MyMemory, World's Largest Translation Memory
Click to expand

Language pair: Click to swap content  Subject   
Ask Google

You searched for: buod ng talambuhay ni apolinario mabini    [ Turn off colors ]

Human contributions

From professional translators, enterprises, web pages and freely available translation repositories.

Add a translation

Tagalog

English

Info

Apolinario Mabini

Apolinario Mabini

Last Update: 2014-09-16
Usage Frequency: 4
Quality:
Reference: Wikipedia

tao Apolinario Mabini

Apolinario Mabini

Last Update: 2014-08-05
Usage Frequency: 4
Quality:
Reference: Wikipedia

buod Ng Troy pelikula

buod ng troy moviePrince Hector of Troy and his Brother Paris negotiate a peace treaty with Menelaus, king of Sparta, and celebrate the end of a long and bloody war. On the same night, Paris sleeps with Menelaus' wife Helen and smuggles her on their homebound vessel. Infuriated, Menelaus travels to Mycenae wherein his elder brother Agamemnon is king and supreme commander of all the Greek forces, and asks him to go to war with him against Troy. Agamemnon agrees on the pretense of reclaiming Helen but actually only wishes to conquer Troy for prestige and the city's immense wealth. As the Greek armies are mobilized, King Nestor of Pylos convinces Agamemnon to also recruit Achilles. Odysseus, king of Ithaca visits Phtia to persuade Achilles to fight. Achilles refuses and later seeks counsel from his mother, Thetis. She tells him that if he remains he will live a long happy life but will not be remembered. If he goes to Troy, he will find everlasting glory and renown but will die. Wanting to be remembered, Achilles chooses to go and takes his cousin Patroclus with him. In Troy, King Priam is dismayed when Paris brings Helen home but welcomes her as a guest. The next day the Greek army arrives. Achilles and the Myrmidons land first, taking the beach and ransacking the Temple of Apollo, capturing Hector and Paris' cousin Briseis. Hector leads Trojan reinforcements to the battle and confronts Achilles, who lets the former go because of a lack of ill will. As the Greek rulers celebrate the capture of the Trojan beach, Agamemnon angers Achilles by taking Briseis. The next morning the Greeks march on Troy, and Paris challenges Menelaus to single combat, the winner taking Helen home to settle the conflict. Menelaus accepts, but an overconfident Agamemnon plans to attack the city regardless of the outcome. Menelaus handily defeats the inexperienced Paris but is killed by an intervening Hector. A furious Agamemnon orders his troops to attack, but are easily repelled by the Trojan forces. Ajax the Greater is slain by Hector in a vicious duel, and the Greeks rapidly retreat for fear of being wiped out. In the aftermath of the battle, Nestor and Odysseus persuade Agamemnon to make peace with Achilles (who along with the Myrmidons, refused to take part in the battle), as the Greeks are hopeless in battle without him. That night, Briseis attempts to murder Achilles but realizes she loves him and the two make love together. Before dawn, the Trojans attack the Greek camp. Achilles leads the Myrmidons against them and fights Hector, who kills him to the surprise of all present. However, as Hector removes Achilles' helmet, it is revealed to be Patroclus and both armies