Fråga Google

You searched for: an image beneath me (Engelska - Tagalog)

Mänskliga bidrag

Från professionella översättare, företag, webbsidor och fritt tillgängliga översättningsdatabaser.

Lägg till en översättning

Engelska

Tagalog

Info

Engelska

Open an image file

Tagalog

file-action

Senast uppdaterad: 2014-08-15
Användningsfrekvens: 1
Kvalitet:

Engelska

i will send you an image

Tagalog

magpapadala ako sa iyo ng isang larawan

Senast uppdaterad: 2020-08-25
Användningsfrekvens: 1
Kvalitet:

Engelska

now i send you an image

Tagalog

magpapadala ako ngayon sa iyo ng isang larawan

Senast uppdaterad: 2020-08-25
Användningsfrekvens: 1
Kvalitet:

Engelska

i'll send you an image

Tagalog

padadalhan kita ng isang larawan

Senast uppdaterad: 2020-08-25
Användningsfrekvens: 1
Kvalitet:

Engelska

Open an image file as layers

Tagalog

file-action

Senast uppdaterad: 2014-08-15
Användningsfrekvens: 1
Kvalitet:

Engelska

Open this pattern as an image

Tagalog

patterns-action

Senast uppdaterad: 2014-08-15
Användningsfrekvens: 1
Kvalitet:

Engelska

violence versus violence is beneath me

Tagalog

karahasan hanggang karahasan ay nasa ilalim ko

Senast uppdaterad: 2020-09-21
Användningsfrekvens: 1
Kvalitet:

Referens: Anonym

Engelska

Unishing violence to violence is beneath me

Tagalog

karahasan hanggang karahasan ay nasa ilalim ko

Senast uppdaterad: 2021-03-28
Användningsfrekvens: 1
Kvalitet:

Referens: Anonym

Engelska

i will send you an image on your screen

Tagalog

magpapadala ako sa iyo ng isang larawan sa iyong screen

Senast uppdaterad: 2020-08-25
Användningsfrekvens: 1
Kvalitet:

Referens: Anonym

Engelska

punishing violence with violence is beneath me

Tagalog

menghukum keganasan dengan keganasan di bawah saya

Senast uppdaterad: 2018-08-09
Användningsfrekvens: 1
Kvalitet:

Referens: Anonym

Engelska

Open an image file from a specified location

Tagalog

file-action

Senast uppdaterad: 2014-08-15
Användningsfrekvens: 1
Kvalitet:

Referens: Anonym

Engelska

A pixel on the screen represents an image pixel

Tagalog

view-action

Senast uppdaterad: 2014-08-15
Användningsfrekvens: 1
Kvalitet:

Referens: Anonym

Engelska

Punishing violence to violence is beneth me is beneath me

Tagalog

karahasan hanggang karahasan ay nasa ilalim ko

Senast uppdaterad: 2021-03-28
Användningsfrekvens: 1
Kvalitet:

Referens: Anonym

Engelska

Remedial education - also called developmental education - suffers from an image problem

Tagalog

pagpapabuti ng pagtuturo

Senast uppdaterad: 2019-02-11
Användningsfrekvens: 1
Kvalitet:

Referens: Anonym

Engelska

They have characteristic club-shaped spikes that project from their surface, which in electron micrographs create an image reminiscent of the solar corona from which their name derives.

Tagalog

Mayroon silang mga natatanging hugis-batutang pako na umuusli mula sa kanilang balat, na sa elektron mikrograp ay lumilikha ng isang imahe na nakapagpapaalaala sa solar corona kung saan nagmula ang kanilang pangalan.

Senast uppdaterad: 2020-08-25
Användningsfrekvens: 1
Kvalitet:

Referens: Anonym

Engelska

The name refers to the characteristic appearance of virions (the infective form of the virus) by electron microscopy, which have a fringe of large, bulbous surface projections creating an image reminiscent of a crown or of a solar corona.

