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Anglais

It was originated

Tagalog

Tagalog Translation

Dernière mise à jour : 2019-08-28
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Anglais

which was devastated by the st

Tagalog

ma disgrasya

Dernière mise à jour : 2020-05-11
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Anglais

Which was most/least rewarding.

Tagalog

Alin ang pinaka / hindi bababa sa kapaki-pakinabang.

Dernière mise à jour : 2018-08-18
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Anglais

Which was confiscated when we were arrested and is locked up in a drawer in the booking room!

Tagalog

Na kinumpiska nang inaresto tayo at nakatago doon sa isang aparador sa booking room!

Dernière mise à jour : 2016-10-27
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Anglais

Which was confiscated when we were arrested and it's in a drawer in the booking room!

Tagalog

Na kinumpiska noong inaresto tayo at nakatago doon sa isang aparador sa booking room!

Dernière mise à jour : 2016-10-27
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Anglais

The researchers made a self-made questionnaire in order to obtain data which was distributed among all year levels.

Tagalog

matukoy ang pang-unawa ng mga mag-aaral ng radiologic technology tungkol sa mga enhancers ng memorya.

Dernière mise à jour : 2019-05-13
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Anglais

It also has a very special Wood's web cam show featuring our recent trip to the Mediterranean which was sponsored by Cruise4Bears.

Tagalog

Mero din itong ang Web Cam show ni Wood na ipapakita ang aming huling biyahe sa Mediterranean na ini-sponsor ng Cruise4Bears.

Dernière mise à jour : 2016-10-27
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Anglais

His bilingual twitter account has been providing updates during the preparation for the launch, which was originally scheduled for August 25.

Tagalog

Ang kanyang twitter sa Ingles at Espanyol ay nagbibigay ng mga bagong balita habang sya ay naghahanda sa kanyang paglunsad, na iniskedyul para sa ika-25 ng Agosto.

Dernière mise à jour : 2016-02-24
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Anglais

The violent dispersal of the Red Shirt protest contributed to the unpopularity of the government in 2010 which was at that time headed by Abhisit Vejjajiva.

Tagalog

Dahil sa marahas na pangyayaring iyon, bumaba ang popularidad ng gobyerno noong 2010 na pinamumunuan noon ni Abhisit Vejjajiva.

Dernière mise à jour : 2016-02-24
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Anglais

But Saul had given Michal his daughter, David's wife, to Phalti the son of Laish, which was of Gallim.

Tagalog

Ngayo'y ibinigay ni Saul si Michal na kaniyang anak, na asawa ni David, kay Palti na anak ni Lais na taga Gallim.

Dernière mise à jour : 2012-05-06
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Anglais

In Libya and Tunisia, they stormed the US embassies after the release of a trailer of a movie, which was insulting of Islam and Prophet Muhammed.

Tagalog

Sa Libya at Tunisia naman, sinugod ng mga Salafi ang mga embahada ng Estados Unidos matapos ipalabas ang trailer ng kontrobersyal na pelikula na insulto 'di-umano sa Islam at kay Propetang Muhammed.

Dernière mise à jour : 2016-02-24
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Anglais

This is an exciting opportunity and we want to bring some positive growth to how to take care of chicken raisers, which was formed to reopen a former poultry that has been vacant for years.

Tagalog

Ito ay isang kapana-panabik na pagkakataon at nais naming magdala ng ilang positibong paglago sa kung paano alagaan ang mga pasas ng manok, na nabuo upang mabuksan muli ang isang dating manok na naging bakante nang maraming taon.

Dernière mise à jour : 2020-07-02
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Anglais

We write to you relative to the LWUA letter dated March 13, 2020 which was received by this office on June 11, 2020 and attached with your letter Notice To Explain Re: Non submission of the Citizen’s Charter and/or Certificate of Compliance. In this regard, we are pleased to inform your good office that Gerona Water District (GWD) has entered into Joint Venture Agreement (JVA) with Prime Water Infrastructure Corporation (PWIC) on February 27, 2019. The JVA is for the Financing, Development,

Tagalog

Sumusulat kami sa iyo na kamag-anak sa lWUA letter na may petsang Marso 13, 2020 na natanggap ng tanggapan na ito noong Hunyo 11, 2020 at nakalakip sa iyong sulat na Paunawa Upang Ipaliwanag ang Re: Hindi pagsumite ng Charter ng Citizen at / o Sertipiko ng Pagsunod. Kaugnay nito, nalulugod kaming ipagbigay-alam sa iyong mabuting tanggapan na ang Gerona Water District (GWD) ay pumasok sa Joint Venture Agreement (JVA) kasama ang Prime Water Infrastructure Corporation (PWIC) noong Pebrero 27, 2019. Ang JVA ay para sa Financing, Development ,

