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Tagalog

Inglese

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Tagalog

Adult

Inglese

Adult

Ultimo aggiornamento 2013-09-06
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Riferimento: Wikipedia

Tagalog

Young

Inglese

Young

Ultimo aggiornamento 2017-11-01
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Riferimento: Anonimo

Tagalog

young, wild at free

Inglese

young, wild and free

Ultimo aggiornamento 2016-08-07
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Riferimento: Anonimo

Tagalog

Tapos na young Live

Inglese

i don't understand much

Ultimo aggiornamento 2018-03-22
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Tagalog

ano ang tagalog ng adult

Inglese

What Tagalog adult

Ultimo aggiornamento 2016-11-18
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Tagalog

too young tagalog version

Inglese

too young Tagalog version

Ultimo aggiornamento 2015-04-18
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Tagalog

Gusto ko lang young effects

Inglese

I just want to talk if it's okay

Ultimo aggiornamento 2019-03-16
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Tagalog

at saan ko po makukuha young order ko

Inglese

and where I get my order young

Ultimo aggiornamento 2017-04-08
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Tagalog

Any sabi ko young kaklasse nation bakla montanga kinikilig

Inglese

I'm just curious

Ultimo aggiornamento 2019-06-19
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Tagalog

pagpasensyahan mo sana young kaybigan ko kasi makulit sya kanina

Inglese

importunate

Ultimo aggiornamento 2014-10-24
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Tagalog

there was a great outcryin the bent backs straighted up, old, and young who were called slaves and cloud fly joined hands say like they would ring-sing but they dint shuffle in a circle

Inglese

there was a great outcryin the bent backs straighted up, old and young who were called slaves and cloud fly joined hands say they would like but they also sing dint shuffle in a circle

Ultimo aggiornamento 2015-11-11
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Tagalog

"She looked at the stars, Father. And Manong Leon sang." "What did he sing?" " Sky Sown with Stars... She sang with him." He was silent again. I could hear the low voices of Mother and my sister Aurelia downstairs. There was also the voice of my brother Leon, and I thought that Father's voice must have been like it when Father was young. He had laid the roll of tobacco on the windowsill once more. I watched the smoke waver faintly upward from the lighted end and vanish slowly into the night outside. The door opened and my brother Leon and Maria came in. "Have you watered Labang?" Father spoke to me. I told him that Labang was resting yet under the barn. "It is time you watered him, my son," my father said. I looked at Maria and she was lovely. She was tall. Beside my brother Leon, she was tall and very still. Then I went out, and in the darkened hall the fragrance of her was like a morning when papayas are in bloom.

Inglese

how my brother leon brought home a wife tagalog

Ultimo aggiornamento 2019-01-29
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Tagalog

will be counting stars Lately, I've been, I've been losing sleep Dreaming about the things that we could be But baby, I've been, I've been praying hard, Said, no more counting dollars We'll be counting stars, yeah we'll be counting stars I see this life like a swinging vine Swing my heart across the line And my face is flashing signs Seek it out and you shall find Old, but I'm not that old Young, but I'm not that bold I don't think the world is sold I'm just doing what we're told I feel something so right Doing the wrong thing I feel something so wrong Doing the right thing I could lie, coudn't I, could lie Everything that kills me makes me feel alive Lately, I've been, I've been losing sleep Dreaming about the things that we could be But baby, I've been, I've been praying hard, Said, no more counting dollars We'll be counting stars Lately, I've been, I've been losing sleep Dreaming about the things that we could be But baby, I've been, I've been praying hard, Said, no more counting dollars We'll be, we'll be counting stars I feel the love and I feel it burn Down this river, every turn Hope is a four-letter word Make that money, watch it burn Old, but I'm not that old Young, but I'm not that bold I don't think the world is sold I'm just doing what we're told I feel something so wrong Doing the right thing I could lie, could lie, could lie Everything that drowns me makes me wanna fly Lately, I've been, I've been losing sleep Dreaming about the things that we could be But baby, I've been, I've been praying hard, Said, no more counting dollars We'll be counting stars Lately, I've been, I've been losing sleep Dreaming about the things that we could be But baby, I've been, I've been praying hard, Said, no more counting dollars We'll be, we'll be counting stars Take that money Watch it burn Sink in the river The lessons are learnt Take that money Watch it burn Sink in the river The lessons are learnt Take that money Watch it burn Sink in the river The lessons are learnt Take that money Watch it burn Sink in the river The lessons are learnt Everything that kills me makes feel alive Lately, I've been, I've been losing sleep Dreaming about the things that we could be But baby, I've been, I've been praying hard, Said, no more counting dollars We'll be counting stars Lately, I've been, I've been losing sleep Dreaming about the things that we could be But baby, I've been, I've been praying hard, Said, no more counting dollars We'll be, we'll be, counting stars Take that money Watch it burn Sink in the river The lessons are learnt Take that money Watch it burn Sink in the river The lessons are learnt Take that money Watch it burn Sink in the river The lessons are learnt Take that money Watch it burn Sink in the river The lessons are learnt

Inglese

counting star lyrics

Ultimo aggiornamento 2018-12-10
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Tagalog

