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Kannada

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to whom so ever it may concern

Kannada

ಅಂದಿನಿಂದ ಸಂಬಂಧಿಸಿದವರ ಯಾರಿಗೆ

Última atualização: 2016-06-23
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What is high blood pressure? High blood pressure, or hypertension, occurs when your blood pressure increases to unhealthy levels. Your blood pressure measurement takes into account how much blood is passing through your blood vessels and the amount of resistance the blood meets while the heart is pumping. Narrow arteries increase resistance. The narrower your arteries are, the higher your blood pressure will be. Over the long term, increased pressure can cause health issues, including heart disease. Hypertension is quite common. In fact, since the guidelines have recently changed, it’s expected that nearly half of American adults will now be diagnosed with this condition. Hypertension typically develops over the course of several years. Usually, you don’t notice any symptoms. But even without symptoms, high blood pressure can cause damage to your blood vessels and organs, especially the brain, heart, eyes, and kidneys. Early detection is important. Regular blood pressure readings can help you and your doctor notice any changes. If your blood pressure is elevated, your doctor may have you check your blood pressure over a few weeks to see if the number stays elevated or falls back to normal levels. Treatment for hypertension includes both prescription medication and healthy lifestyle changes. If the condition isn’t treated, it could lead to health issues, including heart attack and stroke. What causes high blood pressure? There are two types of hypertension. Each type has a different cause. Primary hypertension Primary hypertension is also called essential hypertension. This kind of hypertension develops over time with no identifiable cause. Most people have this type of high blood pressure. Researchers are still unclear what mechanisms cause blood pressure to slowly increase. A combination of factors may play a role. These factors include: Genes: Some people are genetically predisposed to hypertension. This may be from gene mutations or genetic abnormalities inherited from your parents. Physical changes: If something in your body changes, you may begin experiencing issues throughout your body. High blood pressure may be one of those issues. For example, it’s thought that changes in your kidney function due to aging may upset the body’s natural balance of salts and fluid. This change may cause your body’s blood pressure to increase. Environment: Over time, unhealthy lifestyle choices like lack of physical activity and poor diet can take their toll on your body. Lifestyle choices can lead to weight problems. Being overweight or obese can increase your risk for hypertension. Secondary hypertension Secondary hypertension often occurs quickly and can become more severe than primary hypertension. Several conditions that may cause secondary hypertension include: kidney disease obstructive sleep apnea congenital heart defects problems with your thyroid side effects of medications use of illegal drugs alcohol abuse or chronic use adrenal gland problems certain endocrine tumors What are the symptoms of hypertension? Hypertension is generally a silent condition. Many people won’t experience any symptoms. It may take years or even decades for the condition to reach levels severe enough that symptoms become obvious. Even then, these symptoms may be attributed to other issues. Symptoms of severe hypertension can include: headaches shortness of breath nosebleeds flushing dizziness chest pain visual changes blood in the urine These symptoms require immediate medical attention. They don’t occur in everyone with hypertension, but waiting for a symptom of this condition to appear could be fatal. The best way to know if you have hypertension is to get regular blood pressure readings. Most doctors’ offices take a blood pressure reading at every appointment. If you only have a yearly physical, talk to your doctor about your risks for hypertension and other readings you may need to help you watch your blood pressure. For example, if you have a family history of heart disease or have risk factors for developing the condition, your doctor may recommend that you have your blood pressure checked twice a year. This helps you and your doctor stay on top of any possible issues before they become problematic. Diagnosing high blood pressure Diagnosing hypertension is as simple as taking a blood pressure reading. Most doctors’ offices check blood pressure as part of a routine visit. If you don’t receive a blood pressure reading at your next appointment, request one. If your blood pressure is elevated, your doctor may request you have more readings over the course of a few days or weeks. A hypertension diagnosis is rarely given after just one reading. Your doctor needs to see evidence of a sustained problem. That’s because your environment can contribute to increased blood pressure, such as the stress you may feel by being at the doctor’s office. Also, blood pressure levels change throughout the day. If your blood pressure remains high, your doctor will likely conduct more tests to rule out underlying conditions. These tests can include: urine test cholesterol screening and other blood tests test of your heart’s electrical activity with an electrocardiogram (EKG, sometimes referred to as an ECG) ultrasound of your heart or kidneys These tests can help your doctor identify any secondary issues causing your elevated blood pressure. They can also look at the effects high blood pressure may have had on your organs. During this time, your doctor may begin treating your hypertension. Early treatment may reduce your risk of lasting damage. How to understand high blood pressure readings Two numbers create a blood pressure reading: Systolic pressure: This is the first, or top, number. It indicates the pressure in your arteries when your heart beats and pumps out blood. Diastolic pressure: This is the second, or bottom, number. It’s the reading of the pressure in your arteries between beats of your heart. Five categories define blood pressure readings for adults: Healthy:A healthy blood pressure reading is less than 120/80 millimeters of mercury (mm Hg). Elevated:The systolic number is between 120 and 129 mm Hg, and the diastolic number is less than 80 mm Hg. Doctors usually don’t treat elevated blood pressure with medication. Instead, your doctor may encourage lifestyle changes to help lower your numbers. Stage 1 hypertension: The systolic number is between 130 and 139 mm Hg, or the diastolic number is between 80 and 89 mm Hg. Stage 2 hypertension: The systolic number is 140 mm Hg or higher, or the diastolic number is 90 mm Hg or higher. Hypertensive crisis: The systolic number is over 180 mm Hg, or the diastolic number is over 120 mm Hg. Blood pressure in this range requires urgent medical attention. If any symptoms such as chest pain, headache, shortness of breath, or visual changes occur when blood pressure is this high, medical care in the emergency room is needed. A blood pressure reading is taken with a pressure cuff. For an accurate reading, it’s important you have a cuff that fits. An ill-fitting cuff may deliver inaccurate readings. Blood pressure readings are different for children and teenagers. Ask your child’s doctor for the healthy ranges for your child if you’re asked to monitor their blood pressure.

