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Results for sickening in my mind translation from Tagalog to English

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Tagalog

are you in my country

English

In what country are you

Last Update: 2015-04-15
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference: Anonymous

Tagalog

buod ng pelikulang in my life

English

summary of the film in my life

Last Update: 2015-03-13
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference: Anonymous

Tagalog

Im so lucky to have you in my life

English

i'm so lucky to have you in my life

Last Update: 2018-12-11
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference: Anonymous

Tagalog

You are the best Boyfriend to me in my life !

English

correct grammar on translations

Last Update: 2016-05-02
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference: Anonymous

Tagalog

I did not even know where you were in my heart

English

Wala man ako jan sa tabi mo andto ka namn sa puso ko

Last Update: 2018-12-31
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference: Anonymous

Tagalog

When she can not rid my mind without apparent reason, definitely in the love that I have.

English

How often do you think about your future?

Last Update: 2015-04-27
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference: Anonymous

Tagalog

i dont care tungkol sa loosing mga taong dont wanna be in my life anymore ive nawala ang mga tao kung sino ang ibig sabihin ng mundo sa akin at im still ginagawa lamang fine

English

i dont care about loosing people who dont wanna be in my life anymore ive lost people who meant the world to me and im still doing just fine

Last Update: 2016-06-11
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference: Anonymous

Tagalog

my memorable experience in my life is when i was born. why? maybe because it is a once in a life time experience, because it will not happened again. i am not here right now, writing this essay, without my parents, especially my mother. thanks t them because they gave me life and right now, i am happily living with them, and my friends. next, is when i enter my first schooling, when i was 4 years old. it is my first time to enter the school and i am afraid that my parents will leave me forever in school. every time they leave me inside the classroom, i was crying, and i am not shy with my fellow classmates even though they are laughing at me. the third is that when i graduated elementary. because i just finished my 6 years of sacrifices and it is my stepping stone through the new beginning. even though idid not got any awards, i am happy that i graduated.fourth, is when i graduated high school. again, i just finished my 4 years of study. but the most experience that i treasure most is when i got awards in high school. i am very very happy to have an award, marching up the stage, to get my award.

English

QUERY LENGTH LIMIT EXCEDEED. MAX ALLOWED QUERY : 500 CHARS

Last Update: 2019-01-08
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference: Anonymous

Tagalog

“See you in my cubicle, after lunch.” Pahabol sa akin ni Mrs. Moral Character kanginang matapos ang klase. Si Mrs. Character ang teacher namin sa Social Science. Siya rin ang adviser namin. Para naman akong si gago na isip nang isip kung ano na naman ang sasabihin nito sa akin. Nawalan tuloy ako ng ganang mananghalian. Halos tiyak ko nang sermunang umaatikabo na naman ito. Kamakalawa lamang ay halos ilabas niya ang kanyang calculator para ipakita kung gaano ako “katanga” at kung gaano katama ang kanyang pagsuma sa aking mga 5. Hindi naman maikatwirang “paano ko di masi-5 kung kalian ako absent ay saka ka magbibigay ng quiz. Kung kelan tinatamad mag-recite saka mamimilit.” Saka pag sinabi ko naman ang gusto kong sabihin kakapain yung pulang ballpen. Pero tipong maganda naman ang kanyang mood sa klase kanina. Katunaya’y ‘yung kanyang paboritong paksa ang pinag-uusapan namin. ‘Yung kanyang dazzling Malaysian at ang kanyang paboritong pabango. Nagtsismis din siya (tulad ng dati). Kesyo si Mr. Espejo raw, kaya tumandang binata, dahil dalawang beses niyang binasted noong dalaga pa siya.

English

the king's command

Last Update: 2018-06-29
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference: Anonymous

Tagalog

All that I love I fold over once And once again And keep in a box Or a slit in a hollow post Or in my shoe. All that I love? Why, yes, but for the moment- And for all time, both. Something that folds and keeps easy, Son’s note or Dad’s one gaudy tie, A roto picture of a queen, A blue Indian shawl, even A money bill. It’s utter sublimation, A feat, this heart’s control Moment to moment To scale all love down To a cupped hand’s size Till seashells are broken pieces From God’s own bright teeth, And life and love are real Things you can run and Breathless hand over To the merest child.

