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Inglés

Tagalo

Información

Inglés

you are the true god

Tagalo

Pupurihin ka o diyos

Última actualización: 2019-04-26
Frecuencia de uso: 1
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Referencia: Anónimo

Inglés

The true back-blade.

Tagalo

Ang tunay na baliktad ang talim.

Última actualización: 2016-10-27
Frecuencia de uso: 1
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Referencia: Anónimo

Inglés

how dare you keep the true to me

Tagalo

kung paano maglakas-loob sa iyo upang gawin iyon

Última actualización: 2016-08-26
Frecuencia de uso: 1
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Referencia: Anónimo

Inglés

The true nature of the planet Alpha Centauri Bb is still a mystery.

Tagalo

Ang tunay na kalikasan ng planetang Alpha Centauri Bb ay mahiwaga pa.

Última actualización: 2014-02-01
Frecuencia de uso: 1
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Referencia: Anónimo

Inglés

the true beauty of man is not visible to external appearance but to the will of the will

Tagalo

Ang tunay na maganda ay nasa loob ng iyung puso na hindi kumukupas samantalang ang panlabas na anyo ay kumukupas pagdating ng maraming panahon

Última actualización: 2019-01-06
Frecuencia de uso: 1
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Inglés

In this way, I will learn the true meaning of Christian leadership, love, and service to others.

Tagalo

Ako, si Ana, na nauunawan ang kahalagahan ng paguugnayan ng paaralan at tahanan sa kabuuang paghubog sa b

Última actualización: 2019-07-15
Frecuencia de uso: 1
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Referencia: Anónimo

Inglés

Truth be told, many Filipinos have disregarded the true meaning of this day, the martyrdom of Dr. Jose P. Rizal.

Tagalo

Truth be told, many Filipinos have disregarded the true meaning of this day, the martyrdom of Dr. Jose P. Rizal. Nakikita ng In Between Columns yun kabalintunaan na bumati ng "Happy Rizal Day" sa araw na binaril siya ng mga Espanyol na kolonisador:

Última actualización: 2016-02-24
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Inglés

Martin teach and show the true meaning of life in the TV series Spartacus, Jessie can justify it. He learned a lot from him.

Tagalo

Pangasinan translate Tagalog

Última actualización: 2015-05-21
Frecuencia de uso: 1
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Referencia: Anónimo

Inglés

Reading is also a good morning exercise in our brain. It is said to be more demanding than watching television or listening to the radio. As we read, we have more time to think. Well, we can stop for comprehension and get the true meaning and insight of what we have read. Reading also helps with concentration and attention skills. Reading also helps increase our vocabulary. With understanding

Tagalo

Sa pagkaintindi natin sa ating mga binasa ay mauunawaan natin ang mga salitang bago pa lamang sa atin. Nakatutulong din ang pagbabasa sa pagtaas ng tiwala sa sarili ng isang tao at paghasa sa ating creativity. Dahil nai-expose tayo sa mga bagong ideya at mas maraming impormasyon sa pamamagitan ng pagbabasa, maaaring magkaroon ng pagbabago (ikabubuti o ikagagaling) sa paraan ng ating pag-iisip.

Última actualización: 2019-03-07
Frecuencia de uso: 1
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Referencia: Anónimo

Inglés

Boom! blood, flesh, struggle and fear surrounding in the atmosphere if one is sulky, one is scorned if one is not a noble, one is a peasant there are crimes, abuses, hates and injustices and the only thing that rules the earth is immorality Sshhh… silence, for the end may come voices are not made to speak the truth, but to shout and scream! eyes are not made to see the reality, but to hide the facts and cry, and weep and the hands are not made to reach out but to fight instead! This is not yet over this is chaos this is what we call WAR!!! It was a day of in famine last September 11, 2001 when an airplane crashed it’s way into human life! The United States of America’s World Trade Center Shattered! Boom! tranquility and harmony was lost roaming outsider, Boom! Many lives were gone in just a blink of an eye mothers died, fathers vanished and brothers suffered leaving no more but distress and pieces of mind and soul Guess what the cause is? TERRORISM!!! brought by the power of this indespicable greed This is the beginning of the 3rd world war, or the featured prophecy of Nostradamus God forbid though in this world where every one is divided by walls that separates east and west through religion and all living creatures that exists came from only one creator TERRORISM!! Bloodshed, showering of bullets, bombs and missiles biochemical weapons, and death! The story of why many human beings who were victimized and sought for moral righteousness Terrorism! Start walking on ice where beings die, in a shivering cold and lose their lives GET OUT OF MY LIFE!!! I was there, I was there, I was there and shout! Listen, and you will hear the cry of the trouble of our faith so now, eliminate all your senses! Talk, and you will not be heard for your rights are separate from the other turfs Behold For the riches of life were broken because, we are dreamers STOP! This are all hatred, hatred and hatred! You who did cause for the voices of the youth Youth who have the right to be hold for the unity and progress of the future year It’s time to wake up! It’s time to do something! the clock is ticking… and then, 10 selfishness 9 arrogance 8 hate 7 injustice 6 pride 5 war 4 kindness 3 respect 2 love and at last 1 peace It is peace and wisdom we want like a steel pad that serves us on it’s path May that be all? we need to show the true virtue of peace, love soldiers may march towards the war guns may kill millions of men homes may be shuttered and lives may be called in danger but one thing is for sure this is not the end there is hope We, the youth lays here and wakes up in the advent of war processes save our future join hands together for what we want is Peace Not War.

