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Малайский

Knight of the night

Английский

the knight of the night

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Малайский

contoh karangan bi night market

Английский

sample essay by night market

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Малайский

use 'night vision' color scheme

Английский

Star Chart

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Малайский

Baik night..Hope esok lebih baik daripada hari ini ...

Английский

Good night..Hope tomorrow it's better than today...

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Малайский

apa maksud i think a lot about u last night

Английский

what i mean u think a lot about last night

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Малайский

night",_("between 6 p.m. and 6 a.m.

Английский

between midnight and 8 a.m.

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Малайский

hingga Ahad inci bukause 'moonless night' color scheme

Английский

comets nearer to the Sun than this (in AU) are labeled on map

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Малайский

I wish moon always be full & bright and u always be cool n right when never u go to switch off the light,remember that i m wishing u....good night..

Английский

I wish moon always be full & bright and u always be cool n right when never u go to switch off the light,remember that i m wishing u....good night..

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Малайский

bahasa inggeris ke bahasa melayu PPPPP: Leasaith : Suhhihat PPPPP: Leasaith : Suhhihat haggard, wild female hawk in training. Tam. Shrew, 4.1.177; so as adj., of woman disobedient or unfaithful, Oth., 3.111.264. haggled, with many wounds, Item 5, 4.v1.11. h#a#ir, against the h# a#ir, contrary to nature, Troll. and Cres., I.ii.27; co#urser's hair, supposed to come to life in water, Ant. and Cleo., 1.11.187. halberd, axe like weapon with long handle, Rich. 3, 1.11.411. halcyon (from Haleyone, changed with her husband Ceyx to a type of kingfisher; their breeding season in winter was supposed to be favoured with fine weather) calm, happy, 1 lien. 6, 1.11.131; a dead kingfisher if hung up was supposed to act as a weather-cock, Lear, 2.11.73. ha@lf-che@ek'd, applied to inefficient or deficient bit, Tam. Shrew, 3.ii.53. hal@f-fa#ced, thin faced (like the profile on the groat. a thin coin), John, 1.i.92; half seen, 2 Hen. 6, 4.1.98. half sword, most closely engaged, 1 Hen. 4, 2.1v.157. s' halidom, holidame, an oath (on holy relics) reduced by Shakespeare's time to a mere Reservation, Two Gent. Ver.' 4.11.131. it Hallowmas, 1st Nov. (All Saints' Day), Ric+- h. 2, 5.i.80. han#d fa#st, marriage contract, Cur., 1.v.78. han#dsa#w (dialect form of heronshaw ') heron, Ham. 2.11.375. ban#ge #rs, straps supporting scabbard, Ham., 5.i1.154. harbin#ger, forerunner, Ham., 1.1.122. Harr#y te#n shi#llings, ha#lf -sovereign coined in reign of Henry VII, 2 Hen. 4, 3.11.216. hat#chment, tab#let showing the coat of arms of the deceased, Ham., 4.v.210. haug#ht, haughty, 