This story was written during American Colonization, when the colonizers introduced English to the education system, along with American culture. Characters Period it was written "Greta Garbo", a short story depicts a young Filipina woman, Monina Vargas, who greatly idealizes the American actress Greta Garbo. This short story shows Monina inside a train headed to Baguio. While she waits for her boyfriend, Octavio who she refers to as John, the reader witnesses the flashbacks and gets to learn more about her personality. Monina gets out of the train Author describes Monina's characteristics: small eyes, "tabis tari" ng manok ang eyebrow, has a very small face (looks like mestisa), has a small mouth and thin lips She calls herself "GG", and also uses it for letters and signatures Gives pictures of herself to her friends Greta Garbo is an American actress, Monina's ideal person Watches all her shows John Gilbert and Greta Garbo appeared together in a few films Became a real-life couple In the story, Octavio Razon is Monina's "John Gilbert" Octavio is a pilot Had wrinkles on her forehead Enjoyed skating Flashback of how she and Octavio first met and all the men that dated Monina "Talaang ginto" Why Octavio: experienced a "drunken" type of love; passionate hugs and deep kisses Back to the present Case of mistaken identity 3 days before tickets bought Tribune magazine society page Sees a picture of Octavio with his wife Monina is indecisive about whether to stay or go Out of disbelief, she jumps off the train Falls and hurts face THE END Significance of Greta Garbo

Inglese

This story was written during American Colonization, when the colonizers introduced English to the education system, along with American culture. Characters Period it was written "Greta Garbo", a short story depicts a young Filipina woman, Monina Vargas, who greatly idealizes the American actress Greta Garbo. This short story shows Monina inside a train headed to Baguio. While she waits for her boyfriend, Octavio who she refers to as John, the reader witnesses the flashbacks and gets to learn more about her personality. Monina gets out of the train Author describes Monina's characteristics: small eyes, "tabis tari" ng manok ang eyebrow, has a very small face (looks like mestisa), has a small mouth and thin lips She calls herself "GG", and also uses it for letters and signatures Gives pictures of herself to her friends Greta Garbo is an American actress, Monina's ideal person Watches all her shows John Gilbert and Greta Garbo appeared together in a few films Became a real-life couple In the story, Octavio Razon is Monina's "John Gilbert" Octavio is a pilot Had wrinkles on her forehead Enjoyed skating Flashback of how she and Octavio first met and all the men that dated Monina "Talaang ginto" Why Octavio: experienced a "drunken" type of love; passionate hugs and deep kisses Back to the present Case of mistaken identity 3 days before tickets bought Tribune magazine society page Sees a picture of Octavio with his wife Monina is indecisive about whether to stay or go Out of disbelief, she jumps off the train Falls and hurts face THE END Significance of Greta Garbo

Ultimo aggiornamento 2018-11-13
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Tagalog

HISTORY OF CAGAYAN DE ORO CITY By ATTY. "TOMMY" C. PACANA CHAIRMAN, HISTORICAL COMMISSION Two thousand years ago, there were already ancient Kagay-anons living around the vicinity of Hulaga, Himologan and Tagbalitang caves around 8 kilometers south of Cagayan de Oro City. Fr. Francisco Demetrio, S.J., noted archeologist and Filipino folklorist of Xavier University had collected tools, implements, potteries and shards from these areas and subjected these to the Carbon dating process at the Philippine Historical Museum to determine their age. It was found that these tools and implements were already used by the ancient Kagay-anons during the Neolithic Age. This shows how old Cagayan de Oro is before the coming of the Spanish "conquistadors" to the Philippines in march 1521. There were three great Sultanates of Mindanao and Sulu. These were Sultanates of Sulu under Sheriff Aljaluddin, the Sultanate of Maguindanao under Sheriff Mawi, and Tagoloan under Sheriff Mohammed Kabungsuwan. The Sultanate of Tagoloan extended from Baloi, Lanao del Sur, to Butuan, Cagayan de Oro (or Kalambaguhan, by which name it was then known), was merely a passageway from Baloi to Butuan, which was already a great trading center like Zugbu, Panay and Manila. Kalambaguhan has a small settlement of Bukidnons who lived along the riverbanks of the Kalambaguhan River. This river (now the Cagayan River) was so known because of the "Lambago" trees that grew profusely along its banks. During this time, however, the Cachel Corralat (Sultan Kudarat) marauding warriors attacked such places as Manticao, Tagnipa, (El Salvador), Iligan and Kalambaguhan to bring these places with their domain. They captured the women, children and working animals of the inhabitants in these places and brought them to their Sultanate. Because of these constant raids, the Bukidnons along the river fled to the hills of Hulaga led by their ruler, Datu Salangsang. Sometime in 1622, long after the Spaniards had established themselves at Butuan, Spanish friars under Fray Agustin de San Pedro known as "El Padre Capitan" went to see Datu Salangsang and sought to invite him and his people to come down to their told settlement at Kalambaguhan under the protection of the Spaniards. Datu Salangsang's aunt, a Christianized woman of influence whose name was Magdalena Bacuya. With a messenger from El Padre Capitan reiterated his offer to Datu Salangsang and convinced him to come down to their ancient settlement of Kalambaguhan. To protect the Bukidnons from the constant raids of the Muslim from Cachel Corralat, El Padre Capitan built a fortification around the settlement, which is now Gaston Park. Several raids of the Maguindanao warriors were repulsed by the courageous El Padre Capitan that the Muslims never returned again to the settlement. It was from this small settlement that the present Cagayan de Oro originated. A small church was built on the site, which later became the present San Agustin Cathedral. Thereby, the fame of El Padre Capitan as an able military strategist, spread far and wide. He vanquished the Muslims around Lake Lanao. The people of Cagayan de Oro come from a blend of two cultures those of the Muslims and Bukidnons. These were the native people that had settled in the region long before the coming of the Spaniards in fact, the first Christians among these natives were the Muslims from Lanao who were the descendants of the Samporna clan. They were the first to be baptized along with the Bato-Batos, the Wagas, Abas, Dagumbals and several families. HOW DID CAGAYAN DE ORO GOT ITS NAME? Pre-War folks said that Cagayan came from "Cagaycay, " an ancient Bukidnon word meaning to rake in the earth either with one's bare hands or with a piece of wood. It also means rocks gathered from the river or ores raked in from the hillside or streams. Gold have always been abundant in the Cagayan River gold ores are still found in the nearby of Cagayan as Tumpagon, Pigsag-an, Tuburan, Taglimao and other nearby places. Before the Spaniards came to Cagayan (or Kalambaguhan), there were already places where on could rake in the earth. ANOTHER VERSION IS MORE ROMANTIC Another version of how Cagayan de Oro got its name is told in of that story of a Bukidnon chieftain on the eastern side of Cagayan River (whose name according to old folks was Mansicampo), once had a quarrel with a Muslim Datu across the river (now the RER Subdivision), his name was Bagongsalibo. The quarrel became intense that the Bukidnon chieftain wanted it settled by war. However, the Muslim Datu across the river wanted to live in peace with his people in that part of Cagayan. Mansicampo then called on all his followers and relatives from the Bukidnon tribes of Daan Lunsod, gathered on the eastern side of the river ready for combat then Mansicampo ordered his son, the Bagani, to go and see Datu Bagongsalibo and arranged for a council of war. Therefore, the young prince went to see the Muslim Datu and confirmed with him. During the conference, however the young prince noted that there was a beautiful young woman who kept on peeping from behind a door looking at him. She was so beautiful that the young prince was immediately captivated and forgot his main purpose in the council. The young prince immediately proposed his intentions to the Muslim Datu who was only too willing to accept his land in marriage as he was not very keen about going to war against a neighbor. When the Bukidnon chieftain heard about his son proposing marriage to the daughter of his enemy. His warriors bid goodbye and left to live near the hills of Lumbia vowing never return to his former settlement which he now call "Kagayha-an" (or in Bukidnon, a place of shame). Since then, Cagayan de Oro has grown into one of the most peaceful and progressive cities in the entire Philippines.

