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Engels

business management meaning

Tagalog

kahulugan ng pamamahala ng negosyo

Laatste Update: 2020-02-11
Gebruiksfrequentie: 1
Kwaliteit:

Referentie: Anoniem

Engels

heteronims with sentence

Tagalog

heteronims na may pangungusap

Laatste Update: 2016-06-29
Gebruiksfrequentie: 1
Kwaliteit:

Referentie: Anoniem

Engels

conflicts of failure with sentence

Tagalog

kasalungat ng kabiguan may pangungusap

Laatste Update: 2016-07-18
Gebruiksfrequentie: 1
Kwaliteit:

Referentie: Anoniem

Engels

Cohesive device meaning with example

Tagalog

Kahulugan ng cohesive device na may halimbawa

Laatste Update: 2018-07-23
Gebruiksfrequentie: 1
Kwaliteit:

Referentie: Anoniem

Engels

Nevertheless example] conjunction with sentence

Tagalog

si ana ay pumunta sa palengke.

Laatste Update: 2014-12-26
Gebruiksfrequentie: 2
Kwaliteit:

Referentie: Anoniem

Engels

Trump did not place the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) in charge of the government's response to COVID-19, which Politico reported left some experts in disaster management disappointed.

Tagalog

Hindi itinalaga ni Trump ang Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) bilang tugon ng pamahalaan sa COVID-19, kung saan iniulat ng Politico na nag-iwan ng ilang eksperto sa pangangasiwa ng sakuna na dismayado.

Laatste Update: 2020-08-25
Gebruiksfrequentie: 1
Kwaliteit:

Referentie: Anoniem

Engels

Climate change includes both the global warming driven by human emissions of greenhouse gases, and the resulting large-scale shifts in weather patterns.[1] Though there have been previous periods of climatic change, since the mid-20th century the rate of human impact on Earth's climate system and the global scale of that impact have been unprecedented.[2] That human activity has caused climate change is not disputed by any scientific body of national or international standing.[3] The largest driver has been the emission of greenhouse gases, of which more than 90% are carbon dioxide (CO 2) and methane.[4] Fossil fuel burning for energy consumption is the main source of these emissions, with additional contributions from agriculture, deforestation, and industrial processes.[5] Temperature rise is accelerated or tempered by climate feedbacks, such as loss of sunlight-reflecting snow and ice cover, increased water vapour (a greenhouse gas itself), and changes to land and ocean carbon sinks. Observed temperature from NASA versus the 1850–1900 average as a pre-industrial baseline. The main driver for increased global temperatures in the industrial era is human activity, with natural forces adding variability.[6] Because land surfaces heat faster than ocean surfaces, deserts are expanding and heat waves and wildfires are more common.[7] Surface temperature rise is greatest in the Arctic, where it has contributed to melting permafrost, and the retreat of glaciers and sea ice.[8] Increasing atmospheric energy and rates of evaporation cause more intense storms and weather extremes, which damage infrastructure and agriculture.[9] Rising temperatures are limiting ocean productivity and harming fish stocks in most parts of the globe.[10] Current and anticipated effects from undernutrition, heat stress and disease have led the World Health Organization to declare climate change the greatest threat to global health in the 21st century.[11] Environmental effects include the extinction or relocation of many species as their ecosystems change, most immediately in coral reefs, mountains, and the Arctic.[12] Even if efforts to minimize future warming are successful, some effects will continue for centuries, including rising sea levels, rising ocean temperatures, and ocean acidification from elevated levels of CO 2.[13] Some effects of climate change Ecological collapse possibilities. Bleaching has damaged the Great Barrier Reef and threatens reefs worldwide. Many of these effects are already observed at the current level of warming, which is about 1.1 °C (2.0 °F).[15] The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has issued a series of reports that project significant increases in these impacts as warming continues to 1.5 °C (2.7 °F) and beyond.[16] Under the Paris Agreement, nations agreed to keep warming "well under 2.0 °C (3.6 °F)" by reducing greenhouse gas emissions. However, under those pledges, global warming would reach about 2.8 °C (5.0 °F) by the end of the century, and current policies will result in about 3.0 °C (5.4 °F) of warming.[17] Limiting warming to 1.5 °C (2.7 °F) would require halving emissions by 2030, then reaching near-zero levels by 2050.[18] Mitigation efforts include the research, development, and deployment of low-carbon energy technologies, enhanced energy efficiency, policies to reduce fossil fuel emissions, reforestation, and forest preservation. Climate engineering techniques, most prominently solar radiation management and carbon dioxide removal, have substantial limitations and carry large uncertainties. Societies and governments are also working to adapt to current and future global-warming effects through improved coastline protection, better disaster management, and the development of more resistant crops.

