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Şunu aradınız:: photo of a pig (Tagalogca - İngilizce)

İnsan katkıları

Profesyonel çevirmenler, işletmeler, web sayfaları ve erişimin serbest olduğu çeviri havuzlarından.

Çeviri ekle

Tagalogca

İngilizce

Bilgi

Tagalogca

Child of a Pig / Piglet

İngilizce

Anak ng baboy / Biik

Son Güncelleme: 2016-09-07
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Referans: Braapz

Tagalogca

Desease of a heart

İngilizce

Of a heart desease

Son Güncelleme: 2016-06-20
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Referans: Anonim

Tagalogca

script of a comedy philippines

İngilizce

script of a Philippine comedy

Son Güncelleme: 2019-11-16
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Referans: Anonim

Tagalogca

do not make a mountain out of a molehil

İngilizce

Do not make a mountain out of a molehill

Son Güncelleme: 2017-02-04
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Referans: Anonim

Tagalogca

Whenever people of a country truly love

İngilizce

to my fellow youth

Son Güncelleme: 2020-02-15
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Referans: Anonim

Tagalogca

do not make a mountain out of a molehil

İngilizce

make a mountain out of a molehill

Son Güncelleme: 2018-07-12
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Referans: Anonim

Tagalogca

Is the sentence that tells the main idea of a paragraph

İngilizce

what is the topic sentence

Son Güncelleme: 2019-01-15
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Referans: Anonim

Tagalogca

Failure to return to work after availing of a break

İngilizce

Failure to return to work after a availing of a break

Son Güncelleme: 2020-01-09
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Referans: Anonim

Tagalogca

A set of priented or written question with a choice of answer devised for the purpose of a survey or statistical study

İngilizce

A set of priented or written questions with a choice of answer devised for the purpose of a survey or statistical study8

Son Güncelleme: 2020-02-19
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Referans: Anonim

Tagalogca

I would think June 19 would serve that too and affirm the greatness of a Filipino who rose to such heights.

İngilizce

I would think June 19 would serve that too and affirm the greatness of a Filipino who rose to such heights.

Son Güncelleme: 2016-02-24
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Referans: Anonim

Tagalogca

This is fight against a system where things are done for the benefit of a few and at the expense of the many.

İngilizce

This is fight against a system where things are done for the benefit of a few and at the expense of the many.

Son Güncelleme: 2016-02-24
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Referans: Anonim

Tagalogca

Ayon sa pagsasalaysay ng isang ina sa The blog of a Mom , mauunawaan niyo kung gaano kalaki ang impluwensiya ni Doraemon sa kabataan.

İngilizce

The rest of the time of the day other programs like soap operas, news, talk shows, food shows and talent competitions are aired; which brings little value to the kids. Incomprehensible talk shows, kitechen matters or love-romance-tragedies do not attract the kids.

Son Güncelleme: 2016-02-24
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Referans: Anonim

Tagalogca

a "good" that is shared and beneficial for all (or most) members of a given community.

İngilizce

mga halimbawa ng higher good

Son Güncelleme: 2020-03-04
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Referans: Anonim
Uyarı: Görünmez HTML biçimlendirmesi içeriyor

Tagalogca

Ang panlabas na interbensyon ay isang mekanismo na ginagamit ng internasyonal na pamayanan para sa pamamahala ng labanan sa isang bansa. Ang mga epekto ng interbensyon ay natutukoy ng mga motivations ng mga namamagitan na partido at ang pagiging epektibo ng mga inisyatibo ng militar, pang-ekonomiya o diplomatikong isinasagawaIt is an intervention in the sense that it entails interfering in the internal affairs of a state by sending military forces into the territory or airspace of a sovereign state that has not committed an act of aggression against another state

İngilizce

External interventions are a mechanism the international community uses for conflict management in a country. Intervention effects are determined by the motivations of the intervening parties and the effectiveness of the military, economic or diplomatic initiatives undertaken

Son Güncelleme: 2020-02-19
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Referans: Anonim

Tagalogca

Many artists lived in the Greenwich Village area of New York. Two young women named Sue and Johnsy shared a studio apartment at the top of a three-story building. Johnsy's real name was Joanna. In November, a cold, unseen stranger came to visit the city. This disease, pneumonia, killed many people. Johnsy lay on her bed, hardly moving. She looked through the small window. She could see the side of the brick house next to her building. One morning, a doctor examined Johnsy and took her temperature. Then he spoke with Sue in another room. "She has one chance in -- let us say ten," he said. "And that chance is for her to want to live. Your friend has made up her mind that she is not going to get well. Has she anything on her mind?" "She -- she wanted to paint the Bay of Naples in Italy some day," said Sue. "Paint?" said the doctor. "Bosh! Has she anything on her mind worth thinking twice -- a man for example?" "A man?" said Sue. "Is a man worth -- but, no, doctor; there is nothing of the kind." "I will do all that science can do," said the doctor. "But whenever my patient begins to count the carriages at her funeral, I take away fifty percent from the curative power of medicines." After the doctor had gone, Sue went into the workroom and cried. Then she went to Johnsy's room with her drawing board, whistling ragtime. Johnsy lay with her face toward the window. Sue stopped whistling, thinking she was asleep. She began making a pen and ink drawing for a story in a magazine. Young artists must work their way to "Art" by making pictures for magazine stories. Sue heard a low sound, several times repeated. She went quickly to the bedside. Johnsy's eyes were open wide. She was looking out the window and counting -- counting backward. "Twelve," she said, and a little later "eleven"; and then "ten" and "nine;" and then "eight" and "seven," almost together. Sue looked out the window. What was there to count? There was only an empty yard and the blank side of the house seven meters away. An old ivy vine, going bad at the roots, climbed half way up the wall. The cold breath of autumn had stricken leaves from the plant until its branches, almost bare, hung on the bricks. "What is it, dear?" asked Sue. "Six," said Johnsy, quietly. "They're falling faster now. Three days ago there were almost a hundred. It made my head hurt to count them. But now it's easy. There goes another one. There are only five left now." "Five what, dear?" asked Sue. "Leaves. On the plant. When the last one falls I must go, too. I've known that for three days. Didn't the doctor tell you?" "Oh, I never heard of such a thing," said Sue. "What have old ivy leaves to do with your getting well? And you used to love that vine. Don't be silly. Why, the doctor told me this morning that your chances for getting well real soon were -- let's see exactly what he said – he said the chances were ten to one! Try to eat some soup now. And, let me go back to my drawing, so I can sell it to the magazine and buy food and wine for us." "You needn't get any more wine," said Johnsy, keeping her eyes fixed out the window. "There goes another one. No, I don't want any soup. That leaves just four. I want to see the last one fall before it gets dark. Then I'll go, too." "Johnsy, dear," said Sue, "will you promise me to keep your eyes closed, and not look out the window until I am done working? I must hand those drawings in by tomorrow." "Tell me as soon as you have finished," said Johnsy, closing her eyes and lying white and still as a fallen statue. "I want to see the last one fall. I'm tired of waiting. I'm tired of thinking. I want to turn loose my hold on everything, and go sailing down, down, just like one of those poor, tired leaves."