Tagalo

gumawa ng kapayapaan hindi digmaa

Última actualización: 2018-07-10
Frecuencia de uso: 1
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Referencia: Anónimo

Inglés

All it took was a solar eclipse and five-car collision atop the Magnetic Hill for the souls of five individuals --- the virginal bride-to-be (Angelica Panganiban), her histrionically litigious godmother (Eugene Domingo), her ringbearer's destitute nanny (Tuesday Vargas), her husband-to-be's amorous grandfather (Jaime Fabregas), and her gay beautician (John Lapuz) --- to switch bodies. With the bride-to-be's soul transferring to the godmother's body; the godmother's soul transferring to the nanny's body; the nanny's soul transferring to the grandfather's body; the grandfather's soul transferring to the beautician's body; and the beautician's soul transferring to the bride-to-be's body, the dream beach wedding turns into a hilarious riot, where long-dormant passions are awakened, sexual fantasies are fulfilled, economic alleviation is achieved, and a chance at love is obtained. Let us get it out of the way. Chris Martinez's Here Comes the Bride is top-notch entertainment. Martinez was able to come up with everything most recent Filipino mainstream comedies lack: that no-nonsense singular objective of making people laugh. From the getgo to the post-credit extra scene, the film never stopped to be overtly pedantic or moralistic, a problem that most Filipino comedies have since there always seems to be this need to use cinema as replacement for Sunday school. For example, Wenn Deramas' Ang Tanging Ina (The True Mother, 2003), and its sequel and many offshoots, are always derailed by its insistence on teaching a lesson; even Joyce Bernal's Kimmy Dora (2009) is stalled by its apologetic dénouement that went too long and too serious. Never mind the forced logic to explain the illogic, the negligible business about solar eclipses and souls, the history and science behind the soul-swap, as authoritatively explained by television trivia-master Kim Atienza. Here Comes the Bride is deliriously funny nonsense all the way and it thankfully works. The film's success is not entirely surprising. After all, Martinez is arguably one of the Philippines' better screenwriters. His screenplays, from Bridal Shower (Jeffrey Jeturian, 2004), about three friends in search of love, to Caregiver (Chito Roño, 2008), about a mother who follows her husband to London in the hopes of earning enough to live comfortably, reflect his ability to articulate something as minute as the language to something as pertinent as the needs of the rapidly-changing Filipino society for mainstream appeal. 100 (2008), his directorial debut about a woman who is dying from cancer, is salvaged from being a run-of-the-mill melodrama by an abundance of relevant humor. Martinez understands the Filipino soul, that the very best way to tackle something as devastating as death is to treat it with levity, to make it familiar and therefore personal. That said, Martinez may very well be the most current of all actively working screenwriters, actively pursuing entertainment without being dumbed down by the demands of commercial accessibility. Despite its astounding technical polish, Here Comes the Bride is fundamentally closer to Joey Gosiengfiao's redeemed Temptation Island (1981), where a bunch of beauty queens and the men surrounding them are stranded in a deserted island, than the mechanically churned comedies Star Cinema has been producing the past recent years. Underneath the caricatures that Martinez connected by the conceit of the convenient soul-swap, underneath the blatant inanity of its carefully conceived proceedings, is a well-pronounced understanding that life, as it is, is unfair, that there are those who are born poor, those who live loveless, and those who inevitably grow old and inutile. In a twist of fate, cruel only to the bride-to-be who suddenly gets a first-hand experience of the inequity of living after a lifetime of being sheltered and protected, inabilities and deficiencies are cured, emphasizing in what essentially is a film created for no other reason than to be an escapist fantasy that the key to a happy life is as unrealistic and as incredible as swapping souls via rare natural phenomena. Like Temptation Island whose gay pageant director becomes the unwilling sacrificial lamb simply because he presumably has the least to lose among the other loved and loving survivors, the most fully realized character in Here Comes the Bride is the love-starved gay beautician whose fortune of being transported to the body of the beautiful and sexy bride-to-be is the most dramatic out of the five. As expected, it is mostly played for laughs and Panganiban does a brilliant job in emulating the fabulous larger-than-life gestures of Lapuz. After all, the very idea of a gay man suddenly and surprisingly getting everything he ever wanted, from the body parts he can only have in his wildest dreams to the straight men who he can only love and lust for from a safe distance, is in itself a hoot. The hilarity of the absurd situation, at that scene where the bride-to-be in the body of her godmother insists that the gay beautician return her body, unravels into a well-pronounced statement of gay angst and sentiment as he emotionally shouts "Hindi ninyo maiintindihan dahil hindi kayo bakla! (You will never understand because you are not gay!). At that moment, the film, notwithstanding the fact that it never stopped being funny, reflected a current fundamental truth, something that not even a mainstream film as self-promotedly queer as Olivia Lamasan's In My Life (2009) can have the guts to state as plainly and matter-of-factly as that. The gay man becomes a girl. The loveless godmother feels how it is to be loved. The amorous yet incapacitated grandfather relives the passion and the romance of his distant youth. The poor nanny turns into a millionaire. The innocent bride-to-be wallows in the realities of life's misfortune. Martinez fills the screen with realized desires at the expense of the bride-to-be, emphasizing the frailty of the human soul in the face of happiness. In the midst of the film's invaluable wit and humor that frequently pumps in rhythm with the Latin beats of the apt lively music score, the film's characters, ideally uncomplicated and stereotypical, are allowed to live their desires realized, concretizing in easy-to-understand cinematic terms the pleasures of escape, of living a fantasy even if it is only momentarily. I am very happy to say that Here Comes the Bride is as current and relevant as it is entertaining and hysterical.