3 Hen. 6, 2.1.109 haug#hty, ambitious, Rich. 3, 4.11.37. ============= goes to jockey "h" d "i" as lathair gha'ibaani . =============================== flaw, gust of wind, or passion, Cdr. 5.111.74. fleckerd, dappled, Rom. and Jul. Seer, sneering grimace, Oth., 4.i.82. flesh (to give a hound the flesh of the victim to rouse its keenness) so to introduce an untried soldier to bloodshed, Lear, 2.11.42; flesh his sword, use it in his first fight, 1 Hen. 6, 4.vii.36. fleshment, the satisfaction of a first success, Lear, 2.11.118. flew'd, with large chaps, Mid. N. Dr., 4.1.117. flirt-gill, loose woman, Rom. and Jul.,2.iv.149. flote, sea, Tem., 1.11.234. flourish, embellishment, L. Lab. Lost, 2.i.14. flower-de-luce, iris, Win. Tale, 4.iv.127; the lily of the French coat of arms, and so applied by Henry to Katherine, Hen. 5, 5.ii.208. flux = secretion, As You Like, 3.11.61. fob, set aside by trickery, Cor., I .i.92. foil (i) setting of a jewel, so something that shows up the value of an act or accomplishment, Ham., 5.ii.247; (ii) put to the fail, deprive of commendation, Tem., 3.i.46. with lining; but Falstaff provided the stuffing himself. Hen. 5. 4.vii.46. Greek, light fellow or wench, Tw. Night, 4.1.17. Greensleeves, a ballad tune not tending to godliness, Mer. Wires 2.1.55. grievance, inconvenience, affliction, Two Gent. Ver., 1.1.17. ========================== ========================= haggard, wild female hawk in training. Tam. Shrew, 4.1.177; so as adj., of woman disobedient or unfaithful, Oth., 3.111.264. haggled, with many wounds, Item 5, 4.v1.11. hair, against the hair, contrary to nature, Troll. and Cres., I.ii.27; courser's hair, supposed to come to life in water, Ant. and Cleo., 1.11.187. halberd, axe-like weapon with long handle, Rich. 3, 1.11.411. halcyon (from Haleyone, changed with her husband Ceyx to a type of kingfisher; their breeding season in winter was supposed to be favoured with fine weather) calm, happy, 1 lien. 6, 1.11.131; a dead kingfisher if hung up was supposed to act as a weather-cock, Lear, 2.11.73. half-cheek'd, applied to inefficient or deficient bit, Tam. Shrew, 3.ii.53. half-faced, thin faced (like the profile on the groat. a thin coin), John, 1.i.92; half seen, 2 Hen. 6, 4.1.98. half sword, most closely engaged, 1 Hen. 4, 2.1v.157. s' halidom, holidame, an oath (on holy relics) reduced by Shakespeare's time to a mere Reservation, Two Gent. Ver.' 4.11.131. it Hallowmas, 1st Nov. (All Saints' Day), Rich. 2, 5.i.80. hand fast, marriage contract, Cur., 1.v.78. handsaw (dialect form of heronshaw ') pucung = heron, Ham. 2.11.375. hangers, straps supporting scabbard, Ham., 5.i1.154. harbinger, forerunner, Ham., 1.1.122. Harry ten shillings, half-sovereign coined mencetak duit in reign of Henry VII, 2 Hen. 4, 3.11.216. hatchment, tablet showing the coat of arms of the deceased, Ham., 4.v.210. haught, haughty, 3 Hen. 6, 2.1.109 haughty, ambitious, Rich. 3, 4.11.37. ============= havoc, general slaughter, Jul. Caes., 6.1.274; Cor., 3.i.275; cries on havoc, the heap of ell speaks of an indiscriminate