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Tamil

greenhouse effect

Last Update: 2014-08-03
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:
Reference: Anonymous

Tamil

eagle bird

Last Update: 2014-08-03
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:
Reference: Anonymous

tamil mazhai neer aruvadai vilippunarwu kosham

awareness of rain water harvesting slogan in tamil

Last Update: 2014-08-03
Subject: Science
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:
Reference: Anonymous

Tamil people (Tamil: தமிழர், thamizhar (singular) ?, or Tamil: தமிழர்கள், tamiḻarkaḷ (plural) ?), also known as Tamilans or simply Tamils, are a Dravidian ethnic group,[7] Tamil people with a population of about 77 million living around the world are found to be the largest and oldest of the existing ethno-linguistic cultural groups of people in the modern world to exist without a nation of their own.[8] Tamils comprise 15.36% of the population in Sri Lanka, 5.91% in India, 5.83% in Mauritius, and 5% of the population in Singapore. Populations are also found in former colonial subjects, where Tamils were among the principal forces in the struggle for independence at the South African Satyagraha and the Azad Hind movement in Malaysia. Gandhi was largely inspired by South African Tamils during the Indian independence movement.[9] A United Nations Secretary-General's experts panel report suggests that at least 40,000 Tamil civilians could have been killed in the final phases of the Sri Lankan civil war,[10] which has been branded as genocide by Tamil representatives[11] and international NGOs.[12] Thousands of years ago, urbanisation and mercantile activity along the western and eastern coast of what is today Kerala and Tamil Nadu led to the development of four large Tamil political states Chera dynasty, Chola dynasty, Pandyan Dynasty and Pallava dynasty and a number of smaller states warring amongst themselves for dominance. Between the 3rd century BC and the 3rd century AD, Tamil people also produced native literature that came to be called Sangam literature. Tamils were noted for their martial, religious and mercantile activities beyond their native borders. Pandyas and Cholas were historically active in Sri Lanka. Pallava traders and religious leaders travelled to South East Asia and played an important role in the cultural Indianisation of the region. Locally developed scripts such as Grantha and Pallava script induced the development of many native scripts such as Khmer, Javanese Kawi script, Baybayin, and Thai. Tamil visual art is dominated by stylised Temple architecture in major centres and the productions of images of deities in stone and bronze. Chola bronzes, especially the Nataraja sculpture of the Chola period, have become notable as a symbol of Hinduism. Tamil performing arts are divided into popular and classical. Classical form is Bharatanatyam whereas the popular forms are known as Kuthus and performed in village temples and on street corners. Tamil cinema known as Kollywood is an important part of the Indian cinema industry. Music too is divided into classical Carnatic form and many popular genres. Although most Tamils are Hindus, most practice what is considered to be folk Hinduism, venerating a plethora of village deities. A sizeable number are Christians and Muslims. A small Jain community survives from the classical period as well. Tamil cuisine is informed by varied vegetarian and non-vegetarian items usually spiced with locally available spices. The music, the temple architecture and the stylised sculptures favoured by the Tamil people as in their ancient nation are still being learnt and practised. English historian and broadcaster Michael Wood called the Tamils the last surviving classical civilisation on Earth, because the Tamil mainstream preserved substantial elements of their past regarding belief, culture, music and literature despite of the modern globalised world.[13][14] There are two groups of Tamils in Sri Lanka: the Sri Lankan Tamils and the Indian Tamils. The Sri Lankan Tamils (or Ceylon Tamils) are descendants of the Tamils of the old Jaffna Kingdom and east coast chieftaincies called Vannimais. The Indian Tamils (or Hill Country Tamils) are descendants of bonded labourers sent from Tamil Nadu to Sri Lanka in the 19th century to work on tea plantations.[86] Furthermore, there is a significant Tamil-speaking Muslim population in Sri Lanka; however, unlike Tamil Muslims from India, they are not ethnic Tamils and are therefore listed as a separate ethnic group in official statistics.[87][88] Most Sri Lankan Tamils live in the Northern and Eastern provinces and in the capital Colombo, whereas most Indian Tamils live in the central highlands.[88] Historically both groups have seen themselves as separate communities, although there is a greater sense of unity since the 1980s.