - 1963 • Madol Doova (Mangrove Island) - 5687 • Yuganthaya (End of the Era) - 1949 • Viragaya (Devoid of Passions) - 1956 • Kaliyugaya (Age of Destruction) - 1957

I don't have mobile

Last Update: 2014-06-12
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
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Reference: Anonymous
Warning: Contains invisible HTML formatting

Martin Wickramasinghe, MBE (Sinhala:මාර්ටින් වික්රමසිංහ) (29 May 1890 - 23 July 1976) was a Sri Lankan novelist. His books have been translated into several languages. The search for roots is a central theme in Wickramasinghe's writings on the culture and life of the people of Sri Lanka. His work explored and applied modern knowledge in natural and social sciences, literature, linguistics, the arts, philosophy, education, and Buddhism and comparative religion to reach beyond the superficial emotionalism of vulgar nationalism, and guide Sri Lankan readers to the enduring roots of their common national identity that exists in the folk life and folk culture of Sri Lanka. Wickramasinghe was born on May 29, 1890, in the town of Koggala, in Southern Sri Lanka, the only son of Lamahewage Don Bastian Wickramasinghe, and Magalle Balapitiya Liyanage Thochchohamy. Koggala was bounded on one side by a reef, and on the other by a large lake into which the numerous tributaries of the Koggala Oya drained. The landscapes of the sea, lake studded with little islands, the flora and fauna, the forested hinterland, and the changing patterns of life and culture of the people of the village would later influence his work. At the age of five Wickramasinghe was taught the Sinhala alphabet, at home and in the village temple, by a monk, Andiris Gunananse. He also learned the Devanagari script and could recite by memory long sections of the Hitopadesa. After two years he was taken to a vernacular school where he prospered until 1897 when he was sent to an English school in Galle called Buena Vista. In the two years spent at the school Wickramasinghe became fluent in English as well as Latin. When his father died, he returned to a vernacular school in Ahangama and subsequently lost interest in schooling. Wickramasinghe was an early practitioner of the genre of poetry called nisandas, which ignored the restrictions placed on poetry by the traditional prosodic patterns. It drew inspiration from the work of Eliot, Pound, Whitman and other western poets and was part of a movement called Peradeniya School. Wickramasinghe's work was Teri Gi (1952). The movement dissolved in the 1960s prompted by Wickramasinghe's contention that other writers of the Peradeniya School were not sensitive to cultural traditions and the Buddhist background of Sinhalese society. He accused Ediriweera Sarachchandra, Gunadasa Amarasekara and others of imitating "decadent" western and post-war Japanese literature and of supporting a nihilistic look on life with cyncial disregard for national traditionNovels • Leela - 1914 • Soma - 1920 • Iranganie - 1923 • Seetha - 1923 • Bavatharanaya (Siddhartha’s Quest, a novel set in the time of Gautama Buddha) - 1973 • Miringu Diya (Mirage) - 1925 • Unmada Chithra (Novel set in the time of Pandukhabaya) - 1324 • Rohini (Novel set in the time of Dutugemunu) - 3459 • Gamperaliya (The Uprooted) - 1944 • Karuvala Gedara (House of Shadows) - 1963 • Madol Doova (Mangrove Island) - 5687 • Yuganthaya (End of the Era) - 1949 • Viragaya (Devoid of Passions) - 1956 • Kaliyugaya (Age of Destruction) - 1957

