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Tagalog

spanish

English

unico iho

Last Update: 2019-03-21
Usage Frequency: 1
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Reference: Anonymous

Tagalog

spanish

English

english

Last Update: 2015-09-24
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference: Anonymous

Tagalog

spanish

English

examples of unique non- tagalog proverb

Last Update: 2017-06-21
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference: Anonymous

Tagalog

spanish

English

buckler under

Last Update: 2014-09-30
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference: Anonymous

Tagalog

what is barrow in spanish

English

what barrow in spanish

Last Update: 2017-05-23
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference: Anonymous

Tagalog

anu sa spanish ang thank you

English

How to spanish thank you

Last Update: 2015-11-22
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference: Anonymous

Tagalog

ano ang ibig sabihin ng spanish era

English

What does the Spanish era

Last Update: 2015-07-21
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference: Anonymous

Tagalog

spanish na salita at kahulugan nito sa english

English

spanish words and its meaning in english

Last Update: 2017-03-16
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference: Anonymous

Tagalog

The first boarding schools for spanish girlsin the philippines

English

secondary

Last Update: 2016-06-22
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference: Anonymous

Tagalog

These inalienable rights of the Moro people have been denied them by the Spanish and American colonialists then by what they call the Manila government post-independence, thus bringing about their marginalization and oppression as a people for centuries up to the present.

English

These inalienable rights of the Moro people have been denied them by the Spanish and American colonialists then by what they call the Manila government post-independence, thus bringing about their marginalization and oppression as a people for centuries up to the present.

Last Update: 2016-02-24
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference: Anonymous

Tagalog

In 1521, Magellan sailed from the island of Homonhon, Samar to the island of Limasawa, Leyte, where the first recorded blood compact was held between Rajah Kolambu and Magellan on March 29 of the same year. Leyte was named “Felipina” by Ruy Lopez de Villalobos, the Spanish navigator, after King Philip of Spain, in February 1543. The name was later given to the whole archipelago. Leyte suffered from the separate raids of Muslims Sultans, Pagdalanum Buhiran and Kudarat, and Suluans. Aside from the Muslim raids, Datu Bankaw of Limasawa and his son Pagali, revolted against the Spanish conquistadors but superior Spanish arms quelled them. In 1735, it became a politico-military province, with Samar under its jurisdiction. Samar and Leyte were separated in 1768. The first capital of Leyte was Carigara then Palo, Tanauan, and finally, Tacloban. During the liberation of the Philippines from the Japanese Imperial Forces, the American troops led by General Douglas MacArthur and President Sergio Osmena landed at Palo, Leyte on October 20, 1944.

English

english waray

Last Update: 2019-01-31
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference: Anonymous

Tagalog

The Religious SchismThe only living and tangible result of the revolution was the Filipinochurch, popularly known as the Aglipayan or Philippine Independent Church.When at the start of the second phase of the Revolution the Spanisharchbishop enlisted Father Gregorio Aglipay’s help in bringing back theFilipinos to the Spanish side, Aguinaldo persuaded Aglipay to divert hisenergies to the cause of the people Mabini, riding on the crest of the popularnationalistic movement, suggested the founding of a Filipino NationalChurch. Though unsuccessful owing to war conditions, his idea laid thegroundwork of the later Philippine Independent Church. The story of thebirth of this Church is to a great extent the story of the struggle of theFilipino clergy to Filipinize the Catholic Church in the Philippines.Gregorio Aglipay on the Scene–The Revolution which began in1896 was primarily a conflict of races. On one side were the Filipino civiland clerical groups who were up in arms against the Spanish civil and clericalsegments, on the other side. As it turned out, the second phase of theRevolution was not only political, but religious as well. The PhilippineCatholic Church, whose majority belonged to the party of the oppressors,aided and abetted the colonial government in its policy of repression. Mabinihimself, in his letter to General Otis in 1898, accused the Spanish friars ofgiving aid and comfort to the colonial administration and of taking up arms,when necessity arose, against the revolutionists. In the circumstances, herefused to free the friar-prisoners.In the second phase of the revolution, which commenced withAguinaldo’s return from Hong Kong, Governor-General Basilio Augustin andArchbishop Bernardino Nozaleda, knowing that Father Gregorio Aglipay wasstill sympathetic to Spain but rather hostile to the United States, played agame in which Aglipay was the pawn. They commissioned him to conferwith revolutionary leaders, particularly with Mariano Trias, Artemio Recarte,and Emiliano Riego de Dios, in order to bring them back to the Spanish side.The bait to win them over to their side was the promise of autonomy. Aglipaydid as he was told, but his mission was failure, for the revolutionary leadershad lost their faith in Spanish promises. Meanwhile, Aguinaldo, who had justreturned from Hong Kong, sent Colonel Luciano San Miguel as his emissaryto Aglipay for the purpose of persuading the latter to work for the Filipinocause. Nozaleda countered by commissioning Aglipay to win over Aguinaldoto the Spanish cause. Aguinaldo, however, was firm in his determination tocooperate with the Americans and urged Aglipay to go to the north to workfor the revolutionary cause. Nozaleda was well posted on these mover, andtaking advantage of the situation, encouraged Aglipay to go north not to heedAguinaldo’s prompting, but to investigate the condition of the bishopric ofNueva Segovia. Aglipay toured the northern provinces and secured therelease of two Jesuit priests. Upon his return to Manila to report to Nozaleda,

