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Inglês

Tagalo

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Inglês

hardly synonymous

Tagalo

kasingkahulugan ng pagsidlan

Última atualização: 2016-01-16
Frequência de uso: 3
Qualidade:

Referência: Anônimo

Inglês

Well, hardly ever.

Tagalo

Madalang lang.

Última atualização: 2016-10-27
Frequência de uso: 1
Qualidade:

Referência: Anônimo

Inglês

I hardly feel it

Tagalo

Kunti nalang na raramdaman ko

Última atualização: 2020-01-02
Frequência de uso: 1
Qualidade:

Referência: Anônimo

Inglês

i can not hardly wait

Tagalo

hindi na ako makapaghintay

Última atualização: 2020-08-25
Frequência de uso: 1
Qualidade:

Referência: Anônimo

Inglês

i can't hardly wait

Tagalo

hindi na ako makapaghintay

Última atualização: 2020-03-22
Frequência de uso: 1
Qualidade:

Referência: Anônimo

Inglês

Hardly the shining Phoebus

Tagalo

dakilang aliw sa pinakadakilang kalungkutan

Última atualização: 2018-10-09
Frequência de uso: 1
Qualidade:

Referência: Anônimo

Inglês

what that means is hardly

Tagalo

anong ibig sabihin bahagya

Última atualização: 2020-02-02
Frequência de uso: 1
Qualidade:

Referência: Anônimo

Inglês

It hardly ever rains here.

Tagalo

Bihira lang umulan dito.

Última atualização: 2014-02-01
Frequência de uso: 1
Qualidade:

Referência: Anônimo

Inglês

If tutuosin they hardly worthy

Tagalo

kung tutuusin parang hindi pa sila karapat dapat

Última atualização: 2016-03-27
Frequência de uso: 1
Qualidade:

Referência: Anônimo

Inglês

Tom hardly ever loses at chess.

Tagalo

Halos hindi natatalo sa Tom sa chess.

Última atualização: 2014-02-01
Frequência de uso: 1
Qualidade:

Referência: Anônimo

Inglês

I could hardly breathe in the cold

Tagalo

sinisipon ako ang hirap huminga

Última atualização: 2020-01-27
Frequência de uso: 1
Qualidade:

Referência: Anônimo

Inglês

I could hardly keep from liking him.

Tagalo

Hindi ko mapigilang magustuhan siya.

Última atualização: 2014-02-01
Frequência de uso: 1
Qualidade:

Referência: Anônimo

Inglês

Hardly had we come home when it began to rain.

Tagalo

Bahagyang nakauwi kami nang biglang umulan.

Última atualização: 2014-02-01
Frequência de uso: 1
Qualidade:

Referência: Anônimo

Inglês

Hardly had he finished breakfast when the telephone rang.

Tagalo

Bahagya niyang tinapos ang almusal nang kumililing ang telepono.

Última atualização: 2014-02-01
Frequência de uso: 1
Qualidade:

Referência: Anônimo

Inglês

Her voice could hardly be heard over the noise.

Tagalo

Halos hindi marinig ang boses niya sa ingay.

Última atualização: 2014-02-01
Frequência de uso: 1
Qualidade:

Referência: Anônimo

Inglês

All societies are involved in process of social change however this change may be so subtle and slow that society is hardly aware of it

Tagalo

Ang lahat ng mga lipunan ay kasangkot sa proseso ng panlipunang pagbabago gayunpaman ang pagbabagong ito ay maaaring maging lubhang banayad at mabagal na lipunan ay halos hindi alam ito

Última atualização: 2018-07-04
Frequência de uso: 1
Qualidade:

Referência: Anônimo

Inglês

Someday they look forward to having a better life after they are through with their studies which they can hardly attend to because of their work.

Tagalo

Balang-araw sila tumingin forward sa pagkakaroon ng isang mas mahusay na buhay pagkatapos ang mga ito ay sa pamamagitan ng kanilang mga pag-aaral na kung saan maaari nilang bahagya dumalo sa dahil sa kanilang trabaho.