İngilizce

"Hilahin ang lilim; nais kong makita," utos niya, tahimik. Sumunod si Sue. Matapos ang matinding pag-ulan at mabangis na hangin na humihip sa gabi, may nakatayo pa sa pader ng isang dahon ng ivy. Ito ang huli sa puno ng ubas. Madilim pa ang berde sa gitna. Ngunit ang mga gilid nito ay may kulay na dilaw. Matapang itong nakabitin mula sa sangay mga pitong metro sa itaas ng lupa. "Ito na ang huli," sabi ni Johnsy. "Akala ko tiyak na mahuhulog ito sa gabi. Narinig ko ang hangin. Mahuhulog ito ngayon at mamamatay ako nang sabay." "Mahal, mahal!" sabi ni Sue, isinandal ang kanyang pagod na mukha patungo sa kama. "Isipin mo ako, kung hindi mo iisipin ang iyong sarili. Ano ang gagawin ko?" Ngunit hindi sumagot si Johnsy. Kinaumagahan, nang magaan, hiniling ni Johnsy na itaas ang window shade. Nariyan pa rin ang dahon ng ivy. Matagal nang nakahiga si Johnsy, tinitingnan ito. At pagkatapos ay tumawag siya kay Sue, na naghahanda ng sopas ng manok. "Ako ay isang masamang babae," sabi ni Johnsy. "May isang bagay na ginawa sa huling dahon na manatili roon upang ipakita sa akin kung gaano ako masama. Mali ang nais na mamatay. Maaaring dalhin mo ako ng kaunting sopas ngayon." Isang oras mamaya sinabi niya: "Balang araw Inaasahan kong ipinta ang Bay of Naples." Nang maglaon, dumating ang doktor, at si Sue ay nakipag-usap sa kanya sa pasilyo. "Kahit na ang mga pagkakataon," sabi ng doktor. "Sa pamamagitan ng mabuting pag-aalaga, mananalo ka. At ngayon dapat akong makakita ng isa pang kaso na mayroon ako sa iyong gusali. Behrman, ang kanyang pangalan ay - ilang uri ng isang artista, naniniwala ako. Pneumonia, masyadong. Siya ay isang luma, mahina na tao. at ang kanyang kaso ay malubha. Walang pag-asa para sa kanya; ngunit pumupunta siya sa ospital ngayon upang luwag ang kanyang sakit. " Kinabukasan, sinabi ng doktor kay Sue: "Nanganib siya. Napanalunan mo. Nutrisyon at pangangalaga ngayon - iyon lang." Kalaunan nang araw na iyon, dumating si Sue sa kama kung saan nahiga si Johnsy, at inilagay ang isang braso sa kanya. "May sasabihin ako sa iyo, puting mouse," aniya. "Si Mister Behrman ay namatay sa pulmonya ngayon sa ospital. Nakasakit lamang siya ng dalawang araw. Natagpuan nila sa kanya ang umaga ng unang araw sa kanyang silid na wala sa silungan ng sakit.Ang kanyang sapatos at damit ay ganap na basa at malamig na malamig. Hindi nila maisip kung saan siya ay nasa tulad ng isang kakila-kilabot na gabi. At pagkatapos ay nakakita sila ng isang parol, naaaninag pa rin. At nakita nila ang isang hagdan na inilipat mula sa lugar nito. At mga suplay ng sining at isang board ng pagpipinta na may berde at dilaw na kulay na halo-halong dito. Aow, mahal, sa huling dahon ng ivy sa dingding. Hindi ka ba nagtataka kung bakit hindi ito kailanman lumipat nang humihip ang hangin? Ah, mahal, ito ay obra maestra ng Behrman - ipininta niya ito doon sa gabing nahulog ang huling dahon. "

Son Güncelleme: 2020-01-11
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Referans: Anonim
Uyarı: Görünmez HTML biçimlendirmesi içeriyor