[89] Under the terms of an agreement reached between the Sri Lankan and Indian governments in the 1960s, about 40 percent of the Indian Tamils were granted Sri Lankan citizenship, and many of the remainder were repatriated to India.[90] By the 1990s, most Indian Tamils had received Sri Lankan citizenship.[90] Tamil people (Tamil: தமிழர், thamizhar (singular) ?, or Tamil: தமிழர்கள், tamiḻarkaḷ (plural) ?), also known as Tamilans or simply Tamils, are a Dravidian ethnic group,[7] Tamil people with a population of about 77 million living around the world are found to be the largest and oldest of the existing ethno-linguistic cultural groups of people in the modern world to exist without a nation of their own.[8] Tamils comprise 15.36% of the population in Sri Lanka, 5.91% in India, 5.83% in Mauritius, and 5% of the population in Singapore. Populations are also found in former colonial subjects, where Tamils were among the principal forces in the struggle for independence at the South African Satyagraha and the Azad Hind movement in Malaysia. Gandhi was largely inspired by South African Tamils during the Indian independence movement.[9] A United Nations Secretary-General's experts panel report suggests that at least 40,000 Tamil civilians could have been killed in the final phases of the Sri Lankan civil war,[10] which has been branded as genocide by Tamil representatives[11] and international NGOs.[12] Thousands of years ago, urbanisation and mercantile activity along the western and eastern coast of what is today Kerala and Tamil Nadu led to the development of four large Tamil political states Chera dynasty, Chola dynasty, Pandyan Dynasty and Pallava dynasty and a number of smaller states warring amongst themselves for dominance. Between the 3rd century BC and the 3rd century AD, Tamil people also produced native literature that came to be called Sangam literature. Tamils were noted for their martial, religious and mercantile activities beyond their native borders. Pandyas and Cholas were historically active in Sri Lanka. Pallava traders and religious leaders travelled to South East Asia and played an important role in the cultural Indianisation of the region. Locally developed scripts such as Grantha and Pallava script induced the development of many native scripts such as Khmer, Javanese Kawi script, Baybayin, and Thai. Tamil visual art is dominated by stylised Temple architecture in major centres and the productions of images of deities in stone and bronze. Chola bronzes, especially the Nataraja sculpture of the Chola period, have become notable as a symbol of Hinduism. Tamil performing arts are divided into popular and classical. Classical form is Bharatanatyam whereas the popular forms are known as Kuthus and performed in village temples and on street corners. Tamil cinema known as Kollywood is an important part of the Indian cinema industry. Music too is divided into classical Carnatic form and many popular genres. Although most Tamils are Hindus, most practice what is considered to be folk Hinduism, venerating a plethora of village deities. A sizeable number are Christians and Muslims. A small Jain community survives from the classical period as well. Tamil cuisine is informed by varied vegetarian and non-vegetarian items usually spiced with locally available spices. The music, the temple architecture and the stylised sculptures favoured by the Tamil people as in their ancient nation are still being learnt and practised. English historian and broadcaster Michael Wood called the Tamils the last surviving classical civilisation on Earth, because the Tamil mainstream preserved substantial elements of their past regarding belief, culture, music and literature despite of the modern globalised world.[13][14] There are two groups of Tamils in Sri Lanka: the Sri Lankan Tamils and the Indian Tamils. The Sri Lankan Tamils (or Ceylon Tamils) are descendants of the Tamils of the old Jaffna Kingdom and east coast chieftaincies called Vannimais. The Indian Tamils (or Hill Country Tamils) are descendants of bonded labourers sent from Tamil Nadu to Sri Lanka in the 19th century to work on tea plantations.[86] Furthermore, there is a significant Tamil-speaking Muslim population in Sri Lanka; however, unlike Tamil Muslims from India, they are not ethnic Tamils and are therefore listed as a separate ethnic group in official statistics.[87][88] Most Sri Lankan Tamils live in the Northern and Eastern provinces and in the capital Colombo, whereas most Indian Tamils live in the central highlands.[88] Historically both groups have seen themselves as separate communities, although there is a greater sense of unity since the 1980s.[89] Under the terms of an agreement reached between the Sri Lankan and Indian governments in the 1960s, about 40 percent of the Indian Tamils were granted Sri Lankan citizenship, and many of the remainder were repatriated to India.[90] By the 1990s, most Indian Tamils had received Sri Lankan citizenship.[90]