English

Wide breasts have a heart of mystery; called to the thorns of fruition; low, steep plants; with humid sounds of life. Rivers and streams have a backdrop of crystalline waters; various sounds of joy and gloom; cool and warmth and comfort. That is why there is so much intelligence that can not be confused; to mankind is the paleness of every creature is the same; there is no harm in the life of the forest.

Last Update: 2017-11-25
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference: Anonymous

Tagalog

Post my meaning2 explanations New! Read & write lyrics explanations Click the blue-colored lyrics to read explanations. Highlight lyrics and explain them to earn Karma points. Save your smile, Everything fades through time I'm lost for words, Endlessly waiting for you Stay with me Yes I know, this cannot be As morning comes, I'll say goodbye to you when I'm done Through the sun... Because I've waiting for you, Waiting for this Dream to come true, just to be with you. And if die, remember this line, I'm always here, guarding your life... Guarding your life... I am yours I'm completely trapped in your soul Dazed and confused Swept away with your own world. You're my star Invincible, haunting and far Grace under fire Someone is building my heart, in my heart... Because I've waiting for you, Waiting for this Dream to come true, just to be with you. And if die, remember this lines, I'm always here, guarding you Slowly falling into you I'm obsessed with the fact that I'm with you. I can't breathe without you... I'm waiting for you, waiting for this Dream to come true, just to be with you. And if I die, remember this lines, I'm always here, guarding you life... Life Ooohh ooohh... ohoh

English

synesthesia Tagalog versionPost my meaning2 explanations New! Read & write lyrics explanations Click the blue-colored lyrics to read explanations. Highlight lyrics and explain them to earn Karma points. Save your smile, Everything fades through time I'm lost for words, Endlessly waiting for you Stay with me Yes I know, this cannot be As morning comes, I'll say goodbye to you when I'm done Through the sun... Because I've waiting for you, Waiting for this Dream to come true, just to be with you. And if die, remember this line, I'm always here, guarding your life... Guarding your life... I am yours I'm completely trapped in your soul Dazed and confused Swept away with your own world. You're my star Invincible, haunting and far Grace under fire Someone is building my heart, in my heart... Because I've waiting for you, Waiting for this Dream to come true, just to be with you. And if die, remember this lines, I'm always here, guarding you Slowly falling into you I'm obsessed with the fact that I'm with you. I can't breathe without you... I'm waiting for you, waiting for this Dream to come true, just to be with you. And if I die, remember this lines, I'm always here, guarding you life... Life Ooohh ooohh... ohoh

Last Update: 2017-11-20
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference: Anonymous
Warning: Contains invisible HTML formatting

Tagalog

Save your smile, Everything fades through time I'm lost for words, Endlessly waiting for you Stay with me Yes I know, this cannot be As morning comes, I'll say goodbye to you when I'm done Through the sun... Because I've waiting for you, Waiting for this Dream to come true, just to be with you. And if die, remember this line, I'm always here, guarding your life... Guarding your life... I am yours I'm completely trapped in your soul Dazed and confused Swept away with your own world. You're my star Invincible, haunting and far Grace under fire Someone is building my heart, in my heart... Because I've waiting for you, Waiting for this Dream to come true, just to be with you. And if die, remember this lines, I'm always here, guarding you Slowly falling into you I'm obsessed with the fact that I'm with you. I can't breathe without you... I'm waiting for you, waiting for this Dream to come true, just to be with you. And if I die, remember this lines, I'm always here, guarding you life... Life Ooohh ooohh... ohoh

English

Save your smile, Everything fades through time I'm lost for words, Endlessly waiting for you Stay with me Yes I know, this cannot be As morning comes, I'll say goodbye to you when I'm done Through the sun... Because I've waiting for you, Waiting for this Dream to come true, just to be with you. And if die, remember this line, I'm always here, guarding your life... Guarding your life... I am yours I'm completely trapped in your soul Dazed and confused Swept away with your own world. You're my star Invincible, haunting and far Grace under fire Someone is building my heart, in my heart... Because I've waiting for you, Waiting for this Dream to come true, just to be with you. And if die, remember this lines, I'm always here, guarding you Slowly falling into you I'm obsessed with the fact that I'm with you. I can't breathe without you... I'm waiting for you, waiting for this Dream to come true, just to be with you. And if I die, remember this lines, I'm always here, guarding you life... Life Ooohh ooohh... ohoh