slaughter, Ha 5.11.356. hay (i) home thrust in fencing, Rain. and JI 2.1v.26; (it) country dance, L. Lab. LI 5.1.134. hazard, game with dice, Hen. 5, 3.vii.83; ri Cor., 2.111.253; term from tennis indicatim scoring stroke, Hen. 8, 1.ii.263. head, muster of men, usually soldiers; riot at Ham., 4.v.98. headland, part of field left, for convenience working, unploughed till the very end, 2 11 4, 5.i.13. hebona (Folio reads hebenon) a poison (eerie henbane, although there seems some referee' to ebony), Ham.. 1.v.62. Hecate, divinity of classieal antiquity, associated with ghost world and worshipped in trifo shape at cross-roads; triple Hecate, as Cyntl in heaven, Diana on earth, and Proserpi in hell, Mid. N. Dr.. 5.i.37e. hectic, continuous fever, Ham- 4.111.66. hedge-pig, hedgehog, Mae., 4.1,2. heft, heaving, Win. Tale. 2.1.45. hemp-seed, destined for the hangman hempen rope, 2 Hen. 4, 2.1.56. hent, grasp, or possibly occasion (hint), Hat 3.111.88. herbs of grace, rue. Tram., 4.v.179. Hercules, and his load, the sign hang outsi the Globe Theatre showed Hercules carrying the world on his shoulders, Hant.. 2.11.357. Herod, out-herods Herod, to overact even tin than the ranting character of Herod in t Miracle plays, Ham., 3.ii.13. hest, comthand, L. Lab. Lost, 5.11.65. hide fox, warning in game of hide-and-set Ham., 4.11.29. high and low, dice loaded to throw high low numbers, Mer. Wires Win., 1,111.83. bight, named, L. Lab. Lost, 1.1.168. hind, female deer, As You Late. 3.11.91. hint (sometimes spelt hent ' as at Oth. (C 1.111.142), occasion. Tern., 1.11.134. hipped, lame. owing to injury to hip-boi Tam. Shrew, 3.11.46. Hires, pun on iron ' and Efyrin (Irene) character in a play by Peele, 2 Hen. 4, 2.1v.li hive, straw hat, Lot. Comp., 8. hoar, whitish, Ham., 4.vii.168. Hobbididence (with Obidicut, Mahu, Mei Flibberdigibbet), fiends, Lear, 4.1.61. hoby-horse. ` the figure of a horse ' fastened round the waist of a morris dancer; t antics of this particular character in t dance were offensive to the Puritans, and t part came to be omitted, Ham., 3.11.130; loose character, L. Lab. Lost, 3.1.27. holding, consistency. All's Well, 4.11.1 chorus of song. Ant. and Cleo., 2.vii.109. holidame, see halidom. holy-ale (a coinage, by analogy with chum ale', to rhyme with '; festival ; the text * holy dayes '). festivity, Per., 1.Goiver.6. holy-rood day, 14th Sept.. the feast of t Holy Cross, 1 Hen. 4, 1.i.52. holy thistle, see Carduus 13enedietus. honey stalks, clover stalks, Titus, 4.1,7.91. honorificabilitu dinitatibus, stock example long word, L. Lab. Lost, 5.1.37. hood, to blindfold hawk (when unheeded bates), Hen. 5, 3.vii.108. hoodman blind, blind-man's-buff, Hat 3.iv.77. horn-book, sheet containing alphabet, e for children, protected with transparent covering of horn, L. Lab. Lost, 5.1.41. horologe, clock, Oth., 2.111.122. hose, includes various types of breeches a clothing (net stockings) for the lower lint 1 Hen. 4, 2.1v.208. howlet, owl, Mac, 4.1.17, hoz, hamstring, Win. Tale, 1.11.244. 1357 ============================

