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Şunu aradınız:: say xfhm (Malayca - İngilizce)

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Malayca

İngilizce

Bilgi

Malayca

say

İngilizce

greetings

Son Güncelleme: 2013-03-04
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Referans: Anonim

Malayca

saya rindu awak say

İngilizce

Missing you baby

Son Güncelleme: 2020-01-26
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Referans: Anonim

Malayca

i dont know what to say

İngilizce

you know what i know

Son Güncelleme: 2020-03-27
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Referans: Anonim

Malayca

but when i say sorry

İngilizce

maksud i mean it

Son Güncelleme: 2019-12-27
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Referans: Anonim

Malayca

im say u are v ery good grils

İngilizce

learn

Son Güncelleme: 2012-11-06
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Referans: Anonim

Malayca

sentiasa menjadi filem kesukaan say

İngilizce

Do not use on irritated skin

Son Güncelleme: 2019-08-23
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Referans: Anonim

Malayca

but, better u say tht on her..

İngilizce

water bearer

Son Güncelleme: 2015-04-26
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Referans: Anonim

Malayca

but when i say sorry i meant it

İngilizce

maksud i mean it

Son Güncelleme: 2019-12-27
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Referans: Anonim

Malayca

Panggilan D- Bus say () gagal.

İngilizce

The D-Bus call say() failed.

Son Güncelleme: 2011-10-23
Kullanım Sıklığı: 1
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Referans: Anonim

Malayca

contoh karangan bahasa english tentang ibu say a

İngilizce

article language Bahasa Inggeris example of a mother say

Son Güncelleme: 2016-01-21
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Referans: Anonim

Malayca

SAY , hantar teks ke objek pada tetingkap semasa

İngilizce

SAY , sends the text to the object in the current window

Son Güncelleme: 2014-08-20
Kullanım Sıklığı: 2
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Referans: Anonim
Uyarı: Görünmez HTML biçimlendirmesi içeriyor

Malayca

“Listen very carefully, I shall say this only once.”

İngilizce

“Listen very carefully, I shall say this only once.”

Son Güncelleme: 2014-08-15
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Referans: Anonim

Malayca

Ang online games Kasi ay nakaka addict Kasi Yan ang minsan ginagawa Kaya minsan hindi na natin ginagawa ang mga assignment at Hindi Tayo makaka pag riew sa Ora's ng klase Kasi Yan Yung inaatupag pag say bahay na Hindi Tayo makakapag linis ng bahay Kasi cellphone agad ng hinahawakan

İngilizce

Online games Kasi addict Kasi Yan does sometimes We do not do assignments and We can not review Ora's of the class Kasi Yan Yung is taken home when We cannot afford to clean house Kasi cellphone immediately by hand

Son Güncelleme: 2020-01-10
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Referans: Anonim

Malayca

Razid saye sayang awak sangat sangat tlong jangan tinggal kn saya tau..saya betul say sayang razid hari ini dan selama lamanye..muah saya sayang kau sampai bila bila

İngilizce

Razid saye sayang awak sangat sangat tlong jangan tinggal kn saya tau..saya betul betul sayang razid hari ini dan selama lamanye..muah saya sayang awak sampai bila bila

Son Güncelleme: 2017-10-28
Kullanım Sıklığı: 1
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Referans: Anonim

Malayca

say <messagegt;: Hantar mesej secara biasa jika anda tidak menggunakan perintah.

İngilizce

say <messagegt;: Send a message normally as if you weren't using a command.

Son Güncelleme: 2014-08-15
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Referans: Anonim
Uyarı: Görünmez HTML biçimlendirmesi içeriyor

Malayca

say Kakak saya menyiram pokok bunga

İngilizce

I watered the tree

Son Güncelleme: 2020-02-06
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Referans: Anonim

Malayca

Ok this is what I want to say about my dad's death, but it's a secret, but I always ask for my dad's money to go to the store! But my dad is sick, my dad is sorry, my dad is not angry with me, I don't always fight my dad, that's all I want to say

İngilizce

Ok ini aku nak cerita pasal ayahh aku pulak , die ni pendiam je , tapi aku selalu mintak duit abah aku klau nak pergi kedai ! Tapi abah aku ade penyakit , kesian abah aku ,abah aku jarang marah aku , aku pun tidak selalu melawan cakap abah aku

Son Güncelleme: 2019-12-09
Kullanım Sıklığı: 2
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Referans: Anonim