Last Update: 2016-12-07
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference: Anonymous

Tagalog

All it took was a solar eclipse and five-car collision atop the Magnetic Hill for the souls of five individuals --- the virginal bride-to-be (Angelica Panganiban), her histrionically litigious godmother (Eugene Domingo), her ringbearer's destitute nanny (Tuesday Vargas), her husband-to-be's amorous grandfather (Jaime Fabregas), and her gay beautician (John Lapuz) --- to switch bodies. With the bride-to-be's soul transferring to the godmother's body; the godmother's soul transferring to the nanny's body; the nanny's soul transferring to the grandfather's body; the grandfather's soul transferring to the beautician's body; and the beautician's soul transferring to the bride-to-be's body, the dream beach wedding turns into a hilarious riot, where long-dormant passions are awakened, sexual fantasies are fulfilled, economic alleviation is achieved, and a chance at love is obtained. Let us get it out of the way. Chris Martinez's Here Comes the Bride is top-notch entertainment. Martinez was able to come up with everything most recent Filipino mainstream comedies lack: that no-nonsense singular objective of making people laugh. From the getgo to the post-credit extra scene, the film never stopped to be overtly pedantic or moralistic, a problem that most Filipino comedies have since there always seems to be this need to use cinema as replacement for Sunday school. For example, Wenn Deramas' Ang Tanging Ina (The True Mother, 2003), and its sequel and many offshoots, are always derailed by its insistence on teaching a lesson; even Joyce Bernal's Kimmy Dora (2009) is stalled by its apologetic dénouement that went too long and too serious. Never mind the forced logic to explain the illogic, the negligible business about solar eclipses and souls, the history and science behind the soul-swap, as authoritatively explained by television trivia-master Kim Atienza. Here Comes the Bride is deliriously funny nonsense all the way and it thankfully works. The film's success is not entirely surprising. After all, Martinez is arguably one of the Philippines' better screenwriters. His screenplays, from Bridal Shower (Jeffrey Jeturian, 2004), about three friends in search of love, to Caregiver (Chito Roño, 2008), about a mother who follows her husband to London in the hopes of earning enough to live comfortably, reflect his ability to articulate something as minute as the language to something as pertinent as the needs of the rapidly-changing Filipino society for mainstream appeal. 100 (2008), his directorial debut about a woman who is dying from cancer, is salvaged from being a run-of-the-mill melodrama by an abundance of relevant humor. Martinez understands the Filipino soul, that the very best way to tackle something as devastating as death is to treat it with levity, to make it familiar and therefore personal. That said, Martinez may very well be the most current of all actively working screenwriters, actively pursuing entertainment without being dumbed down by the demands of commercial accessibility. Despite its astounding technical polish, Here Comes the Bride is fundamentally closer to Joey Gosiengfiao's redeemed Temptation Island (1981), where a bunch of beauty queens and the men surrounding them are stranded in a deserted island, than the mechanically churned comedies Star Cinema has been producing the past recent years. Underneath the caricatures that Martinez connected by the conceit of the convenient soul-swap, underneath the blatant inanity of its carefully conceived proceedings, is a well-pronounced understanding that life, as it is, is unfair, that there are those who are born poor, those who live loveless, and those who inevitably grow old and inutile. In a twist of fate, cruel only to the bride-to-be who suddenly gets a first-hand experience of the inequity of living after a lifetime of being sheltered and protected, inabilities and deficiencies are cured, emphasizing in what essentially is a film created for no other reason than to be an escapist fantasy that the key to a happy life is as unrealistic and as incredible as swapping souls via rare natural phenomena. Like Temptation Island whose gay pageant director becomes the unwilling sacrificial lamb simply because he presumably has the least to