Английский

PPPPP: Leasaith : Suhhihat PPPPP: Leasaith : Suhhihat haggard, wild female hawk in training. Tam. Shrew, 4.1.177; so as adj., of woman disobedient or unfaithful, Oth., 3.111.264. haggled, with many wounds, Item 5, 4.v1.11. h#a#ir, against the h# a#ir, contrary to nature, Troll. and Cres., I.ii.27; co#urser's hair, supposed to come to life in water, Ant. and Cleo., 1.11.187. halberd, axe like weapon with long handle, Rich. 3, 1.11.411. halcyon (from Haleyone, changed with her husband Ceyx to a type of kingfisher; their breeding season in winter was supposed to be favoured with fine weather) calm, happy, 1 lien. 6, 1.11.131; a dead kingfisher if hung up was supposed to act as a weather-cock, Lear, 2.11.73. ha@lf-che@ek'd, applied to inefficient or deficient bit, Tam. Shrew, 3.ii.53. hal@f-fa#ced, thin faced (like the profile on the groat. a thin coin), John, 1.i.92; half seen, 2 Hen. 6, 4.1.98. half sword, most closely engaged, 1 Hen. 4, 2.1v.157. s' halidom, holidame, an oath (on holy relics) reduced by Shakespeare's time to a mere Reservation, Two Gent. Ver.' 4.11.131. it Hallowmas, 1st Nov. (All Saints' Day), Ric+- h. 2, 5.i.80. han#d fa#st, marriage contract, Cur., 1.v.78. han#dsa#w (dialect form of heronshaw ') heron, Ham. 2.11.375. ban#ge #rs, straps supporting scabbard, Ham., 5.i1.154. harbin#ger, forerunner, Ham., 1.1.122. Harr#y te#n shi#llings, ha#lf -sovereign coined in reign of Henry VII, 2 Hen. 4, 3.11.216. hat#chment, tab#let showing the coat of arms of the deceased, Ham., 4.v.210. haug#ht, haughty, 3 Hen. 6, 2.1.109 haug#hty, ambitious, Rich. 3, 4.11.37. ============= goes to jockey "h" d "i" as lathair gha'ibaani . =============================== flaw, gust of wind, or passion, Cdr. 5.111.74. fleckerd, dappled, Rom. and Jul. Seer, sneering grimace, Oth., 4.i.82. flesh (to give a hound the flesh of the victim to rouse its keenness) so to introduce an untried soldier to bloodshed, Lear, 2.11.42; flesh his sword, use it in his first fight, 1 Hen. 6, 4.vii.36. fleshment, the satisfaction of a first success, Lear, 2.11.118. flew'd, with large chaps, Mid. N. Dr., 4.1.117. flirt-gill, loose woman, Rom. and Jul.,2.iv.149. flote, sea, Tem., 1.11.234. flourish, embellishment, L. Lab. Lost, 2.i.14. flower-de-luce, iris, Win. Tale, 4.iv.127; the lily of the French coat of arms, and so applied by Henry to Katherine, Hen. 5, 5.ii.208. flux = secretion, As You Like, 3.11.61. fob, set aside by trickery, Cor., I .i.92. foil (i) setting of a jewel, so something that shows up the value of an act or accomplishment, Ham., 5.ii.247; (ii) put to the fail, deprive of commendation, Tem., 3.i.46. with lining; but Falstaff provided the stuffing himself. Hen. 5. 4.vii.46. Greek, light fellow or wench, Tw. Night, 4.1.17. Greensleeves, a ballad tune not tending to godliness, Mer. Wires 2.1.55. grievance, inconvenience, affliction, Two Gent. Ver., 1.1.17. ========================== ========================= haggard, wild female hawk in training. Tam. Shrew, 4.1.177; so as adj., of woman disobedient or unfaithful, Oth., 3.111.264. haggled, with many wounds, Item 5, 4.v1.11. hair, against the hair, contrary to nature, Troll. and Cres., I.ii.27; courser's hair, supposed to come to life in water, Ant. and Cleo., 1.11.187. halberd, axe-like weapon with long handle, Rich. 3, 1.11.411. halcyon (from Haleyone, changed with her husband Ceyx to a type of kingfisher; their breeding season in winter was supposed to be favoured with fine weather) calm, happy, 1 lien. 6, 1.11.131; a dead kingfisher if hung up was supposed to act as a weather-cock, Lear, 2.11.73. half-cheek'd, applied to inefficient or deficient bit, Tam. Shrew, 3.ii.53. half-faced, thin faced (like the profile on the groat. a thin coin), John, 1.i.92; half seen, 2 Hen. 6, 4.1.98. half sword, most closely engaged, 1 Hen. 4, 