Tagalo

All it took was a solar eclipse and five-car collision atop the Magnetic Hill for the souls of five individuals --- the virginal bride-to-be (Angelica Panganiban), her histrionically litigious godmother (Eugene Domingo), her ringbearer's destitute nanny (Tuesday Vargas), her husband-to-be's amorous grandfather (Jaime Fabregas), and her gay beautician (John Lapuz) --- to switch bodies. With the bride-to-be's soul transferring to the godmother's body; the godmother's soul transferring to the nanny's body; the nanny's soul transferring to the grandfather's body; the grandfather's soul transferring to the beautician's body; and the beautician's soul transferring to the bride-to-be's body, the dream beach wedding turns into a hilarious riot, where long-dormant passions are awakened, sexual fantasies are fulfilled, economic alleviation is achieved, and a chance at love is obtained. Let us get it out of the way. Chris Martinez's Here Comes the Bride is top-notch entertainment. Martinez was able to come up with everything most recent Filipino mainstream comedies lack: that no-nonsense singular objective of making people laugh. From the getgo to the post-credit extra scene, the film never stopped to be overtly pedantic or moralistic, a problem that most Filipino comedies have since there always seems to be this need to use cinema as replacement for Sunday school. For example, Wenn Deramas' Ang Tanging Ina (The True Mother, 2003), and its sequel and many offshoots, are always derailed by its insistence on teaching a lesson; even Joyce Bernal's Kimmy Dora (2009) is stalled by its apologetic dénouement that went too long and too serious. Never mind the forced logic to explain the illogic, the negligible business about solar eclipses and souls, the history and science behind the soul-swap, as authoritatively explained by television trivia-master Kim Atienza. Here Comes the Bride is deliriously funny nonsense all the way and it thankfully works. The film's success is not entirely surprising. After all, Martinez is arguably one of the Philippines' better screenwriters. His screenplays, from Bridal Shower (Jeffrey Jeturian, 2004), about three friends in search of love, to Caregiver (Chito Roño, 2008), about a mother who follows her husband to London in the hopes of earning enough to live comfortably, reflect his ability to articulate something as minute as the language to something as pertinent as the needs of the rapidly-changing Filipino society for mainstream appeal. 100 (2008), his directorial debut about a woman who is dying from cancer, is salvaged from being a run-of-the-mill melodrama by an abundance of relevant humor. Martinez understands the Filipino soul, that the very best way to tackle something as devastating as death is to treat it with levity, to make it familiar and therefore personal. That said, Martinez may very well be the most current of all actively working screenwriters, actively pursuing entertainment without being dumbed down by the demands of commercial accessibility. Despite its astounding technical polish, Here Comes the Bride is fundamentally closer to Joey Gosiengfiao's redeemed Temptation Island (1981), where a bunch of beauty queens and the men surrounding them are stranded in a deserted island, than the mechanically churned comedies Star Cinema has been producing the past recent years. Underneath the caricatures that Martinez connected by the conceit of the convenient soul-swap, underneath the blatant inanity of its carefully conceived proceedings, is a well-pronounced understanding that life, as it is, is unfair, that there are those who are born poor, those who live loveless, and those who inevitably grow old and inutile. In a twist of fate, cruel only to the bride-to-be who suddenly gets a first-hand experience of the inequity of living after a lifetime of being sheltered and protected, inabilities and deficiencies are cured, emphasizing in what essentially is a film created for no other reason than to be an escapist fantasy that the key to a happy life is as unrealistic and as incredible as swapping souls via rare natural phenomena. Like Temptation Island whose gay pageant director becomes the unwilling sacrificial lamb simply because he presumably has the least to lose among the other loved and loving survivors, the most fully