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英語

carrom board game rules

グジャラート語

કૅરમ બોર્ડ રમત નિયમો

最終更新: 2017-11-25
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英語

carrom board game rules

グジャラート語

कैरम बोर्ड खेल के नियम

最終更新: 2014-12-01
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英語

carrom board game rules

グジャラート語

कैरम बोर्ड खेल के नियम ager queen or cover ek saath mile hon to kaise len

最終更新: 2017-06-15
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英語

Board Game

グジャラート語

બોર્ડ રમતName

最終更新: 2011-10-23
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英語

kho kho game rules

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ખો ખો રમત નિયમો

最終更新: 2017-04-11
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英語

Board Games

グジャラート語

પાટિયા રમતો

最終更新: 2014-08-15
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英語

Board games

グジャラート語

બૉર્ડ ની રમતો

最終更新: 2014-08-15
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英語

Board Games

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最終更新: 2011-10-23
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英語

Play the classic two-player board game of chess

グジャラート語

શાસ્ત્રિય બે-ખેલાડી શતરંજની રમત રમો

最終更新: 2014-08-20
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英語

carrom board game rules Rules FAQ Game Index Subscribe New Warehouse Deals Search for a game or brand... Masters Traditional Games Home Review Centre Ideas for ▼BasketEmail us01727 855058 GAME TABLESPUB GAMESOUTDOORSBOARD GAMESCASINOTABLE-TOPGIANT GAMESFAIR GAMES Visit our Google Plus pageVisit our Facebook page The Rules of Carrom Carrom or Karom is a game that has long been played throughout India and South East Asia but the game has become increasingly popular throughout much of the rest of the world during the last century. There are a huge number of variations in the rules even though an international regulatory body and several major national bodies exist - even these have rule variations depending upon the situation. Masters Games has based the following rules on those from the UK Carrom Club, tailoring them for simplicity where possible. Note: 1 inch = 2.54cm. Equipment The following dimensions vary considerably and are given only as an example of a tournament board. A Carrom board is a square smooth flat wooden board that can be 72cm or 74cm square and which should be positioned 60 - 70cm above the ground. In each corner is a circular hole that can be 51mm in diameter and underneath each hole is a net to catch the pieces in a similar way to a snooker table. Two lines are drawn on the table along the diagonals. These are the "foul lines". In the centre are two concentric circles - the centre circle is the size of a piece, the main circle having a diameter about six times larger. Outside the circles and a short way in from each side of the board are two straight lines parallel with the edge of the board. They should be about 3.8cm apart and the long thin area between them is terminated just before the diagonal foul lines at either end by a red circle of 3.8cm diameter. This thin rectangle with circles at either end is called the "baseline" and the baseline nearest to a player is the area that the player's striker must be played from. There are nine dark or black pieces and nine light or white pieces plus a red piece called the "Queen". The smooth wooden pieces are slightly smaller than the the striker which is between 3.8cm and 4.4cm in diameter. People often own their own strikers which can also be made of bone or ivory and which are normally somewhat heavier than the pieces although can vary in weight from half as heavy to four times as heavy as a piece. On some boards, potato starch, chalk dust or other lubricant is used to make the pieces slide more easily over the surface of the board - the most popular lubricant is boric acid. Preparation To decide who goes first, one player should hold a piece concealed in one hand. If the opponent guesses correctly which hand, the opponent chooses who goes first, otherwise the player concealing the piece chooses. The person who plays first aims to pocket the white pieces. The game is played by two opponents sitting opposite each other. To begin, the Queen is placed in the centre of the board. Six pieces are put around the Queen directly in a circle, each touching the Queen and their neighbours. The remaining twelve pieces are positioned around the inner circle of six pieces, so that each outer piece touches the inner circle. Both circles should have the pieces alternating in colour. The two circles are oriented so that the Queen, a white piece from the inner circle and a white piece from the outer circle lie in a straight line pointing towards the centre of the side of the board where the player who will play first is sitting. Objective Players take turns to play. A turn consists of one or more strikes. A player wins by pocketing all of the pieces of their chosen colour first. However, neither player can win until one or other player has "covered the Queen". To cover the Queen, a player must pocket one of her own pieces immediately after pocketing the Queen. If the Queen is pocketed but not covered, the Queen is returned to the board. Both players normally try to cover the Queen in addition to trying to win the game because a player who wins and also covers the Queen receives bonus