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Engelska

He is my love

Nepali

Senast uppdaterad: 2021-02-09
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Referens: Anonym

Engelska

he is a bo

Nepali

गुगल अनुवादक

Senast uppdaterad: 2014-09-15
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Engelska

He is not human

Nepali

viva

Senast uppdaterad: 2017-01-29
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Engelska

he is hard working man

Nepali

jehendar

Senast uppdaterad: 2017-08-14
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Engelska

i think he is murderer

Nepali

Senast uppdaterad: 2020-05-23
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Engelska

I wish my husband talk to me even though he is bus

Nepali

मलाई लाग्यो कि तपाईं व्यस्त हुनुहुन्छ

Senast uppdaterad: 2020-09-07
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Engelska

He is also very hardworking and works tirelessy from morning till evening

Nepali

उहाँ धेरै दयालु र मायालु बुबा हुनुहु

Senast uppdaterad: 2019-10-06
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Engelska

he is subject to have as same responsibility as a bailee under gratuitous bailment.

Nepali

उसको अनावश्यक जमानत अन्तर्गत अबेली जत्तिकै जिम्मेवार हुन आउँछ।

Senast uppdaterad: 2020-09-22
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Engelska

Write to the Prime Minister for a few days leave informing him that he is unwell

Nepali

आफू अस्वस्थ भएको जानकारी दिएर केही दिन को विदा को निम्ति पधानअयलापत्र लख

Senast uppdaterad: 2020-08-17
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Engelska

he knows what is the right thing for me to do, he is the man who takes my every decision in a perfect way.

Nepali

उसलाई थाहा छ मेरो लागि के सही कुरा हो, ऊ एक त्यस्तो मानिस हो जसले मेरो निर्णयलाई एक सही तरीकाले लिन्छ।

Senast uppdaterad: 2019-11-04
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Engelska

Now my dad, he is, well let's just say the best dad you could ever have. He is very smart

Nepali

अब मेरो बुवा, उहाँ हुनुहुन्छ, ठीक छ तपाईले भन्न सक्ने सबै भन्दा राम्रो बुबा। ऊ धेरै चलाख छ

Senast uppdaterad: 2019-11-04
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Engelska

My dad is my superhero right from the very start he always brings me lot of joy he is my super star my dad works for me morning till night he loves me every time whether i m good or bad i really love him deep within my heart my dad is my superhero right from the start

Nepali

मेरो पिता मेरो सुपर हीरो धेरै शुरुवात बाट सही छ कि उहाँले सधैं मलाई धेरै आनन्द ल्याउनुहुन्छ उहाँ मेरो सुपर स्टार मेरो पिताजीले मेरो लागि बिहान सम्म काम गर्दछ उहाँले मलाई हरेक पटक प्रेम गर्नुहुन्छ कि मलाई राम्रो छ वा खराब मलाई साँच्चै मेरो हृदय भित्र गहिरो प्रेम गर्दछ मेरो पिता मेरो सुपर हीरो सुरूबाट सही छ

Senast uppdaterad: 2018-04-15
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Engelska

my name is agraj bhagat shrestha i am 12 years old i am in grade 6 i like black colour my fathers name is jyoti bhagat shrestha he is 50 years old he is a officer my mothers name is ramila shrestha she is 45 years old she is a house wife my ninis name is mahalaxmi shrestha she stays at home my sisters name is garima shrestha she is 18 years old she has just finish her 12 exam my fathers likes to live in hill places but my mother likes to live in tarai.

Nepali

मेरो नाम अग्रजभाग श्रेष्ठ हो। म १२ बर्षको उमेरमा ग्रेड 6 मा हुँ। म कालो रंग जस्तो चाहन्छु मेरा बुबाहरूको नाम ज्योतिभाग श्रेष्ठ हो उहाँ 50० वर्षको उमेरको हुनुहुन्छ। उहाँ अफिसर हुनुहुन्छ मेरी आमाको नाम रमिला श्रेष्ठ उनी 45 45 बर्षकी उमेरकी छिन् घरकी श्रीमती मेरो निनिसको नाम महालक्ष्मी श्रेष्ठ उनी घरमा बस्छिन् मेरी बहिनीहरूको नाम गरिमा श्रेष्ठ उनी १ 18 वर्षकी छ भर्खर मात्र उनले १२ परीक्षा उत्तीर्ण गरिसकेकी छिन

Senast uppdaterad: 2020-06-03
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Engelska

You can leave the enemy where he is. Go nearly to the gold at the bottom right. Do not pick it up yet, but go up and get the two nuggets at the top left. Then you can come back down to where you were and complete the level.