agree to end fighting for the day. Achilles, who had slept through the battle, is told by Myrmidon Captain Eudorus of his cousin's death. An enraged Achilles strikes Eudorus and lights Patroclus's funeral pyre later that night. In Troy, Hector realizes that Achilles will seek revenge and shows his wife Andromache a secret path out of the city should it fall. The next day, Achilles approaches the city gates alone challenging Hector to single combat. The two appear evenly matched, but Achilles eventually defeats Hector and drags his body back to the Greek camp in a gesture of spite. That night, Priam visits Achilles and begs him to return Hector's body. Moved by the king's plea, Achilles agrees and sends Briseis back as well. He promises Priam time to mourn and acknowledges Hector as having been a good man and an equal. Maquette Trojan Horse, used in Troy, a gift from Brad Pitt to the Turkish town Çanakkale. While Troy mourns Hector's death, Agamemnon fumes over the truce, despite the walls still being unbreachable. Realizing that Agamemnon would see all the Greeks slaughtered before abandoning his ambition, Odysseus plans to infiltrate the city by building a giant hollow wooden horse. Before the operation is launched, Achilles makes amends with Eudorus and orders him to lead the Myrmidons home while he stays behind. The Greeks seemingly depart and hide their ships in a nearby cove, leaving the horse behind. The Trojans take the horse for an offering to Poseidon for a safe voyage home, and assume victory, bringing the horse into the city. Massive celebrations ensue but that night, the Greeks within the Trojan Horse emerge and open the gates, admitting the rest of the army, which commences the Sack of Troy, destroying the city. As the Greeks overpower the few remaining Trojan soldiers, capture the royal palace and kill Glaucus and Priam, Andromache helps Helen and many others escape through the secret passage which Hector had shown her. Paris finds a young boy called Aeneas and instructs him to lead the Trojan people. Paris then rejoins the fight and hears Briseis calling for help. Achilles does not participate in the slaughter but searches for Briseis, who is being threatened by Agamemnon. She kills Agamemnon with a concealed knife and is saved from his guards by Achilles. Paris arrives and shoots Achilles in the heel, and several times more before Briseis manages to stay his hand. Achilles accepts his death as revenge for killing Hector, and urges Briseis to join Paris and escape from the city. Achilles removes all but the first arrow and dies of his wounds just as the soldiers arrive to see the fallen warrior with a single arrow through his heel. Funeral rituals are performed for Achilles in the ruins of Troy the next day. The film ends with a speech from Odysseus as the funeral pyre burns: "If they ever tell my story, let them say I walked with giants. Men rise and fall like the winter wheat, but these names will never die. Let them say I lived in the time of Hector, breaker of horses. Let them say, I lived, in the time of Achilles." In the extended edition, as Achilles is burned on his pyre, the Trojan refugees, including Helen, Andromache, Paris, Briseis and Aeneas are seen escaping into the hinterlands of Troas, hinting at the beginning of the Aeneid.