Tagalog

Climate change includes both the global warming driven by human emissions of greenhouse gases, and the resulting large-scale shifts in weather patterns.[1] Though there have been previous periods of climatic change, since the mid-20th century the rate of human impact on Earth's climate system and the global scale of that impact have been unprecedented.[2] That human activity has caused climate change is not disputed by any scientific body of national or international standing.[3] The largest driver has been the emission of greenhouse gases, of which more than 90% are carbon dioxide (CO 2) and methane.[4] Fossil fuel burning for energy consumption is the main source of these emissions, with additional contributions from agriculture, deforestation, and industrial processes.[5] Temperature rise is accelerated or tempered by climate feedbacks, such as loss of sunlight-reflecting snow and ice cover, increased water vapour (a greenhouse gas itself), and changes to land and ocean carbon sinks. Observed temperature from NASA versus the 1850–1900 average as a pre-industrial baseline. The main driver for increased global temperatures in the industrial era is human activity, with natural forces adding variability.[6] Because land surfaces heat faster than ocean surfaces, deserts are expanding and heat waves and wildfires are more common.[7] Surface temperature rise is greatest in the Arctic, where it has contributed to melting permafrost, and the retreat of glaciers and sea ice.[8] Increasing atmospheric energy and rates of evaporation cause more intense storms and weather extremes, which damage infrastructure and agriculture.[9] Rising temperatures are limiting ocean productivity and harming fish stocks in most parts of the globe.[10] Current and anticipated effects from undernutrition, heat stress and disease have led the World Health Organization to declare climate change the greatest threat to global health in the 21st century.[11] Environmental effects include the extinction or relocation of many species as their ecosystems change, most immediately in coral reefs, mountains, and the Arctic.[12] Even if efforts to minimize future warming are successful, some effects will continue for centuries, including rising sea levels, rising ocean temperatures, and ocean acidification from elevated levels of CO 2.[13] Some effects of climate change Ecological collapse possibilities. Bleaching has damaged the Great Barrier Reef and threatens reefs worldwide. Many of these effects are already observed at the current level of warming, which is about 1.1 °C (2.0 °F).[15] The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has issued a series of reports that project significant increases in these impacts as warming continues to 1.5 °C (2.7 °F) and beyond.[16] Under the Paris Agreement, nations agreed to keep warming ng.[17] Limiting warming to 1.5 °C (2.7 °F) would require halving emissions by 2030, then reaching near-zero levels by 2050.[18] Mitigation efforts include the research, development, and deployment of low-carbon energy technologies, enhanced energy efficiency, policies to reduce fossil fuel emissions, reforestation, and forest preservation. Climate engineering techniques, most prominently solar radiation management and carbon dioxide removal, have substantial limitations and carry large uncertainties. Societies and governments are also working to adapt to current and future global-warming effects through improved coastline protection, better ps.

Laatste Update: 2020-11-23
Gebruiksfrequentie: 1
Kwaliteit:

Referentie: Anoniem
Waarschuwing: Bevat onzichtbare HTML-opmaak

Engels

Climate change includes both the global warming driven by human emissions of greenhouse gases, and the resulting large-scale shifts in weather patterns.[1] Though there have been previous periods of climatic change, since the mid-20th century the rate of human impact on Earth's climate system and the global scale of that impact have been unprecedented.[2] That human activity has caused climate change is not disputed by any scientific body of national or international standing.[3] The largest driver has been the emission of greenhouse gases, of which more than 90% are carbon dioxide (CO 2) and methane.[4] Fossil fuel burning for energy consumption is the main source of these emissions, with additional contributions from agriculture, deforestation, and industrial processes.[5] Temperature rise is accelerated or tempered by climate feedbacks, such as loss of sunlight-reflecting snow and ice cover, increased water vapour (a greenhouse gas itself), and changes to land and ocean carbon sinks. Observed temperature from NASA versus the 1850–1900 average as a pre-industrial baseline. The main driver for increased global temperatures in the industrial era is human activity, with natural forces adding variability.[6] Because land surfaces heat faster than ocean surfaces, deserts are expanding and heat waves and wildfires are more common.[7] Surface temperature rise is greatest in the Arctic, where it has contributed to melting permafrost, and the retreat of glaciers and sea ice.[8] Increasing atmospheric energy and rates of evaporation cause more intense storms and weather extremes, which damage infrastructure and agriculture.[9] Rising temperatures are limiting ocean productivity and harming fish stocks in most parts of the globe.[10] Current and anticipated effects from undernutrition, heat stress and disease have led the World Health Organization to declare climate change the greatest threat to global health in the 21st century.[11] Environmental effects include the extinction or relocation of many species as their ecosystems change, most immediately in coral reefs, mountains, and the Arctic.[12] Even if efforts to minimize future warming are successful, some effects will continue for centuries, including rising sea levels, rising ocean temperatures, and ocean acidification from elevated levels of CO 2.[13] Some effects of climate change Ecological collapse possibilities. Bleaching has damaged the Great Barrier Reef and threatens reefs worldwide. Many of these effects are already observed at the current level of warming, which is about 1.1 °C (2.0 °F).[15] The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has issued a series of reports that project significant increases in these impacts as warming continues to 1.5 °C (2.7 °F) and beyond.[16] Under the Paris Agreement, nations agreed to keep warming "well under 2.0 °C (3.6 °F)" by reducing greenhouse gas emissions. However, under those pledges, global warming would reach about 2.8 °C (5.0 °F) by the end of the century, and current policies will result in about 3.0 °C (5.4 °F) of warming.[17] Limiting warming to 1.5 °C (2.7 °F) would require halving emissions by 2030, then reaching near-zero levels by 2050.[18] Mitigation efforts include the research, development, and deployment of low-carbon energy technologies, enhanced energy efficiency, policies to reduce fossil fuel emissions, reforestation, and forest preservation. Climate engineering techniques, most prominently solar radiation management and carbon dioxide removal, have substantial limitations and carry large uncertainties. Societies and governments are also working to adapt to current and future global-warming effects through improved coastline protection, better disaster management, and the development of more resistant crops.