Inglese

zzzzzzzz

Ultimo aggiornamento 2015-08-27
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Tagalog

muslim to tagalog traA hijab or ḥijāb (/hɪˈdʒɑːb/, /hɪˈdʒæb/, /ˈhɪ.dʒæb/ or /hɛˈdʒɑːb/; Arabic: حجاب‎, pronounced [ħiˈdʒæːb] or [ħiˈɡæːb]) is a veil that covers the head and chest, which is particularly worn by some Muslim women beyond the age of puberty in the presence of adult males outside of their ...nslator

Inglese

muslim hijab Traa to Tagalog or hijab (/ hɪdʒɑːb /, / hɪdʒæb / /hɪ.dʒæb/ or / hɛdʒɑːb /; Arabic: حجاب, pronounced [ħidʒæːb] or [ħiɡæːb]) is a veil that covers the head and chest, which is particularly worn by some Muslim women beyond the age of puberty in the presence of adult males outside of their ... nslator

Ultimo aggiornamento 2015-04-01
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Tagalog

nemo ang batang papel rene villanueva(tagalog) Si Nemo ay isang batang yari sa ginupit na diyaryo. Pinunit-punit, ginupit-gupit saka pinagdikit-dikit, si Nemo ay ginawa ng mga bata para sa isang proyekto nila sa klase. Ngayo’y bakasyon na. Si Nemo’y naiwang kasama ng ibang papel sa silid. Nakatambak siya sa bunton ng mga maalikabok na polder at enbelop. Isang araw, isang mapaglarong hangin ang nanunuksong umihip sa silid. Inilipad niya sa labas si Nemo. Nagpalutang-lutang sa hangin si Nemo. Naroong tumaas siya; naroong bumaba. Muntik na siyang sumabit sa mga sanga ng aratiles. Nang mapadpad siya sa tabi ng daan, muntik na siyang mahagip ng humahagibis na sasakyan. Inangilan siya ng dyip. Binulyawan ng kotse. At sininghalan ng bus. Mabuti na lamang at napakagaan ni Nemo. Nagpatawing-tawing siya sa hangin bago tuluyang lumapag sa gitna ng panot na damo sa palaruan. Nakahinga nang maluwag si Nemo. Ngunit nagulantang siya sa dami ng nagtatakbuhang paa na muntik nang makayapak sa kaniya. Naghahabulan ang mga bata at kay sasaya nila! Araw-araw, tuwing hapon, pinanonood ni Nemo ang mga naglalarong bata. Inggit na inggit siya sa kanila. Tuwing makikita niya ang mga bata sa palaruan, gustong-gusto rin niyang maging isang tunay na bata. “Gusto kong tumawa tulad ng totoong bata! Gusto kong tumakbo tulad ng totoong bata! Gusto kong maghagis ng bola tulad ng totoong bata!” Sabi nila, kapag may hiniling ka raw na gusto mong matupad, kailangang sabihin mo ito sa pinakamalayong bituin sa langit. Kaya isang gabi, matiyagang nagbantay sa langit si Nemo. Hinintay niya ang paglabas ng pinakamalayong bituin. At nang makita niya ito, sinabi niya ang kaniyang hiling. “Bituin, bituin, tuparin ngayon din Ako’y gawing isang batang masayahin!” Pumikit nang mariin na mariin si Nemo. Naramdaman niyang parang umiikot ang paligid at nagkakagulo ang mga busina ng sasakyan. Totoong bata na si Nemo! Pagdilat niya’y kasama na niya ang kaniyang totoong Tatay na walang trabaho, at totoong Nanay na payat na payat, at walong totoong kapatid na ang ingay-ingay sa isang masikip, makipot, at tagpi-tagpi pero totoong bahay. “’Wag kayong tatamad-tamad,” sigaw ng kaniyang totoong tatay. “Magtrabaho kayo!” Kaya napilitang tumakbo si Nemo palabas ng bahay. Palakad-lakad si Nemo sa kalye. Hindi niya pansin ang mga humahagibis na bus. Hindi niya pansin ang mga humahagibis na dyip. Isip siya nang isip kung paano makakatulong sa kaniyang totoong pamilya. Kahit bata pa, napilitang maghanapbuhay si Nemo. Sa umaga’y nagtinda siya ng sampagita at humahabol-habol sa mga kotse. Pagod na pagod si Nemo araw-araw. Pakiramdam niya, pabilis nang pabilis ang kaniyang pagtanda. Kaya naisipan niyang pumasok sa eskuwela. Sumilip siyang muli sa paaralang pinanggalingan niya. Pero dahil marumi ang kaniyang suot at wala siyang sapatos, inirapan lang si Nemo ng libro. “Hindi ka bagay dito!” sabi ng libro. “Ang baho-baho mo!” Nagalit din sa kaniya ang mesa. “Ang dumi-dumi mo!” sinigawan din siya ng pisara. “Alis diyan!” Kaya napilitang tumakbo si Nemo. Nagtatakbo siya nang nagtatakbo hanggang sa gilid ng dagat. Sinabi ni Nemo ang problema niya sa dagat pero naghikab lang ito. At kahit ang alon na puno ng layak ay nagtakip ng ilong nang maamoy siya. “’Wag mo nang dagdagan ang basura dito!” sigaw nito kay Nemo. Malungkot na naglakad-lakad si Nemo. At sa maraming kalye ng marusing na lungsod, sa bawat sulok ay may nakita siyang mga batang-kalye. May nagbebenta ng sampagita. May nagtitinda ng sigarilyo at diyaryo habang maliksing sumasabit-sabit sa mga sasakyan. May mga kalbo, galisin, at palaboy na yakap-yakap ang supot na plastik na kapag sinisinghot nila ay parang nagguguhit sa kanilang mukha ng mangmang na ngiti. May mga batang butuhan ang binti at malamlam ang mata na akay-akay ng matatatandang puti na parang kislap ng balisong ang kislap ng mata. “Kay dami-dami palang batang kalye,” naisip ni Nemo. Kung gabi, kung halos hindi umihip ang mapanuksong hangin, ang mga batang kalye ay nagtitipon-tipon sa parke na may monumento ng bayaning may kipkip na libro. Tumatakbo sila. Naglulundagan. Nagbibiruan. Naghahagikgikan. Pero napansin ni Nemo na walang taginting ang kanilang halakhak. Parang pumanaw na ang kislap sa sulok ng kanilang mata. Sumama si Nemo sa iba pang batang lansangan. Nagtipon-tipon sila sa isang bahagi ng parke. At sa dilim ng gabi, nagsimula silang maglaro at magkantahan. Nalaman ni Nemo na marami palang batang tulad niya. Mga batang lansangan, mga batang kailangang maghanapbuhay dahil sa kahirapan. Tinipon ni Nemo ang iba pang batang lansangan. Nang magkuwentuhan sila, nalaman nilang pare-pareho pala ang kanilang gusto: mapagmahal na magulang, maayos na tahanan, masayang paaralan, at sapat na pagkain. Ipinagtapat ni Nemo ang lihim na kaniyang natuklasan. Matutupad ang anumang pangarap kapag hiniling sa pinakamalayong bituin. Sabay-sabay silang tumingala sa pinakamalayong bituin sa langit at hiniling nila ang lahat ng ito. “Bituin, bituin, tuparin ngayon din Lahat kami’y gawing batang masayahin.” Sa isang iglap, lahat sila ay naging batang papel. Inilipad sila ng hangin. Kay gaan-gaan ng kanilang pakiramdam. Kay saya-saya nila dahil malayo na sila sa magulong pamilya, malupit na eskuwela, at maingay na kalsada. Nagtaka ang mga taong nakakita sa palutang-lutang na mga batang papel. Marami ang naawa sa kanila. Pero ang hindi nila alam, mas maligaya na ngayon ang mga batang papel, gaya ni Nemo, kaysa mga totoong bata na kailangang makibaka at mabuhay sa malupit na kalsada. Mula sa: Ang Gintong Habihan: Mga Kuwentong Premyado ng Palanca. (1998). Maynila: Tahanan Books for Young Readers

Inglese

Nemo the little paper rene villanueva (Tagalog)

Ultimo aggiornamento 2015-02-16
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Tagalog