Kannada

kannada

Última atualização: 2019-05-09
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tarleshan1 THE FAMILY COURTS ACT, 1984 ACT NO. 66 OF 1984 [14th September, 1984.] An Act to provide for the establishment of Family Courts with a view to promote conciliation in, and secure speedy settlement of, disputes relating to marriage and family affairs and for matters connected therewith. BE it enacted by Parliament in the Thirty-fifth Year of the Republic of India as follows:— CHAPTER I PRELIMINARY 1. Short title, extent and commencement.—(1) This Act may be called the Family Courts Act, 1984. (2) It extends to the whole of India except the State of Jammu and Kashmir. (3) It shall come into force on such date1 as the Central Government may, by notification in the Official Gazette, appoint, and different dates may be appointed for different States. 1. This Act shall come into force in— (i) Union territory of Andaman and Nicobar Islands on 19th November, 1986, vide notification No. 79/22/86, dated 19th November, 1986, Gazette of India, Extra., Pt. II, Section 1. (ii) Madhya Pradesh on 19th November, 1986, vide notification No. 79/6/86, dated 14th November, 1986, Gazette of India, Extra., Pt. II, Section 1. (iii) Uttar Pradesh on 2nd October, 1986, vide notification No. 79/11/86-Jus., dated 4th September, 1986, Gazette of India, Pt. II, Section 1. (iv) Delhi on 19th November, 1986, vide notification No. S.O. 863(E), dater 18th November, 1986, Gazette of India, Extra., Pt. II, Section 3 (ii). (v) Maharashtra on 1st December, 1986, vide notification No. S.O. 944(E), dated 5th December, 1986, Gazette of India, Extra., Pt. II, Section 3(ii). (vi) Karnataka on 25th May, 1987, vide notification No. G.S.R. 685(E), dated 15th May, 1987, Gazette of India, Extra., Pt. II, Section 3(i). (vii) Orissa on 1st May, 1989, vide notification No. S.O. 321(E), dated 27th April, 1989, Gazette of India, Extra, Pt. II, Section 3(ii). (viii) Kerala on 21st October, 1989, vide notification No. 79/5/86, dated 17th October, 1989, Gazette of India, Extra., Pt. II, Section 1. (ix) Goa on 16th April, 1990, vide notification No. S.O. 328(E), dated 12th April, 1990, Gazette of India, Extra., Pt. II, Section 3(ii). (x) Union territory of Pondicherry on 1st May, 1987, vide notification No. G.S.R. 459 (E), dated 29th April, 1987, Gazette of India, Extra, Pt. II, Section 3(i). (xi) West Bengal on 1st November, 1991, vide notification No. 79/12/86-Jus., dated 1st November, 1991, Gazette of India, Extra., Pt. II, Section 1 (E). (xii) Assam on 2nd October, 1991, vide notification No. 79/2/86 Jus., dated 30th November, 1991, Gazette of India, Extra., Pt. II, Section 1 (E). (xiii) Bihar on 10th December, 1991, vide notification No. S.O. 838(E), dated 6th December, 1991, Gazette of India, Extra., Pt. II, Section 3(ii). (xiv) Manipur on 3rd February, 1992, vide notification No. S.O. 91(E), dated 30th January, 1992, Gazette of India, Extra., Pt. II, Section 3(ii). (xv) Haryana on 2nd November, 1992, vide notification No. S.O. 784(E), dated 23th October, 1992, Gazette of India, Extra., Pt. II, Section 3(i). (xvi) Andhra Pradesh on 15th February, 1995, vide notification No. S.O. 92(E), dated 6th February, 1995, Gazette of India, Extra.. Part II, Section 3 (ii). (xvii) Gujarat on 1st January, 2000, vide notification No. S.O. 1268(E), dated 20nd December, 1999, Gazette of India, Extra., Pt. II, Section 3 (ii). (xviii) Union territory of Daman and Diu on 10th October, 2003, vide notification No. S.O. 1161 (E), dated 14th October, 2003, Gazette of India, Extra., Pt. II, Section 3 (ii). 2 2. Definitions.—In this Act, unless the context otherwise requires,— (a) “Judge” means the Judge or, as the case may be, the Principal Judge, Additional Principal Judge or other Judge of a Family Court; (b) “notification” means a notification published in the Official Gazette; (c) “prescribed” means prescribed by rules made under this Act; (d) “Family Court” means a Family Court established under section 3; (e) all other words and expressions used but not defined in this Act and defined in the Code of Civil Procedure, 1908 (5 of 1908) shall have the meanings respectively assigned to them in that Code. CHAPTER II FAMILY COURTS 3. Establishment of Family Courts.—(1) For the purpose of exercising the jurisdiction and powers conferred on a Family Court by this Act, the State Government, after consultation with the High Court, and by notification,— (a) shall, as soon as may be after the commencement of this Act, established for every area in the State comprising of city or town whose population exceeds one million, a Family Court; (b) may establish Family Courts for such other areas in the State as it may deem necessary. (2) The State Government shall, after consultation with the High Court, specify, by notification, the local limits of the area to which the jurisdiction of a Family Court shall extend and may, at any time, increase, reduce or alter such limits. 4. Appointment of Judges.—(1) The State Government may, with the concurrence of the High Court, appoint one or more persons to be the Judge or Judges of a Family Court. (2) When a Family Court consists of more than one Judge,— (a) each of the Judges may exercise all or any of the powers conferred on the Court by this Act or any other law for the time being in force; (b) the State Government may, with the concurrence of the High Court, appoint any of the Judges to be the Principal Judge and any other Judge to be the Additional Principal Judge; (c) the Principal Judge may, from time to time, make such arrangements as he may deem fit for the distribution of the business of the Court among the various Judges thereof; (d) the Additional Principal Judge may exercise the powers of the Principal Judge in the event of any vacancy in the office of the Principal Judge or when the Principal Judge is unable to discharge his functions owing to absence, illness or any other cause. (3) A person shall not be qualified for appointment as a Judge unless he— (a) has for at least seven years held a judicial office in India or the office of a Member of a Tribunal or any post under the Union or a State requiring special knowledge of law; or (b) has for at least seven years been an advocate of a High Court or of two or more such Courts in succession; or (c) possesses such other qualifications as the Central Government may, with the concurrence of the Chief Justice of India, prescribe. 