Malayca

The boy's name was Santiago. Dusk was falling as the boy arrived with his herd at an abandoned church. The roof had fallen in long ago, and an enormous sycamore had grown on the spot where the sacristy had once stood. He decided to spend the night there. He saw to it that all the sheep entered through the ruined gate, and then laid some planks across it to prevent the flock from wandering away during the night. There were no wolves in the region, but once an animal had strayed during the night, and the boy had had to spend the entire next day searching for it. He swept the floor with his jacket and lay down, using the book he had just finished reading as a pillow. He told himself that he would have to start reading thicker books: they lasted longer, and made more comfortable pillows. It was still dark when he awoke, and, looking up, he could see the stars through the half-destroyed roof. I wanted to sleep a little longer, he thought. He had had the same dream that night as a week ago, and once again he had awakened before it ended. He arose and, taking up his crook, began to awaken the sheep that still slept. He had noticed that, as soon as he awoke, most of his animals also began to stir. It was as if some mysterious energy bound his life to that of the sheep, with whom he had spent the past two years, leading them through the countryside in search of food and water. "They are so used to me that they know my schedule," he muttered. Thinking about that for a moment, he realized that it could be the other way around: that it was he who had become accustomed to their schedule. But there were certain of them who took a bit longer to awaken. The boy prodded them, one by one, with his crook, calling each by name. He had always believed that the sheep were able to understand what he said. So there were times when he read them parts of his books that had made an impression on him, or when he would tell them of the loneliness or the happiness of a shepherd in the fields. Sometimes he would comment to them on the things he had seen in the villages they passed. But for the past few days he had spoken to them about only one thing: the girl, the daughter of a merchant who lived in the village they would reach in about four days. He had been to the village only once, the year before. The merchant was the proprietor of a dry goods shop, and he always demanded that the sheep be sheared in his presence, so that he would not be cheated. A friend had told the boy about the shop, and he had taken his sheep there. * "I need to sell some wool," the boy told the merchant. The shop was busy, and the man asked the shepherd to wait until the afternoon. So the boy sat on the steps of the shop and took a book from his bag. "I didn't know shepherds knew how to read," said a girl's voice behind him. The girl was typical of the region of Andalusia, with flowing black hair, and eyes that vaguely recalled the Moorish conquerors. "Well, usually I learn more from my sheep than from books," he answered. During the two hours that they talked, she told him she was the merchant's daughter, and spoke of life in the village, where each day was like all the others. The shepherd told her of the Andalusian countryside, and related the news from the other towns where he had stopped. It was a pleasant change from talking to his sheep. "How did you learn to read?" the girl asked at one point. "Like everybody learns," he said. "In school." "Well, if you know how to read, why are you just a shepherd?" The boy mumbled an answer that allowed him to avoid responding to her question. He was sure the girl would never understand. He went on telling stories about his travels, and her bright, Moorish eyes went wide with fear and surprise. As the time passed, the boy found himself wishing that the day would never end, that her father would stay busy and keep him waiting for three days. He recognized that he was feeling something he had never experienced before: the desire to live in one place forever. With the girl with the raven hair, his days would never be the same again. But finally the merchant appeared, and asked the boy to shear four sheep. He paid for the wool and asked the shepherd to come back the following year. * And now it was only four days before he would be back in that same village. He was excited, and at the same time uneasy: maybe the girl had already forgotten him. Lots of shepherds passed through, selling their wool. "It doesn't matter," he said to his sheep. "I know other girls in other places." But in his heart he knew that it did matter. And he knew that shepherds, like seamen and like traveling salesmen, always found a town where there was someone who could make them forget the joys of carefree wandering. The day was dawning, and the shepherd urged his sheep in the direction of the sun. They never have to make any decisions, he thought. Maybe that's why they always stay close to me. The only things that concerned the sheep were food and water. As long as the boy knew how to find the best pastures in Andalusia, they would be his friends. Yes, their days were all the same, with the seemingly endless hours between sunrise and dusk; and they had never read a book in their young lives, and didn't understand when the boy told them about the sights of the cities. They were content with just food and water, and, in exchange, they generously gave of their wool, their company, and—once in a while— their meat. If I became a monster today, and decided to kill them, one by one, they would become aware only after most of the flock had been slaughtered, thought the boy. They trust me, and they've forgotten how to rely on their own instincts, because I lead them to nourishment. The boy was surprised at his thoughts. Maybe the church, with the sycamore growing from within, had been haunted. It had caused him to have the same dream for a second time, and it was causing him to feel anger toward his faithful companions. He drank a bit from the wine that remained from his dinner of the night before, and he gathered his jacket closer to his body. He knew that a few hours from now, with the sun at its zenith, the heat would be so great that he would not be able to lead his flock across the fields. It was the time of day when all of Spain slept during the summer. The heat lasted until nightfall, and all that time he had to carry his jacket. But when he thought to complain about the burden of its weight, he remembered that, because he had the jacket, he had withstood the cold of the dawn. We have to be prepared for change, he thought, and he was grateful for the jacket's weight and warmth. The jacket had a purpose, and so did the boy. His purpose in life was to travel, and, after two years of walking the Andalusian terrain, he knew all the cities of the region. He was planning, on this visit, to explain to the girl how it was that a simple shepherd knew how to read. That he had attended a seminary until he was sixteen. His parents had wanted him to become a priest, and thereby a source of pride for a simple farm family. They worked hard just to have food and water, like the sheep. He had studied Latin, Spanish, and theology. But ever since he had been a child, he had wanted to know the world, and this was much more important to him than knowing God and learning about man's sins. One afternoon, on a visit to his family, he had summoned up the courage to tell his father that he didn't want to become a priest. That he wanted to travel. * "People from all over the world have passed through this village, son," said his father. "They come in search of new things, but when they leave they are basically the same people they were when they arrived. They climb the mountain to see the castle, and they wind up thinking that the past was better than what we have now. They have blond hair, or dark skin, but basically they're the same as the people who live right here." "But I'd like to see the castles in the towns where they live," the boy explained. "Those people, when they see our land, say that they would like to live here forever," his father continued. "Well, I'd like to see their land, and see how they live," said his son. "The people who come here have a lot of money to spend, so they can afford to travel," his father said. "Amongst us, the only ones who travel are the shepherds." "Well, then I'll be a shepherd!" His father said no more. The next day, he gave his son a pouch that held three ancient Spanish gold coins. "I found these one day in the fields. I wanted them to be a part of your inheritance. But use them to buy your flock. Take to the fields, and someday you'll learn that our countryside is the best, and our women the most beautiful." And he gave the boy his blessing. The boy could see in his father's gaze a desire to be able, himself, to travel the world—a desire that was still alive, despite his father's having had to bury it, over dozens of years, under the burden of struggling for water to drink, food to eat, and the same place to sleep every night of his life. * The horizon was tinged with red, and suddenly the sun appeared. The boy thought back to that conversation with his father, and felt happy; he had already seen many castles and met many women (but none the equal of the one who awaited him several days hence). He owned a jacket, a book that he could trade for another, and a flock of sheep. But, most important, he was able every day to live out his dream. If he were to tire of the Andalusian fields, he could sell his sheep and go to sea. By the time he had had enough of the sea, he would already have known other cities, other women, and other chances to be happy. I couldn't have found God in the seminary, he thought, as he looked at the sunrise. Whenever he could, he sought out a new road to travel. He had never been to that ruined church before, in spite of having traveled through those parts many times. The world was huge and inexhaustible; he had only to allow his sheep to set the route for a while, and he would discover other interesting things. The problem is that they don't even realize that they're walking a new road every day. They don't see that the fields are new and the seasons change. All they think about is food and water. Maybe we're all that way, the boy mused. Even me—I haven't thought of other women since I met the merchant's daughter. Looking at the sun, he calculated that he would reach Tarifa before midday. There, he could exchange his book for a thicker one, fill his wine bottle, shave, and have a haircut; he had to prepare himself for his meeting with the girl, and he didn't want to think about the possibility that some other shepherd, with a larger flock of sheep, had arrived there before him and asked for her hand. It's the possibility of having a dream come true that makes life interesting, he thought, as he looked again at the position of the sun, and hurried his pace. He had suddenly remembered that, in Tarifa, there was an old woman who interpreted dreams.