Tagalogca

RIVER JUG BEING DIPPED INTO WATER DRINKING WATER PSYCHE: (REFRESHED)Ah. MENS’ FOOTSTEPS MAN 1: Thou art too pretty a maiden to be fetching water all by her lonesome self. MAN 2: Shall I do it for you? MAN 1: No, I shall complete this task! MAN 2: Who do you think is competent enough to perform this task, Psyche, me or him? PSYCHE: (STRONGWILLED) Thank you, but I am fully capable to fetch water by myself. Farewell, I must get home now. FOOTSTEPS DOOR OPENS PSYCHE: (FRUSTRATED) Father, you were right, it happened again! Men chased after me. (SIGH) KING: It is the price you must pay for your infinite beauty. NARRATOR: Recently, Venus’s temple has been abandoned. SOUND OF CRICKETS WIND SCENE TWO SOFT MUSIC NARRATOR: Meanwhile at Mt. Olympus… VENUS: (STERN) Cupid, I’m so angry. Look at my temple, not a soul stands there to worship. I need you to complete a task for me. CUPID: (SOFT) Anything for you, my lovely mother. VENUS: (ANGRY) That horrible creature Psyche has stolen my admirers. All the men of the world are blind to the gods. CUPID: (HELPFUL) What do you propose we do about it? VENUS: (WICKED) I have a plan. (EVIL LAUGH) Here’s what you must do: You shall use your powers to have Psyche fall in love with most vile, despicable pig of a man. Let me show you this woman. Crystal ball, crystal ball, show me Psyche, show me all. POOF CUPID: (UNDER HIS BREATH) Gasp! Oh my, she is beautiful. I think I have been hit by one of my own arrows. VENUS: (COMMANDING) Now, be gone with you! Complete your duty! SCENE THREE SOFT MUSIC NARRATOR: Instead of immediately following Venus’ commands Cupid goes to the Oracle of Apollo and asks for his help. KNOCKING DOOR OPENING CUPID: (PLEADING) I need your help! ORACLE: (HAPPY) How may I be of your assistance? CUPID: (WORRIED) My mother has ordered me to make Psyche fall in love with a hideous man, but instead I, myself, have fallen in love with her. What shall I do? ORACLE: I will come up with a plan. KNOCKING ORACLE: Hold on a minute. FOOTSTEPS DOOR OPENING ORACLE: (WELCOMING) Well, hello, King. CUPID: (UNDER HIS BREATH) Oh no! I must not be seen! WINGS FLAPPING ORACLE: So my dear King, how may I be of assistance? KING: (STERN) I must find my daughter, Psyche, a good husband. ORACLE: Well…in order for her to find a her destined husband, she must be dressed in the deepest mourning, must be set on the summit of a rocky hill alone, and there, her destined husband, a fearful winged serpent, stronger than the gods themselves, will come to her and make her his wife. KING: (SAD) What has my daughter done to deserve this treachery? SCENE FOUR SOFT MUSIC NARRATOR: On top of a rocky hill in the darkness, Psyche awaits her destined husband. WOMAN CRYING STRONG WIND PSYCHE: (SURPRISED) Oh my I’m being uplifted by Zephyr. WOMAN BEING PLOPPED ONTO GROUND PSYCHE: What a beautiful meadow I landed in. Thank you Zephyr, sweetest of winds, for taking me to this peaceful meadow. (YAWNS) NARRATOR: And with that, all of Psyche’s troubles left her. She fell sound asleep. SCENE FIVE SOFT MUSIC NARRATOR: Soon after, Psyche awoke aside a bright river. On the bank was built a beautiful palace. PSYCHE: (PONDERING) Goodness! What a splendid mansion, but it seems like no one is home. Cupid 2 VOICE 1: (MYSTERIOUS VOICE) This wonderful home is all yours. VOICE 2: MYSTERIOUS VOICE) Do not be afraid. Enter the house and bathe. VOICE 1: A banquet table will be spread for you. VOICE 2: We are your servants, here to do as you desire. NARRATOR: The rest of Psyche’s joyful day included a delightful bath, the most delicious food, and listening to a beautiful choir. At night, Psyche finds herself in the presence of her lover, but does not know his identity due to the darkness. PSYCHE: (QUESTIONABLY) Hello? Who’s there? CUPID: (DEEP, COMFORTING VOICE) Its ok, my dear. Have no fear; I am not the monster you think I am. PSYCHE: (UNDER HER BREATH) Wow, he seems quite kind. CUPID: I will always be here for you. SCENE SIX SOFT MUSIC NARRATOR: After many days of happiness at the palace, Psyche longed to see her sisters at the rock hill where she had been picked up by Zephyr, but her lover would not allow it. PSYCHE: (PLEADING) My love, I wish to go talk to my sisters. CUPID: (STERN) I do not advise this; it will lead to your own destruction. PSYCHE: But I yearn for their presence! Do not cause me such pain! CUPID: If you really must, go along. PSYCHE: (OVERJOYED) Thank you so much! NARRATOR: The next day, Psyche walks to the top of the hill to meet her sisters. PSYCHE: (HAPPY) Hello dear sisters! I have missed you so! SISTER 1: How nice to see you Psyche! How is your marriage? PSYCHE: Oh, it’s fine. My husband is currently away on a hunting trip, but come with me to my new home. FOOTSTEPS SISTER 2: Wow, your mansion is beautiful! PSYCHE: Yes, now come see the marvelous inside! NARRATOR: Psyche toured her sisters around the house. After each wonder showed to them, the sisters envied her more and more. PSYCHE: And in this room, we store all of our jewels. I have a small gift for you. SISTER 2: (AMAZED) Oh my! That is the most beautiful necklace I’ve ever seen! NARRATOR: It had become late, so Psyche’s sisters decided to depart from the mansion. Psyche waved farewell, and her sisters walked home. During their walk, they decided they must plot revenge on their sister due to their jealousy. PSYCHE: Cupid, I had such a wonderful time with my sisters, and now I long to see them again! CUPID: Again, I do not advise this, but if you really want to, go ahead. NARRATOR: The next day, the sisters meet up with Psyche once more with the intent to pursue their plan. SISTER 1: How nice to see you again Psyche! PSYCHE: Nice to see you too, my dear sisters! SISTER 2: (SLYLY) Your palace is lovely and all, but what does your husband look like? We have never seen him before. PSYCHE: Um…well… SISTER 1: You don’t know? PSYCHE: Oh, sisters, to tell you the truth, I have never seen his face, but he seems like a great gentleman. SISTER 2: He’s probably is a despicable monster! PSYCHE: No, no, no, you’re getting things all wrong! He is kind. SISTER 1: No, he must be the fearful serpent Apollo declared him to be. PSYCHE: (PANICKING) Oh my, sisters! He might be! SISTER 2: Yes, he is! You must do something about it! SISTER 1: We have some advice for you. Here is what you must do: Before you go to sleep, hide a sharp knife and a lamp under your bed. When your husband is sound asleep, light the lamp, get the knife, and plunge it into the body of the fearful monster you lay your eyes on. NARRATOR: Her two sisters left and Psyche sadly prepared the murder of her husband. That night, once her husband was fast asleep, Psyche lit the lamp, grabbed the light, and set out to complete her task. PSYCHE: (GASP) My, he is so handsome! He is not a monster, but instead the lovely God of Love, Cupid! DRIPPING OIL SIZZLING ON SKIN CUPID: (SAD) OW! Psyche! I am so disappointed in you. You did not trust me. There is no love. WING FLAPPING PSYCHE: (DISAPOINTED WITH HERSELF) How stupid am I? My husband was the most handsome man alive and now he is gone. I will not rest until I find him once more. SCENE SEVEN MUSIC “ONE”: SOFT MUSIC NARRATOR: Cupid, injured, flies to Venus for his mother’s help. He tells her the whole story of how he came to fall in love with Psyche. VENUS: Cupid, you have disappointed me. I will go find this woman to show her what happens when you draw down the displeasure of a goddess. CUPID: (INJURED) She has injured me, but I still love her greatly. VENUS: I have a good plan. You’ll see what I’ll do. NARRATOR: Psyche, hopeless decides to go to Venus, and offer herself as a servant. She hopes to reconcile with Cupid. PSYCHE: Venus, I have come here to offer myself as a servant for you to make up for my wrong doings. VENUS: (CACKLES) You think that I would let you be my servant? PSYCHE: (PLEADING) Please let me right this wrong. VENUS: I will show my good will by training you by giving you various tasks. NARRATOR: Psyche is ordered to do two difficult tasks, but the creatures take pity on her and aid her, allowing her to complete each of them. PSYCHE: (PROUD) I have finished the tasks you have given me. VENUS: (ANNOYED) How did you complete them so fast? Well, never mind, here is another: This is a box. I need you to fill it will some of Persephone’s beauty. She lives in the underworld. PSYCHE: (UNDER HER BREATH) This is the hardest task yet. How can I complete it? NARRATOR: As Psyche walks on the road to Hades, a friendly guide offers her directions. GUIDE: (FUNNY ACCENT) Hello, Hello. Okay, um, first you must go to a great hole in the earth, then you must go down the river of Death, then you must give the ferryman, Charon, a penny to give you a ride across the river. After that, there is a road that leads straight to the palace. You will meet a very, very, big dog, Cerebus, he is very big, but if you give him a cake he will be very friendly and let you pass. NARRATOR: Psyche follows his instructions and completes the task. After a short amount of time, Psyche comes back from the underworld. PSYCHE: I wonder what is in this box. CREAKING STRONG WIND PSYCHE: (YAWNS) I’m so tired… WINGS FLAPPING UPID: (QUIETLY) Oh, she’s sound asleep. I must