Dernière mise à jour : 2020-06-22
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Anglais

I Once when I was six years old I saw a magnificent picture in a book, called True Stories from Nature, about the primeval forest. It was a picture of a boa constrictor in the act of swallowing an animal. Here is a copy of the drawing. Boa In the book it said: "Boa constrictors swallow their prey whole, without chewing it. After that they are not able to move, and they sleep through the six months that they need for digestion." I pondered deeply, then, over the adventures of the jungle. And after some work with a colored pencil I succeeded in making my first drawing. My Drawing Number One. It looked something like this: Hat I showed my masterpiece to the grown-ups, and asked them whether the drawing frightened them. But they answered: "Frighten? Why should any one be frightened by a hat?" My drawing was not a picture of a hat. It was a picture of a boa constrictor digesting an elephant. But since the grown-ups were not able to understand it, I made another drawing: I drew the inside of a boa constrictor, so that the grown-ups could see it clearly. They always need to have things explained. My Drawing Number Two looked like this: Elephant inside the boa The grown-ups' response, this time, was to advise me to lay aside my drawings of boa constrictors, whether from the inside or the outside, and devote myself instead to geography, history, arithmetic, and grammar. That is why, at the age of six, I gave up what might have been a magnificent career as a painter. I had been disheartened by the failure of my Drawing Number One and my Drawing Number Two. Grown-ups never understand anything by themselves, and it is tiresome for children to be always and forever explaining things to them. So then I chose another profession, and learned to pilot airplanes. I have flown a little over all parts of the world; and it is true that geography has been very useful to me. At a glance I can distinguish China from Arizona. If one gets lost in the night, such knowledge is valuable. In the course of this life I have had a great many encounters with a great many people who have been concerned with matters of consequence. I have lived a great deal among grown-ups. I have seen them intimately, close at hand. And that hasn't much improved my opinion of them. Whenever I met one of them who seemed to me at all clear-sighted, I tried the experiment of showing him my Drawing Number One, which I have always kept. I would try to find out, so, if this was a person of true understanding. But, whoever it was, he, or she, would always say: "That is a hat." Then I would never talk to that person about boa constrictors, or primeval forests, or stars. I would bring myself down to his level. I would talk to him about bridge, and golf, and politics, and neckties. And the grown-up would be greatly pleased to have met such a sensible man. II So I lived my life alone, without anyone that I could really talk to, until I had an accident with my plane in the Desert of Sahara, six years ago. Something was broken in my engine. And as I had with me neither a mechanic nor any passengers, I set myself to attempt the difficult repairs all alone. It was a question of life or death for me: I had scarcely enough drinking water to last a week. The first night, then, I went to sleep on the sand, a thousand miles from any human habitation. I was more isolated than a shipwrecked sailor on a raft in the middle of the ocean. Thus you can imagine my amazement, at sunrise, when I was awakened by an odd little voice. It said: "If you please--draw me a sheep!" "What!" "Draw me a sheep!" I jumped to my feet, completely thunderstruck. I blinked my eyes hard. I looked carefully all around me. And I saw a most extraordinary small person, who stood there examining me with great seriousness. Here you may see the best portrait that, later, I was able to make of him. But my drawing is certainly very much less charming than its model. The Little prince That, however, is not my fault. The grown-ups discouraged me in my painter's career when I was six years old, and I never learned to draw anything, except boas from the outside and boas from the inside. Now I stared at this sudden apparition with my eyes fairly starting out of my head in astonishment. Remember, I had crashed in the desert a thousand miles from any inhabited region. And yet my little man seemed neither to be straying uncertainly among the sands, nor to be fainting from fatigue or hunger or thirst or fear. Nothing about him gave any suggestion of a child lost in the middle of the desert, a thousand miles from any human habitation. When at last I was able to speak, I said to him: "But--what are you doing here?" And in answer he repeated, very slowly, as if he were speaking of a matter of great consequence: "If you please--draw me a sheep..." When a mystery is too overpowering, one dare not disobey. Absurd as it might seem to me, a thousand miles from any human habitation and in danger of death, I took out of my pocket a sheet of paper and my fountain-pen. But then I remembered how my studies had been concentrated on geography, history, arithmetic and grammar, and I told the little chap (a little crossly, too) that I did not know how to draw. He answered me: "That doesn't matter. Draw me a sheep..." But I had never drawn a sheep. So I drew for him one of the two pictures I had drawn so often. It was that of the boa constrictor from the outside. And I was astounded to hear the little fellow greet it with: "No, no, no! I do not want an elephant inside a boa constrictor. A boa constrictor is a very dangerous creature, and an elephant is very cumbersome. Where I live, everything is very small. What I need is a sheep. Draw me a sheep." So then I made a drawing. Sick sheep He looked at it carefully, then he said: "No. This sheep is already very sickly. Make me another." So I made another drawing. A ram. My friend smiled gently and indulgently. "You see yourself," he said, "that this is not a sheep. This is a ram. It has horns." So then I did my drawing over once more. But it was rejected too, just like the others. "This one is too old. I want a sheep that will live a long time." Old sheep By this time my patience was exhausted, because I was in a hurry to start taking my engine apart. So I tossed off this drawing. Sheep in the box And I threw out an explanation with it. "This is only his box. The sheep you asked for is inside." I was very surprised to see a light break over the face of my young judge: "That is exactly the way I wanted it! Do you think that