3 (4) In selecting persons for appointment as Judges,— (a) every endeavour shall be made to ensure that persons committed to the need to protect and preserve the institution of marriage and to promote the welfare of children and qualified by reason of their experience and expertise to promote the settlement of disputes by conciliation and counselling are selected; and (b) preference shall be given to women. (5) No person shall be appointed as, or hold the office of, a Judge of a Family Court after he has attained the age of sixty-two years. (6) The salary or honorarium and other allowances payable to, and the other terms and conditions of service of, a Judge shall be such as the State Government may, in consultation with the High Court, prescribe. 5. Association of social welfare agencies, etc.—The State Government may, in consultation with the High Court, provide, by rules, for the association, in such manner and for such purposes and subject to such conditions as may be specified in the rules, with a Family Court of— (a) institutions or organisations engaged in social welfare or the representatives thereof; (b) persons professionally engaged in promoting the welfare of the family; (c) persons working in the field of social welfare; and (d) any other person whose association with a Family Court would enable it to exercise its jurisdiction more effectively in accordance with the purposes of this Act. 6. Counsellors, officers and other employees of Family Courts.—(1) The State Government shall, in consultation with the High Court, determine the number and categories of counsellors, officers and other employees required to assist a Family Court in the discharge of its functions and provide the Family Court with such counsellors, officers and other employees as it may think fit. (2) The terms and conditions of association of the counsellors and the terms and conditions of service of the officers and other employees, referred to in sub-section (1), shall be such as may be specified by rules made by the State Government. CHAPTER III JURISDICTION 7. Jurisdiction.—(1) Subject to the other provisions of this Act, a Family Court shall— (a) have and exercise all the jurisdiction exercisable by any district court or any subordinate civil court under any law for the time being in force in respect of suits and proceedings of the nature referred to in the Explanation; and (b) be deemed, for the purposes of exercising such jurisdiction under such law, to be a district court or, as the case may be, such subordinate civil court for the area to which the jurisdiction of the Family Court extends. Explanation.—The suits and proceedings referred to in this sub-section are suits and proceedings of the following nature, namely:— (a) a suit or proceeding between the parties to a marriage for a decree of nullity of marriage (declaring the marriage to be null and void or, as the case may be, annulling the marriage) or restitution of conjugal rights or judicial separation or dissolution of marriage; (b) a suit or proceeding for a declaration as to the validity of a marriage or as to the matrimonial status of any person; 4 (c) a suit or proceeding between the parties to a marriage with respect to the property of the parties or of either of them; (d) a suit or proceeding for an order or injunction in circumstance arising out of a marital relationship; (e) a suit or proceeding for a declaration as to the legitimacy of any person; (f) a suit or proceeding for maintenance; (g) a suit or proceeding in relation to the guardianship of the person or the custody of, or access to, any minor. (2) Subject to the other provisions of this Act, a Family Court shall also have and exercise— (a) the jurisdiction exercisable by a Magistrate of the first class under Chapter IX (relating to order for maintenance of wife, children and parents) of the Code of Criminal Procedure, 1973 (2 of 1974); and (b) such other jurisdiction as may be conferred on it by any other enactment. 8. Exclusion of jurisdiction and pending proceedings.—Where a Family Court has been established for any area,— (a) no district court or any subordinate civil court referred to in sub-section (1) of section 7 shall, in relation to such area, have or exercise any jurisdiction in respect of any suit or proceeding of the nature referred to in the Explanation to that sub-section; (b) no magistrate shall, in relation to such area, have or exercise any jurisdiction or powers under Chapter IX of the Code of Criminal Procedure, 1973 (2 of 1974); (c) every suit or proceeding of the nature referred to in the Explanation to sub-section (1) of section 7 and every proceeding under Chapter IX of the Code of Criminal Procedure, 1973 (2 of 1974),— (i) which is pending immediately before the establishment of such Family Court before any district court or subordinate court referred to in that sub-section or, as the case may be, before any magistrate under the said Code; and (ii) which would have been required to be instituted or taken before such Family Court if, before the date on which such suit or proceeding was instituted or taken, this Act had come into force and such Family Court had been established, shall stand transferred to such Family Court on the date on which it is established. CHAPTER IV PROCEDURE 9. Duty of Family Court to make efforts for settlement.—(1) In every suit or proceeding, endeavour shall be made by the Family Court in the first instance, where it is possible to do so consistent with the nature and circumstances of the case, to assist and persuade the parties in arriving at a settlement in respect of the subject-matter of the suit or proceeding and for this purpose a Family Court may, subject to any rules made by the High Court, follow such procedure as it may deem fit. (2) If, in any suit or proceeding, at any stage, it appears to the Family Court that there is a reasonable possibility of a settlement between the parties, the Family Court may adjourn the proceedings for such period as it thinks fit to enable attempts to be made to effect such a settlement. (3) The power conferred by sub-section (2) shall be in addition to, and not in derogation of, any other power of the Family Court to adjourn the proceedings. 5 10. Procedure generally.—(1) Subject to the other provisions of this Act and the rules, the provisions of the Code of Civil Procedure, 1908 (5 of 1908) and of any other law for the time being in force shall apply to the suits and proceedings [other than the proceedings under Chapter IX of the Code of Criminal Procedure, 1973 (2 of 1974)] before a Family Court and for the purposes of the said provisions of the Code, a Family Court shall be deemed to be a civil court and shall have all the powers of such court. (2) Subject to the other provisions of this Act and the rules, the provisions of the Code of Criminal Procedure, 1973 (2 of 1974) or the rules made thereunder, shall apply to the proceedings under Chapter IX of that Code before a Family Court. (3) Nothing in sub-section (1) or sub-section (2) shall prevent a Family Court from laying down its own procedure with a view to arrive at a settlement in respect of the subject-matter of the suit or proceedings or at the truth of the facts alleged by the one party and denied by the other. 