İngilizce

RIVER JUG BEING DIPPED INTO WATER DRINKING WATER PSYCHE: (REFRESHED)Ah. MENS’ FOOTSTEPS MAN 1: Thou art too pretty a maiden to be fetching water all by her lonesome self. MAN 2: Shall I do it for you? MAN 1: No, I shall complete this task! MAN 2: Who do you think is competent enough to perform this task, Psyche, me or him? PSYCHE: (STRONGWILLED) Thank you, but I am fully capable to fetch water by myself. Farewell, I must get home now. FOOTSTEPS DOOR OPENS PSYCHE: (FRUSTRATED) Father, you were right, it happened again! Men chased after me. (SIGH) KING: It is the price you must pay for your infinite beauty. NARRATOR: Recently, Venus’s temple has been abandoned. SOUND OF CRICKETS WIND SCENE TWO SOFT MUSIC NARRATOR: Meanwhile at Mt. Olympus… VENUS: (STERN) Cupid, I’m so angry. Look at my temple, not a soul stands there to worship. I need you to complete a task for me. CUPID: (SOFT) Anything for you, my lovely mother. VENUS: (ANGRY) That horrible creature Psyche has stolen my admirers. All the men of the world are blind to the gods. CUPID: (HELPFUL) What do you propose we do about it? VENUS: (WICKED) I have a plan. (EVIL LAUGH) Here’s what you must do: You shall use your powers to have Psyche fall in love with most vile, despicable pig of a man. Let me show you this woman. Crystal ball, crystal ball, show me Psyche, show me all. POOF CUPID: (UNDER HIS BREATH) Gasp! Oh my, she is beautiful. I think I have been hit by one of my own arrows. VENUS: (COMMANDING) Now, be gone with you! Complete your duty! SCENE THREE SOFT MUSIC NARRATOR: Instead of immediately following Venus’ commands Cupid goes to the Oracle of Apollo and asks for his help. KNOCKING DOOR OPENING CUPID: (PLEADING) I need your help! ORACLE: (HAPPY) How may I be of your assistance? CUPID: (WORRIED) My mother has ordered me to make Psyche fall in love with a hideous man, but instead I, myself, have fallen in love with her. What shall I do? ORACLE: I will come up with a plan. KNOCKING ORACLE: Hold on a minute. FOOTSTEPS DOOR OPENING ORACLE: (WELCOMING) Well, hello, King. CUPID: (UNDER HIS BREATH) Oh no! I must not be seen! WINGS FLAPPING ORACLE: So my dear King, how may I be of assistance? KING: (STERN) I must find my daughter, Psyche, a good husband. ORACLE: Well…in order for her to find a her destined husband, she must be dressed in the deepest mourning, must be set on the summit of a rocky hill alone, and there, her destined husband, a fearful winged serpent, stronger than the gods themselves, will come to her and make her his wife. KING: (SAD) What has my daughter done to deserve this treachery? SCENE FOUR SOFT MUSIC NARRATOR: On top of a rocky hill in the darkness, Psyche awaits her destined husband. WOMAN CRYING STRONG WIND PSYCHE: (SURPRISED) Oh my I’m being uplifted by Zephyr. WOMAN BEING PLOPPED ONTO GROUND PSYCHE: What a beautiful meadow I landed in. Thank you Zephyr, sweetest of winds, for taking me to this peaceful meadow. (YAWNS) NARRATOR: And with that, all of Psyche’s troubles left her. She fell sound asleep. SCENE FIVE SOFT MUSIC NARRATOR: Soon after, Psyche awoke aside a bright river. On the bank was built a beautiful palace. PSYCHE: (PONDERING) Goodness! What a splendid mansion, but it seems like no one is home. Cupid 2 VOICE 1: (MYSTERIOUS VOICE) This wonderful home is all yours. VOICE 2: MYSTERIOUS VOICE) Do not be afraid. Enter the house and bathe. VOICE 1: A banquet table will be spread for you. VOICE 2: We are your servants, here to do as you desire. NARRATOR: The rest of Psyche’s joyful day included a delightful bath, the most delicious food, and listening to a beautiful choir. At night, Psyche finds herself in the presence of her lover, but does not know his identity due to the darkness. PSYCHE: (QUESTIONABLY) Hello? Who’s there? CUPID: (DEEP, COMFORTING VOICE) Its ok, my dear. Have no fear; I am not the monster you think I am. PSYCHE: (UNDER HER BREATH) Wow, he seems quite kind. CUPID: I will always be here for you. SCENE SIX SOFT MUSIC NARRATOR: After many days of happiness at the palace, Psyche longed to see her sisters at the rock hill where she had been picked up by Zephyr, but her lover would not allow it. PSYCHE: (PLEADING) My love, I wish to go talk to my sisters. CUPID: (STERN) I do not advise this; it will lead to your own destruction. PSYCHE: But I yearn for their presence! Do not cause me such pain! CUPID: If you really must, go along. PSYCHE: (OVERJOYED) Thank you so much! NARRATOR: The next day, Psyche walks to the top of the hill to meet her sisters. PSYCHE: (HAPPY) Hello dear sisters! I have missed you so! SISTER 1: How nice to see you Psyche! How is your marriage? PSYCHE: Oh, it’s fine. My husband is currently away on a hunting trip, but come with me to my new home. FOOTSTEPS