this sheep will have to have a great deal of grass?" "Why?" "Because where I live everything is very small..." "There will surely be enough grass for him," I said. "It is a very small sheep that I have given you." He bent his head over the drawing. "Not so small that--Look! He has gone to sleep..." And that is how I made the acquaintance of the little prince. III It took me a long time to learn where he came from. The little prince, who asked me so many questions, never seemed to hear the ones I asked him. It was from words dropped by chance that, little by little, everything was revealed to me. The first time he saw my airplane, for instance (I shall not draw my airplane; that would be much too complicated for me), he asked me: The Little prince "What is that object?" "That is not an object. It flies. It is an airplane. It is my airplane." And I was proud to have him learn that I could fly. He cried out, then: "What! You dropped down from the sky?" "Yes," I answered, modestly. "Oh! That is funny!" And the little prince broke into a lovely peal of laughter, which irritated me very much. I like my misfortunes to be taken seriously. Then he added: "So you, too, come from the sky! Which is your planet?" At that moment I caught a gleam of light in the impenetrable mystery of his presence; and I demanded, abruptly: "Do you come from another planet?" But he did not reply. He tossed his head gently, without taking his eyes from my plane: "It is true that on that you can't have come from very far away..." And he sank into a reverie, which lasted a long time. Then, taking my sheep out of his pocket, he buried himself in the contemplation of his treasure. You can imagine how my curiosity was aroused by this half-confidence about the "other planets." I made a great effort, therefore, to find out more on this subject. "My little man, where do you come from? What is this 'where I live,' of which you speak? Where do you want to take your sheep?" After a reflective silence he answered: "The thing that is so good about the box you have given me is that at night he can use it as his house." "That is so. And if you are good I will give you a string, too, so that you can tie him during the day, and a post to tie him to." But the little prince seemed shocked by this offer: The Little prince and stars "Tie him! What a queer idea!" "But if you don't tie him," I said, "he will wander off somewhere, and get lost." My friend broke into another peal of laughter: "But where do you think he would go?" "Anywhere. Straight ahead of him." Then the little prince said, earnestly: "That doesn't matter. Where I live, everything is so small!" And, with perhaps a hint of sadness, he added: "Straight ahead of him, nobody can go very far..." IV I had thus learned a second fact of great importance: this was that the planet the little prince came from was scarcely any larger than a house! But that did not really surprise me much. I knew very well that in addition to the great planets--such as the Earth, Jupiter, Mars, Venus--to which we have given names, there are also hundreds of others, some of which are so small that one has a hard time seeing them through the telescope. When an astronomer discovers one of these he does not give it a name, but only a number. He might call it, for example, "Asteroid 325". I have serious reason to believe that the planet from which the little prince came is the asteroid known as B-612. This asteroid has only once been seen through the telescope. That was by a Turkish astronomer, in 1909. Star-gazer On making his discovery, the astronomer had presented it to the International Astronomical Congress, in a great demonstration. But he was in Turkish costume, and so nobody would believe what he said. Grown-ups are like that... Fortunately, however, for the reputation of Asteroid B-612, a Turkish dictator made a law that his subjects, under pain of death, should change to European costume. So in 1920 the astronomer gave his demonstration all over again, dressed with impressive style and elegance. And this time everybody accepted his report. Turkish astronomer If I have told you these details about the asteroid, and made a note of its number for you, it is on account of the grown-ups and their ways. When you tell them that you have made a new friend, they never ask you any questions about essential matters. They never say to you, "What does his voice sound like? What games does he love best? Does he collect butterflies?" Instead, they demand: "How old is he? How many brothers has he? How much does he weigh? How much money does his father make?" Only from these figures do they think they have learned anything about him. If you were to say to the grown-ups: "I saw a beautiful house made of rosy brick, with geraniums in the windows and doves on the roof," they would not be able to get any idea of that house at all. You would have to say to them: "I saw a house that cost $20,000." Then they would exclaim: "Oh, what a pretty house that is!" Just so, you might say to them: "The proof that the little prince existed is that he was charming, that he laughed, and that he was looking for a sheep. If anybody wants a sheep, that is a proof that he exists." And what good would it do to tell them that? They would shrug their shoulders, and treat you like a child. But if you said to them: "The planet he came from is Asteroid B-612," then they would be convinced, and leave you in peace from their questions. European astronomer They are like that. One must not hold it against them. Children should always show great forbearance toward grown-up people. But certainly, for us who understand life, figures are a matter of indifference. I should have liked to begin this story in the fashion of the fairy-tales. I should have like to say: "Once upon a time there was a little prince who lived on a planet that was scarcely any bigger than himself, and who had need of a sheep..." To those who understand life, that would have given a much greater air of truth to my story. For I do not want any one to read my book carelessly. I have suffered too much grief in setting down these memories. Six years have already passed since my friend went away from me, with his sheep. If I try to describe him here, it is to make sure that I shall not forget him. To forget a friend is sad. Not every one has had a friend. And if I forget him, I may become like the grown-ups who are no longer interested in anything but figures... It is for that purpose, again, that I have bought a box of paints and some pencils. It is hard to take up drawing again at my age, when I have never made any pictures