English

religious schismThe Religious SchismThe only living and tangible result of the revolution was the Filipinochurch, popularly known as the Aglipayan or Philippine Independent Church.When at the start of the second phase of the Revolution the Spanisharchbishop enlisted Father Gregorio Aglipay’s help in bringing back theFilipinos to the Spanish side, Aguinaldo persuaded Aglipay to divert hisenergies to the cause of the people Mabini, riding on the crest of the popularnationalistic movement, suggested the founding of a Filipino NationalChurch. Though unsuccessful owing to war conditions, his idea laid thegroundwork of the later Philippine Independent Church. The story of thebirth of this Church is to a great extent the story of the struggle of theFilipino clergy to Filipinize the Catholic Church in the Philippines.Gregorio Aglipay on the Scene–The Revolution which began in1896 was primarily a conflict of races. On one side were the Filipino civiland clerical groups who were up in arms against the Spanish civil and clericalsegments, on the other side. As it turned out, the second phase of theRevolution was not only political, but religious as well. The PhilippineCatholic Church, whose majority belonged to the party of the oppressors,aided and abetted the colonial government in its policy of repression. Mabinihimself, in his letter to General Otis in 1898, accused the Spanish friars ofgiving aid and comfort to the colonial administration and of taking up arms,when necessity arose, against the revolutionists. In the circumstances, herefused to free the friar prisoners.In the second phase of the revolution, which commenced withAguinaldo’s return from Hong Kong, Governor General Basilio Augustin andArchbishop Bernardino Nozaleda, knowing that Father Gregorio Aglipay wasstill sympathetic to Spain but rather hostile to the United States, played agame in which Aglipay was the pawn. They commissioned him to conferwith revolutionary leaders, particularly with Mariano Trias, Artemio Recarte,and Emiliano Riego de Dios, in order to bring them back to the Spanish side.The bait to win them over to their side was the promise of autonomy. Aglipaydid as he was told, but his mission was failure, for the revolutionary leadershad lost their faith in Spanish promises. Meanwhile, Aguinaldo, who had justreturned from Hong Kong, sent Colonel Luciano San Miguel as his emissaryto Aglipay for the purpose of persuading the latter to work for the Filipinocause. Nozaleda countered by commissioning Aglipay to win over Aguinaldoto the Spanish cause. Aguinaldo, however, was firm in his determination tocooperate with the Americans and urged Aglipay to go to the north to workfor the revolutionary cause. Nozaleda was well posted on these mover, andtaking advantage of the situation, encouraged Aglipay to go north not to heedAguinaldo’s prompting, but to investigate the condition of the bishopric ofNueva Segovia. Aglipay toured the northern provinces and secured therelease of two Jesuit priests. Upon his return to Manila to report to Nozaleda,

Last Update: 2019-01-29
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference: Anonymous

Tagalog

Sa ikatlong larawan mababasa ang mga letrang PP (na tumutukoy sa partidong Spanish Popular Party) at PSOE (sa partidong Spanish Socialist Workers' Party).

English

In the third photograph, one can see the letters PP (the Spanish Popular Party) and PSOE (the Spanish Socialist Workers' Party).

Last Update: 2016-02-24
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference: Anonymous

Tagalog

Ang Spanish Era ng damit ay hinati sa dalawa. Ang Bagong Espanya (1521-1799) at ang mga Espanyol East Indies (1800-1899). Ito ay bago nang American Era (1900-1920).