Nepali

तपाईँले शत्रुलाई उ भएको ठाउँमा छोड्न सक्नुहुन्छ । पुछारको दायाँ भएको सुनको नजिक जानुहोस् । यसलाई अहिले नटिप्नुहोस् ।, तर माथि जानुहोस् र माथिल्लो बायाँका दुइ सुन टुक्रा प्राप्त गर्नुहोस् । त्यसपछि तपाईँ पहिला भएको ठाउँमा आएर स्तर समाप्त गर्न सक्नुहुन्छ ।

Senast uppdaterad: 2011-10-23
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Engelska

Translator’s Note One of the characteristics of Foucault’s language is his repeated use of certain key words. Many of these present no difficulty to the translator. Others, however, have no normal equivalent. In such cases, it is generally preferable to use a single unusual word rather than a number of familiar ones. When Foucault speaks of la clinique, he is thinking of both clinical medicine and the teaching hospital. So if one wishes to retain the unity of the concept, one is obliged to use the rather odd-sounding ‘clinic’. Similarly, I have used the unusual ‘gaze’ for the common ‘regard’, except in the book’s subtitle, where I have made a concession to the unprepared reader. ix Preface This book is about space, about language, and about death; it is about the act of seeing, the gaze. Towards the middle of the eighteenth century, Pomme treated and cured a hysteric by making her take ‘baths, ten or twelve hours a day, for ten whole months’. At the end of this treatment for the desiccation of the nervous system and the heat that sustained it, Pomme saw ‘membranous tissues like pieces of damp parchment …peel away with some slight discomfort, and these were passed daily with the urine; the right ureter also peeled away and came out whole in the same way’. The same thing occurred with the intestines, which at another stage, ‘peeled off their internal tunics, which we saw emerge from the rectum. The oesophagus, the arterial trachea, and the tongue also peeled in due course; and the patient had rejected different pieces either by vomiting or by expectoration’ [1]. Less than a hundred years later, this is how a doctor observed an anatomical lesion of the brain and its enveloping membranes, die socalled ‘false membranes’ frequently found on patients suffering from ‘chronic meningitis:’ Their outer surface, which is next to the arachnoidian layer of the dura mater, adheres to this layer, sometimes very lightly, when they can be separated easily, sometimes very firmly and tightly, in which case it can be very difficult to detach them. Their internal surface is only contiguous with the arachnoid, and is in no way joined to it…. The false membranes are often transparent, especially when they are very thin; but usually they are white, grey, or red in x PREFACE colour, and occasionally, yellow, brown, or black. This matter often displays different shades in different parts of the same membrane. The thickness of these accidental productions varies greatly; sometimes they are so tenuous that they might be compared to a spider’s web…. The organization of the false membranes also displays a great many differences: the thin ones are buffy, like the albuminous skins of eggs, and have no distinctive structure of their own. Others, on one of their sides, often display traces of blood vessels crossing over one another in different directions and injected. They can often be reduced to layers placed one upon another, between which discoloured blood clots are frequently interposed [2]. Between Pomme, who carried the old myths of nervous pathology to their ultimate form, and Bayle, who described the encephalic lesions of general paralysis for an era from which we have not yet emerged, the difference is both tiny and total. For us, it is total, because each of Bayle’s words, with its qualitative precision, directs our gaze into a world of constant visibility, while Pomme, lacking any perceptual base, speaks to us in the language of fantasy. But by what fundamental experience can we establish such an obvious difference below the level of our certainties, in that region from which they emerge? How can we be sure that an eighteenth-century doctor did not see what he saw, but that it needed several decades before the fantastic figures were dissipated to reveal, in the space they vacated, the shapes of things as they really are? What occurred was not a ‘psychoanalysis’ of medical knowledge, nor any more or less spontaneous break with imaginary investments; ‘positive’ medicine is not a medicine that has made an ‘objectal’ choice in favour of objectivity itself. Not all the powers of a visionary space through which doctors and patients, physiologists and practitioners communicated (stretched and twisted nerves, burning dryness, hardened or burnt organs, the new birth of the body in the beneficent element of cool waters) have disappeared; it is, rather, as if they had been displaced, enclosed within the singularity of the patient, in that region of ‘subjective symptoms’ that—for the doctor—defines not the mode of knowledge, but the world of objects to be known. Far from being broken, the fantasy link between knowledge and pain is reinforced by a more complex means than the mere permeability of the imagination; the presence of disease in the body, with its tensions PREFACE xi and its burnings, the silent world of the entrails, the whole dark underside of the body lined with endless unseeing dreams, are challenged as to their objectivity by the reductive discourse of the doctor, as well as established as multiple objects meeting his positive gaze. The figures of pain are not conjured away by means of a body of neutralized knowledge; they have been redistributed in the space in which bodies and eyes meet. What has changed is the silent configuration in which language finds support: the relation of situation and attitude to what is speaking and what is spoken about. From what moment, from what semantic or syntactical change, can one recognize that language has turned into rational discourse? What sharp line divides a description that depicts membranes as being like ‘damp parchment’ from that other equally qualitative, equally metaphorical description of them laid out over the tunic of the brain, like a film of egg whites? Do Bayle’s ‘white’ and ‘red’ membranes possess greater value, solidity, and objectivity—in terms of scientific discourse—than the horny scales described by the doctors of the eighteenth century? A rather more meticulous gaze, a more measured verbal tread with a more secure footing upon things, a more delicate, though sometimes rather confused choice of adjective—are these not merely the proliferation, in medical language, of a style which, since the days of galenic medicine, has extended whole regions of description around the greyness of things and their