SISTER 2: Wow, your mansion is beautiful! PSYCHE: Yes, now come see the marvelous inside! NARRATOR: Psyche toured her sisters around the house. After each wonder showed to them, the sisters envied her more and more. PSYCHE: And in this room, we store all of our jewels. I have a small gift for you. SISTER 2: (AMAZED) Oh my! That is the most beautiful necklace I’ve ever seen! NARRATOR: It had become late, so Psyche’s sisters decided to depart from the mansion. Psyche waved farewell, and her sisters walked home. During their walk, they decided they must plot revenge on their sister due to their jealousy. PSYCHE: Cupid, I had such a wonderful time with my sisters, and now I long to see them again! CUPID: Again, I do not advise this, but if you really want to, go ahead. NARRATOR: The next day, the sisters meet up with Psyche once more with the intent to pursue their plan. SISTER 1: How nice to see you again Psyche! PSYCHE: Nice to see you too, my dear sisters! SISTER 2: (SLYLY) Your palace is lovely and all, but what does your husband look like? We have never seen him before. PSYCHE: Um…well… SISTER 1: You don’t know? PSYCHE: Oh, sisters, to tell you the truth, I have never seen his face, but he seems like a great gentleman. SISTER 2: He’s probably is a despicable monster! PSYCHE: No, no, no, you’re getting things all wrong! He is kind. SISTER 1: No, he must be the fearful serpent Apollo declared him to be. PSYCHE: (PANICKING) Oh my, sisters! He might be! SISTER 2: Yes, he is! You must do something about it! SISTER 1: We have some advice for you. Here is what you must do: Before you go to sleep, hide a sharp knife and a lamp under your bed. When your husband is sound asleep, light the lamp, get the knife, and plunge it into the body of the fearful monster you lay your eyes on. NARRATOR: Her two sisters left and Psyche sadly prepared the murder of her husband. That night, once her husband was fast asleep, Psyche lit the lamp, grabbed the light, and set out to complete her task. PSYCHE: (GASP) My, he is so handsome! He is not a monster, but instead the lovely God of Love, Cupid! DRIPPING OIL SIZZLING ON SKIN CUPID: (SAD) OW! Psyche! I am so disappointed in you. You did not trust me. There is no love. WING FLAPPING PSYCHE: (DISAPOINTED WITH HERSELF) How stupid am I? My husband was the most handsome man alive and now he is gone. I will not rest until I find him once more. SCENE SEVEN MUSIC “ONE”: SOFT MUSIC NARRATOR: Cupid, injured, flies to Venus for his mother’s help. He tells her the whole story of how he came to fall in love with Psyche. VENUS: Cupid, you have disappointed me. I will go find this woman to show her what happens when you draw down the displeasure of a goddess. CUPID: (INJURED) She has injured me, but I still love her greatly. VENUS: I have a good plan. You’ll see what I’ll do. NARRATOR: Psyche, hopeless decides to go to Venus, and offer herself as a servant. She hopes to reconcile with Cupid. PSYCHE: Venus, I have come here to offer myself as a servant for you to make up for my wrong doings. VENUS: (CACKLES) You think that I would let you be my servant? PSYCHE: (PLEADING) Please let me right this wrong. VENUS: I will show my good will by training you by giving you various tasks. NARRATOR: Psyche is ordered to do two difficult tasks, but the creatures take pity on her and aid her, allowing her to complete each of them. PSYCHE: (PROUD) I have finished the tasks you have given me. VENUS: (ANNOYED) How did you complete them so fast? Well, never mind, here is another: This is a box. I need you to fill it will some of Persephone’s beauty. She lives in the underworld. PSYCHE: (UNDER HER BREATH) This is the hardest task yet. How can I complete it? NARRATOR: As Psyche walks on the road to Hades, a friendly guide offers her directions. GUIDE: (FUNNY ACCENT) Hello, Hello. Okay, um, first you must go to a great hole in the earth, then you must go down the river of Death, then you must give the ferryman, Charon, a penny to give you a ride across the river. After that, there is a road that leads straight to the palace. You will meet a very, very, big dog, Cerebus, he is very big, but if you give him a cake he will be very friendly and let you pass. NARRATOR: Psyche follows his instructions and completes the task. After a short amount of time, Psyche comes back from the underworld. PSYCHE: I wonder what is in this box. CREAKING STRONG WIND PSYCHE: (YAWNS) I’m so tired… WINGS FLAPPING CUPID: (QUIETLY) Oh, she’s sound asleep. I must poke her with one of my arrows. PSYCHE: (YAWNS) (SUPIRSED) Cupid! CUPID: Oh Psyche, you are too curious for your own good. (DESPERATELY) These past few days, I have missed you so. I cannot live without you. PSYCHE: I feel the same way, Cupid. I love you.

