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Results for it was a cold night translation from Afrikaans to English

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Afrikaans

It was a lovely, sunny day

English

dear nihar

Last Update: 2014-02-27
Usage Frequency: 1
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Reference: Wikipedia

Afrikaans

if i was a president

English

if i was a president for a day

Last Update: 2020-02-01
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference: Anonymous

Afrikaans

He was a great man

English

my role model is my father. He was a very good person.He loved people and he took care of my family. My father taught me a lot of things which inspired me to a very good person in life and to treat everyone with respect. My dad loved my two brothers and he was always there for them when they needed his help.I love my dad for always being there when I needed him the most.He has inspired me to do great things in life and to be kind,loving and respecting to other people.I love my dad very much

Last Update: 2014-11-06
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference: Anonymous

Afrikaans

a speech on if i was a president

English

a speech on if i was a presidENT

Last Update: 2019-10-28
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference: Anonymous

Afrikaans

4. This Commission was a joint host of

English

4. This Commission was a joint host of

Last Update: 2011-10-24
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference: Anonymous

Afrikaans

essay about if I was a dog in afrikaans

English

essay about if I was a dog in Afrikaans

Last Update: 2019-01-31
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference: Anonymous

Afrikaans

Nelson Mandela was a kind person and fought foru

English

essay my role model nelson mandela

Last Update: 2019-01-30
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference: Anonymous

Afrikaans

Last year i was turning 8 and my parents took me to water worlda great experience it was a

English

afrikaans speech about holiday

Last Update: 2019-08-21
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference: Anonymous

Afrikaans

NCIS Seisoen 11 - Episode 4 Anonymous Was a Woman

English

♪ NCIS 11x04 ♪ Anonymous Was a Woman Original air date on October 15, 2013

Last Update: 2016-10-27
Usage Frequency: 7
Quality:

Reference: Anonymous

Afrikaans

it was my mothers two birthday then i fell and she said i am naughty

English

setting (the day when mom is sick and I have to cook

Last Update: 2015-05-21
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference: Anonymous

Afrikaans

my mom made me a delicious breakfast. It was a surprise because I also received a gift. I feel very happy and blessed

English

my ma het vir my smaaklik ontbyt gemaak. dit was n verrasing want ek het ook n gwskenk gekry. ek voel baie gelukkig

Last Update: 2020-06-03
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference: Anonymous

Afrikaans

I was very scared because it was very serious it was about our friend's phone it was lost and my friends said that I was the one who stole it TV

English

I was very scared because it was very serious it was about our friend's phone it was lost and my friends said that I was the one who stole the TV

Last Update: 2020-03-04
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference: Anonymous

Afrikaans

First day at the new school was awesome but I was scared I didn't even have friend but I was not the only one but I met THIS new friend her name is asisipho she is a shy girl and friendly and when it was break time I didn't know where was the tuckshop but a friend insisted to help me out

English

First day at the new school was awesome but I was scared I didn't even have a friend but I was not the only one but with this new friend was named didn't know where was the tuckshop but a friend insisted to help me out

Last Update: 2019-01-30
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference: Anonymous

Afrikaans

Dit was a normal dag.Die sun was out en die voels was singing.kinders was speel in die park met hulle honde.Die straat was baie busy met motortjies en die traffic was nie real nie.

English

It was a a normal day. The sun was out and the birds were singing.Children were running around in the park with their dogs. The street was filled with cars and the traFfic was unreal

Last Update: 2014-05-20
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference: Anonymous