except those of the boa constrictor from the outside and the boa constrictor from the inside, since I was six. I shall certainly try to make my portraits as true to life as possible. But I am not at all sure of success. One drawing goes along all right, and another has no resemblance to its subject. I make some errors, too, in the little prince's height: in one place he is too tall and in another too short. And I feel some doubts about the color of his costume. So I fumble along as best I can, now good, now bad, and I hope generally fair-to-middling. In certain more important details I shall make mistakes, also. But that is something that will not be my fault. My friend never explained anything to me. He thought, perhaps, that I was like himself. But I, alas, do not know how to see sheep through the walls of boxes. Perhaps I am a little like the grown-ups. I have had to grow old. V As each day passed I would learn, in our talk, something about the little prince's planet, his departure from it, his journey. The information would come very slowly, as it might chance to fall from his thoughts. It was in this way that I heard, on the third day, about the catastrophe of the baobabs. This time, once more, I had the sheep to thank for it. For the little prince asked me abruptly--as if seized by a grave doubt--"It is true, isn't it, that sheep eat little bushes?" "Yes, that is true." "Ah! I am glad!" I did not understand why it was so important that sheep should eat little bushes. But the little prince added: "Then it follows that they also eat baobabs?" I pointed out to the little prince that baobabs were not little bushes, but, on the contrary, trees as big as castles; and that even if he took a whole herd of elephants away with him, the herd would not eat up one single baobab. The idea of the herd of elephants made the little prince laugh. "We would have to put them one on top of the other," he said. Elephans on the planet But he made a wise comment: "Before they grow so big, the baobabs start out by being little." "That is strictly correct," I said. "But why do you want the sheep to eat the little baobabs?" He answered me at once, "Oh, come, come!", as if he were speaking of something that was self-evident. And I was obliged to make a great mental effort to solve this problem, without any assistance. Indeed, as I learned, there were on the planet where the little prince lived--as on all planets--good plants and bad plants. In consequence, there were good seeds from good plants, and bad seeds from bad plants. But seeds are invisible. They sleep deep in the heart of the earth's darkness, until some one among them is seized with the desire to awaken. Then this little seed will stretch itself and begin--timidly at first--to push a charming little sprig inoffensively upward toward the sun. If it is only a sprout of radish or the sprig of a rose-bush, one would let it grow wherever it might wish. But when it is a bad plant, one must destroy it as soon as possible, the very first instant that one recognizes it. Chare of the planet Now there were some terrible seeds on the planet that was the home of the little prince; and these were the seeds of the baobab. The soil of that planet was infested with them. A baobab is something you will never, never be able to get rid of if you attend to it too late. It spreads over the entire planet. It bores clear through it with its roots. And if the planet is too small, and the baobabs are too many, they split it in pieces... "It is a question of discipline," the little prince said to me later on. "When you've finished your own toilet in the morning, then it is time to attend to the toilet of your planet, just so, with the greatest care. You must see to it that you pull up regularly all the baobabs, at the very first moment when they can be distinguished from the rosebushes which they resemble so closely in their earliest youth. It is very tedious work," the little prince added, "but very easy." And one day he said to me: "You ought to make a beautiful drawing, so that the children where you live can see exactly how all this is. That would be very useful to them if they were to travel some day. Sometimes," he added, "there is no harm in putting off a piece of work until another day. But when it is a matter of baobabs, that always means a catastrophe. I knew a planet that was inhabited by a lazy man. He neglected three little bushes..." So, as the little prince described it to me, I have made a drawing of that planet. I do not much like to take the tone of a moralist. But the danger of the baobabs is so little understood, and such considerable risks would be run by anyone who might get lost on an asteroid, that for once I am breaking through my reserve. "Children," I say plainly, "watch out for the baobabs!" My friends, like myself, have been skirting this danger for a long time, without ever knowing it; and so it is for them that I have worked so hard over this drawing. The lesson which I pass on by this means is worth all the trouble it has cost me. Baobabs Perhaps you will ask me, "Why are there no other drawing in this book as magnificent and impressive as this drawing of the baobabs?" The reply is simple. I have tried. But with the others I have not been successful. When I made the drawing of the baobabs I was carried beyond myself by the inspiring force of urgent necessity. VI Oh, little prince! Bit by bit I came to understand the secrets of your sad little life... For a long time you had found your only entertainment in the quiet pleasure of looking at the sunset. I learned that new detail on the morning of the fourth day, when you said to me: "I am very fond of sunsets. Come, let us go look at a sunset now." "But we must wait," I said. "Wait? For what?" "For the sunset. We must wait until it is time." At first you seemed to be very much surprised. And then you laughed to yourself. You said to me: "I am always thinking that I am at home!" Just so. Everybody knows that when it is noon in the United States the sun is setting over France. If you could fly to France in one minute, you could go straight into the sunset, right from noon. Unfortunately, France is too far away for that. But on your tiny planet, my little prince, all you need do is move your chair a few steps. You can see the day end and the twilight falling whenever you like... "One day," you said to me, "I saw the sunset forty-four times!" And a little later you added: "You know--one loves the sunset, when one is so sad..." "Were you so sad, then?" I asked, "on the day of the forty-four sunsets?" But the little prince made no reply. Sunsets