lose among the other loved and loving survivors, the most fully realized character in Here Comes the Bride is the love-starved gay beautician whose fortune of being transported to the body of the beautiful and sexy bride-to-be is the most dramatic out of the five. As expected, it is mostly played for laughs and Panganiban does a brilliant job in emulating the fabulous larger-than-life gestures of Lapuz. After all, the very idea of a gay man suddenly and surprisingly getting everything he ever wanted, from the body parts he can only have in his wildest dreams to the straight men who he can only love and lust for from a safe distance, is in itself a hoot. The hilarity of the absurd situation, at that scene where the bride-to-be in the body of her godmother insists that the gay beautician return her body, unravels into a well-pronounced statement of gay angst and sentiment as he emotionally shouts "Hindi ninyo maiintindihan dahil hindi kayo bakla! (You will never understand because you are not gay!). At that moment, the film, notwithstanding the fact that it never stopped being funny, reflected a current fundamental truth, something that not even a mainstream film as self-promotedly queer as Olivia Lamasan's In My Life (2009) can have the guts to state as plainly and matter-of-factly as that. The gay man becomes a girl. The loveless godmother feels how it is to be loved. The amorous yet incapacitated grandfather relives the passion and the romance of his distant youth. The poor nanny turns into a millionaire. The innocent bride-to-be wallows in the realities of life's misfortune. Martinez fills the screen with realized desires at the expense of the bride-to-be, emphasizing the frailty of the human soul in the face of happiness. In the midst of the film's invaluable wit and humor that frequently pumps in rhythm with the Latin beats of the apt lively music score, the film's characters, ideally uncomplicated and stereotypical, are allowed to live their desires realized, concretizing in easy-to-understand cinematic terms the pleasures of escape, of living a fantasy even if it is only momentarily. I am very happy to say that Here Comes the Bride is as current and relevant as it is entertaining and hysterical. All it took was a solar eclipse and five-car collision atop the Magnetic Hill for the souls of five individuals --- the virginal bride-to-be (Angelica Panganiban), her histrionically litigious godmother (Eugene Domingo), her ringbearer's destitute nanny (Tuesday Vargas), her husband-to-be's amorous grandfather (Jaime Fabregas), and her gay beautician (John Lapuz) --- to switch bodies. With the bride-to-be's soul transferring to the godmother's body; the godmother's soul transferring to the nanny's body; the nanny's soul transferring to the grandfather's body; the grandfather's soul transferring to the beautician's body; and the beautician's soul transferring to the bride-to-be's body, the dream beach wedding turns into a hilarious riot, where long-dormant passions are awakened, sexual fantasies are fulfilled, economic alleviation is achieved, and a chance at love is obtained. Let us get it out of the way. Chris Martinez's Here Comes the Bride is top-notch entertainment. Martinez was able to come up with everything most recent Filipino mainstream comedies lack: that no-nonsense singular objective of making people laugh. From the getgo to the post-credit extra scene, the film never stopped to be overtly pedantic or moralistic, a problem that most Filipino comedies have since there always seems to be this need to use cinema as replacement for Sunday school. For example, Wenn Deramas' Ang Tanging Ina (The True Mother, 2003), and its sequel and many offshoots, are always derailed by its insistence on teaching a lesson; even Joyce Bernal's Kimmy Dora (2009) is stalled by its apologetic dénouement that went too long and too serious. Never mind the forced logic to explain the illogic, the negligible business about solar eclipses and souls, the history and science behind the soul-swap, as authoritatively explained by television trivia-master Kim Atienza. Here Comes the Bride is deliriously funny nonsense all the way and it thankfully works. The film's success is not entirely surprising. After all, Martinez is arguably one of the Philippines' better screenwriters. His screenplays, from Bridal Shower (Jeffrey Jeturian, 2004), about three friends in search of love, to Caregiver (Chito Roño, 2008), about a mother who follows her husband to London in the hopes of earning enough to live comfortably, reflect his ability to articulate something as minute as the language to something as pertinent as the needs of the rapidly-changing Filipino society for mainstream appeal. 