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Englisch

Tagalog

Info

Englisch

Tier

Tagalog

tier

Letzte Aktualisierung: 2014-11-24
Nutzungshäufigkeit: 1
Qualität:

Referenz: Anonym

Englisch

tier group

Tagalog

baitang at pangkat

Letzte Aktualisierung: 2016-07-21
Nutzungshäufigkeit: 1
Qualität:

Referenz: Anonym

Englisch

Salary and earning potential

Tagalog

kasiyahan sa trabaho

Letzte Aktualisierung: 2019-05-09
Nutzungshäufigkeit: 1
Qualität:

Referenz: Anonym

Englisch

my day is incomplete without earning mone

Tagalog

Hindi kumpleto araw ko pag di kita nakakausap

Letzte Aktualisierung: 2019-03-31
Nutzungshäufigkeit: 1
Qualität:

Referenz: Anonym

Englisch

I will ensure that I will be sent sapakin earning income when you do not ceased best friend

Tagalog

Sisiguraduhin ko na ipapa sapakin kita kita kapag di mo tinigilan Best friend ko

Letzte Aktualisierung: 2017-01-31
Nutzungshäufigkeit: 1
Qualität:

Referenz: Anonym

Englisch

Now that they immediately become mothers, you immediately negate their chance of earning a college degree and therefore becoming a professional and providing for their child.

Tagalog

Ngayong magiging mga ina na sila sa murang edad, ipinagkait mo na agad sa kanila ang pagkakataon nilang makakuha ng kaantasan sa kolehiyo at sa kalaunan, pagkakaroon ng hanapbuhay na panggagalingan ng kanilang ipapakain sa magiging anak nila.

Letzte Aktualisierung: 2016-02-24
Nutzungshäufigkeit: 1
Qualität:

Referenz: Anonym

Englisch

Over the years Pompey and Crassus had come to be intense rivals. But once again Caesar displayed his abilities as a negotiator, earning the trust of both men and convincing them they'd be better suited as allies instead of enemies.

Tagalog

Sa paglipas ng taon Pompey at Crassus ay dumating upang maging malubha karibal. Ngunit sa sandaling muli Caesar ipinapakita ang kanyang kakayahan bilang isang negosyante, kita ang tiwala ng parehong mga kalalakihan at kumbinsihin ang mga ito na gusto sila ay mas mahusay na naaangkop na mga kaalyado sa halip ng mga kaaway.

Letzte Aktualisierung: 2015-10-14
Nutzungshäufigkeit: 1
Qualität:

Referenz: Anonym

Englisch

retained earnings

Tagalog

The statement of retained earnings

Letzte Aktualisierung: 2019-02-03
Nutzungshäufigkeit: 1
Qualität:

Referenz: Anonym

Englisch

All it took was a solar eclipse and five-car collision atop the Magnetic Hill for the souls of five individuals --- the virginal bride-to-be (Angelica Panganiban), her histrionically litigious godmother (Eugene Domingo), her ringbearer's destitute nanny (Tuesday Vargas), her husband-to-be's amorous grandfather (Jaime Fabregas), and her gay beautician (John Lapuz) --- to switch bodies. With the bride-to-be's soul transferring to the godmother's body; the godmother's soul transferring to the nanny's body; the nanny's soul transferring to the grandfather's body; the grandfather's soul transferring to the beautician's body; and the beautician's soul transferring to the bride-to-be's body, the dream beach wedding turns into a hilarious riot, where long-dormant passions are awakened, sexual fantasies are fulfilled, economic alleviation is achieved, and a chance at love is obtained. Let us get it out of the way. Chris Martinez's Here Comes the Bride is top-notch entertainment. Martinez was able to come up with everything most recent Filipino mainstream comedies lack: that no-nonsense singular objective of making people laugh. From the getgo to the post-credit extra scene, the film never stopped to be overtly pedantic or moralistic, a problem that most Filipino comedies have since there always seems to be this need to use cinema as replacement for Sunday school. For example, Wenn Deramas' Ang Tanging Ina (The True Mother, 2003), and its sequel and many offshoots, are always derailed by its insistence on teaching a lesson; even Joyce Bernal's Kimmy Dora (2009) is stalled by its apologetic dénouement that went too long and too serious. Never mind the forced logic to explain the illogic, the negligible business about solar eclipses and souls, the history and science behind the soul-swap, as authoritatively explained by television trivia-master Kim Atienza. Here Comes the Bride is deliriously funny nonsense all the way and it thankfully works. The film's success is not entirely surprising. After all, Martinez is arguably one of the Philippines' better screenwriters. His screenplays, from Bridal Shower (Jeffrey Jeturian, 2004), about three friends in search of love, to Caregiver (Chito Roño, 2008), about a mother who follows her husband to London in the hopes of earning enough to live comfortably, reflect his ability to articulate something as minute as the language to something as pertinent as the needs of the rapidly-changing Filipino society for mainstream appeal. 100 (2008), his directorial debut about a woman who is dying from cancer, is salvaged from being a run-of-the-mill melodrama by an abundance of relevant humor. Martinez understands the Filipino soul, that the very best way to tackle something as devastating as death is to treat it with levity, to make it familiar and therefore personal. That said, Martinez may very well be the most current of all actively working screenwriters, actively pursuing entertainment without being dumbed down by the demands of commercial accessibility. Despite its astounding technical polish, Here Comes the Bride is fundamentally closer to Joey Gosiengfiao's redeemed Temptation Island (1981), where a bunch of beauty queens and the men surrounding them are stranded in a deserted island, than the mechanically churned comedies Star Cinema has been producing the past recent years. Underneath the caricatures that Martinez connected by the conceit of the convenient soul-swap, underneath the blatant inanity of its carefully conceived proceedings, is a well-pronounced understanding that life, as it is, is unfair, that there are those who are born poor, those who live loveless, and those who inevitably grow old and inutile. In a twist of fate, cruel only to the bride-to-be who suddenly gets a first-hand experience of the inequity of living after a lifetime of being sheltered and protected, inabilities and deficiencies are cured, emphasizing in what essentially is a film created for no other reason than to be an escapist fantasy that the key to a happy life is as unrealistic and as incredible as swapping souls via rare natural phenomena. Like Temptation Island whose gay pageant director becomes the unwilling sacrificial lamb simply because he presumably has the least to lose among the other loved and loving survivors, the most fully realized character in Here Comes the Bride is the love-starved gay beautician whose fortune of being transported to the body of the beautiful and sexy bride-to-be is the most dramatic out of the five. As expected, it is mostly played for laughs and Panganiban does a brilliant job in emulating the fabulous larger-than-life gestures of Lapuz. After all, the very idea of a gay man suddenly and surprisingly getting everything he ever wanted, from the body parts he can only have in his wildest dreams to the straight men who he can only love and lust for from a safe distance, is in itself a hoot. The hilarity of the absurd situation, at that scene where the bride-to-be in the body of her godmother insists that the gay beautician return her body, unravels into a well-pronounced statement of gay angst and sentiment as he emotionally shouts "Hindi ninyo maiintindihan dahil hindi kayo bakla! (You will never understand because you are not gay!). At that moment, the film, notwithstanding the fact that it never stopped being funny, reflected a current fundamental truth, something that not even a mainstream film as self-promotedly queer as Olivia Lamasan's In My Life (2009) can have the guts to state as plainly and matter-of-factly as that. The gay man becomes a girl. The loveless godmother feels how it is to be loved. The amorous yet incapacitated grandfather relives the passion and the romance of his distant youth. The poor nanny turns into a millionaire. The innocent bride-to-be wallows in the realities of life's misfortune. Martinez fills the screen with realized desires at the expense of the bride-to-be, emphasizing the frailty of the human soul in the face of happiness. In the midst of the film's invaluable wit and humor that frequently pumps in rhythm with the Latin beats of the apt lively music score, the film's characters, ideally uncomplicated and stereotypical, are allowed to live their desires realized, concretizing in easy-to-understand cinematic terms the pleasures of escape, of living a fantasy even if it is only momentarily. I am very happy to say that Here Comes the Bride is as current and relevant as it is entertaining and hysterical.