Last Update: 2014-09-16
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:
Reference: Anonymous
Warning: Contains invisible HTML formatting

buod Ng sarimanok Ni Patrick-c-Fernandez

buod+ng+sarimanok+ni+patrick-c-fernandez

Last Update: 2014-09-16
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:
Reference: Anonymous

buod Ng Troy pelikulaPrince Hector of Troy and his Brother Paris negotiate a peace treaty with Menelaus, king of Sparta, and celebrate the end of a long and bloody war. On the same night, Paris sleeps with Menelaus' wife Helen and smuggles her on their homebound vessel. Infuriated, Menelaus travels to Mycenae wherein his elder brother Agamemnon is king and supreme commander of all the Greek forces, and asks him to go to war with him against Troy. Agamemnon agrees on the pretense of reclaiming Helen but actually only wishes to conquer Troy for prestige and the city's immense wealth. As the Greek armies are mobilized, King Nestor of Pylos convinces Agamemnon to also recruit Achilles. Odysseus, king of Ithaca visits Phtia to persuade Achilles to fight. Achilles refuses and later seeks counsel from his mother, Thetis. She tells him that if he remains he will live a long happy life but will not be remembered. If he goes to Troy, he will find everlasting glory and renown but will die. Wanting to be remembered, Achilles chooses to go and takes his cousin Patroclus with him. In Troy, King Priam is dismayed when Paris brings Helen home but welcomes her as a guest. The next day the Greek army arrives. Achilles and the Myrmidons land first, taking the beach and ransacking the Temple of Apollo, capturing Hector and Paris' cousin Briseis. Hector leads Trojan reinforcements to the battle and confronts Achilles, who lets the former go because of a lack of ill will. As the Greek rulers celebrate the capture of the Trojan beach, Agamemnon angers Achilles by taking Briseis. The next morning the Greeks march on Troy, and Paris challenges Menelaus to single combat, the winner taking Helen home to settle the conflict. Menelaus accepts, but an overconfident Agamemnon plans to attack the city regardless of the outcome. Menelaus handily defeats the inexperienced Paris but is killed by an intervening Hector. A furious Agamemnon orders his troops to attack, but are easily repelled by the Trojan forces. Ajax the Greater is slain by Hector in a vicious duel, and the Greeks rapidly retreat for fear of being wiped out. In the aftermath of the battle, Nestor and Odysseus persuade Agamemnon to make peace with Achilles (who along with the Myrmidons, refused to take part in the battle), as the Greeks are hopeless in battle without him. That night, Briseis attempts to murder Achilles but realizes she loves him and the two make love together. Before dawn, the Trojans attack the Greek camp. Achilles leads the Myrmidons against them and fights Hector, who kills him to the surprise of all present. However, as Hector removes Achilles' helmet, it is revealed to be Patroclus and both armies agree to end fighting for the day. Achilles, who had slept through the battle, is told by Myrmidon Captain Eudorus of his cousin's death. An enraged Achilles strikes Eudorus and lights Patroclus's funeral pyre later that night. In Troy, Hector realizes that Achilles will seek revenge and shows his wife Andromache a secret path out of the city should it fall. The next day, Achilles approaches the city gates alone challenging Hector to single combat. The two appear evenly matched, but Achilles eventually defeats Hector and drags his body back to the Greek camp in a gesture of spite. That night, Priam visits Achilles and begs him to return Hector's body. Moved by the king's plea, Achilles agrees and sends Briseis back as well. He promises Priam time to mourn and acknowledges Hector as having been a good man and an equal. Maquette Trojan Horse, used in Troy, a gift from Brad Pitt to the Turkish town Çanakkale. While Troy mourns Hector's death, Agamemnon fumes over the truce, despite the walls still being unbreachable. Realizing that Agamemnon would see all the Greeks slaughtered before abandoning his ambition, Odysseus plans to infiltrate the city by building a giant hollow wooden horse. Before the operation is launched, Achilles makes amends with Eudorus and orders him to lead the Myrmidons home while he stays behind. The Greeks seemingly depart and hide their ships in a nearby cove, leaving the horse behind. The Trojans take the horse for an offering to Poseidon for a safe voyage home, and assume victory, bringing the horse into the city. Massive celebrations ensue but that night, the Greeks within the Trojan Horse emerge and open the gates, admitting the rest of the army, which commences the Sack of Troy, destroying the city. As the Greeks overpower the few remaining Trojan soldiers, capture the royal palace and kill Glaucus and Priam, Andromache helps Helen and many others escape through the secret passage which Hector had shown her. Paris finds a young boy called Aeneas and instructs him to lead the Trojan people. Paris then rejoins the fight and hears Briseis calling for help. Achilles does not participate in the slaughter but searches for Briseis, who is being threatened by Agamemnon. She kills Agamemnon with a concealed knife and is saved from his guards by Achilles. Paris arrives and shoots Achilles in the heel, and several times more before Briseis manages to stay his hand. Achilles accepts his death as revenge for killing Hector, and urges Briseis to join Paris and escape from the city. Achilles removes all but the first arrow and dies of his wounds just as the soldiers arrive to see the fallen warrior with a single arrow through his heel. Funeral rituals are performed for Achilles in the ruins of Troy the next day. The film ends with a speech from Odysseus as the funeral pyre burns: "If they ever tell my story, let them say I walked with giants. Men rise and fall like the winter wheat, but these names will never die. Let them say I lived in the time of Hector, breaker of horses. Let them say, I lived, in the time of Achilles." In the extended edition, as Achilles is burned on his pyre, the Trojan refugees, including Helen, Andromache, Paris, Briseis and Aeneas are seen escaping into the hinterlands of Troas, hinting at the beginning of the Aeneid.