İngilizce

story

Son Güncelleme: 2015-12-09
Kullanım Sıklığı: 1
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Referans: Anonim
Uyarı: Görünmez HTML biçimlendirmesi içeriyor

Malayca

kamusThank You Mom I know how often I took you for granted when I was growing up. I always assumed you'd be there when I needed you... and you always were. But I never really thought about what that meant till I got older and began to realize how often your time and energy were devoted to me. so now, for all the times I didn't say it before, thank you, Mom...I love you so very much! bina ayat

İngilizce

kamus binaThank You Mom I know how often I took you for granted when I was growing up. I always assumed you'd be there when I needed you... and you always were. But I never really thought about what that meant till I got older and began to realize how often your time and energy were devoted to me. so now, for all the times I didn't say it before, thank you, Mom...I love you so very much! ayat

Son Güncelleme: 2015-05-09
Kullanım Sıklığı: 1
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Referans: Anonim

Malayca

Not sure if you know this But when we first met I got so nervous I couldn't speak In that very moment I found the one and My life had found its missing piece So as long as I live I'll love you Will have and hold you You look so beautiful in white And from now til my very last breath This day I'll cherish You look so beautiful in white Tonight What we have is timeless My love is endless And with this ring I Say to the world You're my every reason You're all that I believe in With all my heart I mean every word So as long as I live I'll love you Will have and hold you You look so beautiful in white And from now til my very last breath This day I'll cherish You look so beautiful in white Tonight Oooh oh You look so beautiful in white So beautiful in white Tonight And if a daughter is what our future holds I hope she has your eyes Finds love like you and I did Yeah, and when she falls in love, we'll let her go I'll walk her down the aisle She'll look so beautiful in white You look so beautiful in white So as long as I live I'll love you Will have and hold you You look so beautiful in white And from now til my very last breath This day I'll cherish You look so beautiful in white Tonight You look so beautiful in white Tonight Read more: Westlife - Beautiful In White Lyrics | MetroLyrics

İngilizce

good

Son Güncelleme: 2014-10-26
Kullanım Sıklığı: 1
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Referans: Anonim

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