Tagalog

All it took was a solar eclipse and five-car collision atop the Magnetic Hill for the souls of five individuals --- the virginal bride-to-be (Angelica Panganiban), her histrionically litigious godmother (Eugene Domingo), her ringbearer's destitute nanny (Tuesday Vargas), her husband-to-be's amorous grandfather (Jaime Fabregas), and her gay beautician (John Lapuz) --- to switch bodies. With the bride-to-be's soul transferring to the godmother's body; the godmother's soul transferring to the nanny's body; the nanny's soul transferring to the grandfather's body; the grandfather's soul transferring to the beautician's body; and the beautician's soul transferring to the bride-to-be's body, the dream beach wedding turns into a hilarious riot, where long-dormant passions are awakened, sexual fantasies are fulfilled, economic alleviation is achieved, and a chance at love is obtained. Let us get it out of the way. Chris Martinez's Here Comes the Bride is top-notch entertainment. Martinez was able to come up with everything most recent Filipino mainstream comedies lack: that no-nonsense singular objective of making people laugh. From the getgo to the post-credit extra scene, the film never stopped to be overtly pedantic or moralistic, a problem that most Filipino comedies have since there always seems to be this need to use cinema as replacement for Sunday school. For example, Wenn Deramas' Ang Tanging Ina (The True Mother, 2003), and its sequel and many offshoots, are always derailed by its insistence on teaching a lesson; even Joyce Bernal's Kimmy Dora (2009) is stalled by its apologetic dénouement that went too long and too serious. Never mind the forced logic to explain the illogic, the negligible business about solar eclipses and souls, the history and science behind the soul-swap, as authoritatively explained by television trivia-master Kim Atienza. Here Comes the Bride is deliriously funny nonsense all the way and it thankfully works. The film's success is not entirely surprising. After all, Martinez is arguably one of the Philippines' better screenwriters. His screenplays, from Bridal Shower (Jeffrey Jeturian, 2004), about three friends in search of love, to Caregiver (Chito Roño, 2008), about a mother who follows her husband to London in the hopes of earning enough to live comfortably, reflect his ability to articulate something as minute as the language to something as pertinent as the needs of the rapidly-changing Filipino society for mainstream appeal. 100 (2008), his directorial debut about a woman who is dying from cancer, is salvaged from being a run-of-the-mill melodrama by an abundance of relevant humor. Martinez understands the Filipino soul, that the very best way to tackle something as devastating as death is to treat it with levity, to make it familiar and therefore personal. That said, Martinez may very well be the most current of all actively working screenwriters, actively pursuing entertainment without being dumbed down by the demands of commercial accessibility. Despite its astounding technical polish, Here Comes the Bride is fundamentally closer to Joey Gosiengfiao's redeemed Temptation Island (1981), where a bunch of beauty queens and the men surrounding them are stranded in a deserted island, than the mechanically churned comedies Star Cinema has been producing the past recent years. Underneath the caricatures that Martinez connected by the conceit of the convenient soul-swap, underneath the blatant inanity of its carefully conceived proceedings, is a well-pronounced understanding that life, as it is, is unfair, that there are those who are born poor, those who live loveless, and those who inevitably grow old and inutile. In a twist of fate, cruel only to the bride-to-be who suddenly gets a first-hand experience of the inequity of living after a lifetime of being sheltered and protected, inabilities and deficiencies are cured, emphasizing in what essentially is a film created for no other reason than to be an escapist fantasy that the key to a happy life is as unrealistic and as incredible as swapping souls via rare natural phenomena. Like Temptation Island whose gay pageant director becomes the unwilling sacrificial lamb simply because he presumably has the least to lose among the other loved and loving survivors, the most fully realized character in Here Comes the Bride is the love-starved gay beautician whose fortune of being transported to the body of the beautiful and sexy bride-to-be is the most dramatic out of the five. As expected, it is mostly played for laughs and Panganiban does a brilliant job in emulating the fabulous larger-than-life gestures of Lapuz. After all, the very idea of a gay man suddenly and surprisingly getting everything he ever wanted, from the body parts he can only have in his wildest dreams to the straight men who he can only love and lust for from a safe distance, is in itself a hoot. The hilarity of the absurd situation, at that scene where the bride-to-be in the body of her godmother insists that the gay beautician return her body, unravels into a well-pronounced statement of gay angst and sentiment as he emotionally shouts "Hindi ninyo maiintindihan dahil hindi kayo bakla! (You will never understand because you are not gay!). At that moment, the film, notwithstanding the fact that it never stopped being funny, reflected a current fundamental truth, something that not even a mainstream film as self-promotedly queer as Olivia Lamasan's In My Life (2009) can have the guts to state as plainly and matter-of-factly as that. The gay man becomes a girl. The loveless godmother feels how it is to be loved. The amorous yet incapacitated grandfather relives the passion and the romance of his distant youth. The poor nanny turns into a millionaire. The innocent bride-to-be wallows in the realities of life's misfortune. Martinez fills the screen with realized desires at the expense of the bride-to-be, emphasizing the frailty of the human soul in the face of happiness. In the midst of the film's invaluable wit and humor that frequently pumps in rhythm with the Latin beats of the apt lively music score, the film's characters, ideally uncomplicated and stereotypical, are allowed to live their desires realized, concretizing in easy-to-understand cinematic terms the pleasures of escape, of living a fantasy even if it is only momentarily. I am very happy to say that Here Comes the Bride is as current and relevant as it is entertaining and