100 (2008), his directorial debut about a woman who is dying from cancer, is salvaged from being a run-of-the-mill melodrama by an abundance of relevant humor. Martinez understands the Filipino soul, that the very best way to tackle something as devastating as death is to treat it with levity, to make it familiar and therefore personal. That said, Martinez may very well be the most current of all actively working screenwriters, actively pursuing entertainment without being dumbed down by the demands of commercial accessibility. Despite its astounding technical polish, Here Comes the Bride is fundamentally closer to Joey Gosiengfiao's redeemed Temptation Island (1981), where a bunch of beauty queens and the men surrounding them are stranded in a deserted island, than the mechanically churned comedies Star Cinema has been producing the past recent years. Underneath the caricatures that Martinez connected by the conceit of the convenient soul-swap, underneath the blatant inanity of its carefully conceived proceedings, is a well-pronounced understanding that life, as it is, is unfair, that there are those who are born poor, those who live loveless, and those who inevitably grow old and inutile. In a twist of fate, cruel only to the bride-to-be who suddenly gets a first-hand experience of the inequity of living after a lifetime of being sheltered and protected, inabilities and deficiencies are cured, emphasizing in what essentially is a film created for no other reason than to be an escapist fantasy that the key to a happy life is as unrealistic and as incredible as swapping souls via rare natural phenomena. Like Temptation Island whose gay pageant director becomes the unwilling sacrificial lamb simply because he presumably has the least to lose among the other loved and loving survivors, the most fully realized character in Here Comes the Bride is the love-starved gay beautician whose fortune of being transported to the body of the beautiful and sexy bride-to-be is the most dramatic out of the five. As expected, it is mostly played for laughs and Panganiban does a brilliant job in emulating the fabulous larger-than-life gestures of Lapuz. After all, the very idea of a gay man suddenly and surprisingly getting everything he ever wanted, from the body parts he can only have in his wildest dreams to the straight men who he can only love and lust for from a safe distance, is in itself a hoot. The hilarity of the absurd situation, at that scene where the bride-to-be in the body of her godmother insists that the gay beautician return her body, unravels into a well-pronounced statement of gay angst and sentiment as he emotionally shouts "Hindi ninyo maiintindihan dahil hindi kayo bakla! (You will never understand because you are not gay!). At that moment, the film, notwithstanding the fact that it never stopped being funny, reflected a current fundamental truth, something that not even a mainstream film as self-promotedly queer as Olivia Lamasan's In My Life (2009) can have the guts to state as plainly and matter-of-factly as that. The gay man becomes a girl. The loveless godmother feels how it is to be loved. The amorous yet incapacitated grandfather relives the passion and the romance of his distant youth. The poor nanny turns into a millionaire. The innocent bride-to-be wallows in the realities of life's misfortune. Martinez fills the screen with realized desires at the expense of the bride-to-be, emphasizing the frailty of the human soul in the face of happiness. In the midst of the film's invaluable wit and humor that frequently pumps in rhythm with the Latin beats of the apt lively music score, the film's characters, ideally uncomplicated and stereotypical, are allowed to live their desires realized, concretizing in easy-to-understand cinematic terms the pleasures of escape, of living a fantasy even if it is only momentarily. I am very happy to say that Here Comes the Bride is as current and relevant as it is entertaining and hysterical.