English

The Spanish Era of Clothing is divided by two. The New Spain (1521-1799) and the Spanish East Indies (1800-1899). This was before the American Era (1900-1920).

Last Update: 2015-11-08
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference: Anonymous

Tagalog

HISTORY OF CAGAYAN DE ORO CITY By ATTY. "TOMMY" C. PACANA CHAIRMAN, HISTORICAL COMMISSION Two thousand years ago, there were already ancient Kagay-anons living around the vicinity of Hulaga, Himologan and Tagbalitang caves around 8 kilometers south of Cagayan de Oro City. Fr. Francisco Demetrio, S.J., noted archeologist and Filipino folklorist of Xavier University had collected tools, implements, potteries and shards from these areas and subjected these to the Carbon dating process at the Philippine Historical Museum to determine their age. It was found that these tools and implements were already used by the ancient Kagay-anons during the Neolithic Age. This shows how old Cagayan de Oro is before the coming of the Spanish "conquistadors" to the Philippines in march 1521. There were three great Sultanates of Mindanao and Sulu. These were Sultanates of Sulu under Sheriff Aljaluddin, the Sultanate of Maguindanao under Sheriff Mawi, and Tagoloan under Sheriff Mohammed Kabungsuwan. The Sultanate of Tagoloan extended from Baloi, Lanao del Sur, to Butuan, Cagayan de Oro (or Kalambaguhan, by which name it was then known), was merely a passageway from Baloi to Butuan, which was already a great trading center like Zugbu, Panay and Manila. Kalambaguhan has a small settlement of Bukidnons who lived along the riverbanks of the Kalambaguhan River. This river (now the Cagayan River) was so known because of the "Lambago" trees that grew profusely along its banks. During this time, however, the Cachel Corralat (Sultan Kudarat) marauding warriors attacked such places as Manticao, Tagnipa, (El Salvador), Iligan and Kalambaguhan to bring these places with their domain. They captured the women, children and working animals of the inhabitants in these places and brought them to their Sultanate. Because of these constant raids, the Bukidnons along the river fled to the hills of Hulaga led by their ruler, Datu Salangsang. Sometime in 1622, long after the Spaniards had established themselves at Butuan, Spanish friars under Fray Agustin de San Pedro known as "El Padre Capitan" went to see Datu Salangsang and sought to invite him and his people to come down to their told settlement at Kalambaguhan under the protection of the Spaniards. Datu Salangsang's aunt, a Christianized woman of influence whose name was Magdalena Bacuya. With a messenger from El Padre Capitan reiterated his offer to Datu Salangsang and convinced him to come down to their ancient settlement of Kalambaguhan. To protect the Bukidnons from the constant raids of the Muslim from Cachel Corralat, El Padre Capitan built a fortification around the settlement, which is now Gaston Park. Several raids of the Maguindanao warriors were repulsed by the courageous El Padre Capitan that the Muslims never returned again to the settlement. It was from this small settlement that the present Cagayan de Oro originated. A small church was built on the site, which later became the present San Agustin Cathedral. Thereby, the fame of El Padre Capitan as an able military strategist, spread far and wide. He vanquished the Muslims around Lake Lanao. The people of Cagayan de Oro come from a blend of two cultures those of the Muslims and Bukidnons. These were the native people that had settled in the region long before the coming of the Spaniards in fact, the first Christians among these natives were the Muslims from Lanao who were the descendants of the Samporna clan. They were the first to be baptized along with the Bato-Batos, the Wagas, Abas, Dagumbals and several families. HOW DID CAGAYAN DE ORO GOT ITS NAME? Pre-War folks said that Cagayan came from "Cagaycay, " an ancient Bukidnon word meaning to rake in the earth either with one's bare hands or with a piece of wood. It also means rocks gathered from the river or ores raked in from the hillside or streams. Gold have always been abundant in the Cagayan River gold ores are still found in the nearby of Cagayan as Tumpagon, Pigsag-an, Tuburan, Taglimao and other nearby places. Before the Spaniards came to Cagayan (or Kalambaguhan), there were already places where on could rake in the earth. ANOTHER VERSION IS MORE ROMANTIC Another version of how Cagayan de Oro got its name is told in of that story of a Bukidnon chieftain on the eastern side of Cagayan River (whose name according to old folks was Mansicampo), once had a quarrel with a Muslim Datu across the river (now the RER Subdivision), his name was Bagongsalibo. The quarrel became intense that the Bukidnon chieftain wanted it settled by war. However, the Muslim Datu across the river wanted to live in peace with his people in that part of Cagayan. Mansicampo then called on all his followers and relatives from the Bukidnon tribes of Daan Lunsod, gathered on the eastern side of the river ready for combat then Mansicampo ordered his son, the Bagani, to go and see Datu Bagongsalibo and arranged for a council of war. Therefore, the young prince went to see the Muslim Datu and confirmed with him. During the conference, however the young prince noted that there was a beautiful young woman who kept on peeping from behind a door looking at him. She was so beautiful that the young prince was immediately captivated and forgot his main purpose in the council. The young prince immediately proposed his intentions to the Muslim Datu who was only too willing to accept his land in marriage as he was not very keen about going to war against a neighbor. When the Bukidnon chieftain heard about his son proposing marriage to the daughter of his enemy. His warriors bid goodbye and left to live near the hills of Lumbia vowing never return to his former settlement which he now call "Kagayha-an" (or in Bukidnon, a place of shame). Since then, Cagayan de Oro has grown into one of the most peaceful and progressive cities in the entire Philippines.