n the turbulent days in which France was transitioning away from Napoleonic rule, Edmond Dantes (Caviezel) and his closest friend, Fernand Mondego (Pearce), aspire to gain the same two things: the next captaincy of a ship in Morel's (Godfrey) Marseille-based shipping business and the hands of the lovely Mercedes Iguanada (Dominczyk). Dantes and Mondego are diverted to Elba on a shipping mission because their captain requires medical attention. Assistance comes, unexpectedly, in the form of the personal physician of the exiled Napoleon (Norton). In return for the use of his doctor, Napoleon demands that Dantes deliver a letter for him and that the mission and the letter be kept a secret. Unknown to the illiterate Dantes, the letter will provide Bonapartists in Marseille information of pertinence to a possible rescue of Napoleon. Also unknown to him, Fernand has discovered and read the letter and has full knowledge of its contents. On his return to France, Dantes' fortunes peak as Morel names him captain of one of his ships and an improved station in life prompts Edmond to propose to Mercedes, who accepts the offer. In the process of being beaten out of the two things that matter most to him in life, the jealous Fernand knows that the letter Dantes is carrying can be used to falsely implicate him in an act that might be viewed by local authorities as treasonous. Fernand, and his confidant, shipping colleague Danglars (Woodington), betray Dantes by making the magistrate Villefort (Frain) aware of the letter. Dantes is taken by local authorities in front of Villefort. Despite his determination that Dantes is innocent of any crime, he becomes edgy upon learning that the letter was addressed to Noirtier Villefort, a known Bonpartist, and, consequently, a politically inconvenient father for a young man aspiring to a prominent law career in post-Napoleonic France. To eliminate all evidence that his father was involved in plans for an escape attempt by Napoleon from Elba, Villefort burns the letter and has Dantes arrested and taken to the Chateau D'If, a maximum security prison, where Dantes rots for over a decade, with no prospects of getting out in the imaginable future. Dantes befriends a fellow prisoner named Abbe Faria (Harris), who is a great scholar and who, very gradually, transforms the unworldly Dantes into a wise, learned and cultivated man. Faria is an old man, however, and when he comes to realize that he is fatally ill, he tells Dantes of a great treasure and where it is buried. Secretly placing himself in Faria's burial sack, which is to be thrown over the cliffs and into the river alongside the prison, Dantes manages to escape. After a dangerous ordeal in which he mingles with, but ultimately befriends, an enterprising, yet violent, group of smugglers led by Luigi Vampa (Blanc), he makes his way back to Marseille. Dantes now turns his attention to claiming the treasure Abbe Faria had referred to. After locating the treasure, Dantes' riches are suddenly boundless, but rather than retiring to a life of leisure, his new raison d'etre is vengeance, with the objects of his revenge being Fernand (now a count), Danglars (now a baron), and Villefort (now a chief prosecutor), all of whom live in Paris. As they are now members of Parisian high society, Dantes realizes that to gain access to them, he'll need to reinvent himself, and uses some of his newfound riches to purchase a huge estate near Paris. He then proclaims himself to be the Count of Monte Cristo, and although nobody knows of him, his claim is very credible in view of his visibly substantial wealth. The Count plans a party at his new estate and invites many members of Parisian high society, including all the objects of his vengeance. Now having considerable access to each of them, one at a time, he successfully sets them up for failure. Danglars is tricked into an act of embezzlement and Villefort is tricked into confessing to conspiracy to have his own father murdered within earshot of local authorities. The Count gains close access to Fernand and Mercedes, who are now husband and wife, by paying the smuggler Luigi Vampa to pretend to kidnap their son, Albert. This enables the Count himself to save Albert. Having saved their son, the Count is now welcome in the home of Fernand and Mercedes. Taking note of his mannerisms, Mercedes soon works out that the Count is actually Edmond Dantes, but the Count still has a bone to pick with her, as she married Fernand very shortly after his arrest and had Fernand's son, Albert (Cavill), not long after that. This seemed a sign of her infidelity, but the Count ultimately learns that Villefort had announced that Dantes was dead shortly after the onset of his imprisonment. Fernand, it turns out, had bargained for this announcement, from which he hoped to gain the hand of Mercedes, by murdering, at Villefort's request, Villefort's father. Now understanding that Mercedes had believed him dead, the Count is less incensed by her marriage to Fernand, but still finds the very short period of time between his imprisonment and their marriage very unsettling. The Count is about to turn his back completely on Mercedes. But then, Fernand's financial ruin from compulsive gambling compels him to leave Paris to evade his debtors, against whom he has committed crimes. Unwilling to follow Fernand with their son, Mercedes, finally, tells the Count the truth ---- she had married Fernand because she had, unknown to the Count, been impregnated by Dantes shortly before he was arrested. She wanted Albert to have a father. In truth, however, Albert's biological father is the Count himself. Finally willing to forgive her, the Count falls in love all over again with Mercedes, and, with those who had betrayed them out of the way, they resolve to live their lives, casting aside the dark and regrettable episodes which had robbed them of so many happy times with each other and with their son Albert.

Inglese

summary of the count of Monte Cristo

Ultimo aggiornamento 2015-01-13
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Matanglawin (Lit. Hawkeye) is a weekly science-environmental educational show hosted by "Philippine's Trivia King" Kuya Kim Atienza, and is geared towards the young and young at heart. Matanglawin takes its audiences on adventures to natural and supernatural worlds to learn about wildlife, science concepts, culture, practical and general knowledge and basically everything under the sun by being “Mapanuri, Mapagmatiyag, Mapangahas! (Inquisitive, Vigilant, Adventurous!).” It is aired on ABS-CBN every Sunday morning at 9:30am, with replays on Sundays at 7:00am on ABS-CBN News Channel. The show premiered on March 24, 2008 as a late-night program before it was moved to its current time schedule.