Última atualização: 2017-06-12
Frequência de uso: 1
Qualidade:

Referência: Anônimo

Inglês

in our fourth lesson I learned about kitchen design but you can hardly know the number of people who work here or how big your food establishment or kitchen is and how well we can learn the 3 primary work center center and cleaning area after studying them we can design kitchen design, this is l shaped kitchen, U shaped kitchen corridor / 2 wall kitchen, G shaped kitchen, island and the last

Tagalo

sang aming ikaapat na lesson ay natutunan ko ang kitchen design pero kaylangan natin mo na malaman ang mga bilang ng tao nag nag tatrabaho dito o gaano kalaki ang iyong food establishment o silid lutuan at kaylangan rin natin matutunan ang 3 primary work center cooking center, work center and cleaning area pagkatapus natin pag aralan ang mga ito pwede na tayo mag desinyo ng kitchen design, ito ay l shape kitchen, U shaped kitchen corridor/ 2 wall kitchen, G shaped kitchen, island at ang pang hul

Última atualização: 2020-02-18
Frequência de uso: 1
Qualidade:

Referência: Anônimo

Inglês

In the days of King Arthur, the Wife of Bath begins, the isle of Britain was full of fairies and elves. Now, those creatures are gone because their spots have been taken by the friars and other mendicants that seem to fill every nook and cranny of the isle. And though the friars rape women, just as the incubi did in the days of the fairies, the friars only cause women dishonor—the incubi always got them pregnant. In Arthur’s court, however, a young, lusty knight comes across a beautiful young maiden one day. Overcome by lust and his sense of his own power, he rapes her. The court is scandalized by the crime and decrees that the knight should be put to death by decapitation. However, Arthur’s queen and other ladies of the court intercede on his behalf and ask the king to give him one chance to save his own life. Arthur, wisely obedient to wifely counsel, grants their request. The queen presents the knight with the following challenge: if, within one year, he can discover what women want most in the world and report his findings back to the court, he will keep his life. If he cannot find the answer to the queen’s question, or if his answer is wrong, he will lose his head. Video SparkNotes: Homer's The Odyssey summary The knight sets forth in sorrow. He roams throughout the country, posing the question to every woman he meets. To the knight’s dismay, nearly every one of them answers differently. Some claim that women love money best, some honor, some jolliness, some looks, some sex, some remarriage, some flattery, and some say that women most want to be free to do as they wish. Finally, says the Wife, some say that women most want to be considered discreet and secretive, although she argues that such an answer is clearly untrue, since no woman can keep a secret. As proof, she retells Ovid’s story of Midas. Midas had two ass’s ears growing under his hair, which he concealed from everybody except his wife, whom he begged not to disclose his secret. She swore she would not, but the secret burned so much inside her that she ran down to a marsh and whispered her husband’s secret to the water. The Wife then says that if her listeners would like to hear how the tale ends, they should read Ovid. She returns to her story of the knight. When his day of judgment draws near, the knight sorrowfully heads for home. As he rides near a forest, he sees a large group of women dancing and decides to approach them to ask his question. But as he approaches, the group vanishes, and all he can see is an ugly old woman. The woman asks if she can be of help, and the knight explains his predicament and promises to reward her if she can help him. The woman tells the knight that he must pledge himself to her in return for her help, and the knight, having no options left, gladly consents. She then guarantees that his life will be saved. The knight and the old woman travel together to the court, where, in front of a large audience, the knight tells the queen the answer with which the old woman supplied him: what women most desire is to be in charge of their husbands and lovers. The women agree resoundingly that this is the answer, and the queen spares the knight’s life. The old hag comes forth and publicly asks the knight to marry her. The knight cries out in horror. He begs her to take his material possessions rather than his body, but she refuses to yield, and in the end he is forced to consent. The two are married in a small, private wedding and go to bed together the same night. Throughout the entire ordeal, the knight remains miserable. While in bed, the loathsome hag asks the knight why he is so sad. He replies that he could hardly bear the shame of having such an ugly, lowborn wife. She does not take offense at the insult, but calmly asks him whether real “gentillesse,” or noble character, can be hereditary (1109). There have been sons of noble fathers, she argues, who were shameful and villainous, though they shared the same blood. Her family may be poor, but real poverty lies in covetousness, and real riches lie in having little and wanting nothing. She offers the knight a choice: either he can have her be ugly but loyal and good, or he can have her young and fair but also coquettish and unfaithful. The knight ponders in silence. Finally, he replies that he would rather trust her judgment, and he asks her to choose whatever she thinks best. Because the knight’s answer gave the woman what she most desired, the authority to choose for herself, she becomes both beautiful and good. The two have a long, happy marriage, and the woman becomes completely obedient to her husband. The Wife of Bath concludes with a plea that Jesus Christ send all women husbands who are young, meek, and fresh in bed, and the grace to outlive their husbands