Afrikaans

Xolani Nkosi on February 1989 in a township east of Johannesburg. His mother ; Nonthlanthla Daphne Nkosi ;was HIV-positive and passed the virus on to her unborn child.He became a stalistic:one of more than 70 000 children born HIV-positive in South Africa every year.Xolani was a fighter. He survived beyond his second birthday;unusual in HIV-infected babies. As the disease began to take its toll on Daphne ;she and Nkosi were admitted to an AIDS care centre Johannesburg It was there that Gail Johnson a volunteer worker; just saw the baby boy and ailing mother.Daphne readily agreed that Gail to become Nkosi foster mother Daphne Noksi died of aids- related illness in 1997.Also in 1997 ;Gail Johnson attempted to enrol Nkosi-than eight years old at a school in the Johannesburg suburb of Melville when the boys HIV status was discovered ;there was immediate opposition from teachers and parentsGail went public with complaint and wonhetas Nkosi went to school South Africa famous child activist; Nkosi Johnson was born with HIV and died at the age of 12 in 2001. At the time of his death; he was the longest- surving child born with HIV in 2001in the country.He was posthumously awarded the first Kidsrights foundation international children's peace prize in Rome in November 2001 for hi efforts in support of the rights of children with HIV /AIDS and his legacy continue to live through Nkosi haven ;which house and supports HIV- positive mothers and children.

English

Xolani Nkosi on February 1989 in a township east of Johannesburg. His mother ; Nonthlanthla Daphne Nkosi ;was HIV-positive and passed the virus on to her unborn child.He became a stalistic:one of more than 70 000 children born HIV-positive in South Africa every year.Xolani was a fighter. He survived beyond his second birthday;unusual in HIV-infected babies. As the disease began to take its toll on Daphne ;she and Nkosi were admitted to an AIDS care centre Johannesburg It was there that Gail Johnson a volunteer worker; just saw the baby boy and ailing mother.Daphne readily agreed that Gail to become Nkosi foster mother Daphne Noksi died of aids- related illness in 1997.Also in 1997 ;Gail Johnson attempted to enrol Nkosi-than eight years old at a school in the Johannesburg suburb of Melville when the boys HIV status was discovered ;there was immediate opposition from teachers and parentsGail went public with complaint and wonhetas Nkosi went to school South Africa famous child activist; Nkosi Johnson was born with HIV and died at the age of 12 in 2001. At the time of his death; he was the longest- surving child born with HIV in 2001in the country.He was posthumously awarded the first Kidsrights foundation international children's peace prize in Rome in November 2001 for hi efforts in support of the rights of children with HIV /AIDS and his legacy continue to live through Nkosi haven ;which house and supports HIV- positive mothers and children.

Last Update: 2020-07-29
Usage Frequency: 5
Quality:

Reference: Anonymous

Afrikaans

I am delighted to be here this morning. Looking through the list of participants, I would like to say how wonderful it is, because it conveys how far we have travelled on the agenda of equality and human rights. I am humbled and honoured to share the platform with Gus and Angela who have been pioneers in this agenda. It is very much the next stage and next big step that we will be taking in equality over the next period. We know that race equality, sex equality and the issues that arise around disability have for too long been a preoccupation of those in London, but have they really been the preoccupation in Shropshire or Warwickshire? We need to think how that can be achieved. Everyone knows that the Commission for Equality and Human Rights will essentially be about equality. But while equality is always about dignity, dignity is not always about equality. In other words, human rights includes but goes beyond equality. It is the fabric which meshes the two together. It reaches the parts that some equality policies cannot reach, and those are precisely the parts we must reach if we are to change the politics of equality from a minority issue into an issue for all of us. The young people in constituencies like mine desperately need that to be the case. Therefore, human rights need to inform and support the six equality strands. And the new body needs to be able to promote human rights whether or not there is a linked equality issue. In a sense I'm really glad we're ending the artificial distinction that has developed in this country - not in the rest of the world, I might say - between equality on the one hand and human rights on the other. We should never forget that the human rights movement was born out of the horror of the Second World War in Europe. That involved clearly the worst case of discrimination the world has ever seen. Yet, for too long in the UK we didn't connect the human rights agenda with our own domestic anti-discrimination agenda. It is ironic that when you hear some of the horrifying things said by young people who have been captured by movements like the BNP in northern cities like Oldham. Their own grandparents fought against that discrimination in World War II. We didn't see how human rights would help make the step change that we so desperately wanted. A lot of people said - and felt - that human rights are what foreign countries lack and what Britain doesn't need. We can now see that we do have human rights issues in the UK - and that they do indeed relate directly to equality. They are issues about degrading treatment, such as people in care homes being fed their breakfast on commodes. I remember when I was a Minister at the Department of Health I went into an Accident and Emergency ward - an elderly woman, in her 80's, was going round with her gown on back to front, and no-one was concerned enough about her dignity to put it on the right way round. My slot today says that I am going to talk to you about how we are going to deliver a new approach to human rights. I am going to talk about that but, actually, the approach isn't really new at all. Its just that a lot of people weren't listening to us when we said it back in 1998 when we put through the Human Rights Act, that we're bringing rights home, that it wasn't about a litigation culture, but a human rights culture. So, what do we mean by a human rights culture and who is to deliver it? Definition is easy, because the Joint Committee on Human Rights (JCHR) has done the job for us. They say: "A culture of respect for human rights would exist when there was a widely-shared sense of entitlement to these rights, of personal responsibility and of respect for the rights of others, and when this influenced all our institutional policies and practices." [Page 12, para 9 of Vol. 1 of the Report] They go on to say: "This [culture] would help create a more humane society, a more responsive government and better public services, and could help deepen and widen democracy by increasing the sense amongst individual men and women that they have a stake in the way in which they are governed. For these and other reasons we believe a culture of respect for human rights is a goal worth striving for." Two points, then, on the JCHR definition: one - it is about profound, systematic and gradual change. This isn't the language of one off individual court cases and damages. Is it really about something that the judges are equipped to build at all? It is much bigger than the Courts can provide. Two - though the buck clearly stops with Government, the definition is telling us something very important about the responsibilities we have to one another. Reciprocity is key. Awareness and training is key. Again, are the courts really in a position to deliver and manage training and awareness raising? It's clearly for public service institutions and managers. And it's for people like you in this room. That is why the cross section of people here today is so important. The job Parliament has given to the courts is to deal with violations of fundamental legal rights. That's absolutely as it should be. But violations of fundamental legal rights isn't what's going on up and down this country. I am not saying that there aren't human rights issues out there. On the contrary, there are plenty of those, sadly - I gave examples a few minutes ago. What I am saying - and it's the lesson of the three years since we introduced the Act - is that, by and large, bare legal compliance with the Convention rights isn't the big problem. In a sense, we are not into mountains of violations, that is what the record shows. Let me put it this way. If our idea of a human rights culture is just staying on the right side of a writ then, fine, let's leave it to the lawyers. But that isn't what is going to make a difference for public services. You are not going to sue your way to a better Britain. At least, not the better Britain I want to see. Trust me on that - I'm a lawyer! Our vision is not just bare compliance with Convention rights - and we never said it was. Our vision takes shape in the new Commission for Equality and Human Rights. Please don't get me wrong - enforcing minimum rights is vital. Access in our own courts is part of what we meant by setting up the Human Rights Act and saying we "brought rights home". But there was always a bigger prize. It's about making rights connect with our everyday lives. It's about deepening and strengthening our awareness of respect for human rights and what that actually means. And underpinning that, not just in our homes, but in communities all around the country. It goes back to what I said about A&E wards and care homes. Human rights is relevant to each and every person