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Ultimo aggiornamento 2014-12-04
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kombertidorWhile still in the grade school, his mother used to tell him to be a priest, to dignify and ameliorate their state of life; but the father would vehemently counter, no, he should be a lawyer. As always during the eve of the fiesta, Celedonio G. Aguilar earnestly desire to watch the parade with deep interest and enthusiasm especially when the platoon of soldiers march by and roiled in his mind the well-mannered discipline and dignity of mien of the soldiers, that someday, he thought and figured himself to be one of them. So when he enrolled at the Albay High School, after his academic classes, posthaste he would scurry out to his custodial concern, joined the formation of the preparatory military training activities. Through the years he rose from the ranks to become battalion commander. It was October, during his senior year in school that he hide down to the military camp to take the Philippine Military Academy Examination, but the Japanese Imperial forces landed at legazpi on December 14, 1941 thus throwing his ambition to be a soldier to the winds. However during the Japanese occupation, he joined the guerilla movement (NOMETA) Noli Me Tangere Guerilla as 2nd Lieutenant. He was enraptured with much interest when the American Force landed at legazpi on april 1, 1945. And NOMETA unit became 1st. Battalion of Sandico’s 52nd Division Guerilla Unit was re – entrenched to a company and merge to first Regiment Bicol Brigade that include him in the activated regular force of the Philippine Army as First class Private. Utterly disgusted he resigned from the army and applied to teach in the District of camalig as a substitute teacher. After a year of teaching, he became a temporary teacher and was appointed head teacher at Del Rosario Public School. Three years after classroom work, he resigned to pursue a degree in education and Graduated in 1951 at the National University, Manila. He first taught at Libon Private High School, after a year, transferred to St. John’s Academy in Camalig where his former student, Mrs. Minda Grageda Muñoz in their St. John’s Academy Golden Anniversary Souvenir booklet, In Retrospect elucidated; “Mr. Aguilar is a tall respectable man, eloquent and dedicated English instructor. We were all eyes and ears for him when he’s in front of the class, listening intently and spellbound to his interesting lecture. He was forthright and his dignified stature demanded respect.” In the same booklet, Reminiscing Our High School days with our Mentors, Mrs. Josefina Nuas Ramos averred, “Mr. Aguilar was our English teacher. He spoke English fluently. He developed our interest in reading literature and novels. He is a writer. Some of his books are: Shaken Shadows, Time and Sunken Sun, This Season and Night, Pink Sun and Neutral Dust, Readings in Philippine Literature, Speaking and Writing English, Critiques on Poetry, Understanding Poetry through imagery, Thesis Writing Made Easy, Functional Research Techniques, Dimensions in Reading, and Before the Tide Sets In.” Then the Civil Sevice Commission, in a letter, ordered him to report to Marcial O. Rañola Memorial School to teach English, non – compliance will be tantamount to scrapping out his civil service eligibility. Banners in The Quill, student publication of Marcial O. Rañola Memorial School, that new teacher added to MORMS Teaching Force,”one of them was MR. Aguilar of Camalig, Albay who had his first feel of teaching in 1945 when he accepted a teaching position in a barrio elementary school in the District of Camalig. But three years teaching in the elementary, resigned to enroll at National University, where in 1951 obtained his Bachelor of Science degree in Educational major in English and minor in history. He taught for five years at St. John’s Academy. During summer enrolled at U.P. for masteral degree.” He enjoyed immensely his secondary teaching adventure. Especially his literature teaching which spurred in him for more writing for publication in the national magazines: This Week Magazine, Free Press, Sunday Times Magazine, Graphic, Solidarity, etc. Through the suggestion of Bienvenido N. Santos, he organized Albay Writers with membership officials as: Dr. Rodrigo Salazar, Valdemar Olaguer, Jose Ravalo, Vic O. Ballesfin, and 15 other budding writers of Albay with Celedonio G. Aguilar as President and Bienvinido Santos as Adviser. At one instance, through Santos, N.V.M. Gonzales was guest speaker of the group along with Hilario Francia and Petronilo Daroy. To cap it all, he was elected President of the Albay Secondary Teachers Association which perhaps paved the way for his selection for the Master of Art in Teaching Reading Scholarship at the University of the Philippines. In the Class 76 reunion at MORMS of which Dr. Susan Princesa Mallonga was the President presented to him a certificate, which states: “Class 76”presents this certificate of Appreciation to Mr. Celedonio G. Aguilar for his demonstrated patience, hard work and dedication in molding our young minds in the pursuit of our secondary education, most of all, giving us the foundation in academic excellence, and teaching us values of honesty, diligence, sincerity and