11. Proceedings to be held in camera.—In every suit or proceedings to which this Act applies, the proceedings may be held in camera if the Family Court so desires and shall be so held if either party so desires. 12. Assistance of medical and welfare experts.—In every suit or proceedings, it shall be open to a Family Court to secure the services of a medical expert or such person (preferably a woman where available), whether related to the parties or not, including a person professionally engaged in promoting the welfare of the family as the Court may think fit, for the purposes of assisting the Family Court in discharging the functions imposed by this Act. 13. Right to legal representation.—Notwithstanding anything contained in any law, no party to a suit or proceeding before a Family Court shall be entitled, as of right, to be represented by a legal practitioner: Provided that if the Family Court considers it necessary in the interest of justice, it may seek the assistance of a legal expert as amicus curiae. 14. Application of Indian Evidence Act, 1872.—A Family Court may receive as evidence any report, statement, documents, information or matter that may, in its opinion, assist it to deal effectually with a dispute, whether or not the same would be otherwise relevant or admissible under the Indian Evidence Act, 1872 (1 of 1872). 15. Record of oral evidence.—In suits or proceedings before a Family Court, it shall not be necessary to record the evidence of witnesses at length, but the Judge, as the examination of each witness proceeds, shall, record or cause to be recorded, a memorandum of the substance of what the witness deposes, and such memorandum shall be signed by the witness and the Judge and shall form part of the record. 16. Evidence of formal character on affidavit.—(1) The evidence of any person where such evidence is of a formal character, may be given by affidavit and may, subject to all just exceptions, be read in evidence in any suit or proceeding before a Family Court. (2) The Family Court may, if it thinks fit, and shall, on the application of any of the parties to the suit or proceeding summon and examine any such person as to the facts contained in his affidavit. 17. Judgment.—Judgment of a Family Court shall contain a concise statement of the case, the point for determination, the decision thereon and the reasons for such decision. 18. Execution of decrees and orders.—(1) A decree or an order [other than an order under Chapter IX of the Code of Criminal Procedure, 1973 (2 of 1974)], passed by a Family Court shall have the same force and effect as a decree or order of a civil court and shall be executed in the same manner as is prescribed by the Code of Civil Procedure, 1908 (5 of 1908) for the execution of decrees and orders. (2) An order passed by a Family Court under Chapter IX of the Code of Criminal Procedure, 1973 (2 of 1974) shall be executed in the manner prescribed for the execution of such order by that Code. 6 (3) A decree or order may be executed either by the Family Court which passed it or by the other Family Court or ordinary civil court to which it is sent for execution. CHAPTER V 1[APPEALS AND REVISIONS] 19. Appeal.—(1) Save as provided in sub-section (2) and notwithstanding anything contained in the Code of Civil Procedure, 1908 (5 of 1908) or in the Code of Criminal Procedure, 1973 (2 of 1974) or in any other law, an appeal shall lie from every judgment or order, not being an interlocutory order, of a Family Court to the High Court both on facts and on law. (2) No appeal shall lie from a decree or order passed by the Family Court with the consent of the parties 2[or from an order passed under Chapter IX of the Code of Criminal Procedure, 1973 (2 of 1974): Provided that nothing in this sub-section shall apply to any appeal pending before a High Court or any order passed under Chapter IX of the Code of Criminal Procedure, 1973 (2 of 1974) before the commencement of the Family Courts (Amendment) Act, 1991 (59 of 1991).] (3) Every appeal under this section shall be preferred within a period of thirty days from the date of the judgment or order of a Family Court. 2[(4) The High Court may, of its own motion or otherwise, call for and examine the record of any proceeding in which the Family Court situate within its jurisdiction passed an order under Chapter IX of the Code of Criminal Procedure, 1973 (2 of 1974) for the purpose of satisfying itself as to the correctness, legality or propriety of the order, not being an interlocutory order, and as to the regularity of such proceeding.] 3[(5)] Except as aforesaid, no appeal or revision shall lie to any court from any judgment, order or decree of a Family Court. 4[(6)] An appeal preferred under sub-section (1) shall be heard by a Bench consisting of two or more Judges. CHAPTER VI MISCELLANEOUS 20. Act to have overriding effect.—The provisions of this Act shall have effect notwithstanding anything inconsistent therewith contained in any other law for the time being in force or in any instrument having effect by virtue of any law other than this Act. 21. Power of High Court to make rules.—(1) The High Court may, by notification in the Official Gazette, make such rules as it may deem necessary for carrying out the purposes of this Act. (2) In particular, and without prejudice to the generality of the foregoing power, such rules may provide for all or any of the following matters, namely:— (a) normal working hours of Family Courts and holding of sittings of Family Courts on holidays and outside normal working hours; (b) holding of sittings of Family Courts at places other than their ordinary places of sitting; (c) efforts which may be made by, and the procedure which may be followed by, a Family Court for assisting and persuading parties to arrive at a settlement. 1. Subs. by Act 59 of 1991, s. 2, for “Appeals” (w.e.f 28-12-1991). 2. Ins. by s. 2, ibid. (w.e.f. 28-12-1991). 3. Sub-section (4) renumbered as sub-section (5) thereof by s. 2, ibid. (w.e.f. 28-12-1991). 4. Sub-section (5) renumbered as sub-section (6) thereof by s. 2, ibid. (w.e.f. 28-12-1991). 7 22. Power of the Central Government to make rules.—(1) The Central Govern

