Спросить у Google

Вы искали: it really was (Английский - Тагальский)

Переводы пользователей

Добавлены профессиональными переводчиками и компаниями и на основе веб-страниц и открытых баз переводов.

Добавить перевод

Английский

Тагальский

Информация

Английский

It really is your fault.

Тагальский

Talaga namang kasalanan mo.

Последнее обновление: 2014-02-01
Частота использования: 1
Качество:

Английский

It's really a chance

Тагальский

sayang naman talaga ang pagkakataon

Последнее обновление: 2018-05-28
Частота использования: 1
Качество:

Источник: Анонимно

Английский

Right, like it's really his boyfriend Todd.

Тагальский

Oo, boyfriend mo na nga talaga si Todd.

Последнее обновление: 2016-10-27
Частота использования: 1
Качество:

Источник: Анонимно

Английский

It's really starting to become a habit.

Тагальский

Mukhang palagi itong nangyayari sa akin.

Последнее обновление: 2016-10-27
Частота использования: 1
Качество:

Источник: Анонимно

Английский

It's really a great edition to the living room.

Тагальский

Bagay talaga ito sa ating sala.

Последнее обновление: 2016-10-27
Частота использования: 1
Качество:

Источник: Анонимно

Английский

I acted like it wasn't a big deal, when it really was breaking my heart.

Тагальский

Ako ay kumilos na tulad ng ito ay hindi isang malaking deal, kapag ito ay talagang paglabag sa aking puso.

Последнее обновление: 2018-08-04
Частота использования: 1
Качество:

Источник: Анонимно

Английский

In today's world there are many young mothers. According to Dr. Jose Rizal is the youth of the hope of our people. Is it really true that the youth are in the hope of the people? They may be one of the problems facing the country now. Why is the pregnancy of young people early on?

Тагальский

Sa panahon ngayon marami na ang mga batang ina. According to Dr. Jose Rizal ang kabataan ang pag asa ng ating bayan. Totoo ba talaga na ang kabataan ay pag asa ng bayan? Baka naman isa sila sa mga suliranin na kinakaharap ngayon ng atik bansa. Bakit nga ba napaaga ang pagbubuntis ng mga kabataan ngayon?

Последнее обновление: 2018-09-09
Частота использования: 1
Качество:

Источник: Анонимно

Английский

The Lottery Ticket by Anton Pavlovich Chekhov (1860-1904) Approximate Word Count: 1978 Ivan Dmitritch, a middle-class man who lived with his family on an income of twelve hundred a year and was very well satisfied with his lot, sat down on the sofa after supper and began reading the newspaper. "I forgot to look at the newspaper today," his wife said to him as she cleared the table. "Look and see whether the list of drawings is there." "Yes, it is," said Ivan Dmitritch; "but hasn't your ticket lapsed?" "No; I took the interest on Tuesday." "What is the number?" "Series 9,499, number 26." "All right . . . we will look . . . 9,499 and 26." Ivan Dmitritch had no faith in lottery luck, and would not, as a rule, have consented to look at the lists of winning numbers, but now, as he had nothing else to do and as the newspaper was before his eyes, he passed his finger downwards along the column of numbers. And immediately, as though in mockery of his scepticism, no further than the second line from the top, his eye was caught by the figure 9,499! Unable to believe his eyes, he hurriedly dropped the paper on his knees without looking to see the number of the ticket, and, just as though some one had given him a douche of cold water, he felt an agreeable chill in the pit of the stomach; tingling and terrible and sweet! "Masha, 9,499 is there!" he said in a hollow voice. His wife looked at his astonished and panicstricken face, and realized that he was not joking. "9,499?" she asked, turning pale and dropping the folded tablecloth on the table. "Yes, yes . . . it really is there!" "And the number of the ticket?" "Oh yes! There's the number of the ticket too. But stay . . . wait! No, I say! Anyway, the number of our series is there! Anyway, you understand...." Looking at his wife, Ivan Dmitritch gave a broad, senseless smile, like a baby when a bright object is shown it. His wife smiled too; it was as pleasant to her as to him that he only mentioned the series, and did not try to find out the number of the winning ticket. To torment and tantalize oneself with hopes of possible fortune is so sweet, so thrilling! "It is our series," said Ivan Dmitritch, after a long silence. "So there is a probability that we have won. It's only a probability, but there it is!" "Well, now look!" "Wait a little. We have plenty of time to be disappointed. It's on the second line from the top, so the prize is seventy-five thousand. That's not money, but power, capital! And in a minute I shall look at the list, and there--26! Eh? I say, what if we really have won?" The husband and wife began laughing and staring at one another in silence. The possibility of winning bewildered them; they could not have said, could not have dreamed, what they both needed that seventy-five thousand for, what they would buy, where they would go. They thought only of the figures 9,499 and 75,000 and pictured them in their imagination, while somehow they could not think of the happiness itself which was so possible. Ivan Dmitritch, holding the paper in his hand, walked several times from corner to corner, and only when he had recovered from the first impression began dreaming a little. "And if we have won," he said--"why, it will be a new life, it will be a transformation! The ticket is yours, but if it were mine I should, first of all, of course, spend twenty-five thousand on real property in the shape of an estate; ten thousand on immediate expenses, new furnishing . . . travelling . . . paying debts, and so on. . . . The other forty thousand I would put in the bank and get interest on it." "Yes, an estate, that would be nice," said his wife, sitting down and dropping her hands in her lap. "Somewhere in the Tula or Oryol provinces. . . . In the first place we shouldn't need a summer villa, and besides, it would always bring in an income." And pictures came crowding on his imagination, each more gracious and poetical than the last. And in all these pictures he saw himself well-fed, serene, healthy, felt warm, even hot! Here, after eating a summer soup, cold as ice, he lay on his back on the burning sand close to a stream or in the garden under a lime-tree. . . . It is hot. . . . His little boy and girl are crawling about near him, digging in the sand or catching ladybirds in the grass. He dozes sweetly, thinking of nothing, and feeling all over that he need not go to the office today, tomorrow, or the day after. Or, tired of lying still, he goes to the hayfield, or to the forest for mushrooms, or watches the peasants catching fish with a net. When the sun sets he takes a towel and soap and saunters to the bathing shed, where he undresses at his leisure, slowly rubs his bare chest with his hands, and goes into the water. And in the water, near the opaque soapy circles, little fish flit to and fro and green water-weeds nod their heads. After bathing there is tea with cream and milk rolls. . . . In the evening a walk or vint with the neighbors. "Yes, it would be nice to buy an estate," said his wife, also dreaming, and from her face it was evident that she was enchanted by her thoughts. Ivan Dmitritch pictured to himself autumn with its rains, its cold evenings, and its St. Martin's summer. At that season he would have to take longer walks about the garden and beside the river, so as to get thoroughly chilled, and then drink a big glass of vodka and eat a salted mushroom or a soused cucumber, and then--drink another. . . . The children would come running from the kitchen-garden, bringing a carrot and a radish smelling of fresh earth. . . . And then, he would lie stretched full length on the sofa, and in leisurely fashion turn over the pages of some illustrated magazine, or, covering his face with it and unbuttoning his waistcoat, give himself up to slumber. The St. Martin's summer is followed by cloudy, gloomy weather. It rains day and night, the bare trees weep, the wind is damp and cold. The dogs, the horses, the fowls--all are wet, depressed, downcast. There is nowhere to walk; one can't go out for days together; one has to pace up and down the room, looking despondently at the grey window. It is dreary! Ivan Dmitritch stopped and looked at his wife. "I should go abroad, you know, Masha," he said. And he began thinking how nice it would be in late autumn to go abroad somewhere to the South of France ... to Italy ... to India! "I should certainly go abroad too," his wife said. "But look at the number of the ticket!" "Wait, wait! ..." He walked about the room and went on thinking. It occurred to him: what if his wife really did go abroad? It is pleasant to travel alone, or in the society of light, careless women who live in the present, and not such as think and talk all the journey about nothing but their children, sigh, and tremble with dismay over every farthing. Ivan Dmitritch imagined his wife in the train with a multitude of parcels, baskets, and bags; she would be sighing over something, complaining that the train made her head ache, that she had spent so much money.... At the stations he would continually be having to run for boiling water, bread and butter. ...She wouldn't have dinner because of its being too dear.... "She would begrudge me every farthing," he thought, with a glance at his wife. "The lottery ticket is hers, not mine! Besides, what is the use of her going abroad? What does she want there? She would shut herself up in the hotel, and not let me out of her sight.... I know!" And for the first time in his life his mind dwelt on the fact that his wife had grown elderly and plain, and that she was saturated through and through with the smell of cooking, while he was still young, fresh, and healthy, and might well have got married again. "Of course, all that is silly nonsense," he thought; "but...why should she go abroad? What would she make of it? And yet she would go, of course.... I can fancy.... In reality it is all one to her, whether it is Naples or Klin. She would only be in my way. I should be dependent upon her. I can fancy how, like a regular woman, she will lock the money up as soon as she gets it.... She will look after her relations and grudge me every farthing." Ivan Dmitritch thought of her relations. All those wretched brothers and sisters and aunts and uncles would come crawling about as soon as they heard of the winning ticket, would begin whining like beggars, and fawning upon them with oily, hypocritical smiles. Wretched, detestable people! If they were given anything, they would ask for more; while if they were refused, they would swear at them, slander them, and wish them every kind of misfortune. Ivan Dmitritch remembered his own relations, and their faces, at which he had looked impartially in the past, struck him now as repulsive and hateful. "They are such reptiles!" he thought. And his wife's face, too, struck him as repulsive and hateful. Anger surged up in his heart against her, and he thought malignantly: "She knows nothing about money, and so she is stingy. If she won it she would give me a hundred roubles, and put the rest away under lock and key." And he looked at his wife, not with a smile now, but with hatred. She glanced at him too, and also with hatred and anger. She had her own daydreams, her own plans, her own reflections; she understood perfectly well what her husband's dreams were. She knew who would be the first to try to grab her winnings. "It's very nice making daydreams at other people's expense!" is what her eyes expressed. "No, don't you dare!" Her husband understood her look; hatred began stirring again in his breast, and in order to annoy his wife he glanced quickly, to spite her at the fourth page on the newspaper and read out triumphantly: "Series 9,499, number 46! Not 26!" Hatred and hope both disappeared at once, and it began immediately to seem to Ivan Dmitritch and his wife that their rooms were dark and small and low-pitched, that the supper they had been eating was not doing them good, but Lying heavy on their stomachs, that the evenings were long and wearisome. . . . "What the devil's the meaning of it?" said Ivan Dmitritch, beginning to be ill-humored. 'Wherever one steps there are bits of paper under one's feet, crumbs, husks. The rooms are never swept! One is simply forced to go out. Damnation take my soul entirely! I shall go and hang myself on the first aspen-tree!"