English

All it took was a solar eclipse and five-car collision atop the Magnetic Hill for the souls of five individuals --- the virginal bride-to-be (Angelica Panganiban), her histrionically litigious godmother (Eugene Domingo), her ringbearer's destitute nanny (Tuesday Vargas), her husband-to-be's amorous grandfather (Jaime Fabregas), and her gay beautician (John Lapuz) --- to switch bodies. With the bride-to-be's soul transferring to the godmother's body; the godmother's soul transferring to the nanny's body; the nanny's soul transferring to the grandfather's body; the grandfather's soul transferring to the beautician's body; and the beautician's soul transferring to the bride-to-be's body, the dream beach wedding turns into a hilarious riot, where long-dormant passions are awakened, sexual fantasies are fulfilled, economic alleviation is achieved, and a chance at love is obtained. Let us get it out of the way. Chris Martinez's Here Comes the Bride is top-notch entertainment. Martinez was able to come up with everything most recent Filipino mainstream comedies lack: that no-nonsense singular objective of making people laugh. From the getgo to the post-credit extra scene, the film never stopped to be overtly pedantic or moralistic, a problem that most Filipino comedies have since there always seems to be this need to use cinema as replacement for Sunday school. For example, Wenn Deramas' Ang Tanging Ina (The True Mother, 2003), and its sequel and many offshoots, are always derailed by its insistence on teaching a lesson; even Joyce Bernal's Kimmy Dora (2009) is stalled by its apologetic dénouement that went too long and too serious. Never mind the forced logic to explain the illogic, the negligible business about solar eclipses and souls, the history and science behind the soul-swap, as authoritatively explained by television trivia-master Kim Atienza. Here Comes the Bride is deliriously funny nonsense all the way and it thankfully works. The film's success is not entirely surprising. After all, Martinez is arguably one of the Philippines' better screenwriters. His screenplays, from Bridal Shower (Jeffrey Jeturian, 2004), about three friends in search of love, to Caregiver (Chito Roño, 2008), about a mother who follows her husband to London in the hopes of earning enough to live comfortably, reflect his ability to articulate something as minute as the language to something as pertinent as the needs of the rapidly-changing Filipino society for mainstream appeal. 100 (2008), his directorial debut about a woman who is dying from cancer, is salvaged from being a run-of-the-mill melodrama by an abundance of relevant humor. Martinez understands the Filipino soul, that the very best way to tackle something as devastating as death is to treat it with levity, to make it familiar and therefore personal. That said, Martinez may very well be the most current of all actively working screenwriters, actively pursuing entertainment without being dumbed down by the demands of commercial accessibility. Despite its astounding technical polish, Here Comes the Bride is fundamentally closer to Joey Gosiengfiao's redeemed Temptation Island (1981), where a bunch of beauty queens and the men surrounding them are stranded in a deserted island, than the mechanically churned comedies Star Cinema has been producing the past recent years. Underneath the caricatures that Martinez connected by the conceit of the convenient soul-swap, underneath the blatant inanity of its carefully conceived proceedings, is a well-pronounced understanding that life, as it is, is unfair, that there are those who are born poor, those who live loveless, and those who inevitably grow old and inutile. In a twist of fate, cruel only to the bride-to-be who suddenly gets a first-hand experience of the inequity of living after a lifetime of being sheltered and protected, inabilities and deficiencies are cured, emphasizing in what essentially is a film created for no other reason than to be an escapist fantasy that the key to a happy life is as unrealistic and as incredible as swapping souls via rare natural phenomena. Like Temptation Island whose gay pageant director becomes the unwilling sacrificial lamb simply because he presumably has the least to lose among the other loved and loving survivors, the most fully realized character in Here Comes the Bride is the love-starved gay beautician whose fortune of being transported to the body of the beautiful and sexy bride-to-be is the most dramatic out of the five. As expected, it is mostly played for laughs and Panganiban does a brilliant job in emulating the fabulous larger-than-life gestures of Lapuz. After all, the very idea of a gay man suddenly and surprisingly getting everything he ever wanted, from the body parts he can only have in his wildest dreams to the straight men who he can only love and lust for from a safe distance, is in itself a hoot. The hilarity of the absurd situation, at that scene where the bride-to-be in the body of her godmother insists that the gay beautician return her body, unravels into a well-pronounced statement of gay angst and sentiment as he emotionally shouts "Hindi ninyo maiintindihan dahil hindi kayo bakla! (You will never understand because you are not gay!). At that moment, the film, notwithstanding the fact that it never stopped being funny, reflected a current fundamental truth, something that not even a mainstream film as self-promotedly queer as Olivia Lamasan's In My Life (2009) can have the guts to state as plainly and matter-of-factly as that. The gay man becomes a girl. The loveless godmother feels how it is to be loved. The amorous yet incapacitated grandfather relives the passion and the romance of his distant youth. The poor nanny turns into a millionaire. The innocent bride-to-be wallows in the realities of life's misfortune. Martinez fills the screen with realized desires at the expense of the bride-to-be, emphasizing the frailty of the human soul in the face of happiness. In the midst of the film's invaluable wit and humor that frequently pumps in rhythm with the Latin beats of the apt lively music score, the film's characters, ideally uncomplicated and stereotypical, are allowed to live their desires realized, concretizing in easy-to-understand cinematic terms the pleasures of escape, of living a fantasy even if it is only momentarily. I am very happy to say that Here Comes the Bride is as current and relevant as it is entertaining and hysterical.