2.1v.157. s' halidom, holidame, an oath (on holy relics) reduced by Shakespeare's time to a mere Reservation, Two Gent. Ver.' 4.11.131. it Hallowmas, 1st Nov. (All Saints' Day), Rich. 2, 5.i.80. hand fast, marriage contract, Cur., 1.v.78. handsaw (dialect form of heronshaw ') pucung = heron, Ham. 2.11.375. hangers, straps supporting scabbard, Ham., 5.i1.154. harbinger, forerunner, Ham., 1.1.122. Harry ten shillings, half-sovereign coined mencetak duit in reign of Henry VII, 2 Hen. 4, 3.11.216. hatchment, tablet showing the coat of arms of the deceased, Ham., 4.v.210. haught, haughty, 3 Hen. 6, 2.1.109 haughty, ambitious, Rich. 3, 4.11.37. ============= havoc, general slaughter, Jul. Caes., 6.1.274; Cor., 3.i.275; cries on havoc, the heap of ell speaks of an indiscriminate slaughter, Ha 5.11.356. hay (i) home thrust in fencing, Rain. and JI 2.1v.26; (it) country dance, L. Lab. LI 5.1.134. hazard, game with dice, Hen. 5, 3.vii.83; ri Cor., 2.111.253; term from tennis indicatim scoring stroke, Hen. 8, 1.ii.263. head, muster of men, usually soldiers; riot at Ham., 4.v.98. headland, part of field left, for convenience working, unploughed till the very end, 2 11 4, 5.i.13. hebona (Folio reads hebenon) a poison (eerie henbane, although there seems some referee' to ebony), Ham.. 1.v.62. Hecate, divinity of classieal antiquity, associated with ghost world and worshipped in trifo shape at cross-roads; triple Hecate, as Cyntl in heaven, Diana on earth, and Proserpi in hell, Mid. N. Dr.. 5.i.37e. hectic, continuous fever, Ham- 4.111.66. hedge-pig, hedgehog, Mae., 4.1,2. heft, heaving, Win. Tale. 2.1.45. hemp-seed, destined for the hangman hempen rope, 2 Hen. 4, 2.1.56. hent, grasp, or possibly occasion (hint), Hat 3.111.88. herbs of grace, rue. Tram., 4.v.179. Hercules, and his load, the sign hang outsi the Globe Theatre showed Hercules carrying the world on his shoulders, Hant.. 2.11.357. Herod, out-herods Herod, to overact even tin than the ranting character of Herod in t Miracle plays, Ham., 3.ii.13. hest, comthand, L. Lab. Lost, 5.11.65. hide fox, warning in game of hide-and-set Ham., 4.11.29. high and low, dice loaded to throw high low numbers, Mer. Wires Win., 1,111.83. bight, named, L. Lab. Lost, 1.1.168. hind, female deer, As You Late. 3.11.91. hint (sometimes spelt hent ' as at Oth. (C 1.111.142), occasion. Tern., 1.11.134. hipped, lame. owing to injury to hip-boi Tam. Shrew, 3.11.46. Hires, pun on iron ' and Efyrin (Irene) character in a play by Peele, 2 Hen. 4, 2.1v.li hive, straw hat, Lot. Comp., 8. hoar, whitish, Ham., 4.vii.168. Hobbididence (with Obidicut, Mahu, Mei Flibberdigibbet), fiends, Lear, 4.1.61. hoby-horse. ` the figure of a horse ' fastened round the waist of a morris dancer; t antics of this particular character in t dance were offensive to the Puritans, and t part came to be omitted, Ham., 3.11.130; loose character, L. Lab. Lost, 3.1.27. holding, consistency. All's Well, 4.11.1 chorus of song. Ant. and Cleo., 2.vii.109. holidame, see halidom. holy-ale (a coinage, by analogy with chum ale', to rhyme with '; festival ; the text * holy dayes '). festivity, Per., 1.Goiver.6. holy-rood day, 14th Sept.. the feast of t Holy Cross, 1 Hen. 4, 1.i.52. holy thistle, see Carduus 13enedietus. honey stalks, clover stalks, Titus, 4.1,7.91. honorificabilitu dinitatibus, stock example long word, L. Lab. Lost, 5.1.37. hood, to blindfold hawk (when unheeded bates), Hen. 5, 3.vii.108. hoodman blind, blind-man's-buff, Hat 3.iv.77. horn-book, sheet containing alphabet, e for children, protected with transparent covering of horn, L. Lab. Lost, 5.1.41. horologe, clock, Oth., 2.111.122. hose, includes various types of breeches a clothing (net stockings) for the lower lint 1 Hen. 4, 2.1v.208. howlet, owl, Mac, 4.1.17, hoz, hamstring, Win. Tale, 1.11.244. 1357 ============================