humility,” After enjoying the DECS scholarships, he was promoted to Junior College Instructor and assigned to School for Philippine a Craftsmen, Polangui, Albay. In The Craftlet official student publication of School for Philippine Craftsmen, in Campus Tidbits by June Ailes where she spot lighted and enunciated campus personalities, she articulated on Mr. Aguilar as “our beloved English instructor and his being very energetic to drill us in writing as if he was ink in his veins, for he has several collection of poetry which he considers his vice: together with his scholarships at U.P. and Silliman University. Indeed how lucky we are to be our instructor.” On School visitation of the Regional Director at SPC observing teachers, he spotted Mr. Aguilar for promotion to Regional General Education Supervisor, at which instance, he devoted his time after office hours to teaching at Bicol College and then to Divine Word College of Legazpi. Then retired from the government service. Outrightly, Bicol College took him to be Dean of the College of Education with only secondary teaching as the course offered. So he formalized the opening of the elementary grades in preparation for the opening of Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education (BSEed). At point and time, Mr. Manuel T. Javier, Bicol College Faculty and Adviser of Bicol Collegian, Student Publication of the School, wrote a feature which said: If the Colossus of Rhodes has been one wonders of the world in the days of antiquity, it has its equal in our present time at our school at that. We are referring to Dr. Celedonio G. Aguilar as the mighty colossus. Aside from being Dean of the College of Education, he is also Secretary of the Graduate School, twin positions enough to stymie the most intrepid of men, but not this titan. He savors these burdens with gusto. His student is the living witness to his pedagogical virtuosity. They would swear to high heaven how this man could change adrab classroom into exciting arena of intellectual combat where educational myths and heresies are blasted and intellectual pursuits are probed and defend.” Eventually a year after, he became the Dean of the Graduated School. As Dean of the Graduate School, he worked for the opening of the doctoral program subsequently a year later, through the help of his friend in the Higher Education Division, Manila, its recognition, a help exerted to boost Bicol College’s headway to educational permanence. But resigned later on when University of Santo Thomas called him for interview in connection to his application to teach at that school. But Fr. Reyes, President of Divine Word College of Legazpi and was to be promoted to higher position in Manila, sweet talked him to teach rather the King Seminary in Quezon City, which he accepted. He only taught half – day at the Seminary which gave him ample time for research, and call to mind, the dearth of specific books for the subject he taught in college, such as Philippine Literature, so Readings in Philippines Literature was written, Grammar and Composition, for Speaking and writing English, literary Criticism, for Critiques on Poetry, Poetry and Drama, for Understanding Poetry through Imagery, and for Graduate Students, Thesis Writing Made Easy, and Functional Research Techniques, for teacher and would be teacher, Dimension in Reading and Before the Tide Sets In. He also included in foreign and local anthologies: World Poetry by Kim Young Sam (Korea), East – West Voices by Dr. V.S. Skanda Prasad, (Mangalore, India), Edicao Commemorativo by Wilson Oliviera Jasa, (Sao Paulo, Brazil), and National Library of Poetry: Walk Through Paradise 1995, Portraits of Life 1996, Owing Mills, Maryland, USA, Bicol Voice Anthology by Merito B. Espinas, Bicol of the Philippines by Lilia Realubit, Ani by Cultural Center of the Philippines, Palihan by U.P. Creative Writing Center. On the outset of June, a letter from Mayor’s Office, requested all occupational pursuits an Camalig to submit their Bio – Data emphasizing their significant accomplishments in their chosen job career, such as: Civic Action Movement, business enterprises, inventions, constructions, mentors to take from classroom teacher, principals, (district, division, regional) supervisors, college professors, and Deans of schools who are legitimate Camaligueños. In view of his teaching feat, scholarship, written books that benefited college and graduates students throughout the country and his Doctor of Education degree from Bicol University, prompted the award as outstanding Camaligueños in the field of EDUCATION (along with other professional pursuits) June 24, 2005 camalig’s town fiesta by the Camalig Council on Arts, Culture and Tourism to Dr. Celedonio G. Aguilar. Apathetically he muttered, if only there is a school who would avail of his expertise on the subjects corresponding to his written books, he is still willing to teach, for teaching to him is a life time endeavor, not anymore for remuneration, with life and Comfort, but to deciminate and share the knowledge he has learned from his scholarships by the DECS in Master of Arts in Teaching Reading at U.P. Diliman, QC, Master of fine Art in Creative Writing a Silliman University under the Tiempos (Edilberto and Edith) and William Sweet, Master of Arts in Educational Management.