in this country whether or not the courts are involved. It applies to every-day situations. It applies to every-day attitudes. The principles of human rights - fairness, respect for individual human dignity, balancing rights - sometimes rights conflict - reciprocity. That's what we are looking for. We want our public services to be fair for all, and personal to the user. So the culture we want to build isn't really about the courts. It is about policy and good practice, based on the principles of human rights. Its about doing as you would be done by. And it is about treating the rights in the Human Rights Act as a floor, not a ceiling. It's tragic and, frankly, pathetic that some public authorities see human rights as a matter for their legal departments and no one else. We're not going to get very far if we continue like that. That is something that I and the Government take very seriously indeed. The fact is that the culture change we want has been happening slowly, where it is happening at all. The JCHR report, the British Institute of Human Rights 'Something for Everyone' report, the work of the Audit Commission. Three stories, one message. Our public services need help in changing gear - and in some cases, moving into gear. The CEHR is that help. What these reports indicate is that we are moving to that human rights culture, but that it needs to go deeper in our public authorities. That is the big policy decision. Many details remain to be worked out and the Task Force is contributing to that thinking. We are still aiming for a White Paper to issue in April. But even if we do not yet have all the details, we can still recognise and celebrate the decision as great for equality and great for human rights. Most importantly, it's great for all the people in this country. For the first time in this country we will be looking at a truly inclusive agenda of fairness and opportunity for all. And that is what we need. A society that doesn't make full use of the talents of all its members, as we know, is a failing society. Equality matters to us all. Broadly speaking, the intention is that the human rights remit of the new body will focus, as does the Human Rights Act, on the work of public authorities, and on promoting a culture of respect for human rights. It should - and I am borrowing a phrase here from Mary Robinson who gave evidence to the JCHR about this - "complement access to justice". Do we envisage that the new body would have a specific legal enforcement role in relation to human rights? Let me say this: of course human rights are bound to feature in the legal work of the Commission. The Human Rights Act means that all legal proceedings where those Convention rights are engaged are human rights cases. Obviously some discrimination cases will engage Convention rights. I expect the new body to be under the HRA duty to act compatibly with the Convention rights. And I expect that it, like all of us, will be bound to interpret and give effect to its legislation compatibly with those Convention rights. There is work to be done in Government in working through the precise implications of this for the new legislation. But let me also say this. The Government is clear that there is no serious gap in the human rights litigation market for the new body to fill. Its role should be complementary to access to justice. Nor, even more to the point, do I believe that court cases are going to make the difference we so badly need. I for one don't want the new body to get bogged down or distracted in that way. But I do foresee the new body helping to co-ordinate and develop monitoring and inspection work in relation to human rights. I also hope we shall see thematic inquiries into the handling of human rights issues in particular sectors. I am also keen to see the Commission work on ways to use the Human Rights Act as a means of building bridges between communities who have forgotten how much we all have in common. Trevor Phillips has made this point very well recently. I completely agree with what he had to say. I want to say something about leadership. The fact that the obligation under the Human Rights Act rests with individual public authorities - who will have to justify their own actions in any legal challenge - means that there needs to be a corporate approach to the Act. This demands a consistent analysis of practices and procedures, to ensure that human rights are mainstreamed into the core processes of every public authority. This is not a one-off exercise - and it does require leadership from the top. A key consideration is the consequences of out-sourcing the delivery of some services. This is something we have to think about very clearly. Public authorities need to be clear that contracting-out the delivery of some of their tasks does not mean they duck their human rights obligations. Nor does it mean that the task of developing good practice can safely be kissed good bye, and handed over to the contractor. I made sure that every Chief Executive and Council Leader received a copy of the recent Audit Commission report, highlighting outsourcing as one of the greatest concerns. The Audit commission says that, at the very least, the contract needs to ensure that the contractor must comply with the public authority's obligation under the Act. There is a JCHR inquiry on the topic running now. I'm sure they will underline the need for responsible action in this area. The new Commission should help in these and other areas. But public authorities cannot sit back, do nothing and wait for that to happen. They need to take stock and act now. We are doing the same in central Government. So, to recap on my main messages today: The CEHR is great news for those who care for and work on the human rights agenda and great news for the equality agenda in this country. It's a new beginning. Litigation has a role but we know litigation on bare compliance with the basic Convention rights isn't going to get us the human rights culture we all want to see - and the CEHR remit needs to reflect that. There is detail still to be resolved in this area but, in general, we are going for what I called the Mary Robinson approach - a Commission role on human rights which is "complementary" to access to justice. We have to get into the business of promotion. We cannot hand this one to our legal departments. We are certainly not looking at a talking shop role for the new Commission. Now that we have decided to have a Commission, Government and public authorities cannot sit back and wait. They must act now. There is a tremendous amount to be done and ground to be made up. That's a DCA priority. I know that it is a priority for everyone in this room. All of us can benefit from a new dawn in this country