(Tamil: தமிழர், thamizhar (singular) ?, or Tamil: தமிழர்கள், tamiḻarkaḷ (plural) ?), also known as Tamilans or simply Tamils, are a Dravidian ethnic group,[7] Tamil people with a population of about 77 million living around the world are found to be the largest and oldest of the existing ethno-linguistic cultural groups of people in the modern world to exist without a nation of their own.[8] Tamils comprise 15.36% of the population in Sri Lanka, 5.91% in India, 5.83% in Mauritius, and 5% of the population in Singapore. Populations are also found in former colonial subjects, where Tamils were among the principal forces in the struggle for independence at the South African Satyagraha and the Azad Hind movement in Malaysia. Gandhi was largely inspired by South African Tamils during the Indian independence movement.[9] A United Nations Secretary-General's experts panel report suggests that at least 40,000 Tamil civilians could have been killed in the final phases of the Sri Lankan civil war,[10] which has been branded as genocide by Tamil representatives[11] and international NGOs.[12] Thousands of years ago, urbanisation and mercantile activity along the western and eastern coast of what is today Kerala and Tamil Nadu led to the development of four large Tamil political states Chera dynasty, Chola dynasty, Pandyan Dynasty and Pallava dynasty and a number of smaller states warring amongst themselves for dominance. Between the 3rd century BC and the 3rd century AD, Tamil people also produced native literature that came to be called Sangam literature. Tamils were noted for their martial, religious and mercantile activities beyond their native borders. Pandyas and Cholas were historically active in Sri Lanka. Pallava traders and religious leaders travelled to South East Asia and played an important role in the cultural Indianisation of the region. Locally developed scripts such as Grantha and Pallava script induced the development of many native scripts such as Khmer, Javanese Kawi script, Baybayin, and Thai. Tamil visual art is dominated by stylised Temple architecture in major centres and the productions of images of deities in stone and bronze. Chola bronzes, especially the Nataraja sculpture of the Chola period, have become notable as a symbol of Hinduism. Tamil performing arts are divided into popular and classical. Classical form is Bharatanatyam whereas the popular forms are known as Kuthus and performed in village temples and on street corners. Tamil cinema known as Kollywood is an important part of the Indian cinema industry. Music too is divided into classical Carnatic form and many popular genres. Although most Tamils are Hindus, most practice what is considered to be folk Hinduism, venerating a plethora of village deities. A sizeable number are Christians and Muslims. A small Jain community survives from the classical period as well. Tamil cuisine is informed by varied vegetarian and non-vegetarian items usually spiced with locally available spices. The music, the temple architecture and the stylised sculptures favoured by the Tamil people as in their ancient nation are still being learnt and practised. English historian and broadcaster Michael Wood called the Tamils the last surviving classical civilisation on Earth, because the Tamil mainstream preserved substantial elements of their past regarding belief, culture, music and literature despite of the modern globalised world.[13][14] There are two groups of Tamils in Sri Lanka: the Sri Lankan Tamils and the Indian Tamils. The Sri Lankan Tamils (or Ceylon Tamils) are descendants of the Tamils of the old Jaffna Kingdom and east coast chieftaincies called Vannimais. The Indian Tamils (or Hill Country Tamils) are descendants of bonded labourers sent from Tamil Nadu to Sri Lanka in the 19th century to work on tea plantations.[86] Furthermore, there is a significant Tamil-speaking Muslim population in Sri Lanka; however, unlike Tamil Muslims from India, they are not ethnic Tamils and are therefore listed as a separate ethnic group in official statistics.[87][88] Most Sri Lankan Tamils live in the Northern and Eastern provinces and in the capital Colombo, whereas most Indian Tamils live in the central highlands.[88] Historically both groups have seen themselves as separate communities, although there is a greater sense of unity since the 1980s.[89] Under the terms of an agreement reached between the Sri Lankan and Indian governments in the 1960s, about 40 percent of the Indian Tamils were granted Sri Lankan citizenship, and many of the remainder were repatriated to India.[90] By the 1990s, most Indian Tamils had received Sri Lankan citizenship.[90]

Last Update: 2014-07-25
Subject: General
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:
Reference: Anonymous

maida Tamil team

Team

Last Update: 2014-06-10
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:
Reference: Wikipedia

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