hysterical. All it took was a solar eclipse and five-car collision atop the Magnetic Hill for the souls of five individuals --- the virginal bride-to-be (Angelica Panganiban), her histrionically litigious godmother (Eugene Domingo), her ringbearer's destitute nanny (Tuesday Vargas), her husband-to-be's amorous grandfather (Jaime Fabregas), and her gay beautician (John Lapuz) --- to switch bodies. With the bride-to-be's soul transferring to the godmother's body; the godmother's soul transferring to the nanny's body; the nanny's soul transferring to the grandfather's body; the grandfather's soul transferring to the beautician's body; and the beautician's soul transferring to the bride-to-be's body, the dream beach wedding turns into a hilarious riot, where long-dormant passions are awakened, sexual fantasies are fulfilled, economic alleviation is achieved, and a chance at love is obtained. Let us get it out of the way. Chris Martinez's Here Comes the Bride is top-notch entertainment. Martinez was able to come up with everything most recent Filipino mainstream comedies lack: that no-nonsense singular objective of making people laugh. From the getgo to the post-credit extra scene, the film never stopped to be overtly pedantic or moralistic, a problem that most Filipino comedies have since there always seems to be this need to use cinema as replacement for Sunday school. For example, Wenn Deramas' Ang Tanging Ina (The True Mother, 2003), and its sequel and many offshoots, are always derailed by its insistence on teaching a lesson; even Joyce Bernal's Kimmy Dora (2009) is stalled by its apologetic dénouement that went too long and too serious. Never mind the forced logic to explain the illogic, the negligible business about solar eclipses and souls, the history and science behind the soul-swap, as authoritatively explained by television trivia-master Kim Atienza. Here Comes the Bride is deliriously funny nonsense all the way and it thankfully works. The film's success is not entirely surprising. After all, Martinez is arguably one of the Philippines' better screenwriters. His screenplays, from Bridal Shower (Jeffrey Jeturian, 2004), about three friends in search of love, to Caregiver (Chito Roño, 2008), about a mother who follows her husband to London in the hopes of earning enough to live comfortably, reflect his ability to articulate something as minute as the language to something as pertinent as the needs of the rapidly-changing Filipino society for mainstream appeal. 100 (2008), his directorial debut about a woman who is dying from cancer, is salvaged from being a run-of-the-mill melodrama by an abundance of relevant humor. Martinez understands the Filipino soul, that the very best way to tackle something as devastating as death is to treat it with levity, to make it familiar and therefore personal. That said, Martinez may very well be the most current of all actively working screenwriters, actively pursuing entertainment without being dumbed down by the demands of commercial accessibility. Despite its astounding technical polish, Here Comes the Bride is fundamentally closer to Joey Gosiengfiao's redeemed Temptation Island (1981), where a bunch of beauty queens and the men surrounding them are stranded in a deserted island, than the mechanically churned comedies Star Cinema has been producing the past recent years. Underneath the caricatures that Martinez connected by the conceit of the convenient soul-swap, underneath the blatant inanity of its carefully conceived proceedings, is a well-pronounced understanding that life, as it is, is unfair, that there are those who are born poor, those who live loveless, and those who inevitably grow old and inutile. In a twist of fate, cruel only to the bride-to-be who suddenly gets a first-hand experience of the inequity of living after a lifetime of being sheltered and protected, inabilities and deficiencies are cured, emphasizing in what essentially is a film created for no other reason than to be an escapist fantasy that the key to a happy life is as unrealistic and as incredible as swapping souls via rare natural phenomena. Like Temptation Island whose gay pageant director becomes the unwilling sacrificial lamb simply because he presumably has the least to lose among the other loved and loving survivors, the most fully realized character in Here Comes the Bride is the love-starved gay beautician whose fortune of being transported to the body of the beautiful and sexy bride-to-be is the most dramatic out of the five. As expected, it is mostly played for laughs and Panganiban does a brilliant job in emulating the fabulous larger-than-life gestures of Lapuz. After all, the very idea of a gay man suddenly and surprisingly getting everything he ever wanted, from the body parts he can only have in his wildest dreams to the straight men who he can only love and lust for from a safe distance, is in itself a hoot. The hilarity of the absurd situation, at that scene where the bride-to-be in the body of her godmother insists that the gay beautician return her body, unravels into a well-pronounced statement of gay angst and sentiment as he emotionally shouts "Hindi ninyo maiintindihan dahil hindi kayo bakla! (You will never understand because you are not gay!). At that moment, the film, notwithstanding the fact that it never stopped being funny, reflected a current fundamental truth, something that not even a mainstream film as self-promotedly queer as Olivia Lamasan's In My Life (2009) can have the guts to state as plainly and matter-of-factly as that. The gay man becomes a girl. The loveless godmother feels how it is to be loved. The amorous yet incapacitated grandfather relives the passion and the romance of his distant youth. The poor nanny turns into a millionaire. The innocent bride-to-be wallows in the realities of life's misfortune. Martinez fills the screen with realized desires at the expense of the bride-to-be, emphasizing the frailty of the human soul in the face of happiness. In the midst of the film's invaluable wit and humor that frequently pumps in rhythm with the Latin beats of the apt lively music score, the film's characters, ideally uncomplicated and stereotypical, are allowed to live their desires realized, concretizing in easy-to-understand cinematic terms the pleasures of escape, of living a fantasy even if it is only momentarily. I am very happy to say that Here Comes the Bride is as current and relevant as it is entertaining and hysterical.