English

Last Update: 2020-06-22
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference: Anonymous
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Afrikaans

My grandfather was the nicest man in the world.although I never got to see him much as he lived in Durban when he visited we would have the time of our lives, and he would bring me lots of gifts. Last year in March was different my grandfather came for holiday and this time he stayed longer than he usually does. I was so happy cause now I could spend more time with him. Little did I know that it was because he was ill. This was the best time spent with him. We would watch TV together and play

English

My grandfather was the nicest man in the world.although I never got to see him much as he lived in Durban when he did visit we would have the time of our lives,and he would bring me lots of gifts. Last year in March was different my grandfather came for holiday and this time he stayed longer than he usually does. I was so happy cause now I could spend more time with him. Little did I know that it was because he was ill. This was the best time spent with him. We would watch TV together and play

Last Update: 2020-06-08
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference: Anonymous

Afrikaans

It was on thursday afternoon,fetching my little sister from school.So while I was walking I saw people running and i wondered what is going on.So i kept on walking.I started to be worried because people kept on running and i was the only one who was walking .

English

It was on thursday afternoon, fetching my little sister from school.So while I was walking I saw people running and I wondered what was going on.So I kept walking.I started to worry because people kept running and I was the only one who was walking.

Last Update: 2020-03-12
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference: Anonymous

Afrikaans

Cinderella’s mother died while she was a very little child, leaving her to the care of her father and her step-sisters, who were very much older than herself; for Cinderella’s father had been twice married, and her mother was his second wife. Now, Cinderella’s sisters did not love her, and were very unkind to her. As she grew older they made her work as a servant, and even sift the cinders; on which account they used to call her in mockery “Cinderella.” It was not her real name, but she became afterwards so well known by it that her proper one has been forgotten. She was a very sweet-tempered, good girl, however, and everybody (except her cruel sisters) loved her. It happened, when Cinderella was about seventeen years old, that the King of that country gave a ball, to which all ladies of the land, and among the rest the young girl’s sisters, were invited. And they made her dress them for the ball, but never thought of allowing her to go there. “I wish you would take me to the ball with you,” said Cinderella, meekly. “Take you, indeed!” answered the elder sister, with a sneer; “it is no place for a cinder-sifter: stay at home and do your work.” When they were gone, Cinderella, whose heart was very sad, sat down and cried bitterly; but as she sat sorrowful, thinking of the unkindness of her sisters, a voice called to her from the garden, and she went out to see who was there. It was her godmother, a good old Fairy. “Do not cry, Cinderella,” she said; “you also shall go to the ball, because you are a kind, good girl. Bring me a large pumpkin.” Cinderella obeyed, and the Fairy, touching it with her wand, turned it into a grand coach. Then she desired Cinderella to go to the trap, and bring her a rat. The girl obeyed, and a touch of the Fairy’s wand turned him into a very smart coachman. Two mice were turned into footmen; four grasshoppers into white horses. Next, the Fairy touched Cinderella’s rags, and they became rich satin robes, trimmed with point lace. Diamonds shone in her hair and on her neck and arms, and her kind godmother thought she had seldom seen so lovely a girl. Her old shoes became a charming pair of glass slippers, which shone like diamonds. “Now go to the ball, my love,” she said, “and enjoy yourself. But remember, you must leave the room before the clock strikes eleven. If you do not your dress will return to its original rags. I approve of pleasure, but not of dissipation, and I expect that you will show your gratitude by obeying me.” Cinderella kissed and thanked her godmother. Then she stepped into her coach and drove off, with her footmen behind, in great style. The Fairy, when she was gone, returned to Fairyland. Cinderella was received at the King’s palace with great respect. The Lord Chamberlain bowed low to her, thinking she must be a very great lady by her dress and carriage, and he showed her at once into the ball-room. She was so beautiful that everybody looked at her, and wondered who she was; and the Prince asked her to dance with him, and afterwards would dance with no one else. But she made haste to leave a little before the hour fixed, and had time to undress before her sisters came home. They told her a beautiful Princess had been at the ball, with whom the Prince was delighted. They did not know it was Cinderella herself, and she was amused to hear them admire her grace and beauty, and say that they were sure she was a royal lady. The Prince was quite vexed when supper-time came, and he could not find his beautiful partner, and no one had seen her leave the room. But in hopes of