Tagalog

Ang pangalan ay tumutukoy sa karakteristikong paglitaw ng virions (ang nakakahawang anyo ng virus) sa pamamagitan ng electron microscopy, na may palawit na malaki, maumbok sa ibabaw na lumilikha ng imahe na nakapagpapaalaala sa isang korona o ng isang solar na korona.

Senast uppdaterad: 2020-08-25
Användningsfrekvens: 1
Kvalitet:

Referens: Anonym

Engelska

The Sarimanok is a legendary bird of the Maranao people who originate from Mindanao, a major island in the Philippines. It comes from the words “sari” and “manok.” “Sari” means cloth or garment, which is generally of assorted colors. Manòk, which makes up part of its name, is a Philippine word for chicken. It is the legendary bird that has become a ubiquitous symbol of Maranao art. It is depicted as a fowl with colorful wings and feathered tail, holding a fish on its beak or talons. The head is profusely decorated with scroll, leaf, and spiral motifs. It is said to be a symbol of good fortune. The Sarimanok is derived from a totem bird of the Maranao people, called Itotoro. According to the Maranao people, the Itotoro SARIMANOK.jpg is a medium to the spirit world via its unseen twin spirit bird called Inikadowa. According to the tradition, the Sarimanok is never displayed by itself. It must be displayed with the set of flags, standards and vexilloids. At present, this is not totally true; sarimanok may be placed on the top of the umbrella of a Sultan or dignitary, and also, the Mindanao State University has adopted it for the graduation exercises following a non-traditional use. Various versions of the legend of the Sarimanok were recorded. One legend tells of the daughter of the sultan of Lanao, named Sari. Sari was loved by her father and people because of her beauty and kindness. On her eighteenth birthday, a feast was set to celebrate the occasion. A cock/chicken (manok) with bright, glowing feathers flew into the middle of the feast, shocking all the people there. To everyone’s amazement, the cock transformed into a handsome prince. The prince stated that he has been watching over and protecting Sari since she was born, and that it was time that he took her to be with him. With this he transformed back into a cock and took Sari, flying away into the sun. Both he and the princess were never seen again. The loss of his daughter brought grief to the sultan and he had the best craftsman in his lands to carve an image of the magical cock that took her daughter. Another version is about the romantic relationship between Raja Indarapatra and the Maranao moon goddess, who comes down to earth every Friday. Raja Indarapatra eventually joined the goddess to her realm forever by riding the Sarimanok.

Tagalog

buod ng syon

Senast uppdaterad: 2019-10-04
Användningsfrekvens: 1
Kvalitet:

Referens: Anonym

Engelska

Pygmalion and Galatea Pygmalion and Galatea The story of Pygmalion and Galatea is found in Greek Mythology, and in the famous work "Metamorphoses", by the great Roman poet Ovid. Their love was so unique that it is difficult to define it. But from this legendary love story, one thing is clear, man can never love an inanimate object with as much passion as he loves a living, breathing being. Love gives rise to desire and without this passion any love remains unfulfilled. Pygmalion was a master sculptor in the ancient city of Greece. All day he sculpted beautiful statues from huge pieces of rock. In fact, his creations were so wonderful that whoever saw them were mesmerised by their sheer artistic beauty and exact finish. Pygmalion himself was a fine and handsome young man. He was liked by all men and women. Many women loved him for his great skill and looks. But Pygmalion never paid attention to any of these women. He saw so much to blame in women that he came at last to abhor the sex, and resolved to live unmarried. He was a sculptor, and with his with wonderful skill he sculpted a beautiful ivory statue which was so lifelike that it was difficult to believe that it was lifeless at the first glance. The beauty was such that no living woman could compete with it. It was indeed the perfect semblance of a maiden that seemed to be alive, and only prevented from moving by modesty. His art was so perfect that it concealed itself and its product looked like the workmanship of nature. Pygmalion spent hours admiring his creation. By and by Pygmalion's admiration for his own sculpture turned to love. Oftentimes he laid his hand upon it as if to assure himself whether it were living or not, and could not, even then, believe that it was only ivory. He caressed it, and gave it such presents as young girls love - bright shells and polished stones, little birds and flowers of various hues, beads and amber. He adorned his ivory maiden with jewels. He put rainment on its limbs, and jewels on its fingers, and a necklace about its neck. To the ears he hung earrings and strings of pearls upon the breast. Her dress became her, and she looked not less charming than when unattired. He laid her on a couch spread with cloths of Tyrian dye, and called her his wife, and put her head upon a pillow of the softest feathers, as if she could enjoy their softness. He gave the statue a name: "Galatea", meaning "sleeping love'. But what will be the consequence of falling in love with a lifeless ivory maiden? The festival of Aphrodite was at hand - a festival celebrated with great pomp at Cyprus. Victims were offered, the altars smoked, and the odor of incense filled the air. When the festivities of Aphrodite started, Pygmalion took part in the ceremonies. He went to the temple of Aphrodite to ask forgiveness for all the years he had shunned her. When Pygmalion had performed his part in the solemnities, he hesitantly prayed for a wife like his ivory virgin statue. He stood before the altar of Aphrodite and timidly said, "Ye gods, who can do all things, give me, I pray you, for my wife" - he dared not utter "my ivory virgin," but said instead - "one like my ivory virgin." But Goddess Aphrodite understood what the poor man was trying to say. She was curious. How can a man love a lifeless thing so much? Was it so beautiful that Pygmalion fell in love with his own creation? So she visited the studio of the sculptor while he was away. What she saw greatly amazed her. For the sculpture had a perfect likeness to her. In fact, it would not have been wrong to say that the sculpture was an image of Aphrodite herself. Goddess Aphrodite was charmed by Pygmalion's creation. She brought the statue to life. When Pygmalion returned to his home, he went before Galatea and knelt down before the woman of his dreams. He looked at her lovingly, with a lover's ardour. It seemed to him that Galatea was looking at her lovingly too. For a moment, it seemed to Pygmalion that it was just a figment of his imagination. He rubbed his eyes and looked again. But no. There was no mistake this time. Galatea was smiling at him. He laid his hand upon the limbs; the ivory felt soft to his touch and yielded to his fingers like the wax of Hymettus. It seemed to be warm. He stood up; his mind oscillated between doubt and joy. Fearing he may be mistaken, again and again with a lover's ardor he touches the object of his hopes. It was indeed alive! The veins when pressed yielded to the finger and again resumed their roundness. Slowly it dawned on Pygmalion that the animation of his sculpture was the result of his prayer to Goddess Aphrodite who knew his desire. At last, the votary of Aphrodite found words to thank the goddess. Pygmalion humbled himself at the Goddess' feet. Soon Pygmalion and Galatea were wed, and Pygmalion never forgot to thank Aphrodite for the gift she had given him. Aphrodite blessed the nuptials she had formed, and this union between Pygmalion and Galatea produced a son named Paphos, from whom the city Paphos, sacred to Aphrodite, received its name. He and Galatea brought gifts to her temple throughout their life and Aphrodite blessed them with happiness and love in return. The unusual love that blossomed between Pygmalion and Galatea enthralls all. Falling in love with one's creation and then getting the desired object as wife- perhaps this was destined for Pygmalion. Even to this day, countless people and young lovers are mesmerized by this exceptional love that existed between two persons at a time when civilization was in its infancy.

Tagalog

pygmalion sa galatea

Senast uppdaterad: 2015-06-13
Användningsfrekvens: 2
Kvalitet:

Referens: Anonym
Varning: Innehåller osynlig HTML-formatering

Få en bättre översättning med
4,401,923,520 mänskliga bidrag

Användare ber nu om hjälp:



Vi använder cookies för att förbättra din upplevelse. Genom att fortsätta besöka den här webbplatsen godkänner du vår användning av cookies. Läs mer. OK