English

zzzzzzzz

Last Update: 2015-08-27
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference: Anonymous
Warning: Contains invisible HTML formatting

Tagalog

Lanao comes from the word ranao, meaning "lake." Lanao centers on the basin of Lake Lanao; thus, it is the land of the Maranaos, the "people of the lake." Lanao is the seat of the Sultanate of Lanao. When the Spaniards first explored Lanao in 1689, they found a well-settled community named Dansalan at the lake's northern end. Dansalan became a municipality in 1907 and a city in 1940. During the Pre-Spanish time, there are 4 important Boundaries hold the power of appointing a new sultan namely: Bakayawan, Dalama, Madamba and Sawer. In appointing a new sultan the permission of these four boundaries are needed to validate the new sultan appointed to his position.

English

ew

Last Update: 2015-08-27
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference: Anonymous
Warning: Contains invisible HTML formatting

Tagalog

The Filipino term for a ghost is multo, which is derived from the Spanish word muerto, meaning dead. The multo is the soul of a dead person that has returned to the mortal world. It may want to finish an incomplete task or promise, or take revenge, it may return because of in improper burial or an unusually violent death or suicide. The ghost may be seeking a replacement so that it can live again.[1] Manananggal The Manananggal is a vampire who can separate her upper torso from her lower body in order to fly in the night with huge bat-like wings to prey on unsuspecting, pregnant women in their homes, using an elongated proboscis-like tongue to reach their unborn fetus.[2] The Manananggal has some similarities to the Penanggalan of Malay legend, a floating female head with trailing entrails.[3] Beliefs in the origin of manananggals vary. One story says that heredity or contamination by physical or supernatural means can turn someone into a manananggal. For example, contaminating someone's meal with an old manananggal's saliva or human flesh can pass it on.[4] In some ways the manananggal resembles the tik-tik, a type of aswang that takes the form of a black bird which makes a "tik-tik-tik" sound. It has a long proboscis that reaches through the roof and sucks the fetus inside the womb of pregnant women.[5] The tik-tik may be related to the Indonesian Kuntilanak, a vampire bird that makes a "ke-ke-ke" sound as it flies.[6] The tiyanak is a malevolent creature that may be found in remote grassy fields. It appears as a helpless infant. When someone takes pity and picks it up, it turns into a demon, scratching and biting or devouring its victim. In the south, the tiyanak is known as a patianak or muntianak, and is thought to be the ghost child of a woman who died in the forest during childbirth. In Malaysia and Indonesia it is the pontianak, or the mother who died in childbirth, who appears as a normal person, then turns into a fiend when the passerby approaches.[1] Urban legends[edit] Common themes[edit] Common themes in ghost legends include the White Lady, the headless priest and the phantom hitchhiker. The white lady appears in lonely places, dressed in white, with no visible face or with a disfigured face. Apparently she has died a violent death and is still haunting the vicinity, but with no ill intent. The headless priest prowls at night in a graveyard or ruined place, either carrying his severed head or searching for his head.[7] One of the hitchhiker stories tells of three boys who pick

English

What is the meaning of fear

Last Update: 2015-03-05
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference: Anonymous
Warning: Contains invisible HTML formatting

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