Kannada

1 THE FAMILY COURTS ACT, 1984 ACT NO. 66 OF 1984 [14th September, 1984.] An Act to provide for the establishment of Family Courts with a view to promote conciliation in, and secure speedy settlement of, disputes relating to marriage and family affairs and for matters connected therewith. BE it enacted by Parliament in the Thirty-fifth Year of the Republic of India as follows:— CHAPTER I PRELIMINARY 1. Short title, extent and commencement.—(1) This Act may be called the Family Courts Act, 1984. (2) It extends to the whole of India except the State of Jammu and Kashmir. (3) It shall come into force on such date1 as the Central Government may, by notification in the Official Gazette, appoint, and different dates may be appointed for different States. 1. This Act shall come into force in— (i) Union territory of Andaman and Nicobar Islands on 19th November, 1986, vide notification No. 79/22/86, dated 19th November, 1986, Gazette of India, Extra., Pt. II, Section 1. (ii) Madhya Pradesh on 19th November, 1986, vide notification No. 79/6/86, dated 14th November, 1986, Gazette of India, Extra., Pt. II, Section 1. (iii) Uttar Pradesh on 2nd October, 1986, vide notification No. 79/11/86-Jus., dated 4th September, 1986, Gazette of India, Pt. II, Section 1. (iv) Delhi on 19th November, 1986, vide notification No. S.O. 863(E), dater 18th November, 1986, Gazette of India, Extra., Pt. II, Section 3 (ii). (v) Maharashtra on 1st December, 1986, vide notification No. S.O. 944(E), dated 5th December, 1986, Gazette of India, Extra., Pt. II, Section 3(ii). (vi) Karnataka on 25th May, 1987, vide notification No. G.S.R. 685(E), dated 15th May, 1987, Gazette of India, Extra., Pt. II, Section 3(i). (vii) Orissa on 1st May, 1989, vide notification No. S.O. 321(E), dated 27th April, 1989, Gazette of India, Extra, Pt. II, Section 3(ii). (viii) Kerala on 21st October, 1989, vide notification No. 79/5/86, dated 17th October, 1989, Gazette of India, Extra., Pt. II, Section 1. (ix) Goa on 16th April, 1990, vide notification No. S.O. 328(E), dated 12th April, 1990, Gazette of India, Extra., Pt. II, Section 3(ii). (x) Union territory of Pondicherry on 1st May, 1987, vide notification No. G.S.R. 459 (E), dated 29th April, 1987, Gazette of India, Extra, Pt. II, Section 3(i). (xi) West Bengal on 1st November, 1991, vide notification No. 79/12/86-Jus., dated 1st November, 1991, Gazette of India, Extra., Pt. II, Section 1 (E). (xii) Assam on 2nd October, 1991, vide notification No. 79/2/86 Jus., dated 30th November, 1991, Gazette of India, Extra., Pt. II, Section 1 (E). (xiii) Bihar on 10th December, 1991, vide notification No. S.O. 838(E), dated 6th December, 1991, Gazette of India, Extra., Pt. II, Section 3(ii). (xiv) Manipur on 3rd February, 1992, vide notification No. S.O. 91(E), dated 30th January, 1992, Gazette of India, Extra., Pt. II, Section 3(ii). (xv) Haryana on 2nd November, 1992, vide notification No. S.O. 784(E), dated 23th October, 1992, Gazette of India, Extra., Pt. II, Section 3(i). (xvi) Andhra Pradesh on 15th February, 1995, vide notification No. S.O. 92(E), dated 6th February, 1995, Gazette of India, Extra.. Part II, Section 3 (ii). (xvii) Gujarat on 1st January, 2000, vide notification No. S.O. 1268(E), dated 20nd December, 1999, Gazette of India, Extra., Pt. II, Section 3 (ii). (xviii) Union territory of Daman and Diu on 10th October, 2003, vide notification No. S.O. 1161 (E), dated 14th October, 2003, Gazette of India, Extra., Pt. II, Section 3 (ii). 2 2. Definitions.—In this Act, unless the context otherwise requires,— (a) “Judge” means the Judge or, as the case may be, the Principal Judge, Additional Principal Judge or other Judge of a Family Court; (b) “notification” means a notification published in the Official Gazette; (c) “prescribed” means prescribed by rules made under this Act; (d) “Family Court” means a Family Court established under section 3; (e) all other words and expressions used but not defined in this Act and defined in the Code of Civil Procedure, 1908 (5 of 1908) shall have the meanings respectively assigned to them in that Code. CHAPTER II FAMILY COURTS 3. Establishment of Family Courts.—(1) For the purpose of exercising the jurisdiction and powers conferred on a Family Court by this Act, the State Government, after consultation with the High Court, and by notification,— (a) shall, as soon as may be after the commencement of this Act, established for every area in the State comprising of city or town whose population exceeds one million, a Family Court; (b) may establish Family Courts for such other areas in the State as it may deem necessary. (2) The State Government shall, after consultation with the High Court, specify, by notification, the local limits of the area to which the jurisdiction of a Family Court shall extend and may, at any time, increase, reduce or alter such limits. 4. Appointment of Judges.—(1) The State Government may, with the concurrence of the High Court, appoint one or more persons to be the Judge or Judges of a Family Court. (2) When a Family Court consists of more than one Judge,— (a) each of the Judges may exercise all or any of the powers conferred on the Court by this Act or any other law for the time being in force; (b) the State Government may, with the concurrence of the High Court, appoint any of the Judges to be the Principal Judge and any other Judge to be the Additional Principal Judge; (c) the Principal Judge may, from time to time, make such arrangements as he may deem fit for the distribution of the business of the Court among the various Judges thereof; (d) the Additional Principal Judge may exercise the powers of the Principal Judge in the event of any vacancy in the office of the Principal Judge or when the Principal Judge is unable to discharge his functions owing to absence, illness or any other cause. (3) A person shall not be qualified for appointment as a Judge unless he— (a) has for at least seven years held a judicial office in India or the office of a Member of a Tribunal or any post under the Union or a State requiring special knowledge of law; or (b) has for at least seven years been an advocate of a High Court or of two or more such Courts in succession; or (c) possesses such other qualifications as the Central Government may, with the concurrence of the Chief Justice of India, prescribe. 3 (4) In selecting persons for appointment as Judges,— (a) every endeavour shall be made to ensure that persons committed to the need to protect and preserve the institution of marriage and to promote the welfare of children and qualified by reason of their experience and expertise to promote the settlement of disputes by conciliation and counselling are selected; and (b) preference shall be given to women. (5) No person shall be appointed as, or hold the office of, a Judge of a Family Court after he has attained the age of sixty-two years. (6) The salary or honorarium and other allowances payable to, and the other terms and conditions of service of, a Judge shall be such as the State Government may, in consultation with the High Court, prescribe. 5. Association of social welfare agencies, etc.—The State Government may, in consultation with the High Court, provide, by rules, for the association, in such manner and for such purposes and subject to such conditions as may be specified in the rules, with a Family Court of— (a) institutions or organisations engaged in social welfare or the representatives thereof; (b) persons professionally engaged in promoting the welfare of the family; (c) persons working in the field of social welfare; and (d) any other person whose association with a Family Court would enable it to exercise its jurisdiction more effectively in accordance with the purposes of this Act. 6. Counsellors, officers and other employees of Family Courts.—(1) The State Government shall, in consultation with the High Court, determine the number and categories of counsellors, officers and other employees required to assist a Family Court in the discharge of its functions and provide the Family Court with such counsellors, officers and other employees as it may think fit. (2) The terms and conditions of association of the counsellors and the terms and conditions of service of the officers and other employees, referred to in sub-section (1), shall be such as may be specified by rules made by the State Government. CHAPTER III JURISDICTION 7. Jurisdiction.—(1) Subject to the other provisions of this Act, a Family Court shall— (a) have and exercise all the jurisdiction exercisable by any district court or any subordinate civil court under any law for the time being in force in respect of suits and proceedings of the nature referred to in the Explanation; and (b) be deemed, for the purposes of exercising such jurisdiction under such law, to be a district court or, as the case may be, such subordinate civil court for the area to which the jurisdiction of the Family Court extends. Explanation.—The suits and proceedings referred to in this sub-section are suits and proceedings of the following nature, namely:— (a) a suit or proceeding between the parties to a marriage for a decree of nullity of marriage (declaring the marriage to be null and void or, as the case may be, annulling the marriage) or restitution of conjugal rights or judicial separation or dissolution of marriage; (b) a suit or proceeding for a declaration as to the validity of a marriage or as to the matrimonial status of any person; 4 (c) a suit or proceeding between the parties to a marriage with respect to the property of the parties or of either of them; (d) a suit or proceeding for an order or injunction in circumstance arising out of a marital relationship; (e) a suit or proceeding for a declaration as to the legitimacy of any person; (f) a suit or proceeding for maintenance; (g) a suit or proceeding in relation to the guardianship of the person or the custody of, or access to, any minor. (2) Subject to the other provisions of this Act, a Family Court shall also have and exercise— (a) the jurisdiction exercisable by a Magistrate of the first class under Chapter IX (relating to order for maintenance of wife, children and parents) of the Code of Criminal Procedure, 1973 (2 of 1974); and (b) such other jurisdiction as may be conferred on it by any other enactment. 