Tagalog

Dernière mise à jour : 2020-05-12
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Anglais

Sandreyn had two suitors Ralph and Marwin. She did not openly show her preference but on two occasions, accepted Marwin’s invitation to concerts. Ralph was a working student and could only ask Sandreyn to see a movie which was declined. Ralph felt insulted and made plans to get even with Marwin by scaring him off somehow. One day, he entered Marwin’s room in their boarding house and placed a rubber snake which appeared to be real in Marwin’s backpack, because Marwin had a weak heart, he s

Tagalog

May dalawang suitors si Sandreyn na sina Ralph at Marwin. Hindi niya hayag na ipinakita ang kanyang kagustuhan ngunit sa dalawang pagkakataon, tinanggap ang paanyaya ni Marwin sa mga konsyerto. Si Ralph ay isang mag-aaral na nagtatrabaho at maaari lamang hilingin kay Sandreyn na makakita ng pelikula na tinanggihan. Nakaramdam si Ralph ng pang-iinsulto at gumawa ng mga plano upang makasama si Marwin sa pamamagitan ng pag-scaring sa kanya kahit papaano. Isang araw, pinasok niya ang silid ni Marwin sa kanilang boarding house at naglagay ng isang goma ahas na tila totoo sa backpack ni Marwin, dahil may mahinang puso si Marwin,

Dernière mise à jour : 2020-04-10
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Anglais

were able to create a character somehow similar to us, something which we can relate for. The author wanted us to show the true meaning of patriotism. Selflessness and fearlessness as well were represented very well by General Luna, but the problem was that the government lacked in unity, causing him to face more formidable enemy than the American army; which was in fact his own treacherous countrymen. The movie shows how selfishness and having no collective unity and loyalty in the society

Tagalog

nakagawa ng isang character na kahit papaano katulad sa amin, isang bagay na maaari nating maiugnay. Nais ng may-akda na maipakita namin ang totoong kahulugan ng pagiging makabayan. Ang kawalan ng pag-iingat at kawalang-takot ay kinakatawan din ng Heneral Luna, ngunit ang problema ay ang gobyerno ay kulang sa pagkakaisa, na nagdulot sa kanya na harapin ang mas matapang na kaaway kaysa sa hukbo ng Amerika; na sa katunayan ay kanyang sariling mga taksil na kababayan. Ipinapakita ng pelikula kung paano ang pagiging makasarili at walang kolektibong pagkakaisa at katapatan sa lipunan

Dernière mise à jour : 2020-03-11
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Anglais

Servius Sulpicius Galba (Latin: Servius Sulpicius Galba Caesar Augustus;[2] English: /ˈsɜːrviəs sʌlˈpɪʃəs ˈɡælbə/; 24 December 3 BC – 15 January 69 AD) was a Roman Emperor for seven months from AD 68 to 69. Galba was an governor of Hispania Tarraconensis, which was the province near the Pyrenees. He was the first emperor of Year of the Four Emperors. He was born near Terracina, "On the left as you travel towards Fundi" in the words of Suetonius. Galba was adopted by Livia Ocellin