shapes? In order to determine the moment at which the mutation in discourse took place, we must look beyond its thematic content or its logical modalities to the region where ‘things’ and ‘words’ have not yet been separated, and where—at the most fundamental level of language—seeing and saying are still one. We must re-examine the original distribution of the visible and invisible insofar as it is linked with the division between what is stated and what remains unsaid: thus the articulation of medical language and its object will appear as a single figure. But if one poses no retrospective question, there can be no priority; only the spoken structure of the perceived—that full space in the hollow of which language assumes volume and size—may be brought up into the indifferent light of day. We must place ourselves, and remain once and for all, at the level of the fundamental spatialization and verbalization of the pathological, where the loquacious gaze with which the xii PREFACE doctor observes the poisonous heart of things is born and communes with itself. Modern medicine has fixed its own date of birth as being in the last years of the eighteenth century. Reflecting on its situation, it identifies the origin of its positivity with a return—over and above all theory—to the modest but effecting level of the perceived. In fact, this supposed empiricism is not based on a rediscovery of the absolute values of the visible, nor on the predetermined rejection of systems and all their chimeras, but on a reorganization of that manifest and secret space that opened up when a millennial gaze paused over men’s sufferings. Nonetheless the rejuvenation of medical perception, the way colours and things came to life under the illuminating gaze of the first clinicians is no mere myth. At the beginning of the nineteenth century, doctors described what for centuries had remained below the threshold of the visible and the expressible, but this did not mean that, after over-indulging in speculation, they had begun to perceive once again, or that they listened to reason rather than to imagination; it meant that the relation between the visible and invisible—which is necessary to all concrete knowledge—changed its structure, revealing through gaze and language what had previously been below and beyond their domain. A new alliance was forged between words and things, enabling one to see and to say. Sometimes, indeed, the discourse was so completely ‘naive’ that it seems to belong to a more archaic level of rationality, as if it involved a return to the clear, innocent gaze of some earlier, golden age. In 1764, J.F.Meckel set out to study the alterations brought about in the brain by certain disorders (apoplexy, mania, phthisis); he used the rational method of weighing equal volumes and comparing them to determine which parts of the brain had been de-hydrated, which parts had been swollen, and by which diseases. Modern medicine has made hardly any use of this research. Brain pathology achieved its ‘positive’ form when Bichat, and above all Récamier and Lallemand, used the celebrated ‘hammer, with a broad, thin end. If one proceeds with light taps, no concussion liable to cause disorders can result as the skull is full. It is better to begin from the rear, because, when only the occipital has to be broken, it is often so mobile that one misses one’s aim…. In the case of very young children, the bones are too supple to be broken and too thin to be PREFACE xiii sawn; they have to be cut with strong scissors’ [3]. The fruit is then opened up. From under the meticulously parted shell, a soft, greyish mass appears, wrapped in viscous, veined skins: a delicate, dingylooking pulp within which—freed at last and exposed at last to the light of day—shines the seat of knowledge. The antisanal skill of the brain-breaker has replaced the scientific precision of the scales, and yet our science since Bichat identifies with the former; the precise, but immeasurable gesture that opens up the plenitude of concrete things, combined with the delicate network of their properties to the gaze, has produced a more scientific objectivity for us than instrumental arbitrations of quantity. Medical rationality plunges into the marvelous density of perception, offering the grain of things as the first face of truth, with their colours, their spots, their hardness, their adherence. The breadth of the experiment seems to be identified with the domain of the careful gaze, and of an empirical vigilance receptive only to the evidence of visible contents. The eye becomes the depositary and source of clarity; it has the power to bring a truth to light that it receives only to the extent that it has brought it to light; as it opens, the eye first opens the truth: a flexion that marks the transition from the world of classical clarity—from the ‘enlightenment’—to the nineteenth century. For Descartes and Malebranche, to see was to perceive (even in the most concrete kinds of experience, such as Descartes’s practice of anatomy, or Malebranche’s microscopic observations); but, without stripping perception of its sensitive body, it was a matter of rendering it transparent for the exercise of the mind: light, anterior to every gaze, was the element of ideality—the unassignable place of origin where things were adequate to their essence—and the form by which things reached it through the geometry of bodies; according to them, the act of seeing, having attained perfection, was absorbed back into the unbending, unending figure of light. At the end of the eighteenth century, however, seeing consists in leaving to experience its greatest corporal opacity; the solidity, the obscurity, the density of things closed in upon themselves, have powers of truth that they owe not to light, but to the slowness of the gaze that passes over them, around them, and gradually into them, bringing them nothing more than its own light. The residence of truth in the dark centre of things is linked, paradoxically, to this sovereign power of the empirical gaze that turns their darkness into xiv PREFACE light. All light has passed over into the thin flame of the eye, which now flickers around solid objects and, in so doing, establishes their place and form. Rational discourse is based less on the geometry of light than on the insistent, impenetrable density of the object, for prior to all knowledge, the source, the domain, and the boundaries of experience can be found in its dark presence. The gaze is passively linked to the primary passivity that dedicates it to the endless task of absorbing experience in its entirety, and of mastering it. The task lay with this language of