8. Exclusion of jurisdiction and pending proceedings.—Where a Family Court has been established for any area,— (a) no district court or any subordinate civil court referred to in sub-section (1) of section 7 shall, in relation to such area, have or exercise any jurisdiction in respect of any suit or proceeding of the nature referred to in the Explanation to that sub-section; (b) no magistrate shall, in relation to such area, have or exercise any jurisdiction or powers under Chapter IX of the Code of Criminal Procedure, 1973 (2 of 1974); (c) every suit or proceeding of the nature referred to in the Explanation to sub-section (1) of section 7 and every proceeding under Chapter IX of the Code of Criminal Procedure, 1973 (2 of 1974),— (i) which is pending immediately before the establishment of such Family Court before any district court or subordinate court referred to in that sub-section or, as the case may be, before any magistrate under the said Code; and (ii) which would have been required to be instituted or taken before such Family Court if, before the date on which such suit or proceeding was instituted or taken, this Act had come into force and such Family Court had been established, shall stand transferred to such Family Court on the date on which it is established. CHAPTER IV PROCEDURE 9. Duty of Family Court to make efforts for settlement.—(1) In every suit or proceeding, endeavour shall be made by the Family Court in the first instance, where it is possible to do so consistent with the nature and circumstances of the case, to assist and persuade the parties in arriving at a settlement in respect of the subject-matter of the suit or proceeding and for this purpose a Family Court may, subject to any rules made by the High Court, follow such procedure as it may deem fit. (2) If, in any suit or proceeding, at any stage, it appears to the Family Court that there is a reasonable possibility of a settlement between the parties, the Family Court may adjourn the proceedings for such period as it thinks fit to enable attempts to be made to effect such a settlement. (3) The power conferred by sub-section (2) shall be in addition to, and not in derogation of, any other power of the Family Court to adjourn the proceedings. 5 10. Procedure generally.—(1) Subject to the other provisions of this Act and the rules, the provisions of the Code of Civil Procedure, 1908 (5 of 1908) and of any other law for the time being in force shall apply to the suits and proceedings [other than the proceedings under Chapter IX of the Code of Criminal Procedure, 1973 (2 of 1974)] before a Family Court and for the purposes of the said provisions of the Code, a Family Court shall be deemed to be a civil court and shall have all the powers of such court. (2) Subject to the other provisions of this Act and the rules, the provisions of the Code of Criminal Procedure, 1973 (2 of 1974) or the rules made thereunder, shall apply to the proceedings under Chapter IX of that Code before a Family Court. (3) Nothing in sub-section (1) or sub-section (2) shall prevent a Family Court from laying down its own procedure with a view to arrive at a settlement in respect of the subject-matter of the suit or proceedings or at the truth of the facts alleged by the one party and denied by the other. 11. Proceedings to be held in camera.—In every suit or proceedings to which this Act applies, the proceedings may be held in camera if the Family Court so desires and shall be so held if either party so desires. 12. Assistance of medical and welfare experts.—In every suit or proceedings, it shall be open to a Family Court to secure the services of a medical expert or such person (preferably a woman where available), whether related to the parties or not, including a person professionally engaged in promoting the welfare of the family as the Court may think fit, for the purposes of assisting the Family Court in discharging the functions imposed by this Act. 13. Right to legal representation.—Notwithstanding anything contained in any law, no party to a suit or proceeding before a Family Court shall be entitled, as of right, to be represented by a legal practitioner: Provided that if the Family Court considers it necessary in the interest of justice, it may seek the assistance of a legal expert as amicus curiae. 14. Application of Indian Evidence Act, 1872.—A Family Court may receive as evidence any report, statement, documents, information or matter that may, in its opinion, assist it to deal effectually with a dispute, whether or not the same would be otherwise relevant or admissible under the Indian Evidence Act, 1872 (1 of 1872). 15. Record of oral evidence.—In suits or proceedings before a Family Court, it shall not be necessary to record the evidence of witnesses at length, but the Judge, as the examination of each witness proceeds, shall, record or cause to be recorded, a memorandum of the substance of what the witness deposes, and such memorandum shall be signed by the witness and the Judge and shall form part of the record. 16. Evidence of formal character on affidavit.—(1) The evidence of any person where such evidence is of a formal character, may be given by affidavit and may, subject to all just exceptions, be read in evidence in any suit or proceeding before a Family Court. (2) The Family Court may, if it thinks fit, and shall, on the application of any of the parties to the suit or proceeding summon and examine any such person as to the facts contained in his affidavit. 17. Judgment.—Judgment of a Family Court shall contain a concise statement of the case, the point for determination, the decision thereon and the reasons for such decision. 18. Execution of decrees and orders.—(1) A decree or an order [other than an order under Chapter IX of the Code of Criminal Procedure, 1973 (2 of 1974)], passed by a Family Court shall have the same force and effect as a decree or order of a civil court and shall be executed in the same manner as is prescribed by the Code of Civil Procedure, 1908 (5 of 1908) for the execution of decrees and orders. (2) An order passed by a Family Court under Chapter IX of the Code of Criminal Procedure, 1973 (2 of 1974) shall be executed in the manner prescribed for the execution of such order by that Code. 6 (3) A decree or order may be executed either by the Family Court which passed it or by the other Family Court or ordinary civil court to which it is sent for execution. CHAPTER V 1[APPEALS AND REVISIONS] 19. Appeal.—(1) Save as provided in sub-section (2) and notwithstanding anything contained in the Code of Civil Procedure, 1908 (5 of 1908) or in the Code of Criminal Procedure, 1973 (2 of 1974) or in any other law, an appeal shall lie from every judgment or order, not being an interlocutory order, of a Family Court to the High Court both on facts and on law. (2) No appeal shall lie from a decree or order passed by the Family Court with the consent of the parties 2[or from an order passed under Chapter IX of the Code of Criminal Procedure, 1973 (2 of 1974): Provided that nothing in this sub-section shall apply to any appeal pending before a High Court or any order passed under Chapter IX of the Code of Criminal Procedure, 1973 (2 of 1974) before the commencement of the Family Courts (Amendment) Act, 1991 (59 of 1991).] (3) Every appeal under this section shall be preferred within a period of thirty days from the date of the judgment or order of a Family Court. 2[(4) The High Court may, of its own motion or otherwise, call for and examine the record of any proceeding in which the Family Court situate within its jurisdiction passed an order under Chapter IX of the Code of Criminal Procedure, 1973 (2 of 1974) for the purpose of satisfying itself as to the correctness, legality or propriety of the order, not being an interlocutory order, and as to the regularity of such proceeding.] 3[(5)] Except as aforesaid, no appeal or revision shall lie to any court from any judgment, order or decree of a Family Court. 4[(6)] An appeal preferred under sub-section (1) shall be heard by a Bench consisting of two or more Judges. CHAPTER VI MISCELLANEOUS 20. Act to have overriding effect.—The provisions of this Act shall have effect notwithstanding anything inconsistent therewith contained in any other law for the time being in force or in any instrument having effect by virtue of any law other than this Act. 21. Power of High Court to make rules.—(1) The High Court may, by notification in the Official Gazette, make such rules as it may deem necessary for carrying out the purposes of this Act. (2) In particular, and without prejudice to the generality of the foregoing power, such rules may provide for all or any of the following matters, namely:— (a) normal working hours of Family Courts and holding of sittings of Family Courts on holidays and outside normal working hours; (b) holding of sittings of Family Courts at places other than their ordinary places of sitting; (c) efforts which may be made by, and the procedure which may be followed by, a Family Court for assisting and persuading parties to arrive at a settlement. 1. Subs. by Act 59 of 1991, s. 2, for “Appeals” (w.e.f 28-12-1991). 2. Ins. by s. 2, ibid. (w.e.f. 28-12-1991). 3. Sub-section (4) renumbered as sub-section (5) thereof by s. 2, ibid. (w.e.f. 28-12-1991). 4. Sub-section (5) renumbered as sub-section (6) thereof by s. 2, ibid. (w.e.f. 28-12-1991). 7 22. Power of the Central Government to make rules.—(1) The Central Government may,