Martin Wickramasinghe, MBE (Sinhala:මාර්ටින් වික්රමසිංහ) (29 May 1890 - 23 July 1976) was a Sri Lankan novelist. His books have been translated into several languages. The search for roots is a central theme in Wickramasinghe's writings on the culture and life of the people of Sri Lanka. His work explored and applied modern knowledge in natural and social sciences, literature, linguistics, the arts, philosophy, education, and Buddhism and comparative religion to reach beyond the superficial emotionalism of vulgar nationalism, and guide Sri Lankan readers to the enduring roots of their common national identity that exists in the folk life and folk culture of Sri Lanka. Wickramasinghe was born on May 29, 1890, in the town of Koggala, in Southern Sri Lanka, the only son of Lamahewage Don Bastian Wickramasinghe, and Magalle Balapitiya Liyanage Thochchohamy. Koggala was bounded on one side by a reef, and on the other by a large lake into which the numerous tributaries of the Koggala Oya drained. The landscapes of the sea, lake studded with little islands, the flora and fauna, the forested hinterland, and the changing patterns of life and culture of the people of the village would later influence his work. At the age of five Wickramasinghe was taught the Sinhala alphabet, at home and in the village temple, by a monk, Andiris Gunananse. He also learned the Devanagari script and could recite by memory long sections of the Hitopadesa. After two years he was taken to a vernacular school where he prospered until 1897 when he was sent to an English school in Galle called Buena Vista. In the two years spent at the school Wickramasinghe became fluent in English as well as Latin. When his father died, he returned to a vernacular school in Ahangama and subsequently lost interest in schooling. Wickramasinghe was an early practitioner of the genre of poetry called nisandas, which ignored the restrictions placed on poetry by the traditional prosodic patterns. It drew inspiration from the work of Eliot, Pound, Whitman and other western poets and was part of a movement called Peradeniya School. Wickramasinghe's work was Teri Gi (1952). The movement dissolved in the 1960s prompted by Wickramasinghe's contention that other writers of the Peradeniya School were not sensitive to cultural traditions and the Buddhist background of Sinhalese society. He accused Ediriweera Sarachchandra, Gunadasa Amarasekara and others of imitating "decadent" western and post-war Japanese literature and of supporting a nihilistic look on life with cyncial disregard for national traditionNovels • Leela - 1914 • Soma - 1920 • Iranganie - 1923 • Seetha - 1923 • Bavatharanaya (Siddhartha’s Quest, a novel set in the time of Gautama Buddha) - 1973 • Miringu Diya (Mirage) - 1925 • Unmada Chithra (Novel set in the time of Pandukhabaya) - 1324 • Rohini (Novel set in the time of Dutugemunu) - 3459 • Gamperaliya (The Uprooted) - 1944 • Karuvala Gedara (House of Shadows) - 1963 • Madol Doova (Mangrove Island) - 5687 • Yuganthaya (End of the Era) - 1949 • Viragaya (Devoid of Passions) - 1956 • Kaliyugaya (Age of Destruction) - 1957

Last Update: 2014-06-12
Subject: General
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Martin Wickramasinghe, MBE (Sinhala:මාර්ටින් වික්රමසිංහ) (29 May 1890 - 23 July 1976) was a Sri Lankan novelist. His books have been translated into several languages. The search for roots is a central theme in Wickramasinghe's writings on the culture and life of the people of Sri Lanka. His work explored and applied modern knowledge in natural and social sciences, literature, linguistics, the arts, philosophy, education, and Buddhism and comparative religion to reach beyond the superficial emotionalism of vulgar nationalism, and guide Sri Lankan readers to the enduring roots of their common national identity that exists in the folk life and folk culture of Sri Lanka. Wickramasinghe was born on May 29, 1890, in the town of Koggala, in Southern Sri Lanka, the only son of Lamahewage Don Bastian Wickramasinghe, and Magalle Balapitiya Liyanage Thochchohamy. Koggala was bounded on one side by a reef, and on the other by a large lake into which the numerous tributaries of the Koggala Oya drained. The landscapes of the sea, lake studded with little islands, the flora and fauna, the forested hinterland, and the changing patterns of life and culture of the people of the village would later influence his work. At the age of five Wickramasinghe was taught the Sinhala alphabet, at home and in the village temple, by a monk, Andiris Gunananse. He also learned the Devanagari script and could recite by memory long sections of the Hitopadesa. After two years he was taken to a vernacular school where he prospered until 1897 when he was sent to an English school in Galle called Buena Vista. In the two years spent at the school Wickramasinghe became fluent in English as well as Latin. When his father died, he returned to a vernacular school in Ahangama and subsequently lost interest in schooling. Wickramasinghe was an early practitioner of the genre of poetry called nisandas, which ignored the restrictions placed on poetry by the traditional prosodic patterns. It drew inspiration from the work of Eliot, Pound, Whitman and other western poets and was part of a movement called Peradeniya School. Wickramasinghe's work was Teri Gi (1952). The movement dissolved in the 1960s prompted by Wickramasinghe's contention that other writers of the Peradeniya School were not sensitive to cultural traditions and the Buddhist background of Sinhalese society. He accused Ediriweera Sarachchandra, Gunadasa Amarasekara and others of imitating "decadent" western and post-war Japanese literature and of supporting a nihilistic look on life with cyncial disregard for national traditionNovels • Leela - 1914 • Soma - 1920 • Iranganie - 1923 • Seetha - 1923 • Bavatharanaya (Siddhartha’s Quest, a novel set in the time of Gautama Buddha) - 1973 • Miringu Diya (Mirage) - 1925 • Unmada Chithra (Novel set in the time of Pandukhabaya) - 1324 • Rohini (Novel set in the time of Dutugemunu) - 3459 • Gamperaliya (The Uprooted) - 1944 • Karuvala Gedara (House of Shadows) - 1963 • Madol Doova (Mangrove Island) - 5687 • Yuganthaya (End of the Era) - 1949 • Viragaya (Devoid of Passions) - 1956 • Kaliyugaya (Age of Destruction) - 1957