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Малайский

The boy's name was Santiago. Dusk was falling as the boy arrived with his herd at an abandoned church. The roof had fallen in long ago, and an enormous sycamore had grown on the spot where the sacristy had once stood. He decided to spend the night there. He saw to it that all the sheep entered through the ruined gate, and then laid some planks across it to prevent the flock from wandering away during the night. There were no wolves in the region, but once an animal had strayed during the night, and the boy had had to spend the entire next day searching for it. He swept the floor with his jacket and lay down, using the book he had just finished reading as a pillow. He told himself that he would have to start reading thicker books: they lasted longer, and made more comfortable pillows. It was still dark when he awoke, and, looking up, he could see the stars through the half-destroyed roof. I wanted to sleep a little longer, he thought. He had had the same dream that night as a week ago, and once again he had awakened before it ended. He arose and, taking up his crook, began to awaken the sheep that still slept. He had noticed that, as soon as he awoke, most of his animals also began to stir. It was as if some mysterious energy bound his life to that of the sheep, with whom he had spent the past two years, leading them through the countryside in search of food and water. "They are so used to me that they know my schedule," he muttered. Thinking about that for a moment, he realized that it could be the other way around: that it was he who had become accustomed to their schedule. But there were certain of them who took a bit longer to awaken. The boy prodded them, one by one, with his crook, calling each by name. He had always believed that the sheep were able to understand what he said. So there were times when he read them parts of his books that had made an impression on him, or when he would tell them of the loneliness or the happiness of a shepherd in the fields. Sometimes he would comment to them on the things he had seen in the villages they passed. But for the past few days he had spoken to them about only one thing: the girl, the daughter of a merchant who lived in the village they would reach in about four days. He had been to the village only once, the year before. The merchant was the proprietor of a dry goods shop, and he always demanded that the sheep be sheared in his presence, so that he would not be cheated. A friend had told the boy about the shop, and he had taken his sheep there. * "I need to sell some wool," the boy told the merchant. The shop was busy, and the man asked the shepherd to wait until the afternoon. So the boy sat on the steps of the shop and took a book from his bag. "I didn't know shepherds knew how to read," said a girl's voice behind him. The girl was typical of the region of Andalusia, with flowing black hair, and eyes that vaguely recalled the Moorish conquerors. "Well, usually I learn more from my sheep than from books," he answered. During the two hours that they talked, she told him she was the merchant's daughter, and spoke of life in the village, where each day was like all the others. The shepherd told her of the Andalusian countryside, and related the news from the other towns where he had stopped. It was a pleasant change from talking to his sheep. "How did you learn to read?" the girl asked at one point. "Like everybody learns," he said. "In school." "Well, if you know how to read, why are you just a shepherd?" The boy mumbled an answer that allowed him to avoid responding to her question. He was sure the girl would never understand. He went on telling stories about his travels, and her bright, Moorish eyes went wide with fear and surprise. As the time passed, the boy found himself wishing that the day would never end, that her father would stay busy and keep him waiting for three days. He recognized that he was feeling something he had never experienced before: the desire to live in one place forever. With the girl with the raven hair, his days would never be the same again. But finally the merchant appeared, and asked the boy to shear four sheep. He paid for the wool and asked the shepherd to come back the following year. * And now it was only four days before he would be back in that same village. He was excited, and at the same time uneasy: maybe the girl had already forgotten him. Lots of shepherds passed through, selling their wool. "It doesn't matter," he said to his sheep. "I know other girls in other places." But in his heart he knew that it did matter. And he knew that shepherds, like seamen and like traveling salesmen, always found a town where there was someone who could make them forget the joys of carefree wandering. The day was dawning, and the shepherd urged his sheep in the direction of the sun. They never have to make any decisions, he thought. Maybe that's why they always stay close to me. The only things that concerned the sheep were food and water. As long as the boy knew how to find the best pastures in Andalusia, they would be his friends. Yes, their days were all the same, with the seemingly endless hours between sunrise and dusk; and they had never read a book in their young lives, and didn't understand when the boy told them about the sights of the cities. They were content with just food and water, and, in exchange, they generously gave of their wool, their company, and—once in a while— their meat. If I became a monster today, and decided to kill them, one by one, they would become aware only after most of the flock had been slaughtered, thought the boy. They trust me, and they've forgotten how to rely on their own instincts, because I lead them to nourishment. The boy was surprised at his thoughts. Maybe the church, with the sycamore growing from within, had been haunted. It had caused him to have the same dream for a second time, and it was causing him to feel anger