realized character in Here Comes the Bride is the love-starved gay beautician whose fortune of being transported to the body of the beautiful and sexy bride-to-be is the most dramatic out of the five. As expected, it is mostly played for laughs and Panganiban does a brilliant job in emulating the fabulous larger-than-life gestures of Lapuz. After all, the very idea of a gay man suddenly and surprisingly getting everything he ever wanted, from the body parts he can only have in his wildest dreams to the straight men who he can only love and lust for from a safe distance, is in itself a hoot. The hilarity of the absurd situation, at that scene where the bride-to-be in the body of her godmother insists that the gay beautician return her body, unravels into a well-pronounced statement of gay angst and sentiment as he emotionally shouts "Hindi ninyo maiintindihan dahil hindi kayo bakla! (You will never understand because you are not gay!). At that moment, the film, notwithstanding the fact that it never stopped being funny, reflected a current fundamental truth, something that not even a mainstream film as self-promotedly queer as Olivia Lamasan's In My Life (2009) can have the guts to state as plainly and matter-of-factly as that. The gay man becomes a girl. The loveless godmother feels how it is to be loved. The amorous yet incapacitated grandfather relives the passion and the romance of his distant youth. The poor nanny turns into a millionaire. The innocent bride-to-be wallows in the realities of life's misfortune. Martinez fills the screen with realized desires at the expense of the bride-to-be, emphasizing the frailty of the human soul in the face of happiness. In the midst of the film's invaluable wit and humor that frequently pumps in rhythm with the Latin beats of the apt lively music score, the film's characters, ideally uncomplicated and stereotypical, are allowed to live their desires realized, concretizing in easy-to-understand cinematic terms the pleasures of escape, of living a fantasy even if it is only momentarily. I am very happy to say that Here Comes the Bride is as current and relevant as it is entertaining and hysterical. All it took was a solar eclipse and five-car collision atop the Magnetic Hill for the souls of five individuals --- the virginal bride-to-be (Angelica Panganiban), her histrionically litigious godmother (Eugene Domingo), her ringbearer's destitute nanny (Tuesday Vargas), her husband-to-be's amorous grandfather (Jaime Fabregas), and her gay beautician (John Lapuz) --- to switch bodies. With the bride-to-be's soul transferring to the godmother's body; the godmother's soul transferring to the nanny's body; the nanny's soul transferring to the grandfather's body; the grandfather's soul transferring to the beautician's body; and the beautician's soul transferring to the bride-to-be's body, the dream beach wedding turns into a hilarious riot, where long-dormant passions are awakened, sexual fantasies are fulfilled, economic alleviation is achieved, and a chance at love is obtained. Let us get it out of the way. Chris Martinez's Here Comes the Bride is top-notch entertainment. Martinez was able to come up with everything most recent Filipino mainstream comedies lack: that no-nonsense singular objective of making people laugh. From the getgo to the post-credit extra scene, the film never stopped to be overtly pedantic or moralistic, a problem that most Filipino comedies have since there always seems to be this need to use cinema as replacement for Sunday school. For example, Wenn Deramas' Ang Tanging Ina (The True Mother, 2003), and its sequel and many offshoots, are always derailed by its insistence on teaching a lesson; even Joyce Bernal's Kimmy Dora (2009) is stalled by its apologetic dénouement that went too long and too serious. Never mind the forced logic to explain the illogic, the negligible business about solar eclipses and souls, the history and science behind the soul-swap, as authoritatively explained by television trivia-master Kim Atienza. Here Comes the Bride is deliriously funny nonsense all the way and it thankfully works. The film's success is not entirely surprising. After all, Martinez is arguably one of the Philippines' better screenwriters. His screenplays, from Bridal Shower (Jeffrey Jeturian, 2004), about three friends in search of love, to Caregiver (Chito Roño, 2008), about a mother who follows her husband to London in the hopes of earning enough to live comfortably, reflect his ability to articulate something as minute as the language to something as pertinent as the needs of the rapidly-changing Filipino society for mainstream appeal. 