things, and perhaps with it alone, to authorize a knowledge of the individual that was not simply of a historic or aesthetic order. That the definition of the individual should be an endless labour was no longer an obstacle to an experience, which, by accepting its own limits, extended its task into the infinite. By acquiring the status of object, its particular quality, its impalpable colour, its unique, transitory form took on weight and solidity. No light could now dissolve them in ideal truths; but the gaze directed upon them would, in turn, awaken them and make them stand out against a background of objectivity. The gaze is no longer reductive, it is, rather, that which establishes the individual in his irreducible quality. And thus it becomes possible to organize a rational language around it. The object of discourse may equally well be a subject, without the figures of objectivity being in any way altered. It is this formal reorganization, in depth, rather than the abandonment of theories and old systems, that made clinical experience possible; it lifted the old Aristotelian prohibition: one could at last hold a scientifically structured discourse about an individual. Our contemporaries see in this accession to the individual the establishment of a ‘unique dialogue’, the most concentrated formulation of an old medical humanism, as old as man’s compassion. The mindless phenomenologies of understanding mingle the sand of their conceptual desert with this half-baked notion; the feebly eroticized vocabulary of Encounter’ and of the ‘doctor/patient relationship’ (le couple médecin-malade) exhausts itself in trying to communicate the pale powers of matrimonial fantasies to so much non-thought Clinical experience—that opening up of the concrete individual, for the first time in Western history, to the language of rationality, that major event in the relationship of man to himself and of language to things—was soon taken as a simple, PREFACE xv unconceptualized confrontation of a gaze and a face, or a glance and a silent body; a son of contact prior to all discourse, free of the burdens of language, by which two living individuals are ‘trapped’ in a common, but non-reciprocal situation. Recently, in the interests of an open market, so-called ‘liberal’ medicine has revived the old rights of a clinic understood as a special contract, a tacit pact made between one man and another. This patient gaze has even been attributed with the power of assuming—with the calculated addition of reasoning (neither too much nor too little)—the general form of all scientific observation: In order to be able to offer each of our patients a course of treatment perfectly adapted to his illness and to himself, we try to obtain a complete, objective idea of his case; we gather together in a file of his own all the information we have about him. We ‘observe’ him in the same way that we observe the stars or a laboratory experiment [4]. Miracles are not so easy to come by: the mutation that made it possible—and which continues to do so every day—for the patient’s ‘bed’ to become a field of scientific investigation and discourse is not the sudden explosive mixture of an old practice and an even older logic, or that of a body of knowledge and some strange, sensorial element of ‘touch’, ‘glance’, or ‘flair’. Medicine made its appearance as a clinical science in conditions which define, together with its historical possibility, the domain of its experience and the structure of its rationality. They form its concrete a priori, which it is now possible to uncover, perhaps because a new experience of disease is coming into being that will make possible a historical and critical understanding of the old experience. A detour is necessary here if we are to lay the foundations of our discourse on the birth of the clinic. It is a strange discourse, I admit, since it will be based neither on the present consciousness of clinicians, nor even on a repetition of what they once might have said. It may well be that we belong to an age of criticism whose lack of a primary philosophy reminds us at every moment of its reign and its fatality: an age of intelligence that keeps us irremediably at a distance from an original language. For Kant, the possibility and necessity of a critique were linked, through certain scientific contents, to the fact that there is such a thing as knowledge. In our time—and Nietzsche xvi PREFACE the philologist testifies to it—they are linked to the fact that language exists and that, in the innumerable words spoken by men—whether they are reasonable or senseless, demonstrative or poetic—a meaning has taken shape that hangs over us, leading us forward in our blindness, but awaiting in the darkness for us to attain awareness before emerging into the light of day and speaking. We are doomed historically to history, to the patient construction of discourses about discourses, and to the task of hearing what has already been said. But is it inevitable that we should know of no other function for speech (parole) than that of commentary? Commentary questions discourse as to what it says and intended to say; it tries to uncover that deeper meaning of speech that enables it to achieve an identity with itself, supposedly nearer to its essential truth; in other words, in stating what has been said, one has to re-state what has never been said. In this activity known as commentary which tries to transmit an old, unyielding discourse seemingly silent to itself, into another, more prolix discourse that is both more archaic and more contemporary—is concealed a strange attitude towards language: to comment is to admit by definition an excess of the signified over the signifier; a necessary, unformulated remainder of thought that language has left in the shade—a remainder that is the very essence of that thought, driven outside its secret—but to comment also presupposes that this unspoken element slumbers within speech (parole), and that, by a super-abundance proper to the signifier, one may, in questioning it, give voice to a content that was not explicitly signified. By opening up the possibility of commentary, this double plethora dooms us to an endless task that nothing can limit: there is always a certain amount of signified remaining that must be allowed to speak, while the signifier is always offered to us in an abundance that questions us, in spite of ourselves, as to what it ‘means’ (veut dire). Signifier and signified thus assume a substantial autonomy that accords the treasure of a virtual signification to each of them separately; one may even exist without the other, and begin to speak of itself: commentary resi