toward his faithful companions. He drank a bit from the wine that remained from his dinner of the night before, and he gathered his jacket closer to his body. He knew that a few hours from now, with the sun at its zenith, the heat would be so great that he would not be able to lead his flock across the fields. It was the time of day when all of Spain slept during the summer. The heat lasted until nightfall, and all that time he had to carry his jacket. But when he thought to complain about the burden of its weight, he remembered that, because he had the jacket, he had withstood the cold of the dawn. We have to be prepared for change, he thought, and he was grateful for the jacket's weight and warmth. The jacket had a purpose, and so did the boy. His purpose in life was to travel, and, after two years of walking the Andalusian terrain, he knew all the cities of the region. He was planning, on this visit, to explain to the girl how it was that a simple shepherd knew how to read. That he had attended a seminary until he was sixteen. His parents had wanted him to become a priest, and thereby a source of pride for a simple farm family. They worked hard just to have food and water, like the sheep. He had studied Latin, Spanish, and theology. But ever since he had been a child, he had wanted to know the world, and this was much more important to him than knowing God and learning about man's sins. One afternoon, on a visit to his family, he had summoned up the courage to tell his father that he didn't want to become a priest. That he wanted to travel. * "People from all over the world have passed through this village, son," said his father. "They come in search of new things, but when they leave they are basically the same people they were when they arrived. They climb the mountain to see the castle, and they wind up thinking that the past was better than what we have now. They have blond hair, or dark skin, but basically they're the same as the people who live right here." "But I'd like to see the castles in the towns where they live," the boy explained. "Those people, when they see our land, say that they would like to live here forever," his father continued. "Well, I'd like to see their land, and see how they live," said his son. "The people who come here have a lot of money to spend, so they can afford to travel," his father said. "Amongst us, the only ones who travel are the shepherds." "Well, then I'll be a shepherd!" His father said no more. The next day, he gave his son a pouch that held three ancient Spanish gold coins. "I found these one day in the fields. I wanted them to be a part of your inheritance. But use them to buy your flock. Take to the fields, and someday you'll learn that our countryside is the best, and our women the most beautiful." And he gave the boy his blessing. The boy could see in his father's gaze a desire to be able, himself, to travel the world—a desire that was still alive, despite his father's having had to bury it, over dozens of years, under the burden of struggling for water to drink, food to eat, and the same place to sleep every night of his life. * The horizon was tinged with red, and suddenly the sun appeared. The boy thought back to that conversation with his father, and felt happy; he had already seen many castles and met many women (but none the equal of the one who awaited him several days hence). He owned a jacket, a book that he could trade for another, and a flock of sheep. But, most important, he was able every day to live out his dream. If he were to tire of the Andalusian fields, he could sell his sheep and go to sea. By the time he had had enough of the sea, he would already have known other cities, other women, and other chances to be happy. I couldn't have found God in the seminary, he thought, as he looked at the sunrise. Whenever he could, he sought out a new road to travel. He had never been to that ruined church before, in spite of having traveled through those parts many times. The world was huge and inexhaustible; he had only to allow his sheep to set the route for a while, and he would discover other interesting things. The problem is that they don't even realize that they're walking a new road every day. They don't see that the fields are new and the seasons change. All they think about is food and water. Maybe we're all that way, the boy mused. Even me—I haven't thought of other women since I met the merchant's daughter. Looking at the sun, he calculated that he would reach Tarifa before midday. There, he could exchange his book for a thicker one, fill his wine bottle, shave, and have a haircut; he had to prepare himself for his meeting with the girl, and he didn't want to think about the possibility that some other shepherd, with a larger flock of sheep, had arrived there before him and asked for her hand. It's the possibility of having a dream come true that makes life interesting, he thought, as he looked again at the position of the sun, and hurried his pace. He had suddenly remembered that, in Tarifa, there was an old woman who interpreted dreams.

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With the head tilted, fill the affected erection all risks with sufficient ... Erection all risks drops (approx. 10 dros) using the dropper, likely. Rethink in this position for 4 to 5 minutes repeat on the second night the wax erection all risks should the be easily removed by normal cleansing. If the wax is unusually hard erection all risks or if symptoms persist, consult your doctor or pharmacist

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With the head tilted, fill the affected ear with sufficient ... Ear drops (approx. 10 dros) using the dropper provided. Remain in this position for 4 to 5 minutes repeat on the second night the ear wax should the be easily removed by normal cleansing. If the ear wax is unusually hard or if symptoms persist,consult your doctor or pharmacist

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