Son Güncelleme: 2019-06-12
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Tagalogca

talumpati tagalog english translationVideo recordings, still video sequences, and player tracking patterns in games are probably the most complex representations of sports movements that you will come across. It is only your familiarity with sports videos that enables you to understand such patterns – watch a video of a game or sporting activity for which you do not know the rules (environmental and task constraints), and the complexity of video representations of movement patterns becomes obvious

İngilizce

Video recordings, still video sequences, and player tracking patterns in games are probably the most complex representations of sports movements that you will come across. It is only your familiarity with sports videos that enables you to understand such patterns – watch a video of a game or sporting activity for which you do not know the rules (environmental and task constraints), and the complexity of video representations of movement patterns becomes obvious

Son Güncelleme: 2019-04-21
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Tagalogca

The Religious SchismThe only living and tangible result of the revolution was the Filipinochurch, popularly known as the Aglipayan or Philippine Independent Church.When at the start of the second phase of the Revolution the Spanisharchbishop enlisted Father Gregorio Aglipay’s help in bringing back theFilipinos to the Spanish side, Aguinaldo persuaded Aglipay to divert hisenergies to the cause of the people Mabini, riding on the crest of the popularnationalistic movement, suggested the founding of a Filipino NationalChurch. Though unsuccessful owing to war conditions, his idea laid thegroundwork of the later Philippine Independent Church. The story of thebirth of this Church is to a great extent the story of the struggle of theFilipino clergy to Filipinize the Catholic Church in the Philippines.Gregorio Aglipay on the Scene–The Revolution which began in1896 was primarily a conflict of races. On one side were the Filipino civiland clerical groups who were up in arms against the Spanish civil and clericalsegments, on the other side. As it turned out, the second phase of theRevolution was not only political, but religious as well. The PhilippineCatholic Church, whose majority belonged to the party of the oppressors,aided and abetted the colonial government in its policy of repression. Mabinihimself, in his letter to General Otis in 1898, accused the Spanish friars ofgiving aid and comfort to the colonial administration and of taking up arms,when necessity arose, against the revolutionists. In the circumstances, herefused to free the friar-prisoners.In the second phase of the revolution, which commenced withAguinaldo’s return from Hong Kong, Governor-General Basilio Augustin andArchbishop Bernardino Nozaleda, knowing that Father Gregorio Aglipay wasstill sympathetic to Spain but rather hostile to the United States, played agame in which Aglipay was the pawn. They commissioned him to conferwith revolutionary leaders, particularly with Mariano Trias, Artemio Recarte,and Emiliano Riego de Dios, in order to bring them back to the Spanish side.The bait to win them over to their side was the promise of autonomy. Aglipaydid as he was told, but his mission was failure, for the revolutionary leadershad lost their faith in Spanish promises. Meanwhile, Aguinaldo, who had justreturned from Hong Kong, sent Colonel Luciano San Miguel as his emissaryto Aglipay for the purpose of persuading the latter to work for the Filipinocause. Nozaleda countered by commissioning Aglipay to win over Aguinaldoto the Spanish cause. Aguinaldo, however, was firm in his determination tocooperate with the Americans and urged Aglipay to go to the north to workfor the revolutionary cause. Nozaleda was well posted on these mover, andtaking advantage of the situation, encouraged Aglipay to go north not to heedAguinaldo’s prompting, but to investigate the condition of the bishopric ofNueva Segovia. Aglipay toured the northern provinces and secured therelease of two Jesuit priests. Upon his return to Manila to report to Nozaleda,

İngilizce

religious schismThe Religious SchismThe only living and tangible result of the revolution was the Filipinochurch, popularly known as the Aglipayan or Philippine Independent Church.When at the start of the second phase of the Revolution the Spanisharchbishop enlisted Father Gregorio Aglipay’s help in bringing back theFilipinos to the Spanish side, Aguinaldo persuaded Aglipay to divert hisenergies to the cause of the people Mabini, riding on the crest of the popularnationalistic movement, suggested the founding of a Filipino NationalChurch. Though unsuccessful owing to war conditions, his idea laid thegroundwork of the later Philippine Independent Church. The story of thebirth of this Church is to a great extent the story of the struggle of theFilipino clergy to Filipinize the Catholic Church in the Philippines.Gregorio Aglipay on the Scene–The Revolution which began in1896 was primarily a conflict of races. On one side were the Filipino civiland clerical groups who were up in arms against the Spanish civil and clericalsegments, on the other side. As it turned out, the second phase of theRevolution was not only political, but religious as well. The PhilippineCatholic Church, whose majority belonged to the party of the oppressors,aided and abetted the colonial government in its policy of repression. Mabinihimself, in his letter to General Otis in 1898, accused the Spanish friars ofgiving aid and comfort to the colonial administration and of taking up arms,when necessity arose, against the revolutionists. In the circumstances, herefused to free the friar prisoners.In the second phase of the revolution, which commenced withAguinaldo’s return from Hong Kong, Governor General Basilio Augustin andArchbishop Bernardino Nozaleda, knowing that Father Gregorio Aglipay wasstill sympathetic to Spain but rather hostile to the United States, played agame in which Aglipay was the pawn. They commissioned him to conferwith revolutionary leaders, particularly with Mariano Trias, Artemio Recarte,and Emiliano Riego de Dios, in order to bring them back to the Spanish side.The bait to win them over to their side was the promise of autonomy. Aglipaydid as he was told, but his mission was failure, for the revolutionary leadershad lost their faith in Spanish promises. Meanwhile, Aguinaldo, who had justreturned from Hong Kong, sent Colonel Luciano San Miguel as his emissaryto Aglipay for the purpose of persuading the latter to work for the Filipinocause. Nozaleda countered by commissioning Aglipay to win over Aguinaldoto the Spanish cause. Aguinaldo, however, was firm in his determination tocooperate with the Americans and urged Aglipay to go to the north to workfor the revolutionary cause. Nozaleda was well posted on these mover, andtaking advantage of the situation, encouraged Aglipay to go north not to heedAguinaldo’s prompting, but to investigate the condition of the bishopric ofNueva Segovia. Aglipay toured the northern provinces and secured therelease of two Jesuit priests. Upon his return to Manila to report to Nozaleda,