Nepali

Senast uppdaterad: 2021-02-28
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Engelska

He can smell his master from far off. He is a four footed animal. Dogs are of many kinds: Bull dogs, Grey hounds, Blood hounds, lap dogs etc…It has sharp teeth’s. He has four legs, a tail and straight ears. He is very useful in catching thieves and criminals by its powerful sense of hearing and smelling. Each dog has a different nose print. People love him for its noble service.

Nepali

ऊ टाढाबाट उसको मालिकको गन्ध लिन सक्छ। ऊ चार खुट्टा भएको जनावर हो। कुकुरहरु धेरै प्रकारका हुन्छन्: बैल कुकुर, खरानी शिकारी, रगत का शिकार, गोद कुकुरहरु आदि… यसको तीखा दाँत छन्। उसको चार खुट्टा, पुच्छर र सिधा कानहरू छन्। ऊ चोरहरु र अपराधीहरुलाई समात्न र यसको सुन्न र गन्धको शक्तिशाली बोधबाट उपयोगी छ। प्रत्येक कुकुरको नाक प्रिन्ट फरक हुन्छ। मानिसहरु यसको महान सेवा को लागी उहाँलाई माया गर्छन्।

Senast uppdaterad: 2020-12-07
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Engelska

He is known for building the White Stupa at the Miaoying Temple in Beijing. During the reign of Jaya Bhim Dev Malla, he was sent on a project to build a golden stupa in Tibet, where he also initiated into monkhood. From Tibet he was sent further to North China to work in the court of the emperor Kublai Khan, the founder of Yuan dynasty (1279–1368), where he brought the trans Himalayan artistic tradition to China. In his later life, he renounced monkhood and started his family in China. He marr

Nepali

Goo

Senast uppdaterad: 2020-11-10
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Engelska

I reach at my at the fixed timing. I come to school with other friends of mine. We happily enter into the schools with great confidence. We take part in school assembly and then we move into our classrooms. As I enter into my classroom I find quite relaxed. Our Class teacher greets us daily and asks about us. He is quite cool and kind man. He entertains us along with teaching his subject. We learn a lot of things like disciple, self help, confidence and cooperation here. My school has the bes

Nepali

म निश्चित समयमा मेरोमा पुग्छु। म मेरा साथीहरूसँग स्कूल आउँछु। हामी खुशी संग ठूलो विश्वास संग स्कूल मा प्रवेश। हामी स्कूल सम्मेलनमा भाग लिन्छौं र त्यसपछि हामी हाम्रो कक्षाकोठामा जान्छौं। म मेरो कक्षाकोठामा प्रवेश गर्ने बित्तिकै आराम पाएको छु। हाम्रो कक्षा शिक्षक हामीलाई दैनिक बधाई छ र हाम्रो बारेमा सोध्छ। ऊ एकदम राम्रो र दयालु मान्छे हो। उसले हामीलाई आफ्नो विषयको पढाइको साथ मनोरञ्जन पनि दिन्छ। हामी यहाँ धेरै कुरा सिक्न सक्छौं जस्तै शिष्य, स्वयं सहायता

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Essay on Mahatma Gandhi (Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi) On April 20, 2015 By Team Work Category: Famous and Great Personalities of India Mahatma Gandhi Introduction: Gandhiji was one of the greatest Indian of all time. He is called the “Father of the Indian Nation”. His original name was Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi. He was given the title of “Mahatma“, which implies “Great Soul“. People also call him “Bapu” affectionately. Early life: The birth of Mahatma Gandhi took place on 2nd day of October in 1869 at Porbandar (Gujarat). His father, Karamchand Gandhi, was a noble and pious man. Mr. Karamchand was the chief Dewan of the State of Rajkot. His mother, Putlibai, was a simple and religious lady. In his early age, Gandhiji was deeply influenced by the religious and pious behaviour of her mother. Gandhiji received his early education and training from such pious parents. He grew up to be deeply religious, truthful, honest, and fearless from his very boyhood. He was married to Kasturba Gandhi in 1983. The wedding took place according to traditional custom. As a child, he was a brilliant student. He completed his matriculation examination in 1887. After a brief study, he traveled to England to study barrister-in-law. In 1991, he became a barrister and returned back to home country. South Africa: At the age of 24, Mahatma Gandhi went to South Africa