Última atualização: 2018-04-10
Frequência de uso: 1
Qualidade:

Referência: Anônimo

Inglês

apology letterI am so sorry for they way I have been behaving lately. I just have so much doubt in everything. You have always been the constant in my life, and I know I have said that before, but it is the truth. I always see my self as the lesser of the relationship we have had. I am the one that makes the bad decisions. You have always been my compass and gravity. The past few years have just been so hard on both of us. I know I sure have not made it any easier. Lately I have been so depressed and... well, hurt. I just do not know how to react to anything between us. I know I have become overbearing with jealousy and distrust. I am having a really hard time processing it. I have never felt this way in my entire life, and I just cannot control it. I know it can be done because I see what you have put up with over these years. I have been nothing but insensitive to you and.sanni,.. well, just an all around jerk. I have never meant to make you feel belittled or disrespected. I know I have, but it was not my intention. You know I am not really good at expressing my feelings unless they are on paper. So that is what this is an attempt at. I do trust you... I really and genuinely do. I do not trust others. We have been through so much and I know I have not been supportive to you in the ways that I need to. And I am not a mind reader. I do not want to guess anymore, I want to know what you need... what you want. I love you with every fiber of my being and I always will. I need work work past my issues as well. I have forgiven you for the past... but I can not forget what has happened. I know it is the same with you. I want and wish for us, not just you and me, but us as a family to be close again. I see it in sanni, the way she has almost distanced herself from me. The way she acts is so frustrating, it is like looking in the mirror and seeing the two of us mashed together. It breaks my heart to even try to know what she thinks of me. I see it in atte, she tries so hard to do everything right. She really does remind me of a young version of myself. I was the same way, I never seemed to please my mother wow she is so much like you it just scares me. you each have your best qualities, but I think the past couple of years have been amplifying the worst of our traits in them. I just want it all to end. I want us back! I want our family back! I want to enjoy the rest of my life with you and only you! I do not want to lose the best friend that I have ever had nor do I want to lose the only love I have ever had. I really do not mean to sound cheesy but you do “complete me.” If I did not know you, if I did not have you in my life, I would not be me. Before you came into my life, I was on a one way ticket to no where. Sure, things may have worked out fine for me but I would always have known that something was missing. I look back at latif and kenwet, avinash, . Their marriages have all been of convenience. Ours was a disaster, since the beginning and I only blame no one but myself.. We knew how hard it would be, we knew that we were taking a risk. We went in without even hesitating. I was not “wonder love sick”, I was not doing it for “the right reasons.” I wanted you beside me for the rest of our lives. I always knew you would be the woman I would be with for the rest of my life. I never imagined myself with anyone else, only you. I still feel that way. I do feel we are broken in some way. I feel like our lives have turned into the pieces of one of your puzzles, scattered on the table just waiting for the right hand... fingers to pick it up and to gently place each piece where it should go. I want to do this, but as we've done in the past, I need your help to keep me from mashing the wrong pieces in the wrong places. I need you to help me keep this puzzle together. I am sorry. I am sorry for what I did yesterday, I am sorry for what I did today and what I'll do tomorrow. I know I could apologize for days on end but it may not eliminate your thought that I do not respect you. I know that my actions upset you tremendously and for that I am truly apologetic. My greatest wish is to never take you for granted and my fault is that I am human. Suffering from serious bipolar disorder..i tried it to cure with all the antidepressants’ available , but no use..the only hope left is go for E>C>T(shock treatment).so my present situation is company kept all240 staffs as stand by until march 2016.. if crude price will not go at least 45 dollar per barrel if not they will decide stop thinking of production send all of us home… so in that case I will straight away go and admit Christian hospital vellore and take treatment.. if feel good I may come to sanni’s birthday.. but not waste a single day and start my planed coffee shop with my boss in kerala.. I am sorry that my emotions tend to overwhelm me. I know you deserve to be treated with respect, love and care...I want you to know that I truly do respect, love and care for you and I am hoping that with this you will forgive my conduct and realize how much you mean to me. I love you. Always and Forever,

Kannada

ಕ್ಷಮೆ ಪತ್ರ

Última atualização: 2016-01-15
Frequência de uso: 2
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Referência: Sudeshamwaj
Aviso: contém formatação HTML invisível

Inglês

Whether to use the "--driver generic-mmc-raw" flag with cdrdao. Set to True, brasero will use it; it may be a workaround for some drives/setups.

Kannada

cdrdao ನೊಂದಿಗೆ "--driver generic-mmc-raw" ಫ್ಲಾಗಿನೊಂದಿಗೆ ಬಳಸಬೇಕೆ. True ಗೆ ಹೊಂದಿಸಿದಲ್ಲಿ, brasero ಇದನ್ನು ಬಳಸುತ್ತದೆ; ಕೆಲವು ಡ್ರೈವ್‌ಗಳು/ಸಿದ್ಧತೆಗಳಿಗೆ ಇದು ಒಂದು ಪರ್ಯಾಯಮಾರ್ಗವಾಗಿರಬಹುದು.

Última atualização: 2014-08-15
Frequência de uso: 1
Qualidade:

Referência: Sudeshamwaj
Aviso: contém formatação HTML invisível

Inglês

Whether to use the "-use-the-force-luke=dao" flag with growisofs. Set to false, brasero won't use it; it may be a workaround for some drives/setups.

Kannada

growisofs ನೊಂದಿಗೆ "-use-the-force-luke=dao" ಫ್ಲಾಗ್ ಅನ್ನು ಬಳಸಬೇಕೆ. false ಗೆ ಹೊಂದಿಸಿದಲ್ಲಿ, brasero ಇದನ್ನು ಬಳಸುವುದಿಲ್ಲ; ಕೆಲವು ಡ್ರೈವ್‌ಗಳು/ಸಿದ್ಧತೆಗಳಿಗೆ ಇದು ಒಂದು ಪರ್ಯಾಯ ಮಾರ್ಗವಾಗಿರಬಹುದು.

Última atualização: 2014-08-15
Frequência de uso: 1
Qualidade:

Referência: Sudeshamwaj
Aviso: contém formatação HTML invisível

Inglês

Busy Cursor KDE offers a busy cursor for application startup notification. To enable the busy cursor, select one kind of visual feedback from the combobox. It may occur, that some applications are not aware of this startup notification. In this case, the cursor stops blinking after the time given in the section'Startup indication timeout '

Kannada

ಕಾರ್ಯನಿರತ ತೆರೆಸೂಚಕ KDE ಯು ಅನ್ವಯದ ಆರಂಭದ ಸೂಚನೆಗಾಗಿ ಒಂದು ಕಾರ್ಯನಿರತ ತೆರೆಸೂಚಕವನ್ನು ಒದಗಿಸುತ್ತದೆ. ಕಾರ್ಯನಿರತ ತೆರೆಸೂಚಕವನ್ನು ಶಕ್ತಗೊಳಿಸಲು, ಕಾಂಬೋಬಾಕ್ಸಿನಿಂದ ಒಂದು ಬಗೆಯ ಅಭಿಪ್ರಾಯವನ್ನು ಆಯ್ಕೆ ಮಾಡಿ ಕೆಲವೊಂದು ಅನ್ವಯಗಳಿಗೆ ಈ ಆರಂಭ ಸೂಚನೆಯ ಬಗ್ಗೆ ತಿಳಿದಿರುವುದಿಲ್ಲ. ಇಂತಹ ಸಂದರ್ಭಗಳಲ್ಲಿ, 'ಆರಂಭಗೊಳಿಕಾ ಸೂಚನೆಯ ಕಾಲಾವಧಿ ಮಿತಿ' ವಿಭಾಗದಲ್ಲಿ ನೀಡಲಾದ ಸಮಯವು ಮುಗಿದ ನಂತರ ತೆರೆಸೂಚಕವು ಮಿನುಗುವುದನ್ನು ನಿಲ್ಲಿಸುತ್ತದೆ.