Son Güncelleme: 2019-01-29
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Tagalogca

Receivables Cash Management. Cash management is the treasury function of a business, responsible for achieving optimal efficiency in two key areas: receivables, which is cash coming in, and payables, which is cash going out.

İngilizce

Cash management refers to a broad area of finance involving the collection, handling, and usage of cash. It involves assessing market liquidity, cash flow, and investments. ... Financial instruments involved in cash management include money market funds, treasury bills, and certificates of deposit.

Son Güncelleme: 2019-01-20
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Tagalogca

characteristicsSophocles was an ancient Greek poet and one of three ancient Greek tragedians whose plays have survived. His plays belonged to the period after Aeschylus and earlier of Euripides. Based on the information provided by Suda, a 10th century encyclopedia, Sophocles wrote 123 plays during his lifetime, out of which only seven have survived in a complete form. These plays are Ajax, Antigone, Trachinian Women, Oedipus the King, Electra, Philoctetes and Oedipus at Colonus. It was believed that he remained the most celebrated playwright in the dramatic competitions of the city-state of Athens held during the religious festivals of the Lenaea and the Dionysia. Sophocles participated in thirty competitions, of which he won 24 and never went below second place in the rest. Among his plays, the two most famous tragedies, Oedipus and Antigone are generally known as the Theban plays, even though each play belonged to a part of a different tetralogy. Sophocles greatly influenced the drama. His main contribution was the addition of third actor which reduced the importance of the chorus in the presentation of the plot. A crater on the surface of Mercury has been after this ace Greek poet and playwright. Sophocles Childhood and Life Sophocles was the son of Sophilus, who was a rich member of the rural deme (small community) of Colonus Hippius. Sophocles was said to have been born in Attica. It is said that he was born few years before the Battle of Marathon in 490 BC, which is probably around 497/6 BC. Sophocles received his first artistic achievement in 468 BC, when he won first prize in the Dionysia theatre competition over the reigning master of Athenian drama, Aeschylus. According to Greek historian Plutarch, this victory was quite unusual. Unlike the usual custom of choosing judges by lot, the archon asked Cimon and the other strategoi present to decide the victor of the contest. According to him after being defeated, Aeschylus left for Sicily. “Triptolemus” was one amongst the plays that Sophocles presented at this festival. When Sophocles was sixteen, he was chosen to lead the paean, a choral chant to a God, celebrating the Greek victory over the Persians at the Battle of Salamis. He was one of the ten strategoi, high executive officials that commanded the armed forces and was the junior colleague of Pericles. In the beginning of his career, Sophocles received patronage from the politician Cimon. Even when Cimon was ostracized by Pericles (Cimon's rival) in 461 BC, Sophocles received no harm. In 443/ 442 he became one of the Hellenotamiai, or treasurers of Athena, and had the role to assist managing the finances of the city during the political ascendancy of Pericles. Based on the accounts of the Vita Sophoclis, he served as a general in the Athenian campaign against Samos in 441 BC. It was believed that Sophocles received this post because of his writing of Antigone. In 420 BC, when Asclepius was introduced to Athens, he welcomed it and set up an altar for the image of deity at his house. In 413, Sophocles was elected one of the commissioners who reacted to the catastrophic destruction of the Athenian expeditionary force in Sicily during the Peloponnesian War. Personal Life Sophocles first married to Nicostrata, with whom he had a son named Iophon. In the later life, he had relationship with a woman of Sicyon. She bore him a son called Ariston. It was believed that he had three more sons, but there is not much information about them. Death In the winter of 406/ 405 BC, Sophocles died at the age of ninety or ninety one. Like the other famous men from the ancient history, his death also inspired many apocryphal stories. One of the stories states that he died from the strain of trying to recite a long sentence from his play, “Antigone” without pausing to take a breath. Whereas the other story suggests that he choked to death while eating grapes at the Anthesteria festival in Athens. The third story accounts that he died due to excessive happiness over winning his final victory at the City Dionysia. Works The earliest contribution of Sophocles to the drama was the introduction of the third actor which immensely reduced the role of the chorus and created better opportunities for character development and conflict between characters. Even his competitor Aeschylus, who dominated Athenian playwrights during Sophocles' early career, accepted the new idea and adopted it into his own work towards the end of his life. Aristotle gave Sophocles the credit of the introduction of skenographia, or scenery-painting. After the death of Aeschylus in 456 BC, Sophocles became the celebrated playwright in Athens. He emerged victorious in different dramatic competitions, 18 at Dionysia and 6 at Lenaea festivals. Apart from making innovations in the dramatic structure, he was also known for his deeper development of characters than the earlier playwrights. His widespread reputation helped him to get invitation from foreign rulers to attend their courts, but unlike other playwrights Aeschylus who died in Sicily, or Euripides who spent time in Macedon, he never accepted any of these invitations. Sophocles works were influential and significant for the Greek culture. Two out of his seven plays can be estimated correctly to their exact dates, which namely are “Philoctetes” (409 BC) and “Oedipus at Colonus” (401 BC, staged after his death by his grandson). From the rest of his plays, “Electra” had striking similarities to these two plays which put forwards the fact that it was written in the later part of his literary career. Again based on the stylistic characteristics of “Oedipus the King” which came in his middle period, “Ajax”, “Antigone” and “The Trachiniae” belonged to his early days. Sophocles had also written three Theban plays namely, “Oedipus the King”, “Oedipus at Colonus” and “Antigone”. All these plays described the fate of Thebes during and after the reign of King Oedipus. These plays were sometimes even published under a single cover. Sophocles had written these plays in separate festival competitions with several years of difference between them. They cannot be called trilogy because of the presence of inconsistencies among them. Apart from these, Sophocles is supposed to have written few more Theban plays such as such as “The Progeny”, which survived in fragments. The majority of his plays depicted the undercurrent of early fatalism and the offset of Socratic logic being the keystone for the long tradition of Greek tragedy.