Tagalo

ang asawa ng kwentong paliguan ang kwento

Última atualização: 2020-02-10
Frequência de uso: 1
Qualidade:

Referência: Anônimo

Inglês

Many artists lived in the Greenwich Village area of New York. Two young women named Sue and Johnsy shared a studio apartment at the top of a three-story building. Johnsy's real name was Joanna. In November, a cold, unseen stranger came to visit the city. This disease, pneumonia, killed many people. Johnsy lay on her bed, hardly moving. She looked through the small window. She could see the side of the brick house next to her building. One morning, a doctor examined Johnsy and took her temperature. Then he spoke with Sue in another room. "She has one chance in -- let us say ten," he said. "And that chance is for her to want to live. Your friend has made up her mind that she is not going to get well. Has she anything on her mind?" "She -- she wanted to paint the Bay of Naples in Italy some day," said Sue. "Paint?" said the doctor. "Bosh! Has she anything on her mind worth thinking twice -- a man for example?" "A man?" said Sue. "Is a man worth -- but, no, doctor; there is nothing of the kind." "I will do all that science can do," said the doctor. "But whenever my patient begins to count the carriages at her funeral, I take away fifty percent from the curative power of medicines." After the doctor had gone, Sue went into the workroom and cried. Then she went to Johnsy's room with her drawing board, whistling ragtime. Johnsy lay with her face toward the window. Sue stopped whistling, thinking she was asleep. She began making a pen and ink drawing for a story in a magazine. Young artists must work their way to "Art" by making pictures for magazine stories. Sue heard a low sound, several times repeated. She went quickly to the bedside. Johnsy's eyes were open wide. She was looking out the window and counting -- counting backward. "Twelve," she said, and a little later "eleven"; and then "ten" and "nine;" and then "eight" and "seven," almost together. Sue looked out the window. What was there to count? There was only an empty yard and the blank side of the house seven meters away. An old ivy vine, going bad at the roots, climbed half way up the wall. The cold breath of autumn had stricken leaves from the plant until its branches, almost bare, hung on the bricks. "What is it, dear?" asked Sue. "Six," said Johnsy, quietly. "They're falling faster now. Three days ago there were almost a hundred. It made my head hurt to count them. But now it's easy. There goes another one. There are only five left now." "Five what, dear?" asked Sue. "Leaves. On the plant. When the last one falls I must go, too. I've known that for three days. Didn't the doctor tell you?" "Oh, I never heard of such a thing," said Sue. "What have old ivy leaves to do with your getting well? And you used to love that vine. Don't be silly. Why, the doctor told me this morning that your chances for getting well real soon were -- let's see exactly what he said – he said the chances were ten to one! Try to eat some soup now. And, let me go back to my drawing, so I can sell it to the magazine and buy food and wine for us." "You needn't get any more wine," said Johnsy, keeping her eyes fixed out the window. "There goes another one. No, I don't want any soup. That leaves just four. I want to see the last one fall before it gets dark. Then I'll go, too." "Johnsy, dear," said Sue, "will you promise me to keep your eyes closed, and not look out the window until I am done working? I must hand those drawings in by tomorrow." "Tell me as soon as you have finished," said Johnsy, closing her eyes and lying white and still as a fallen statue. "I want to see the last one fall. I'm tired of waiting. I'm tired of thinking. I want to turn loose my hold on everything, and go sailing down, down, just like one of those poor, tired leaves."

Tagalo

c / ang huling dahon ng o

Última atualização: 2020-01-11
Frequência de uso: 1
Qualidade:

Referência: Anônimo
Aviso: contém formatação HTML invisível

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