Тагальский

Ang tiket ng loterya ay hindi masasaktan

Последнее обновление: 2018-05-14
Частота использования: 1
Качество:

Источник: Анонимно
Предупреждение: Содержит скрытое HTML-форматирование

Английский

so it's true that when you love to always be happy even if there is a problem with the status bar you are in heaven especially if you are still a message like that when you love her at night waiting for you to call you but if you do not sleep then maybe you dream about it so it really hit you every day is beautiful and even feel alone with you so it's really the love you're coming in. You're trembling uneasy and it seems like it's really so ' I love you so much when you love him to avoid being jealous of others let you know that if it does not hurt you, it is astonishing that it really hits you every day is beautiful and even if you are alone with him so it's really love she's coming to you trembling uneasily and just as stupid so you really love it so much that you hit every day it's beautiful and even feeling alone you're with him so much the one who loves to come to you you're trembling to be uncomfortable and like to stare like that really loves you oh oh that's exactly how it really is .

Тагальский

ganyan talaga kapag in love ka na laging masaya kahit na may problema sa status palang ay nasa heaven ka na lalo na kung sayo ay nag message pa siya ganyan talaga kapag mahal mo siya sa gabi naghihintay kung tatawagan ka ngunit kung hindi ay matulog ka na at baka sakaling mapanaginipan mo pa ganyan talaga pag-tinamaan ka ang bawat araw ay gumaganda at kahit nag-iisa ang pakiramdam ay kasama mo siya ganyan talaga ang umiibig paglumapit siya ika'y nanginginig di mapalagay at parang na-uutal ganyan talaga pag-ika'y nagmamahal ganyan talaga kapag mahal mo siya hindi maiwasang magselos sa iba hayaan mo na pagkat ganyan talaga kung hindi nasasaktan ay nakapagtataka ganyan talaga pag-tinamaan ka ang bawat araw ay gumaganda at kahit nag-iisa ang pakiramdam ay kasama mo siya ganyan talaga ang umiibig paglumapit siya ika'y nanginginig di mapalagay at parang na-uutal ganyan talaga pag-ikaw ay nagmamahal ganyan talaga pag-tinamaan ka ang bawat araw ay gumaganda at kahit nag-iisa ang pakiramdam ay kasama mo siya ganyan talaga ang umiibig paglumapit siya ika'y nanginginig di mapalagay at parang na-uutal ganyan talaga pag-ikaw ay nagmamahal oh oh ganyan talaga ganyan talaga.