Letzte Aktualisierung: 2016-12-05
Nutzungshäufigkeit: 1
Qualität:

Referenz: Anonym
Warnung: Enthält unsichtbare HTML-Formatierung

Englisch

beat earnings

Tagalog

bugbugin kita

Letzte Aktualisierung: 2016-04-28
Nutzungshäufigkeit: 1
Qualität:

Referenz: Anonym

Englisch

A legend on the origin of Paoay Lake in Paoay, Ilocos Norte STORY: Long ago, there was a beautiful village situated on a verdant tropical land. The people living in the village were known for being simple, hardworking and god fearing. These humble villagers built a church out of their skimpy earnings to worship and show respect to their god. Years passed and the village prospered. The people became rich; their wealth has been reflected through their ornate houses, extravagant clothing and glittering jewelries. As pride lingered on every resident, rivalry also sets in. The people worked even more hard to acquire things more than the others. Being very rich, the people forgot to respect god as jealousy took the place of good will. The church was no longer a place of worship but it became an avenue to display the townspeople’s vanity. Whilst the rest of the village residents spent their lives in worldly competition, a couple remained simple and god-fearing. One night an apparition appeared and told them that the village will be destroyed by a flood. The following day, the couple warned their neighbors and told them to revert for them to be spared from the flood. The villagers did not heed their warning but laughed at them. They continued what they’re doing and mocked the couple accusing them of envy. That night, the humble couple heard a voice telling them to leave the village early in the morning. The voice instructed them to go as far as they can and never look back; most especially when they hear a loud thunder and noise. The next day, they couple prepared early and left the village. While on their way, they heard a loud clap of thunder followed by rampaging waters. The villagers were awakened but their shrieks and cries were resounded and died as they were submerged in a pool of muddy water. The fleeing couple was shaken by these cries and loud rumblings. Unconsciously, the woman turned back to look at the village. In an instant, the woman fainted as the husband tried to drag her but they both turned into stone. As years went by, a beautiful lake emerged at the place where the village sank; and is now the famous PAOAY LAKE. Rekindle this fantastic legend by visiting the pretty places in Paoay in Ilocos Norte

Tagalog

MyMemory

Letzte Aktualisierung: 2016-02-27
Nutzungshäufigkeit: 1
Qualität:

Referenz: Anonym

Englisch

Export earnings of the garment sector represent about a third of the country’s 15.25-billion-dollar GDP last year.