Tagalog

Si Servius Sulpicius Galba (Latin: Servius Sulpicius Galba Cesar Augustus; ng Hispania Tarraconensis, na siyang lalawigan malapit sa Pyrenees. Siya ang unang emperor ng Taon ng Apat na Emperor. Ipinanganak siya malapit sa Terracina, "Sa kaliwa habang naglalakbay ka patungong Fundi" sa mga salita ni Suetonius. Ang Galba ay pinagtibay ni Livia Ocellin

Dernière mise à jour : 2020-02-06
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Anglais

A Low Art [Excerpt from The Penelopiad] by Margaret Atwood (Canada) Now that I’m dead I know everything. This is what I wished would happen, but like so many of my wishes it failed to come true. I know only a few factoids that I didn’t know before. Death is much too high a price to pay for the satisfaction of curiosity, needless to say. Since being dead — since achieving this state of bonelessness, liplessness, breastlessness —I’ve learned some things I would rather not know, as one does when listening at windows or opening ot her people’s letters. You think you’d like to read minds? Think again. Down here everyone arrives with a sack, like the sacks used to keep the winds in, but each of these sacks is full of words —words you’ve spoken, words you’ve heard, wo rds that have been said about you. Some sacks are very small, others large; my own is of a reasonable size, though a lot of the words in it concern my eminent husband. What a fool he made of me, some say. It was a specialty of his: making fools. He got away with everything, which was another of his specialties: getting away. He was always so plausible. Many people have believed that his version of events was the true one, give or take a few murders, a few beautiful seductresses, a few one-eyed monsters. Even I believed him, from time to time. I knew he was tricky and a liar, I just didn’t think he would play his tricks and try out his lies on me. Hadn’t I been faithful? Hadn’t I waited, and waited, and waited, despite the temptation — almost the compulsion — to do otherwise? And what did I amount to, once the official version gained ground? An edifying legend. A stick used to beat other women with. Why couldn’t they be as considerate, as trustworthy, as all-suffering as I had been? That was the line they took, the singers, the yarn- spinners. Don’t follow my example, I want to scream in your ears — yes, yours! But when I try to scream, I sound like an owl. Of course I had inklings, about his slipperiness, his wiliness, his foxiness, his — how can I put this? — his unscrupulousness, but I turned a blind eye. I kept my mouth shut; or if I opened it, I sang his praises. I didn’t contradict, I didn’t ask awkward questions, I didn’t dig deep. I wanted happy endings in those days, and happy endings are best achieved by keeping the right doors locked and going to sleep during the rampages. But after the main events were over and things had become less legendary, I realised how many people were laughing at me behind my back — how they were jeering, making jokes about me, jokes both clean and dirty; how they were turning me into a story, or into several stories, though not the kind of stories I’d prefer to hear about m yself. What can a woman do when scandalous gossip travels the world? If she defends herself she sounds guilty. So I waited some more. Now that all the others have run out of air, it’s my t urn to do a little storymaking. I owe it to myself. I’ve had to work myself up to it: it’s a low art, tale-telling. Old women go in for it, strolling beggars, blind singers, maidservants, children — folks with time on their hands. Once, people would have laughed if I’d tried to play th e minstrel —there’s nothing more preposterous than an aristocrat fumbling around with the arts — but who cares about public opinion now? The opinion of the people down here: the opinions of shadows, of echoes. So I’ll spin a thread of my own.

Tagalog

isang mababang kwento ng sining sa tagalog

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Anglais

AUTHORITY TO DEDUCTI hereby authorize you to deduct from my salary the sum of ____________________________ (P_____________) for ___consecutive months beginning ______________________ andtoremit the said amount tothePHILIPPINE PUBLIC SCHOOL TEACHERS ASSOCIATION(PPSTA)in consideration of myloan in the principal amount of ____________________ (P_____________) plus add-on interest and other charges, which was granted to me on _______________________.This authorization is VALID AND BINDING until my aforementioned loan is fully paid for or upon writtennoticeof its discontinuance bythe PPSTA.PROMISSORY NOTEFor value received, the undersigned promises to pay to the order of the PHILIPPINE PUBLIC SCHOOL TEACHERS ASSOCIATION at its officelocated at245 Banawe St. Quezon City, Philippines,through APDS,the sum of PESOS ______________________________ (P_______________) with interest rate of ___________ percent (___%) per annum, TO BE PAID IN EQUAL MONTHLY INSTALLMENTS IN THE AMOUNT OF P _____________ FOR ________ MONTHS, BEGINNING _____________________ ANDENDING _________________.Default in the payment for six (6) consecutive installments shall render the entire unpaid balance due and demandable.IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this ____day of ___________________at ___________________.___________________________________________(Signature Over Printed name of Borrower)Employee No._________Division No.____ Station No.____CTC No. School or Station Address____________________________Date Issued_________________________________________________Place IssuedHome Address: ____________________________________Telephone No.: _________________________________________________ACKNOWLEDGMENTREPUBLIC OF THE PHILIPPINES)CITY OF _____________________) S.SX-----------------------------------------)BEFORE ME, A Notary Public in and for the above jurisdiction, this ___day of __________________ 200___ personally appeared _________________________________ with Community Tax Certificate No. ______________ issued at _____________________________ on ____________________ known to me and tome known to be the same personwho executed the foregoing instrument and acknowledgedto me that the same is his/her free and voluntary act and deed.WITNESS MY HAND AND NOTARIALSEAL on the dateandplace first above-written.NOTARY PUBLICDoc. No.________________Page No.________________Book No. _______________Series of ________________