Последнее обновление: 2018-02-13
Частота использования: 1
Качество:

Источник: Анонимно

Английский

THE MOVIE The movie is about an Alien who is stranded on this planet; as it happens, his "remote" to contact his ship to come collect him is stolen on his landing. The rest of the movie is about his hunt for the remote, and his adventures as he goes about it. It is a hard-hitting expose on human nature and modern life, or what we call civilization. And, as we shall see, the movie ends with a punch to the gut, which leaves you almost feeling ashamed of being a human being on Earth. The movie gives you pride in being a Hindu, or to be accurate, a Sanaatan Dharmi; but it makes you feel ashamed to be a Human Being living on this planet, all in just one shocking dialogue, that takes your breath away, and leaves you retching in sheer disgust at humanity. The Alien, who has been given no name, is from an advanced race that does not speak, but communicates with telepathy. Thus, they are unable to lie, or practice chicanery in any form. And this poor fellow is loose in a land full of lies and uncaring people. {Close your eyes, and imagine this scene for a moment; imagine his desperation!} When people, unable to understand, tell him - ask God - he begins to question, who is this God? And gets directed to a Temple, as this is the most populous in India. He asks God to return his Remote to him, and sits in the Temple, waiting for God to give it back to him - since that is what he sees people do : ask God, do this and do that for me! He then sees people doing all sorts of penance - Flowers, Milk, Chaader on a Muslim Peer Tomb, Churches - and he does all of this. He sees people donate money to the Temple, and blindly follows this. And then, when obviously no result is obtained, doesnt get angry - unlike us. He just assumes that God is missing from these places of Worship, and distributes placards and posters with images of all Gods of all Religions, asking "Missing", if anyone finds God, please contact me! Religion is only one of the two or three themes of the movie; to be sure, it is a predominant theme - but it is one theme among two or three nonetheless. And the picture is not about Hinduism, it is about Religion, blind faith, loot, lies and chicanery. It just so happens that first, we Hindus are the majority in this nation. Other religions have also been covered. Second, can anyone imagine the reaction if such hard questions were asked of Islam? Or, to an admittedly much lesser extent, Christianity? Recall the protests to The Da Vinci Code? Or the various problems in the Islamic world? Is it really feasible to ask such hard questions of Islam? Thus, isnt it a matter of tremendous pride for us Sanaatan Dharmis that we are followers of an open faith, where such questions can be asked? The movie then acquires a compelling and rapid narrative, as PK gets mixed up in politicised religion, and gets pitted against a powerful so-called Godman. Also mixed in is a lovely India-Pakistan love story that will tug the strings of your heart. And the best part of this is that all these 3 narratives combine into one story effortlessly and naturally. The movie does not question the need for Religion; neither does it question the existence of God. It does not mock any Religion; rather it mocks the practices and blind faith that goes into the same. It does not question the core tenets of any faith, let alone Sanaatan Dharm. It actually preaches that Man does need to pray to God, and that God does help. The movie is not an attack on any Religion; it is an attack on Mankind as it exists today. It is teaches us to believe, to have faith in God, and that God helps those who helps themselves. Isnt that what Sanaatan Dharm says precisely? It teaches us the value of true love, of self-confidence, and of true faith; it teaches us to have faith in God, and focus on our Karm. Again, precisely Sanaatan Dharm. After all, the movie has been written and directed by a Hindu. {By the way, that reminds me - if this has been written and directed by a Hindu or Sanaatan Dharmi, pray tell how is Aamir Khan the only one being questioned?} Hats off to you, Team PK! Sad that so many people have not understood its core message... there are some movies with a message. And then there are some messages with a movie woven into them, like PK. A landmark movie... stupendous. Stupendous! We need more such movies, and more such courageous actors and directors and artists... take a bow, Team PK! Stunning! Superlative! One of the best motion picture features to come out of Mumbai! I say it again : Strange that Haidar does cause even a ripple, with its negative portrayal of our beloved Armed Forces, and PK with its questions on so many vital aspects of life can cause an uproar! Is the nation more important or the religion? I am an INDIAN first. Did not watch Haidar, do not intend to. No one insults my Army. Sorry. And PK is much, much de "jhoothh bolnaa seekh kar gayaa, pyaar karnaa sikhaa gayaa" the last dialogue of the movie...

Тагальский

reflection paper-tungkol sa buhay

Последнее обновление: 2017-08-21
Частота использования: 1
Качество:

Источник: Анонимно
Предупреждение: Содержит скрытое HTML-форматирование

Получите качественный перевод благодаря усилиям
4,401,923,520 пользователей

Сейчас пользователи ищут:



Для Вашего удобства мы используем файлы cookie. Факт перехода на данный сайт подтверждает Ваше согласие на использование cookies. Подробнее. OK