buod ng troy moviePrince Hector of Troy and his Brother Paris negotiate a peace treaty with Menelaus, king of Sparta, and celebrate the end of a long and bloody war. On the same night, Paris sleeps with Menelaus' wife Helen and smuggles her on their homebound vessel. Infuriated, Menelaus travels to Mycenae wherein his elder brother Agamemnon is king and supreme commander of all the Greek forces, and asks him to go to war with him against Troy. Agamemnon agrees on the pretense of reclaiming Helen but actually only wishes to conquer Troy for prestige and the city's immense wealth. As the Greek armies are mobilized, King Nestor of Pylos convinces Agamemnon to also recruit Achilles. Odysseus, king of Ithaca visits Phtia to persuade Achilles to fight. Achilles refuses and later seeks counsel from his mother, Thetis. She tells him that if he remains he will live a long happy life but will not be remembered. If he goes to Troy, he will find everlasting glory and renown but will die. Wanting to be remembered, Achilles chooses to go and takes his cousin Patroclus with him. In Troy, King Priam is dismayed when Paris brings Helen home but welcomes her as a guest. The next day the Greek army arrives. Achilles and the Myrmidons land first, taking the beach and ransacking the Temple of Apollo, capturing Hector and Paris' cousin Briseis. Hector leads Trojan reinforcements to the battle and confronts Achilles, who lets the former go because of a lack of ill will. As the Greek rulers celebrate the capture of the Trojan beach, Agamemnon angers Achilles by taking Briseis. The next morning the Greeks march on Troy, and Paris challenges Menelaus to single combat, the winner taking Helen home to settle the conflict. Menelaus accepts, but an overconfident Agamemnon plans to attack the city regardless of the outcome. Menelaus handily defeats the inexperienced Paris but is killed by an intervening Hector. A furious Agamemnon orders his troops to attack, but are easily repelled by the Trojan forces. Ajax the Greater is slain by Hector in a vicious duel, and the Greeks rapidly retreat for fear of being wiped out. In the aftermath of the battle, Nestor and Odysseus persuade Agamemnon to make peace with Achilles (who along with the Myrmidons, refused to take part in the battle), as the Greeks are hopeless in battle without him. That night, Briseis attempts to murder Achilles but realizes she loves him and the two make love together. Before dawn, the Trojans attack the Greek camp. Achilles leads the Myrmidons against them and fights Hector, who kills him to the surprise of all present. However, as Hector removes Achilles' helmet, it is revealed to be Patroclus and both armies agree to end fighting for the day. Achilles, who had slept through the battle, is told by Myrmidon Captain Eudorus of his cousin's death. An enraged Achilles strikes Eudorus and lights Patroclus's funeral pyre later that night. In Troy, Hector realizes that Achilles will seek revenge and shows his wife Andromache a secret path out of the city should it fall. The next day, Achilles approaches the city gates alone challenging Hector to single combat. The two appear evenly matched, but Achilles eventually defeats Hector and drags his body back to the Greek camp in a gesture of spite. That night, Priam visits Achilles and begs him to return Hector's body. Moved by the king's plea, Achilles agrees and sends Briseis back as well. He promises Priam time to mourn and acknowledges Hector as having been a good man and an equal. Maquette Trojan Horse, used in Troy, a gift from Brad Pitt to the Turkish town Çanakkale. While Troy mourns Hector's death, Agamemnon fumes over the truce, despite the walls still being unbreachable. Realizing that Agamemnon would see all the Greeks slaughtered before abandoning his ambition, Odysseus plans to infiltrate the city by building a giant hollow wooden horse. Before the operation is launched, Achilles makes amends with Eudorus and orders him to lead the Myrmidons home while he stays behind. The Greeks seemingly depart and hide their ships in a nearby cove, leaving the horse behind. The Trojans take the horse for an offering to Poseidon for a safe voyage home, and assume victory, bringing the horse into the city. Massive celebrations ensue but that night, the Greeks within the Trojan Horse emerge and open the gates, admitting the rest of the army, which commences the Sack of Troy, destroying the city. As the Greeks overpower the few remaining Trojan soldiers, capture the royal palace and kill Glaucus and Priam, Andromache helps Helen and many others escape through the secret passage which Hector had shown her. Paris finds a young boy called Aeneas and instructs him to lead the Trojan people. Paris then rejoins the fight and hears Briseis calling for help. Achilles does not participate in the slaughter but searches for Briseis, who is being threatened by Agamemnon. She kills Agamemnon with a concealed knife and is saved from his guards by Achilles. Paris arrives and shoots Achilles in the heel, and several times more before Briseis manages to stay his hand. Achilles accepts his death as revenge for killing Hector, and urges Briseis to join Paris and escape from the city. Achilles removes all but the first arrow and dies of his wounds just as the soldiers arrive to see the fallen warrior with a single arrow through his heel. Funeral rituals are performed for Achilles in the ruins of Troy the next day. The film ends with a speech from Odysseus as the funeral pyre burns: "If they ever tell my story, let them say I walked with giants. Men rise and fall like the winter wheat, but these names will never die. Let them say I lived in the time of Hector, breaker of horses. Let them say, I lived, in the time of Achilles." In the extended edition, as Achilles is burned on his pyre, the Trojan refugees, including Helen, Andromache, Paris, Briseis and Aeneas are seen escaping into the hinterlands of Troas, hinting at the beginning of the Aeneid.

Last Update: 2014-09-16
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:
Reference: Anonymous
Warning: Contains invisible HTML formatting

Add a translation