Tagalog

awtoridad na ibawas ang sample letter

Dernière mise à jour : 2019-02-16
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Anglais

The Lottery Ticket by Anton Pavlovich Chekhov (1860-1904) Approximate Word Count: 1978 Ivan Dmitritch, a middle-class man who lived with his family on an income of twelve hundred a year and was very well satisfied with his lot, sat down on the sofa after supper and began reading the newspaper. "I forgot to look at the newspaper today," his wife said to him as she cleared the table. "Look and see whether the list of drawings is there." "Yes, it is," said Ivan Dmitritch; "but hasn't your ticket lapsed?" "No; I took the interest on Tuesday." "What is the number?" "Series 9,499, number 26." "All right . . . we will look . . . 9,499 and 26." Ivan Dmitritch had no faith in lottery luck, and would not, as a rule, have consented to look at the lists of winning numbers, but now, as he had nothing else to do and as the newspaper was before his eyes, he passed his finger downwards along the column of numbers. And immediately, as though in mockery of his scepticism, no further than the second line from the top, his eye was caught by the figure 9,499! Unable to believe his eyes, he hurriedly dropped the paper on his knees without looking to see the number of the ticket, and, just as though some one had given him a douche of cold water, he felt an agreeable chill in the pit of the stomach; tingling and terrible and sweet! "Masha, 9,499 is there!" he said in a hollow voice. His wife looked at his astonished and panicstricken face, and realized that he was not joking. "9,499?" she asked, turning pale and dropping the folded tablecloth on the table. "Yes, yes . . . it really is there!" "And the number of the ticket?" "Oh yes! There's the number of the ticket too. But stay . . . wait! No, I say! Anyway, the number of our series is there! Anyway, you understand...." Looking at his wife, Ivan Dmitritch gave a broad, senseless smile, like a baby when a bright object is shown it. His wife smiled too; it was as pleasant to her as to him that he only mentioned the series, and did not try to find out the number of the winning ticket. To torment and tantalize oneself with hopes of possible fortune is so sweet, so thrilling! "It is our series," said Ivan Dmitritch, after a long silence. "So there is a probability that we have won. It's only a probability, but there it is!" "Well, now look!" "Wait a little. We have plenty of time to be disappointed. It's on the second line from the top, so the prize is seventy-five thousand. That's not money, but power, capital! And in a minute I shall look at the list, and there--26! Eh? I say, what if we really have won?" The husband and wife began laughing and staring at one another in silence. The possibility of winning bewildered them; they could not have said, could not have dreamed, what they both needed that seventy-five thousand for, what they would buy, where they would go. They thought only of the figures 9,499 and 75,000 and pictured them in their imagination, while somehow they could not think of the happiness itself which was so possible. Ivan Dmitritch, holding the paper in his hand, walked several times from corner to corner, and only when he had recovered from the first impression began dreaming a little. "And if we have won," he said--"why, it will be a new life, it will be a transformation! The ticket is yours, but if it were mine I should, first of all, of course, spend twenty-five thousand on real property in the shape of an estate; ten thousand on immediate expenses, new furnishing . . . travelling . . . paying debts, and so on. . . . The other forty thousand I would put in the bank and get interest on it." "Yes, an estate, that would be nice," said his wife, sitting down and dropping her hands in her lap. "Somewhere in the Tula or Oryol provinces. . . . In the first place we shouldn't need a summer villa, and besides, it would always bring in an income." And pictures came crowding on his imagination, each more gracious and poetical than the last. And in all these pictures he saw himself well-fed, serene, healthy, felt warm, even hot! Here, after eating a summer soup, cold as ice, he lay on his back on the burning sand close to a stream or in the garden under a lime-tree. . . . It is hot. . . . His little boy and girl are crawling about near him, digging in the sand or catching ladybirds in the grass. He dozes sweetly, thinking of nothing, and feeling all over that he need not go to the office today, tomorrow, or the day after. Or, tired of lying still, he goes to the hayfield, or to the forest for mushrooms, or watches the peasants catching fish with a net. When the sun sets he takes a towel and soap and saunters to the bathing shed, where he undresses at his leisure, slowly rubs his bare chest with his hands, and goes into the water. And in the water, near the opaque soapy circles, little fish flit to and fro and green water-weeds nod their heads. After bathing there is tea with cream and milk rolls. . . . In the evening a walk or vint with the neighbors. "Yes, it would be nice to buy an estate," said his wife, also dreaming, and from her face it was evident that she was enchanted by her thoughts. Ivan Dmitritch pictured to himself autumn with its rains, its cold