points. Striking For each strike, the player must position the striker within the baseline OR on one of the two circles at either end of the baseline. A striker within the baseline must touch both the front line and the rear line. The striker may not "cut the moon" - be placed partially within the baseline and partially within the circle. The player must flick the striker with one finger so that it crosses the front baseline - it is not permitted to flick backwards or horizontally. A piece that is on or behind the front baseline must not be struck by the striker until the striker has crossed the front baseline. In striking, the player's hand or arm must not cross the diagonal foul lines at either end of the baseline. Basic rules For the very first turn, the player is allowed three attempts to "break" i.e. disturb the central group of counters. It doesn't matter which piece the striker hits first and it doesn't matter if the striker hits no pieces. If a the striker pockets the Queen and/or one or more pieces of her own colour, the player retrieves the striker and takes another strike. If the player pockets no pieces or commits a foul, the turn finishes. Covering the Queen A player may only pocket and cover the Queen if that player has already pocketed at least one piece of that player's colour. Should a player pocket the Queen before being permitted to cover it, the turn continues but the Queen is returned to the centre at the end of the turn. If a player pockets the Queen and one of her own pieces in the same turn, this counts and that player has covered the Queen. Such a player must have already pocketed at least one piece in order to cover the Queen as per normal. When a player pockets the Queen but does not cover it, the Queen is returned as near as possible to the centre circle by the opponent. Other Rules Pieces returned to the centre can be placed on top of other pieces within the main circle. If pieces come to rest standing on their edge or overlapping another piece, they are left as they are until moved again in the normal course of play. If the striker comes to rest under another piece, the striker should be removed with as little disturbance to the covering piece as possible. Fouls When a player commits a foul, the turn comes to an end immediately and a penalty is incurred. The penalty is that one pocketed piece is returned to the board by the opponent anywhere within the main circle. Any other pieces requiring to be returned to the board are also placed within the main circle by the opponent. It is normal for pieces to be positioned in order to confer an advantage for the opponent. A foul is recorded in the following situations: The striker is pocketed. The striker or any other piece leaves the board. A player pockets an opponent's piece. If the Queen was also pocketed, it is returned to the centre by the opponent together with the penalty piece. Any other pieces pocketed in the same strike remain pocketed. A player pockets the final opponent's piece. Regardless of whether the Queen has been covered, the opponent's piece is returned to the centre in addition to the penalty piece. A player pockets the final piece before the Queen has been covered. In this case both the pocketed piece and a penalty piece are returned to the centre. A player contravenes the rules for striking. A player touches any piece in play, other than the striker. The first player to strike fails to break the counters in three attempts. Where a penalty is incurred but no pocketed pieces exist to return, the penalty is "owed" until a piece becomes available. If a penalty is owed, when a piece becomes available due to being pocketed, the piece is returned to the centre by the opponent at the end of the turn. Should the opponent forget to do this before the start of the next turn, any owed penalties are lost. Scoring At the end of the game the winner scores 1 point for each opponent's piece left on the board. If the winner has less than 24 points and the winner also covered the Queen, a bonus 5 points are scored. If the winner has 24 or more points, then no points are scored for covering the Queen. The maximum score for one game is therefore 14 points. A match is played to 29 points. Doubles Carrom is played by four people just as often as by two. For the doubles game, partners sit opposite one another and turns proceed in a clockwise order. Other than that, play is exactly the same as for the singles game. The game has a different character, though, because pieces behind the baseline can be safely left for the partner to deal with unlike in the singles game where pieces behind the baseline can only be moved by the opponent or by rebounding of the board edges. PRODUCTS Carrom Boards Carrom Boards Uber Games Carrom Uber Games Carrom Uber Games Tournament Carrom Uber Games Tournament Carrom Garden Games Carrom Board Garden Games Carrom Board Uber Championship Carrom Board Uber Championship Carrom Board These rules are provided by Masters Traditional Games, an Internet shop selling quality traditional games, pub games and unusual games. For information on copying and copyright, see our disclaimer. Our rules are comprehensive instructions for friendly play. If in doubt, always abide by locally-played or house rules. Copyright Masters Traditional Games © 2017. All rights reserved. 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グジャラート語