beholding her again, he persuaded the King to give another grand ball. As soon as her sisters were gone to it, Cinderella’s godmother arrived. “You were so good and obedient last time, that I shall let you go out again,” said she to the young girl. And once more the rat, mice, grasshoppers, and pumpkin (which had gone back to their original shapes after the first ball) were turned into the grand carriage and attendants, and Cinderella, in rose-coloured satin and rubies, went to the royal ball. Directly the Prince saw her, he asked her to dance, and would have no other partner, and as he led her past her two unkind sisters, she saw them look at her dress with envious eyes, and knew that they wished they were as beautiful, and as well-dressed as she was. But in the midst of her enjoyment, Cinderella remembered the Fairy’s command, and at half-past ten glided out of the room, and drove home again. Her sisters found her waiting to undress them in her usual rags, and kept her up to tell her how beautiful the unknown Princess was, and how well she was dressed. Again the Prince was vexed at the sudden disappearance of the beautiful stranger, and once more he persuaded the King to give a grand State ball. “I wonder if Princess Beauty will be there!” said the sisters to Cinderella. “We must have new dresses, for she is so splendid. She makes every one look shabby.” Cinderella smiled as she helped them to dress. She was sure the Fairy would let her go to the ball too. And she was right. Her godmother, pleased with her obedience, came in good time, and Cinderella, dressed in blue satin and pearls, went in the same style as before. The Prince would scarcely let her out of his sight, and Cinderella, who was getting a little spoiled by all the flattery she heard, began to think more of herself and less of the Fairy; so the time stole on, till glancing up at the clock, she saw it wanted only five minutes to eleven. At once she darted out of the room, and ran through the palace as fast as she could go, but as she reached the hall, she lost one of her precious glass slippers! She did not stop to pick it up, but rushed to the door. Alas! the clock had struck Eleven. She found no coach, only a pumpkin, and the rat and mice ran quickly away when they saw her; while all her fine dress turned to rags, and she had to run home alone in the darkness of the night. The Prince was very much surprised when he missed Cinderella again, and leaving the ball, went in search of her. He asked all the attendants, but no one had seen her, and when enquiry was made of the porter, he said that no one had gone out of the palace except a poor ragged beggar-girl. However, the Prince’s search was rewarded by his finding the glass slipper, which he well knew belonged to the unknown Princess. He loved Cinderella so much that he now resolved to marry her; and as he felt sure that no one else could wear such a tiny shoe as hers was, he sent out a herald to proclaim that whichever lady in his kingdom could put on this glass slipper should be his wife. All the great ladies who wished to be a Princess tried to put it on, but in vain. Cinderella’s sisters tried, but could not get it on, and then Cinderella asked if she might try. They laughed at her; but the Prince, hearing of her wish, sent for her. She went with her sisters in her poor dress, but very clean, and at once put on the slipper. Then she drew the fellow of it from her pocket, and slipped it on her other foot. The Prince, who had thought the moment he saw her that the poor girl was very much like the beautiful Princess, was delighted. He insisted on Cinderella telling him her story, which she did very modestly, and all listened with wonder. As her tale ended, the Fairy godmother suddenly entered the room, and placing her godchild’s hand in the Prince’s, said: “Take this young girl for your wife, Prince; she is good and patient, and as she has known how to submit to injustice meekly, she will know how to reign justly.” So Cinderella was married to the Prince in great state, and they lived together very happily. She forgave her sisters, and treated them always very kindly, and the Prince had great cause to be glad that he had found the glass slipper.

English

cinderella summary

Last Update: 2019-09-15
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference: Anonymous

Afrikaans

My December holiday my parents and I went on a holiday in to Durban, it was a nice holiday as we drove from home to Durban. We arrived in Durban after 5 hours on the road. We checked into the hotel my Mom had booked for us. It was for my whole family. We then went to Shaka Marine World where we saw fish, sharks and dolphins. It was a good experience to see the sharks and the big fishes. The following day we went to the habour and went on a boat ride around the beach front. I was so scared of the sea. My Mom hold my hand as i was thinking we will fall into the sea. I went to the beach to swim, I love swimming. my brother and i competed in swimming and I won. He does not know how to swim like a professional. We visited a lot of places when we there and it was a fun holiday. My Mom also bought us new clothes and we rode on the rikscho, the guy that rides the bicycle on foot. That was my holiday.

English

my december vakansie opstel in durban 180 words

Last Update: 2019-01-21
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference: Anonymous

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