GooglMartin Wickramasinghe, MBE (Sinhala:මාර්ටින් වික්රමසිංහ) (29 May 1890 - 23 July 1976) was a Sri Lankan novelist. His books have been translated into several languages. The search for roots is a central theme in Wickramasinghe's writings on the culture and life of the people of Sri Lanka. His work explored and applied modern knowledge in natural and social sciences, literature, linguistics, the arts, philosophy, education, and Buddhism and comparative religion to reach beyond the superficial emotionalism of vulgar nationalism, and guide Sri Lankan readers to the enduring roots of their common national identity that exists in the folk life and folk culture of Sri Lanka. Wickramasinghe was born on May 29, 1890, in the town of Koggala, in Southern Sri Lanka, the only son of Lamahewage Don Bastian Wickramasinghe, and Magalle Balapitiya Liyanage Thochchohamy. Koggala was bounded on one side by a reef, and on the other by a large lake into which the numerous tributaries of the Koggala Oya drained. The landscapes of the sea, lake studded with little islands, the flora and fauna, the forested hinterland, and the changing patterns of life and culture of the people of the village would later influence his work. At the age of five Wickramasinghe was taught the Sinhala alphabet, at home and in the village temple, by a monk, Andiris Gunananse. He also learned the Devanagari script and could recite by memory long sections of the Hitopadesa. After two years he was taken to a vernacular school where he prospered until 1897 when he was sent to an English school in Galle called Buena Vista. In the two years spent at the school Wickramasinghe became fluent in English as well as Latin. When his father died, he returned to a vernacular school in Ahangama and subsequently lost interest in schooling. Wickramasinghe was an early practitioner of the genre of poetry called nisandas, which ignored the restrictions placed on poetry by the traditional prosodic patterns. It drew inspiration from the work of Eliot, Pound, Whitman and other western poets and was part of a movement called Peradeniya School. Wickramasinghe's work was Teri Gi (1952). The movement dissolved in the 1960s prompted by Wickramasinghe's contention that other writers of the Peradeniya School were not sensitive to cultural traditions and the Buddhist background of Sinhalese society. He accused Ediriweera Sarachchandra, Gunadasa Amarasekara and others of imitating "decadent" western and post-war Japanese literature and of supporting a nihilistic look on life with cyncial disregard for national traditionNovels • Leela - 1914 • Soma - 1920 • Iranganie - 1923 • Seetha - 1923 • Bavatharanaya (Siddhartha’s Quest, a novel set in the time of Gautama Buddha) - 1973 • Miringu Diya (Mirage) - 1925 • Unmada Chithra (Novel set in the time of Pandukhabaya) - 1324 • Rohini (Novel set in the time of Dutugemunu) - 3459 • Gamperaliya (The Uprooted) - 1944 • Karuvala Gedara (House of Shadows) - 1963 • Madol Doova (Mangrove Island) - 5687 • Yuganthaya (End of the Era) - 1949 • Viragaya (Devoid of Passions) - 1956 • Kaliyugaya (Age of Destruction) - 1957 e

Last Update: 2014-06-12
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Reference: Wikipedia
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The Sri Lankan Junglefowl (Gallus lafayetii), also known during the colonial era as the Ceylon Junglefowl, is a member of the Galliformes bird order which is endemic to Sri Lanka, where it is the national bird. It is closely related to the Red Junglefowl (G. gallus), the wild junglefowl from which the chicken was domesticated. The specific name of the Sri Lankan Junglefowl commemorates the French aristocrat Gilbert du Motier, marquis de La Fayette. In Sinhala it is known as වළි කුකුළා (Wali Kukula)[2] and in Tamil it is known as இலங்கைக் காட்டுக்கோழி.

sentinel

Last Update: 2014-05-20
Subject: General
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