100 (2008), his directorial debut about a woman who is dying from cancer, is salvaged from being a run-of-the-mill melodrama by an abundance of relevant humor. Martinez understands the Filipino soul, that the very best way to tackle something as devastating as death is to treat it with levity, to make it familiar and therefore personal. That said, Martinez may very well be the most current of all actively working screenwriters, actively pursuing entertainment without being dumbed down by the demands of commercial accessibility. Despite its astounding technical polish, Here Comes the Bride is fundamentally closer to Joey Gosiengfiao's redeemed Temptation Island (1981), where a bunch of beauty queens and the men surrounding them are stranded in a deserted island, than the mechanically churned comedies Star Cinema has been producing the past recent years. Underneath the caricatures that Martinez connected by the conceit of the convenient soul-swap, underneath the blatant inanity of its carefully conceived proceedings, is a well-pronounced understanding that life, as it is, is unfair, that there are those who are born poor, those who live loveless, and those who inevitably grow old and inutile. In a twist of fate, cruel only to the bride-to-be who suddenly gets a first-hand experience of the inequity of living after a lifetime of being sheltered and protected, inabilities and deficiencies are cured, emphasizing in what essentially is a film created for no other reason than to be an escapist fantasy that the key to a happy life is as unrealistic and as incredible as swapping souls via rare natural phenomena. Like Temptation Island whose gay pageant director becomes the unwilling sacrificial lamb simply because he presumably has the least to lose among the other loved and loving survivors, the most fully realized character in Here Comes the Bride is the love-starved gay beautician whose fortune of being transported to the body of the beautiful and sexy bride-to-be is the most dramatic out of the five. As expected, it is mostly played for laughs and Panganiban does a brilliant job in emulating the fabulous larger-than-life gestures of Lapuz. After all, the very idea of a gay man suddenly and surprisingly getting everything he ever wanted, from the body parts he can only have in his wildest dreams to the straight men who he can only love and lust for from a safe distance, is in itself a hoot. The hilarity of the absurd situation, at that scene where the bride-to-be in the body of her godmother insists that the gay beautician return her body, unravels into a well-pronounced statement of gay angst and sentiment as he emotionally shouts "Hindi ninyo maiintindihan dahil hindi kayo bakla! (You will never understand because you are not gay!). At that moment, the film, notwithstanding the fact that it never stopped being funny, reflected a current fundamental truth, something that not even a mainstream film as self-promotedly queer as Olivia Lamasan's In My Life (2009) can have the guts to state as plainly and matter-of-factly as that. The gay man becomes a girl. The loveless godmother feels how it is to be loved. The amorous yet incapacitated grandfather relives the passion and the romance of his distant youth. The poor nanny turns into a millionaire. The innocent bride-to-be wallows in the realities of life's misfortune. Martinez fills the screen with realized desires at the expense of the bride-to-be, emphasizing the frailty of the human soul in the face of happiness. In the midst of the film's invaluable wit and humor that frequently pumps in rhythm with the Latin beats of the apt lively music score, the film's characters, ideally uncomplicated and stereotypical, are allowed to live their desires realized, concretizing in easy-to-understand cinematic terms the pleasures of escape, of living a fantasy even if it is only momentarily. I am very happy to say that Here Comes the Bride is as current and relevant as it is entertaining and hysterical.