İngilizce

Sophocles was an ancient Greek poet and one of three ancient Greek tragedians whose plays have survived. His plays belonged to the period after Aeschylus and earlier of Euripides. Based on the information provided by Suda, a 10th century encyclopedia, Sophocles wrote 123 plays during his lifetime, out of which only seven have survived in a complete form. These plays are Ajax, Antigone, Trachinian Women, Oedipus the King, Electra, Philoctetes and Oedipus at Colonus. It was believed that he remained the most celebrated playwright in the dramatic competitions of the city-state of Athens held during the religious festivals of the Lenaea and the Dionysia. Sophocles participated in thirty competitions, of which he won 24 and never went below second place in the rest. Among his plays, the two most famous tragedies, Oedipus and Antigone are generally known as the Theban plays, even though each play belonged to a part of a different tetralogy. Sophocles greatly influenced the drama. His main contribution was the addition of third actor which reduced the importance of the chorus in the presentation of the plot. A crater on the surface of Mercury has been after this ace Greek poet and playwright. Sophocles Childhood and Life Sophocles was the son of Sophilus, who was a rich member of the rural deme (small community) of Colonus Hippius. Sophocles was said to have been born in Attica. It is said that he was born few years before the Battle of Marathon in 490 BC, which is probably around 497/6 BC. Sophocles received his first artistic achievement in 468 BC, when he won first prize in the Dionysia theatre competition over the reigning master of Athenian drama, Aeschylus. According to Greek historian Plutarch, this victory was quite unusual. Unlike the usual custom of choosing judges by lot, the archon asked Cimon and the other strategoi present to decide the victor of the contest. According to him after being defeated, Aeschylus left for Sicily. “Triptolemus” was one amongst the plays that Sophocles presented at this festival. When Sophocles was sixteen, he was chosen to lead the paean, a choral chant to a God, celebrating the Greek victory over the Persians at the Battle of Salamis. He was one of the ten strategoi, high executive officials that commanded the armed forces and was the junior colleague of Pericles. In the beginning of his career, Sophocles received patronage from the politician Cimon. Even when Cimon was ostracized by Pericles (Cimon's rival) in 461 BC, Sophocles received no harm. In 443/ 442 he became one of the Hellenotamiai, or treasurers of Athena, and had the role to assist managing the finances of the city during the political ascendancy of Pericles. Based on the accounts of the Vita Sophoclis, he served as a general in the Athenian campaign against Samos in 441 BC. It was believed that Sophocles received this post because of his writing of Antigone. In 420 BC, when Asclepius was introduced to Athens, he welcomed it and set up an altar for the image of deity at his house. In 413, Sophocles was elected one of the commissioners who reacted to the catastrophic destruction of the Athenian expeditionary force in Sicily during the Peloponnesian War. Personal Life Sophocles first married to Nicostrata, with whom he had a son named Iophon. In the later life, he had relationship with a woman of Sicyon. She bore him a son called Ariston. It was believed that he had three more sons, but there is not much information about them. Death In the winter of 406/ 405 BC, Sophocles died at the age of ninety or ninety one. Like the other famous men from the ancient history, his death also inspired many apocryphal stories. One of the stories states that he died from the strain of trying to recite a long sentence from his play, “Antigone” without pausing to take a breath. Whereas the other story suggests that he choked to death while eating grapes at the Anthesteria festival in Athens. The third story accounts that he died due to excessive happiness over winning his final victory at the City Dionysia. Works The earliest contribution of Sophocles to the drama was the introduction of the third actor which immensely reduced the role of the chorus and created better opportunities for character development and conflict between characters. Even his competitor Aeschylus, who dominated Athenian playwrights during Sophocles' early career, accepted the new idea and adopted it into his own work towards the end of his life. Aristotle gave Sophocles the credit of the introduction of skenographia, or scenery-painting. After the death of Aeschylus in 456 BC, Sophocles became the celebrated playwright in Athens. He emerged victorious in different dramatic competitions, 18 at Dionysia and 6 at Lenaea festivals. Apart from making innovations in the dramatic structure, he was also known for his deeper development of characters than the earlier playwrights. His widespread reputation helped him to get invitation from foreign rulers to attend their courts, but unlike other playwrights Aeschylus who died in Sicily, or Euripides who spent time in Macedon, he never accepted any of these invitations. Sophocles works were influential and significant for the Greek culture. Two out of his seven plays can be estimated correctly to their exact dates, which namely are “Philoctetes” (409 BC) and “Oedipus at Colonus” (401 BC, staged after his death by his grandson). From the rest of his plays, “Electra” had striking similarities to these two plays which put forwards the fact that it was written in the later part of his literary career. Again based on the stylistic characteristics of “Oedipus the King” which came in his middle period, “Ajax”, “Antigone” and “The Trachiniae” belonged to his early days. Sophocles had also written three Theban plays namely, “Oedipus the King”, “Oedipus at Colonus” and “Antigone”. All these plays described the fate of Thebes during and after the reign of King Oedipus. These plays were sometimes even published under a single cover. Sophocles had written these plays in separate festival competitions with several years of difference between them. They cannot be called trilogy because of the presence of inconsistencies among them. Apart from these, Sophocles is supposed to have written few more Theban plays such as such as “The Progeny”, which survived in fragments. The majority of his plays depicted the undercurrent of early fatalism and the offset of Socratic logic being the keystone for the long tradition of Greek tragedy.

Son Güncelleme: 2018-03-23
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