evenings, and its St. Martin's summer. At that season he would have to take longer walks about the garden and beside the river, so as to get thoroughly chilled, and then drink a big glass of vodka and eat a salted mushroom or a soused cucumber, and then--drink another. . . . The children would come running from the kitchen-garden, bringing a carrot and a radish smelling of fresh earth. . . . And then, he would lie stretched full length on the sofa, and in leisurely fashion turn over the pages of some illustrated magazine, or, covering his face with it and unbuttoning his waistcoat, give himself up to slumber. The St. Martin's summer is followed by cloudy, gloomy weather. It rains day and night, the bare trees weep, the wind is damp and cold. The dogs, the horses, the fowls--all are wet, depressed, downcast. There is nowhere to walk; one can't go out for days together; one has to pace up and down the room, looking despondently at the grey window. It is dreary! Ivan Dmitritch stopped and looked at his wife. "I should go abroad, you know, Masha," he said. And he began thinking how nice it would be in late autumn to go abroad somewhere to the South of France ... to Italy ... to India! "I should certainly go abroad too," his wife said. "But look at the number of the ticket!" "Wait, wait! ..." He walked about the room and went on thinking. It occurred to him: what if his wife really did go abroad? It is pleasant to travel alone, or in the society of light, careless women who live in the present, and not such as think and talk all the journey about nothing but their children, sigh, and tremble with dismay over every farthing. Ivan Dmitritch imagined his wife in the train with a multitude of parcels, baskets, and bags; she would be sighing over something, complaining that the train made her head ache, that she had spent so much money.... At the stations he would continually be having to run for boiling water, bread and butter. ...She wouldn't have dinner because of its being too dear.... "She would begrudge me every farthing," he thought, with a glance at his wife. "The lottery ticket is hers, not mine! Besides, what is the use of her going abroad? What does she want there? She would shut herself up in the hotel, and not let me out of her sight.... I know!" And for the first time in his life his mind dwelt on the fact that his wife had grown elderly and plain, and that she was saturated through and through with the smell of cooking, while he was still young, fresh, and healthy, and might well have got married again. "Of course, all that is silly nonsense," he thought; "but...why should she go abroad? What would she make of it? And yet she would go, of course.... I can fancy.... In reality it is all one to her, whether it is Naples or Klin. She would only be in my way. I should be dependent upon her. I can fancy how, like a regular woman, she will lock the money up as soon as she gets it.... She will look after her relations and grudge me every farthing." Ivan Dmitritch thought of her relations. All those wretched brothers and sisters and aunts and uncles would come crawling about as soon as they heard of the winning ticket, would begin whining like beggars, and fawning upon them with oily, hypocritical smiles. Wretched, detestable people! If they were given anything, they would ask for more; while if they were refused, they would swear at them, slander them, and wish them every kind of misfortune. Ivan Dmitritch remembered his own relations, and their faces, at which he had looked impartially in the past, struck him now as repulsive and hateful. "They are such reptiles!" he thought. And his wife's face, too, struck him as repulsive and hateful. Anger surged up in his heart against her, and he thought malignantly: "She knows nothing about money, and so she is stingy. If she won it she would give me a hundred roubles, and put the rest away under lock and key." And he looked at his wife, not with a smile now, but with hatred. She glanced at him too, and also with hatred and anger. She had her own daydreams, her own plans, her own reflections; she understood perfectly well what her husband's dreams were. She knew who would be the first to try to grab her winnings. "It's very nice making daydreams at other people's expense!" is what her eyes expressed. "No, don't you dare!" Her husband understood her look; hatred began stirring again in his breast, and in order to annoy his wife he glanced quickly, to spite her at the fourth page on the newspaper and read out triumphantly: "Series 9,499, number 46! Not 26!" Hatred and hope both disappeared at once, and it began immediately to seem to Ivan Dmitritch and his wife that their rooms were dark and small and low-pitched, that the supper they had been eating was not doing them good, but Lying heavy on their stomachs, that the evenings were long and wearisome. . . . "What the devil's the meaning of it?" said Ivan Dmitritch, beginning to be ill-humored. 'Wherever one steps there are bits of paper under one's feet, crumbs, husks. The rooms are never swept! One is simply forced to go out. Damnation take my soul entirely! I shall go and hang myself on the first aspen-tree!"

Tagalog

Ang tiket ng loterya ay hindi masasaktan

Dernière mise à jour : 2018-05-14
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