as a lawyer. He had spent twenty-one years at South Africa from 1893 to 1914. As a lawyer, he was mainly employed by Indians staying at South Africa. He found that Indians and other dark skinned people were the oppressed section of the society. He himself faced discrimination on several occasions. He was once disallowed to travel on first-class and thrown out of the train. He was moved by the poor condition of Indians and decided to fight against the injustice. In 1894, he formed the Indian Natal Congress to fight for the civil rights of the Indian community in South Africa. While at South Africa, he fought for the civil rights and privileges of the Indians living in South Africa. Throughout his struggle, he taught people to fight for their rights through non-violence. Hence, he made his mark as a great political leader in South Africa. India: He returned to India in 1915. Later, he was the president of Indian National Congress. He protested against the mis-rule of the British Government. He had been associated with several national movements during India’s struggle for independence such as Non-cooperation Movement in 1920, Satyagraha, Quit India Movement in 1942, etc. On several occasions, he was sent to prison. There was wide participation of women in the freedom movements led by Gandhi. Non-cooperation was his great weapon. The Non-cooperation Movement as a non-violent protest against the use of the British made goods by Indians. It was a movement of the masses of India. Salt Satyagraha or Dandi March was a protest against the tax regime of British in India. Gandhiji produced salt at Dandi without paying the salt tax. The Civil Disobediance Movement movement got support of millions of common people. Also read: Causes, Effects and Significance of Civil Disobedience Movement in India In 1942, Gandhi raised the ‘Quit India’ slogan. Gandhiji asked the British Government to “Quit India”. The Quit India Movement was the most powerful movement launched by Gandhi to end the British rule in India. He gave the famous slogan of “Do or die” for the freedom of mother country. Principles: He followed the principles of non-violence, truth and peace throughout his life. He guided his fellow citizens to struggle for freedom, not by using weapons, but by following ahimsa (non-violence), peace (Shanti) and truth (Sayta). He proved that Ahimsa (non-violence) is more powerful than the sword. He adopted the principles of satyagraha in the Indian Independence movements. Gandhian era in Indian History: His remained the most influential leader of India’s freedom movement during the period from 1919 to 1948 and thus the period is called the ‘Gandhian Era’in Indian history. Importance: He is a well-known world personality. He shook off the British imperialism. The British were compelled to quit India. He secured freedom for our country following the principles of truth and non-violence. He was, thus, a saintly leader. Finally, India won its independence on 15th day of August in 1947. Gandhi Jayanti: In India, Gandhi Jayanti is celebrated every-year on the day of his birth-anniversary. It is a national holiday. The world celebrates 2nd October as the International day of non-violence. Death: Unfortunately, the great saint was assassinated by Nathuram Godse on 30th January, 1948. Conclusion: Thus, Mahatma Gandhi was both a saint and a practical leader of his compatriots. He was a simple, pure, unselfish and religious person. He did most of his personal jobs of his own. He fought for the freedom of India through non-violent and peaceful methods. He tried hard to raise the distressed sections of the society. He fought against illiteracy. He dreamt of providing mass employment through Charka and Khaddar. He always felt for the poor and untouchables people. He wanted to abolish untouchability from Indian society. The life and teachings of Mahatma Gandhi were so glorious that people around the world still pay homage to him. We will always remember his in our hearts.