Última actualización: 2016-12-05
Frecuencia de uso: 1
Calidad:

Referencia: Anónimo
Advertencia: contiene formato HTML invisible

Inglés

It is the time of the Crusades during the Middle Ages - the world shaping 200-year collision between Europe and the East. A blacksmith named Balian has lost his family and nearly his faith. The religious wars raging in the far-off Holy Land seem remote to him, yet he is pulled into that immense drama. Amid the pageantry and intrigues of medieval Jerusalem he falls in love, grows into a leader, and ultimately uses all his courage and skill to defend the city against staggering odds. Destiny comes seeking Balian in the form of a great knight, Godfrey of Ibelin, a Crusader briefly home to France from fighting in the East. Revealing himself as Balian's father, Godfrey shows him the true meaning of knighthood and takes him on a journey across continents to the fabled Holy City. In Jerusalem at that moment--between the Second and Third Crusades--a fragile peace prevails, through the efforts of its enlightened Christian king, Baldwin IV, aided by his advisor Tiberias, and the military restraint of the legendary Muslim leader Saladin. But Baldwin's days are numbered, and strains of fanaticism, greed, and jealousy among the Crusaders threaten to shatter the truce. King Baldwin's vision of peace--a kingdom of heaven--is shared by a handful of knights, including Godfrey of Ibelin, who swear to uphold it with their lives and honor. As Godfrey passes his sword to his son, he also passes on that sacred oath: to protect the helpless, safeguard the peace, and work toward harmony between religions and cultures, so that a kingdom of heaven can flourish on earth. Balian takes the sword and steps into history. - Written by Sujit R. Varma In 1184, French village blacksmith Balian just lost his wife trough suicide grief-stricken by their child's death; the crusader lord Godfrey, baron of Ibelin, reveals himself as Balian's father and offers him a crusader life, which the youngster spontaneously rejects but after the local priest taunts him till his sword strikes fatally accepts, fleeing the French bishop's bloody justice and seeking divine forgiveness as promised to crusaders in Jerusalem. On the way, Balian is instructed the skills of war and chivalric honor code and dubbed a knight in Messina by his father, who was fatally wounded fighting off the bishop's men. After shipwreck on the Levantine coast, Balian soon proves himself a superior knight as fighter and noble idealist in the loyal service of leper king Baldwin, whose pragmatic right hand, the count of Tiberias, fails to convince Balian the ruthless knight Reynald de Chatillon and his traitorous master, candidate-heir to the throne Guy de Lusignan, must be stopped by all means before they plunge the crusader kingdom in a fatal war against the noble, militarily far superior Saracen king Saladin. When Tiberias is proven right, he leaves for Cyprus, brave Balian stays to defend besieged Jerusalem against impossible odds.

Tagalo

Summary of the kingdom of heaven

Última actualización: 2014-12-15
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Referencia: Anónimo

Inglés

The point where the happiness arise from me while watching the movie is when the funny teacher who disguise as a clown at the very first meeting with the kid came. I salute the way he explained to Ishan’s family the reason why he doesn’t recognize letters and yet Ishan find it hard to read was really amazing. One of the things that made a big impact on me was when parents ignore what the teacher tell them and didn’t give any help for their son yet the teacher still holds on his faith that he can lend a hand to aid not only the disability of Ishan but also the misery in the eyes and heart of the little boy. What I learned: To give care and to believe in a child’s unique ability is the true meaning of love. To allot time for a child to teach and support them are the important lessons that I gained because for me that explains the best meaning of the movies’ title Every Child is Special.

Tagalo

everychild mga espesyal na buod ng pelikula

Última actualización: 2014-12-07
Frecuencia de uso: 1
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Referencia: Anónimo

Inglés

CHRISTMAS CAROLING SOLICITATION LETTER December 2011 Dear Sir / Ma’am: The Yuletide season is now in our midst. It opens joy and happiness in the hearts of people. Christmas has also become for us a time to share the blessings our Lord has showered us. In accordance with this, the Cuartel Football Community would like to hold a Christmas caroling on each of your houses to solicit any assistance that you can provide us in our endeavor to help our club to raise funds for the betterment of it, so as to continue to promote the value of health and fitness among the everyone interested, especially among the youth. We would be very grateful to receive your donation, in cash or in kind. Let us redeem the true meaning of Christmas and understand the spirit of giving and sharing. Let us then appreciate the significance of Jesus’ birth- even now and years later. Thanking you in anticipation. On behalf of Cuartel Football Community, we wish you a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year. Respectfully yours, Cuartel Football Community Members ---feel free to edit. thanks.