Last Update: 2016-12-05
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference: Anonymous
Warning: Contains invisible HTML formatting

Tagalog

All it took was a solar eclipse and five-car collision atop the Magnetic Hill for the souls of five individuals --- the virginal bride-to-be (Angelica Panganiban), her histrionically litigious godmother (Eugene Domingo), her ringbearer's destitute nanny (Tuesday Vargas), her husband-to-be's amorous grandfather (Jaime Fabregas), and her gay beautician (John Lapuz) --- to switch bodies. With the bride-to-be's soul transferring to the godmother's body; the godmother's soul transferring to the nanny's body; the nanny's soul transferring to the grandfather's body; the grandfather's soul transferring to the beautician's body; and the beautician's soul transferring to the bride-to-be's body, the dream beach wedding turns into a hilarious riot, where long-dormant passions are awakened, sexual fantasies are fulfilled, economic alleviation is achieved, and a chance at love is obtained. Let us get it out of the way. Chris Martinez's Here Comes the Bride is top-notch entertainment. Martinez was able to come up with everything most recent Filipino mainstream comedies lack: that no-nonsense singular objective of making people laugh. From the getgo to the post-credit extra scene, the film never stopped to be overtly pedantic or moralistic, a problem that most Filipino comedies have since there always seems to be this need to use cinema as replacement for Sunday school. For example, Wenn Deramas' Ang Tanging Ina (The True Mother, 2003), and its sequel and many offshoots, are always derailed by its insistence on teaching a lesson; even Joyce Bernal's Kimmy Dora (2009) is stalled by its apologetic dénouement that went too long and too serious. Never mind the forced logic to explain the illogic, the negligible business about solar eclipses and souls, the history and science behind the soul-swap, as authoritatively explained by television trivia-master Kim Atienza. Here Comes the Bride is deliriously funny nonsense all the way and it thankfully works. The film's success is not entirely surprising. After all, Martinez is arguably one of the Philippines' better screenwriters. His screenplays, from Bridal Shower (Jeffrey Jeturian, 2004), about three friends in search of love, to Caregiver (Chito Roño, 2008), about a mother who follows her husband to London in the hopes of earning enough to live comfortably, reflect his ability to articulate something as minute as the language to something as pertinent as the needs of the rapidly-changing Filipino society for mainstream appeal. 100 (2008), his directorial debut about a woman who is dying from cancer, is salvaged from being a run-of-the-mill melodrama by an abundance of relevant humor. Martinez understands the Filipino soul, that the very best way to tackle something as devastating as death is to treat it with levity, to make it familiar and therefore personal. That said, Martinez may very well be the most current of all actively working screenwriters, actively pursuing entertainment without being dumbed down by the demands of commercial accessibility. Despite its astounding technical polish, Here Comes the Bride is fundamentally closer to Joey Gosiengfiao's redeemed Temptation Island (1981), where a bunch of beauty queens and the men surrounding them are stranded in a deserted island, than the mechanically churned comedies Star Cinema has been producing the past recent years. Underneath the caricatures that Martinez connected by the conceit of the convenient soul-swap, underneath the blatant inanity of its carefully conceived proceedings, is a well-pronounced understanding that life, as it is, is unfair, that there are those who are born poor, those who live loveless, and those who inevitably grow old and inutile. In a twist of fate, cruel only to the bride-to-be who suddenly gets a first-hand experience of the inequity of living after a lifetime of being sheltered and protected, inabilities and deficiencies are cured, emphasizing in what essentially is a film created for no other reason than to be an escapist fantasy that the key to a happy life is as unrealistic and as incredible as swapping souls via rare natural phenomena. Like Temptation Island whose gay pageant director becomes the unwilling sacrificial lamb simply because he presumably has the least to lose among the other loved and loving survivors, the most fully realized character in Here Comes the Bride is the love-starved gay beautician whose fortune of being transported to the body of the beautiful and sexy bride-to-be is the most dramatic out of the five. As expected, it is mostly played for laughs and Panganiban does a brilliant job in emulating the fabulous larger-than-life gestures of Lapuz. After all, the very idea of a gay man suddenly and surprisingly getting everything he ever wanted, from the body parts he can only have in his wildest dreams to the straight men who he can only love and lust for from a safe distance, is in itself a hoot. The hilarity of the absurd situation, at that scene where the bride-to-be in the body of her godmother insists that the gay beautician return her body, unravels into a well-pronounced statement of gay angst and sentiment as he emotionally shouts "Hindi ninyo maiintindihan dahil hindi kayo bakla! (You will never understand because you are not gay!). At that moment, the film, notwithstanding the fact that it never stopped being funny, reflected a current fundamental truth, something that not even a mainstream film as self-promotedly queer as Olivia Lamasan's In My Life (2009) can have the guts to state as plainly and matter-of-factly as that. The gay man becomes a girl. The loveless godmother feels how it is to be loved. The amorous yet incapacitated grandfather relives the passion and the romance of his distant youth. The poor nanny turns into a millionaire. The innocent bride-to-be wallows in the realities of life's misfortune. Martinez fills the screen with realized desires at the expense of the bride-to-be, emphasizing the frailty of the human soul in the face of happiness. In the midst of the film's invaluable wit and humor that frequently pumps in rhythm with the Latin beats of the apt lively music score, the film's characters, ideally uncomplicated and stereotypical, are allowed to live their desires realized, concretizing in easy-to-understand cinematic terms the pleasures of escape, of living a fantasy even if it is only momentarily. I am very happy to say that Here Comes the Bride is as current and relevant as it is entertaining and hysterical.