Inglese

While still in the grade school, his mother used to tell him to be a priest, to dignify and ameliorate their state of life; but the father would vehemently counter, no, he should be a lawyer. As always during the eve of the fiesta, Celedonio G. Aguilar earnestly desire to watch the parade with deep interest and enthusiasm especially when the platoon of soldiers march by and roiled in his mind the well-mannered discipline and dignity of mien of the soldiers, that someday, he thought and figured himself to be one of them. So when he enrolled at the Albay High School, after his academic classes, posthaste he would scurry out to his custodial concern, joined the formation of the preparatory military training activities. Through the years he rose from the ranks to become battalion commander. It was October, during his senior year in school that he hide down to the military camp to take the Philippine Military Academy Examination, but the Japanese Imperial forces landed at legazpi on December 14, 1941 thus throwing his ambition to be a soldier to the winds. However during the Japanese occupation, he joined the guerilla movement (NOMETA) Noli Me Tangere Guerilla as 2nd Lieutenant. He was enraptured with much interest when the American Force landed at legazpi on april 1, 1945. And NOMETA unit became 1st. Battalion of Sandico’s 52nd Division Guerilla Unit was re – entrenched to a company and merge to first Regiment Bicol Brigade that include him in the activated regular force of the Philippine Army as First class Private. Utterly disgusted he resigned from the army and applied to teach in the District of camalig as a substitute teacher. After a year of teaching, he became a temporary teacher and was appointed head teacher at Del Rosario Public School. Three years after classroom work, he resigned to pursue a degree in education and Graduated in 1951 at the National University, Manila. He first taught at Libon Private High School, after a year, transferred to St. John’s Academy in Camalig where his former student, Mrs. Minda Grageda Muñoz in their St. John’s Academy Golden Anniversary Souvenir booklet, In Retrospect elucidated; “Mr. Aguilar is a tall respectable man, eloquent and dedicated English instructor. We were all eyes and ears for him when he’s in front of the class, listening intently and spellbound to his interesting lecture. He was forthright and his dignified stature demanded respect.” In the same booklet, Reminiscing Our High School days with our Mentors, Mrs. Josefina Nuas Ramos averred, “Mr. Aguilar was our English teacher. He spoke English fluently. He developed our interest in reading literature and novels. He is a writer. Some of his books are: Shaken Shadows, Time and Sunken Sun, This Season and Night, Pink Sun and Neutral Dust, Readings in Philippine Literature, Speaking and Writing English, Critiques on Poetry, Understanding Poetry through imagery, Thesis Writing Made Easy, Functional Research Techniques, Dimensions in Reading, and Before the Tide Sets In.” Then the Civil Sevice Commission, in a letter, ordered him to report to Marcial O. Rañola Memorial School to teach English, non – compliance will be tantamount to scrapping out his civil service eligibility. Banners in The Quill, student publication of Marcial O. Rañola Memorial School, that new teacher added to MORMS Teaching Force,”one of them was MR. Aguilar of Camalig, Albay who had his first feel of teaching in 1945 when he accepted a teaching position in a barrio elementary school in the District of Camalig. But three years teaching in the elementary, resigned to enroll at National University, where in 1951 obtained his Bachelor of Science degree in Educational major in English and minor in history. He taught for five years at St. John’s Academy. During summer enrolled at U.P. for masteral degree.” He enjoyed immensely his secondary teaching adventure. Especially his literature teaching which spurred in him for more writing for publication in the national magazines: This Week Magazine, Free Press, Sunday Times Magazine, Graphic, Solidarity, etc. Through the suggestion of Bienvenido N. Santos, he organized Albay Writers with membership officials as: Dr. Rodrigo Salazar, Valdemar Olaguer, Jose Ravalo, Vic O. Ballesfin, and 15 other budding writers of Albay with Celedonio G. Aguilar as President and Bienvinido Santos as Adviser. At one instance, through Santos, N.V.M. Gonzales was guest speaker of the group along with Hilario Francia and Petronilo Daroy. To cap it all, he was elected President of the Albay Secondary Teachers Association which perhaps paved the way for his selection for the Master of Art in Teaching Reading Scholarship at the University of the Philippines. In the Class 76 reunion at MORMS of which Dr. Susan Princesa Mallonga was the President presented to him a certificate, which states: “Class 76”presents this certificate of Appreciation to Mr. Celedonio G. Aguilar for his demonstrated patience, hard work and dedication in molding our young minds in the pursuit of our secondary education, most of all, giving us the foundation in academic excellence, and teaching us values of honesty, diligence, sincerity and humility,” After enjoying the DECS scholarships, he was promoted to Junior College Instructor and assigned to School for