Tagalog

Climate change includes both the global warming driven by human emissions of greenhouse gases, and the resulting large-scale shifts in weather patterns.[1] Though there have been previous periods of climatic change, since the mid-20th century the rate of human impact on Earth's climate system and the global scale of that impact have been unprecedented.[2] That human activity has caused climate change is not disputed by any scientific body of national or international standing.[3] The largest driver has been the emission of greenhouse gases, of which more than 90% are carbon dioxide (CO 2) and methane.[4] Fossil fuel burning for energy consumption is the main source of these emissions, with additional contributions from agriculture, deforestation, and industrial processes.[5] Temperature rise is accelerated or tempered by climate feedbacks, such as loss of sunlight-reflecting snow and ice cover, increased water vapour (a greenhouse gas itself), and changes to land and ocean carbon sinks. Observed temperature from NASA versus the 1850–1900 average as a pre-industrial baseline. The main driver for increased global temperatures in the industrial era is human activity, with natural forces adding variability.[6] Because land surfaces heat faster than ocean surfaces, deserts are expanding and heat waves and wildfires are more common.[7] Surface temperature rise is greatest in the Arctic, where it has contributed to melting permafrost, and the retreat of glaciers and sea ice.[8] Increasing atmospheric energy and rates of evaporation cause more intense storms and weather extremes, which damage infrastructure and agriculture.[9] Rising temperatures are limiting ocean productivity and harming fish stocks in most parts of the globe.[10] Current and anticipated effects from undernutrition, heat stress and disease have led the World Health Organization to declare climate change the greatest threat to global health in the 21st century.[11] Environmental effects include the extinction or relocation of many species as their ecosystems change, most immediately in coral reefs, mountains, and the Arctic.[12] Even if efforts to minimize future warming are successful, some effects will continue for centuries, including rising sea levels, rising ocean temperatures, and ocean acidification from elevated levels of CO 2.[13] Some effects of climate change Ecological collapse possibilities. Bleaching has damaged the Great Barrier Reef and threatens reefs worldwide. Many of these effects are already observed at the current level of warming, which is about 1.1 °C (2.0 °F).[15] The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has issued a series of reports that project significant increases in these impacts as warming continues to 1.5 °C (2.7 °F) and beyond.[16] Under the Paris Agreement, nations agreed to keep warming "well under 2.0 °C (3.6 °F)" by reducing greenhouse gas emissions. However, under those pledges, global warming would reach about 2.8 °C (5.0 °F) by the end of the century, and current policies will result in about 3.0 °C (5.4 °F) of warming.[17] Limiting warming to 1.5 °C (2.7 °F) would require halving emissions by 2030, then reaching near-zero levels by 2050.[18] Mitigation efforts include the research, development, and deployment of low-carbon energy technologies, enhanced energy efficiency, policies to reduce fossil fuel emissions, reforestation, and forest preservation. Climate engineering techniques, most prominently solar radiation management and carbon dioxide removal, have substantial limitations and carry large uncertainties. Societies and governments are also working to adapt to current and future global-warming effects through improved coastline protection, better disaster management, and the development of more resistant crops.

Laatste Update: 2020-11-23
Gebruiksfrequentie: 1
Kwaliteit:

Referentie: Anoniem
Waarschuwing: Bevat onzichtbare HTML-opmaak

Engels

Ceteris paribus or ceterus paribus is a Latin phrase meaning "with other things the same" or "all other things being equal or held constant". A prediction or a statement about a causal, empirical, or logical relation between two states of affairs is ceteris paribus entails an acknowledgement that the prediction, although usually accurate in expected conditions, can fail or the relation can be abolished by intervening factors.[

Tagalog

ceteris paribus

Laatste Update: 2014-11-09
Gebruiksfrequentie: 1
Kwaliteit:

Referentie: Anoniem
Waarschuwing: Bevat onzichtbare HTML-opmaak

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