English

Tagalog word for here comes the bride

Last Update: 2016-12-05
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference: Anonymous
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Tagalog

On that, I was returning home from school. I had few friends with me. Suddenly I found black clouds to the northwest side of the sky. I thought it would rain soon. So I started to walk fast. After a few times, it began to rain cats and dogs. I took shelter in a wayside house. I got drenched thoroughly. I pulled off my shoes and shirt and waited in the hope that the rains would soon cease. But there was no umbrella with me. Finding no other alternative I started for home again. I put my books in a poly bag. I found the path too much muddy and slippery. However, I reached home two hours late. I was wet from head to foot and was shivering with cold. My parents and other family members were astonished to see my condition. They took necessary steps to make fresh instantly. Really, it is a bitter experience in my life

English

english to ilocano translate

Last Update: 2016-06-07
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference: Anonymous

Tagalog

@melcahmay yun pick-up truck sa harap namin ay meron 2 patay na katawan. sa trabaho ng nanay ko, may nahanam sila ng 2 babae namatay pero hindi nakilala. @melcahmay the pick-up truck in front of us have 2 dead bodies. in my mama's office they found 2 unknown female casualties.

English

@melcahmay the pick-up truck in front of us have 2 dead bodies. in my mama's office they found 2 unknown female casualties.

Last Update: 2016-02-24
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference: Anonymous

Tagalog

Hindi ko man masabi ang nais kung sabihin sayo mahal kong mama, (GLORIA MAHINAY PATRICIO) ngunit alam ko na nararamdaman mo kung gaano kita ka-miss... and I really want to hug and feel you're embrace.. kahit malabong mangyari ang lahat hindi ko makakalimutan ang pagmamahal at pag-aalaga mo sa amin, you are the very best mom in my biggest world. happy mothers day to you mama.. i love you with all my hearth.

English

I can't say what I want to say to you my loving mother, (GLORIA MAHINAY PATRICIO) but I know that you can feel how much I miss you... and I really want to hug and feel you're embrace...even though everything happened in a blur I will never forget the love and the care you gave us, you are the very best mom in my biggest world. Happy Mother's Day to you mother...I love you with all my heart.

Last Update: 2015-07-29
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference: Anonymous

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