Philippine a Craftsmen, Polangui, Albay. In The Craftlet official student publication of School for Philippine Craftsmen, in Campus Tidbits by June Ailes where she spot lighted and enunciated campus personalities, she articulated on Mr. Aguilar as “our beloved English instructor and his being very energetic to drill us in writing as if he was ink in his veins, for he has several collection of poetry which he considers his vice: together with his scholarships at U.P. and Silliman University. Indeed how lucky we are to be our instructor.” On School visitation of the Regional Director at SPC observing teachers, he spotted Mr. Aguilar for promotion to Regional General Education Supervisor, at which instance, he devoted his time after office hours to teaching at Bicol College and then to Divine Word College of Legazpi. Then retired from the government service. Outrightly, Bicol College took him to be Dean of the College of Education with only secondary teaching as the course offered. So he formalized the opening of the elementary grades in preparation for the opening of Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education (BSEed). At point and time, Mr. Manuel T. Javier, Bicol College Faculty and Adviser of Bicol Collegian, Student Publication of the School, wrote a feature which said: If the Colossus of Rhodes has been one wonders of the world in the days of antiquity, it has its equal in our present time at our school at that. We are referring to Dr. Celedonio G. Aguilar as the mighty colossus. Aside from being Dean of the College of Education, he is also Secretary of the Graduate School, twin positions enough to stymie the most intrepid of men, but not this titan. He savors these burdens with gusto. His student is the living witness to his pedagogical virtuosity. They would swear to high heaven how this man could change adrab classroom into exciting arena of intellectual combat where educational myths and heresies are blasted and intellectual pursuits are probed and defend.” Eventually a year after, he became the Dean of the Graduated School. As Dean of the Graduate School, he worked for the opening of the doctoral program subsequently a year later, through the help of his friend in the Higher Education Division, Manila, its recognition, a help exerted to boost Bicol College’s headway to educational permanence. But resigned later on when University of Santo Thomas called him for interview in connection to his application to teach at that school. But Fr. Reyes, President of Divine Word College of Legazpi and was to be promoted to higher position in Manila, sweet talked him to teach rather the King Seminary in Quezon City, which he accepted. He only taught half – day at the Seminary which gave him ample time for research, and call to mind, the dearth of specific books for the subject he taught in college, such as Philippine Literature, so Readings in Philippines Literature was written, Grammar and Composition, for Speaking and writing English, literary Criticism, for Critiques on Poetry, Poetry and Drama, for Understanding Poetry through Imagery, and for Graduate Students, Thesis Writing Made Easy, and Functional Research Techniques, for teacher and would be teacher, Dimension in Reading and Before the Tide Sets In. He also included in foreign and local anthologies: World Poetry by Kim Young Sam (Korea), East – West Voices by Dr. V.S. Skanda Prasad, (Mangalore, India), Edicao Commemorativo by Wilson Oliviera Jasa, (Sao Paulo, Brazil), and National Library of Poetry: Walk Through Paradise 1995, Portraits of Life 1996, Owing Mills, Maryland, USA, Bicol Voice Anthology by Merito B. Espinas, Bicol of the Philippines by Lilia Realubit, Ani by Cultural Center of the Philippines, Palihan by U.P. Creative Writing Center. On the outset of June, a letter from Mayor’s Office, requested all occupational pursuits an Camalig to submit their Bio – Data emphasizing their significant accomplishments in their chosen job career, such as: Civic Action Movement, business enterprises, inventions, constructions, mentors to take from classroom teacher, principals, (district, division, regional) supervisors, college professors, and Deans of schools who are legitimate Camaligueños. In view of his teaching feat, scholarship, written books that benefited college and graduates students throughout the country and his Doctor of Education degree from Bicol University, prompted the award as outstanding Camaligueños in the field of EDUCATION (along with other professional pursuits) June 24, 2005 camalig’s town fiesta by the Camalig Council on Arts, Culture and Tourism to Dr. Celedonio G. Aguilar. Apathetically he muttered, if only there is a school who would avail of his expertise on the subjects corresponding to his written books, he is still willing to teach, for teaching to him is a life time endeavor, not anymore for remuneration, with life and Comfort, but to deciminate and share the knowledge he has learned from his scholarships by the DECS in Master of Arts in Teaching Reading at U.P. Diliman, QC, Master of fine Art in Creative Writing a Silliman University under the Tiempos (Edilberto and Edith) and William Sweet, Master of Arts in Educational Management.

Ultimo aggiornamento 2014-11-23
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