Tagalo

pangangalap sulat para sa pasko partido

Última actualización: 2014-12-02
Frecuencia de uso: 1
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Referencia: Anónimo

Inglés

“Light Up For Christ” Prayer Service Blessing Heavenly Father, We praise you for the light of creation; the sun, the moon and the stars of the night. We praise you for the light of Israel: the Law, the Prophets and the wisdom of the Scriptures. We praise you for Jesus Christ your Son, the true Light of the world, the Light which no darkness can overcome. He is Emmanuel, God-with-us, the Prince of Peace who saved the world from darkness and brought humanity into the peace of everlasting Light. We praise you for Mary, who held your Son in her loving arms, and who was given to us as a Mother at the foot of the Cross. She is the New Eve, leading all her children into the Light of Joy who is her Son, Jesus. We praise you for the gift of faith, given to us at Baptism, which enlightens our minds to know and accept the Gospel of Truth and Life. (Pause & Close our Eyes Bow our Heads) Lord, we ask that your blessing come down upon us and those of our brothers and family who cannot be with us tonight as we illusion this Nativity scene. (Illuminate the Nativity Scene By Switching ON the Lights.) May the light that it gives fill our hearts with hope that you will free us from the darkness of sin, and deliver us into the light of your peace and happiness. May all who look at this Christmas display come to the knowledge and joy of salvation. Grant that we may always walk as sons and daughters of the light, keeping the flame of Truth alive in our hearts, until we join you and the heavenly host in the Kingdom of everlasting Light. We ask this through Christ our Lord, Amen. converter

Tagalo

kombertidor“Light Up For Christ” Prayer Service Blessing Heavenly Father, We praise you for the light of creation; the sun, the moon and the stars of the night. We praise you for the light of Israel: the Law, the Prophets and the wisdom of the Scriptures. We praise you for Jesus Christ your Son, the true Light of the world, the Light which no darkness can overcome. He is Emmanuel, God-with-us, the Prince of Peace who saved the world from darkness and brought humanity into the peace of everlasting Light. We praise you for Mary, who held your Son in her loving arms, and who was given to us as a Mother at the foot of the Cross. She is the New Eve, leading all her children into the Light of Joy who is her Son, Jesus. We praise you for the gift of faith, given to us at Baptism, which enlightens our minds to know and accept the Gospel of Truth and Life. (Pause & Close our Eyes Bow our Heads) Lord, we ask that your blessing come down upon us and those of our brothers and family who cannot be with us tonight as we illusion this Nativity scene. (Illuminate the Nativity Scene By Switching ON the Lights.) May the light that it gives fill our hearts with hope that you will free us from the darkness of sin, and deliver us into the light of your peace and happiness. May all who look at this Christmas display come to the knowledge and joy of salvation. Grant that we may always walk as sons and daughters of the light, keeping the flame of Truth alive in our hearts, until we join you and the heavenly host in the Kingdom of everlasting Light. We ask this through Christ our Lord, Amen.

Última actualización: 2014-11-27
Frecuencia de uso: 1
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Inglés

A F F I D A V I T O F L O S S I, RODEL V. BAUTISTA, Filipino, of legal age, married and a resident of M.Pagkalinawan St. P-2 New Lower Bicutan Taguig City, after being duly sworn in accordance with law, depose and state: That I am the true and licensed owner of a one (1) unit PISTL 45 ARMSCOR M1911 FS GI firearm with Serial No. 1260668. That on JUNE 2014, I was surprised to see our gate open and when I went to close it, I discovered that my vehicle parked at our garage was also opened; I then discovered that my belt bag that I had left in the said vehicle was gone and with it are the above-mentioned firearm, several rounds of ammunition, the original copy of my License to carry the said firearm, some identification cards, and other important documents; That despite diligent search and efforts to locate said firearm, my belt bag and its aforementioned contents, I could not find the same such that I now believe that all the foregoing items were stolen and are now lost beyond recovery. As such, I am executing this Affidavit of Loss to attest to the truth of the foregoing. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this _____________ at _____________, Philippines.

Tagalo

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Última actualización: 2014-10-31
Frecuencia de uso: 1
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Referencia: Anónimo

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