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MERA महात्मा गान्धी मा निबंध

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essay on mera mahatma gandhiMahatma Gandhi From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia "Gandhi" redirects here. For other uses, see Gandhi (disambiguation). Mahatma Mohandas Gandhi The face of Gandhi in old age—smiling, wearing glasses, and with a white sash over his right shoulder Born Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi 2 October 1869 Porbandar State, Kathiawar Agency, British Indian Empire[1] (now in Gujarat, India) Died 30 January 1948 (aged 78) New Delhi, Delhi, India Cause of death Assassination by shooting Resting place Ashes scattered in various rivers Other names Mahatma Gandhi, Bapu, Gandhiji Education barrister-at-law Alma mater Kathiawar High School, Rajkot, Samaldas College, Bhavnagar, University College, London Known for Leadership of Indian independence movement, philosophy of Satyagraha, Ahimsa or nonviolence, pacifism Movement Indian National Congress Spouse(s) Kasturba Gandhi Children Harilal Manilal Ramdas Devdas Parents Karamchand Gandhi (father) Putlibai Gandhi (mother) Signature Mohandas K. Gandhi signature.svg Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi (/ˈɡɑːndi, ˈɡæn-/;[2] Hindustani: [ˈmoːɦənd̪aːs ˈkərəmtʃənd̪ ˈɡaːnd̪ʱi] ( listen); 2 October 1869 – 30 January 1948) was the preeminent leader of the Indian independence movement in British-ruled India. Employing nonviolent civil disobedience, Gandhi led India to independence and inspired movements for civil rights and freedom across the world. The honorific Mahatma (Sanskrit: "high-souled", "venerable")[3]—applied to him first in 1914 in South Africa[4]—is now used worldwide. In India, he is also called Bapu (Gujarati: endearment for "father",[5] "papa"[5][6]) and Gandhiji. He is unofficially called the Father of the Nation.[7][8] Born and raised in a Hindu merchant caste family in coastal Gujarat, western India, and trained in law at the Inner Temple, London, Gandhi first employed nonviolent civil disobedience as an expatriate lawyer in South Africa, in the resident Indian community's struggle for civil rights. After his return to India in 1915, he set about organising peasants, farmers, and urban labourers to protest against excessive land-tax and discrimination. Assuming leadership of the Indian National Congress in 1921, Gandhi led nationwide campaigns for easing poverty, expanding women's rights, building religious and ethnic amity, ending untouchability, but above all for achieving Swaraj or self-rule.

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