Última atualização: 2011-10-23
Frequência de uso: 1
Qualidade:

Referência: Sudeshamwaj

Inglês

Taskbar Notification You can enable a second method of startup notification which is used by the taskbar where a button with a rotating hourglass appears, symbolizing that your started application is loading. It may occur, that some applications are not aware of this startup notification. In this case, the button disappears after the time given in the section'Startup indication timeout '

Kannada

ಕಾರ್ಯಪಟ್ಟಿಕೆ ಸೂಚನೆ ನೀವು ಆರಂಭಿಸಿದ ಅನ್ವಯವು ಲೋಡ್‌ ಆಗುತ್ತಿದೆ ಎಂದು ಸೂಚಿಸುವ, ಕಾರ್ಯಪಟ್ಟಿಕೆಯು ಬಳಸುವಂತಹ ತಿರುಗುವ ಮರಳು ಗಡಿಯಾರ (hourglass) ಅನ್ನು ಹೊಂದಿರುವ ಗುಂಡಿಯು ಕಾಣಿಸಿಕೊಳ್ಳುವಂತಹ ಆರಂಭಿಸುವ ಇನ್ನೊಂದು ಕ್ರಮವನ್ನು ಶಕ್ತಗೊಳಿಸಬಹುದಾಗಿದೆ. ಕೆಲವೊಂದು ಅನ್ವಯಗಳಿಗೆ ಈ ಆರಂಭ ಸೂಚನೆಯ ಬಗ್ಗೆ ತಿಳಿದಿರುವುದಿಲ್ಲ. ಇಂತಹ ಸಂದರ್ಭಗಳಲ್ಲಿ, 'ಆರಂಭಗೊಳಿಕಾ ಸೂಚನೆಯ ಕಾಲಾವಧಿ ಮಿತಿ' ವಿಭಾಗದಲ್ಲಿ ನೀಡಲಾದ ಸಮಯವು ಮುಗಿದ ನಂತರ ಗುಂಡಿಯು ಮರೆಯಾಗುತ್ತದೆ.

Última atualização: 2011-10-23
Frequência de uso: 1
Qualidade:

Referência: Sudeshamwaj

Inglês

This word was considered to be an "unknown word" because it does not match any entry in the dictionary currently in use. It may also be a word in a foreign language. If the word is not misspelled, you may add it to the dictionary by clicking Add to Dictionary. If you do not want to add the unknown word to the dictionary, but you want to leave it unchanged, click Ignore or Ignore All. However, if the word is misspelled, you can try to find the correct replacement in the list below. If you cannot find a replacement there, you may type it in the text box below, and click Replace or Replace All.

Kannada

ಈ ಪದವು ಗಣಕದ ಶಬ್ದಕೋಶದಲ್ಲಿ ಇಲ್ಲವಾದ್ದರಿಂದ "ಗೊತ್ತಿಲ್ಲದ ಪದ" ವೆಂದು ಪರಿಗಣಿಸಲಾಗಿದೆ. ಇದು ಬೇರೆ ಭಾಷಾ ಪದವಾಗಿಯೂ ಇರಬಹುದು. ಈ ಪದವು ಸರಿಯಾಗಿದೆಯಂದು ನಿಮಗೆ ಖಾತರಿಯಿದ್ದಲ್ಲಿ ನೀವುಈ ಪದವನ್ನು ಶಬ್ದಕೋಶಕ್ಕೆ ಸೇರಿಸು ಗುಂಡಿ ಒತ್ತುವುದರ ಮೂಲಕ ಗಣಕದ ಶಬ್ದಕೋಶಕ್ಕೆ ಸೇರಿಸಬಹುದು. ಅಥವಾ, ಈ ಪದವನ್ನು ಶಬ್ದಕೋಶಕ್ಕೆ ಸೇರಿಸದೇ, ಬದಲಾವಣೆಯನ್ನೂ ಮಾಡದೇ ಹಾಗೇ ಉಳಿಸಬೇಕೆಂದರೆ ನಿರ್ಲಕ್ಷಿಸು ಅಥವಾ ಎಲ್ಲವನ್ನು ನಿರ್ಲಕ್ಷಿಸು ಗುಂಡಿ ಒತ್ತಿರಿ. ಈ ಪದವು ತಪ್ಪಾಗಿದ್ದಲ್ಲಿ ಸರಿಯಾದ ಪದವನ್ನು ಕೆಳಗಿರುವ ಪಟ್ಟಿಯಲ್ಲಿ ಹುಡುಕಲು ಪ್ರಯತ್ನಿಸಿ. ಅಲ್ಲಿಯೂ ಕೂಡ ಸರಿಯಾದ ಪದ ಕಂಡು ಬರದಿದ್ದಲ್ಲಿ ನೀವೇ ಸರಿಯಾದ ಪದವನ್ನು ಟೈಪ್ ಮಾಡಿ. ನಂತರ, ಬದಲಾಯಿಸು ಅಥವಾ ಎಲ್ಲವನ್ನು ಬದಲಾಯಿಸು ಗುಂಡಿ ಒತ್ತಿರಿ.

Última atualização: 2011-10-23
Frequência de uso: 1
Qualidade:

Referência: Sudeshamwaj
Aviso: contém formatação HTML invisível

Inglês

kioclient exec'url '['mimetype'] # Tries to open the document pointed to by'url ', in the application # associated with it in KDE. You may omit'mimetype'. # In this case the mimetype is determined # automatically. Of course URL may be the URL of a # document, or it may be a *. desktop file. # 'url 'can be an executable, too.

Kannada

kioclient exec 'url' ['mimetype'] # 'url' ಸೂಚಿಸುವ ದಸ್ತಾವೇಜನ್ನು ಕೆಡಿಇ ಯೊಡನೆ ಸಂಬಂಧಿಸಲಾದ ಅನ್ವಯದಲ್ಲಿ ತೆರೆಯಲು ಪ್ರಯತ್ನಿಸುತ್ತದೆ # 'mimetype' ಅನ್ನು ಬಿಟ್ಟುಬಿಡಬಹುದು. # ಈ ಪರಿಸ್ಥಿತಿಯಲ್ಲಿ ಮೈಮ್ ಬಗೆಯನ್ನು ಸ್ವಯಂಚಾಲಿತವಾಗಿ ಪತ್ತೆಹಚ್ಚಲಾಗುವುದು. # URL ಒಂದು ದಸ್ತಾವೇಜಿನ URL ಆಗಿರಬಹುದು ಇಲ್ಲವೇ ಅದು ಒಂದು *. desktop ಕಡತವಾಗಿರಬಹುದು.

Última atualização: 2011-10-23
Frequência de uso: 1
Qualidade:

Referência: Sudeshamwaj

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