carrom board game rules

最終更新: 2017-08-21
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英語

Life with a child with ADD/ADHD can be frustrating and overwhelming, but as a parent there is a lot you can do to help control and reduce the symptoms. You can help your child overcome daily challenges, channel his or her energy into positive arenas, and bring greater calm to your family. The earlier and more consistently you address your child’s problems, the greater chance they have for success in life. Helping your child with ADD/ADHD: What you need to know Children with ADD/ADHD generally have deficits in executive function: the ability to think and plan ahead, organize, control impulses, and complete tasks. That means you need to take over as the executive, providing extra guidance while your child gradually acquires executive skills of his or her own. Although the symptoms of ADD/ADHD can be nothing short of exasperating, it’s important to remember that the child with ADD/ADHD who is ignoring, annoying, or embarrassing you is not acting willfully. Kids with ADD/ADHD want to sit quietly; they want to make their rooms tidy and organized; they want to do everything their parent says to do—but they don’t know how to make these things happen. Having ADD/ADHD can be just as frustrating as dealing with someone who has it. If you keep this in mind, it will be a lot easier to respond to you child in positive, supportive ways. With patience, compassion, and plenty of support, you can manage childhood ADHD while enjoying a stable, happy home. ADD/ADHD and the family Before you can successfully parent a child with ADD/ADHD, it’s essential to understand the impact of your child’s symptoms on the family as a whole. Children with ADD/ADHD exhibit a slew of behaviors that can disrupt family life: They often don’t “hear” parental instructions, so they don’t obey them. They’re disorganized and easily distracted, keeping other family members waiting. They start projects and forget to finish them—let alone clean up after them. Children with impulsivity issues often interrupt conversations and demand attention at inappropriate times. They might speak before they think, saying tactless or embarrassing things. It’s often difficult to get them to bed and to sleep. Hyperactive children may tear around the house or even do things that put them in physical danger. The impact of ADD/ADHD on siblings Because of these behaviors, siblings of children with ADD/ADHD face a number of challenges: Their needs often get less attention than those of the child with ADD/ADHD. They may be rebuked more sharply when they err, and their successes may be less celebrated or taken for granted. They may be enlisted as assistant parents—and blamed if the sibling with ADD/ADHD misbehaves under their supervision. As a result, siblings may find their love for a brother or sister with ADD/ADHD mixed with jealousy and resentment. The impact of ADD/ADHD on parents And, of course, having a child with ADD/ADHD affects parents in many ways: The demands of a child with ADD/ADHD can be physically exhausting. The need to monitor the child’s activities and actions can be psychologically exhausting. The child’s inability to “listen” is frustrating. The child’s behaviors, and your knowledge of their consequences, can make you anxious and stressed. If there’s a basic difference between your personality and that of your child with ADD/ADHD, you may find your child’s behaviors especially difficult to accept. Frustration can lead to anger—and guilt about being angry at your child. In order to meet the challenges of raising a child with ADD/ADHD, you must to be able to master a combination of compassion and consistency. Living in a home that provides both love and structure is the best thing for a child or teenager who is learning to manage ADD/ADHD. ADD/ADHD parenting tip 1: Stay positive and healthy yourself As a parent, you set the stage for your child’s emotional and physical health. You have control over many of the factors that can positively influence the symptoms of your child’s disorder. The power of a positive attitude Your best assets for helping your child meet the challenges of ADD/ADHD are your positive attitude and common sense. When you are calm and focused, you are more likely to be able to connect with your child, helping him or her to be calm and focused as well. Keep things in perspective. Remember that your child’s behavior is related to a disorder. Most of the time it is not intentional. Hold on to your sense of humor. What’s embarrassing today may be a funny family story ten years from now. Don’t sweat the small stuff and be willing to make some compromises. One chore left undone isn’t a big deal when your child has completed two others plus the day’s homework. If you are a perfectionist, you will not only be constantly dissatisfied but also create impossible expectations for your ADD/ADHD child. Believe in your child. Think about or make a written list of everything that is positive, valuable, and unique about your child. Trust that your child can learn, change, mature, and succeed. Make thinking about this trust a daily task as you brush your teeth or make your coffee. When you take care of yourself, you’re better able to take care of your child As your child’s role model and most important source of strength, it is vital that you live healthfully. If you are overtired or have simply run out of patience, you risk losing sight of the structure and support you have so carefully set up for your child with ADD/ADHD. Take care of yourself. Eat right, exercise, and find ways to reduce stress, whether it means taking a nightly bath or practicing morning meditation. If you do get sick, acknowledge it and get help. Seek support. One of the most important things to remember in rearing a child with ADD/ADHD is that you don’t have to do it alone. Talk to your child’s doctors, therapists, and teachers. Join an organized support group for parents of children with ADHD. These groups offer a forum for giving and receiving advice, and provide a safe place to vent feelings and share experiences. Take breaks. Friends and family can be wonderful about offering to babysit, but you may feel guilty about leaving your child, or leaving the volunteer with a child with ADD/ADHD. Next time, accept their offer and discuss honestly how best to handle your child. How pets can help kids with ADHD (and their parents ) If your home life feels chaotic, you may be reluctant to add a pet to the mix. But pets come with a host of benefits for you and your child. They can help teach your kid responsibility and get him or her outside. They can also inject some much-needed fun and help the whole family blow off steam. In fact, studies show that pets can protect you from depression, stress, and even medical problems. Read: The Health Benefits of Pets ADD/ADHD parenting tip 2: Establish structure and stick to it Children with ADHD are more likely to succeed in completing tasks when the tasks occur in predictable patterns and in predictable places. Your job is to create and sustain structure in your home, so that your child knows what to expect and what they are expected to do. Tips for helping your child with ADD/ADHD stay focused and organized Follow a routine. It is important to set a time and a place for everything to help the child with ADD/ADHD understand and meet expectations. Establish simple and predictable rituals for meals, homework, play, and bed. Have your child lay out clothes for the next morning before going to bed, and make sure whatever he or she needs to take to school is in a special place, ready to grab. Use clocks and timers. Consider placing clocks throughout the house, with a big one in your child’s bedroom. Allow enough time for what your child needs to do, such as homework or getting ready in the morning. Use a timer for homework or transitional times, such between finishing up play and getting ready for bed. Simplify your child’s schedule. It is good to avoid idle time, but a child with ADHD may become more distracted and “wound up” if there are many after-school activities. You may need to make adjustments to the child’s after-school commitments based on the individual child’s abilities and the demands of particular activities. Create a quiet place. Make sure your child has a quiet, private space of his or her own. A porch or a bedroom work well too, as long as it’s not the same place as the child goes for a time-out. Do your best to be neat and organized. Set up your home in an organized way. Make sure your child knows that everything has its place. Role model neatness and organization as much as possible. Avoid problems by keeping kids with attention deficit disorder busy! For kids with ADD/ADHD, idle time may exacerbate their symptoms and create chaos in your home. It is important to keep a child with ADD/ADHD busy without piling on so many things that the child becomes overwhelmed. Sign your child up for a sport, art class, or music. At home, organize simple activities that fill up your child’s time. These can be tasks like helping you cook, playing a board game with a sibling, or drawing a picture. Try not to over-rely on the television or computer/video games as time-fillers. Unfortunately, TV and video games are increasingly violent in nature and may only increase your child’s symptoms of ADD/ADHD. ADD/ADHD parenting tip 3: Set clear expectations and rules Children with ADHD need consistent rules that they can understand and follow. Make the rules of behavior for the family simple and clear. Write down the rules and hang them up in a place where your child can easily read them. Children with ADD/ADHD respond particularly well to organized systems of rewards and consequences. It's important to explain what will happen when the rules are obeyed and when they are broken. Finally, stick to your system: follow through each and every time with a reward or a consequence. Don’t forget praise and positive reinforcement As you establish these consistent structures, keep in mind that children with ADHD often receive criticism. Be on the lookout for good behavior—and praise it. Praise is especially important for children who have ADD/ADHD because they typically get so little of it. These children receive correction, remediation, and complaints about their behavior—but little positive reinforcement. A smile, positive comment, or other reward from you can improve the attention, concentration and impulse control of your child with ADD/ADHD. Do your best to focus on giving positive praise for appropriate behavior and task completion, while giving as few negative responses as possible to inappropriate behavior or poor task performance. Reward your child for small achievements that you might take for granted in another child. Kids with ADD/ADHD: Using Rewards and Consequences Rewards Consequences Reward your child with privileges, praise, or activities, rather than with food or toys. Consequences should be spelled out in advance and occur immediately after your child has misbehaved. Change rewards frequently. Kids with ADD/ADHD get bored if the reward is always the same. Try time-outs and the removal of privileges as consequences for misbehavior. Make a chart with points or stars awarded for good behavior, so your child has a visual reminder of his or her successes. Remove your child from situations and environments that trigger inappropriate behavior. Immediate rewards work better than the promise of a future reward, but small rewards leading to a big one can also work. When your child misbehaves, ask what he or she could have done instead. Then have your child demonstrate it. Always follow through with a reward. Always follow through with a consequence. ADD/ADHD parenting tip 4: Encourage movement and sleep Physical activity can help your child with ADD/ADHD Better sleep can help your child with ADD/ADHD Children with ADD/ADHD often have energy to burn. Organized sports and other physical activities can help them get their energy out in healthy ways and focus their attention on specific movements and skills. The benefits of physical activity are endless: it improves concentration, decreases depression and anxiety, and promotes brain growth. Most importantly for children with attention deficits, however, is the fact that exercise leads to better sleep, which in turn can also reduce the symptoms of ADD/ADHD. Find a sport that your child will enjoy and that suits his or her strengths. For example, sports such as softball that involve a lot of “down time” are not the best fit for children with attention problems. Individual or team sports like basketball and hockey that require constant motion are better options. Children with ADD/ADHD may also benefit from martial arts training, tae kwon do, or yoga, which enhance mental control as they work out the body. Better sleep can help your child with ADD/ADHD Insufficient sleep can make anyone less attentive, but it can be highly detrimental for children with ADD/ADHD. Kids with ADD/ADHD need at least as much sleep as their unaffected peers, but tend not to get what they need. Their attention problems can lead to overstimulation and trouble falling asleep. A consistent, early bedtime is the most helpful strategy to combat this problem, but it may not completely solve it. Help your child get better rest by trying out one or more of the following strategies: Decrease television time and increase your child's activities and exercise levels during the day. Eliminate caffeine from your child’s diet. Create a buffer time to lower down the activity level for an hour or so before bedtime. Find quieter activities such as coloring, reading or playing quietly. Spend ten minutes cuddling with your child. This will build a sense of love and security as well as provide a time to calm down. Use lavender or other aromas in your child's room. The scent may help to calm your child. Use relaxation tapes as background noise for your child when falling asleep. There are many varieties available including nature sounds and calming music. Children with ADD/ADHD often find "white noise" to be calming. You can create white noise by putting a radio on static or running an electric fan. The benefits of “green time” in kids with attention deficit disorder Research shows that children with ADD/ADHD benefit from spending time in nature. Kids experience a greater reduction of symptoms of ADD/ADHD when they play in a park full of grass and trees than on a concrete playground. Take note of this promising and simple approach to managing ADD/ADHD. Even in cities, most families have access to parks and other natural settings. Join your children in this “green time”—you’ll also get a much-deserved breath of fresh air for yourself. ADD/ADHD parenting tip 5: Help your child eat right Diet is not a direct cause of attention deficit disorder, but food can and does affect your child's mental state, which in turn seems to affect behavior. Monitoring and modifying what, when, and how much your child eats can help decrease the symptoms of ADD/ADHD. All children benefit from fresh foods, regular meal times, and staying away from junk food. These tenets are especially true for children with ADD/ADHD, whose impulsiveness and distractedness can lead to missed meals, disordered eating, and overeating. Eating small meals more often may help your child’s ADD/ADHD Children with ADD/ADHD are notorious for not eating regularly. Without parental guidance, these children might not eat for hours and then binge on whatever is around. The result of this pattern can be devastating to the child’s physical and emotional health. Prevent unhealthy eating habits by scheduling regular nutritious meals or snacks for your child no more than three hours apart. Physically, a child with ADD/ADHD needs a regular intake of healthy food; mentally, meal times are a necessary break and a scheduled rhythm to the day. Get rid of the junk foods in your home. Put fatty and sugary foods off-limits when eating out. Turn off television shows riddled with junk-food ads. Give your child a daily vitamin-and-mineral supplement. To learn more, see Nutrition for Children and Teens. ADD/ADHD parenting tip 6: Teach your child how to make friends Tip for helping your child with ADD/ADHD stay focused and organized Children with ADD/ADHD often have difficulty with simple social interactions. They may struggle with reading social cues, talk too much, interrupt frequently, or come off as aggressive or “too intense.” Their relative emotional immaturity can make them stand out among children their own age, and make them targets for unfriendly teasing. Don’t forget, though, that many kids with ADD/ADHD are exceptionally intelligent and creative and will eventually figure out for themselves how to get along with others and spot people who aren’t appropriate as friends. Moreover, personality traits that might exasperate parents and teachers may come across to peers as funny and charming. Helping a child with attention deficit disorder improve social skills It's hard for children with ADHD to learn social skills and social rules. You can help your child with ADD/ADHD become a better listener, learn to read people’s faces and body language, and interact more smoothly in groups. Speak gently but honestly with your child about his or her challenges and how to make changes. Role-play various social scenarios with your child. Trade roles often and try to make it fun. Be careful to select playmates for your child with similar language and physical skills. Invite only one or two friends at a time at first. Watch them closely while they play. Have a zero tolerance policy for hitting, pushing and yelling in your house or yard. Make time and space for your child to play, and reward good play behaviors often.

グジャラート語

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最終更新: 2015-02-12
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