Tagalog

Ang mga pakinabang sa pag-e-export ng sektor ng pananamit ay kumakatawan sa halos ikatlong bahagi ng 15.25-bilyong-dolyares na GDP noong nakaraang taon.

Letzte Aktualisierung: 2016-02-24
Nutzungshäufigkeit: 1
Qualität:

Referenz: Anonym

Englisch

buod sa talambuhay ni isko morenoIn the Philippine entertainment, Isko Moreno is an actor who had turned to politics as is career aside from being a celebrity. His real name is Francisco Domagoso, born in Tondo, Manila on October 24, 1974. He went to Arellano University, Pamantasan ng Lungsod ng Maynila and University of the Philippines for his education and a college degree in Bachelor of Laws. He was an only child to parents Joaquin and Rosario, who tried to raise him in spite of poverty and difficulties in life. His father worked as a stevedore at the North Harbor, and his earnings are barely enough to sustain the daily needs of the family. Isko saw this situation as a challenge and at an early age he tried to help and share in the burden of the family. He gathered all sorts of recyclable and reusable garbage such as plastics, cans, old newspapers and cartons and sold them. He was doing this until he had finished his elementary education at the Rosauro Almario Elementary School. In his high school days, he was a pedicab driver, and this supported him in his schooling at the Tondo High School. He did not mind the hardships and hindrances because he believed that all the hard works would pay off in the future. It is when he was enrolled in Marine Engineering at the Philippine Maritime Institute that luck and fate befalls him. This was the moment that he was discovered by Roxas. From doing bit roles he worked his way to become a good actor and be successful in his acting career. Focus is the right word to describe him, his firm determination to achieve whatever he wants is what makes him going. He used to be a member of German Moreno’s teen oriented show entitled “That’s Entertainment.” Isko used to work as a street vendor with a pushcart while studying until Wowie Roxas spotted and brought him to Kuya Germs (nickname of German Moreno.) That is how his acting and movie career started. Eventually, she married Diana Lynn Ditan and had four children namely, Vincent Patrick, Frances Diane, Joaquin Andre and Franco. It was in 1998 that he decided to enter politics, because of his desire to improve the plight of his community from where he came from. Barely new in the field, his opponents were surprised to see that he landed as one of the top councilors of the 1st District of Manila. He did his job, much to the amazement of the people in the political arena, which gained him a 3-term for the seat. Isko as he promised lived to create resolutions that served the interest of the poor population of Tondo. He did vow to serve the underprivileged people. Isko Moreno had completed his three-term Councilor in Manila and has won as Vice Mayor at the last election. Some of his memorable movie and TV appearances were, “May Minamahal,” “Muntik Na Kitang Minahal,””Sya’y Nagdadalaga,” “Exploitation,” “Mga Babae Sa Isla Azul,””Misteryosa,’ and “Tukso Layuan Mo Ako.” Other TV shows include, “Ligaw Na Bulaklak,””Bakekang,” “Mga Anghel Na Walang Langit,”

Tagalog

Summary biography of isko moreno

Letzte Aktualisierung: 2016-02-16
Nutzungshäufigkeit: 1
Qualität:

Referenz: Anonym

Englisch

The movie entails about the life of the young ones who suffer from national crises. It all starts with the narration of the Painter about life of the children, as the character of his master piece of the Last Supper painting. The children in the painting have different stories in life. They are being abused and used for survival, who suffers from irresponsible parents, and putting their life into risk in order to feed their self. At the same time the painter tries to convey to the viewers on how to be sensitive to the children who are not worth of the life they have today. He tries to express that we are not blind of not seeing the environment of poverty. At present I know that poverty everywhere really existing, and who suffer from it are the young ones. I’ve experience the situation where in I’m kind of stupid to be hesitated to express my pity for those who are asking for money, to sustain their needs. I’m kind of inconsiderate of what they are begging. It’s just that I am thinking of myself but not about the situation they have now, being less fortunate of the society. I have also experience a situation where in I’m kind of judgmental person. I judge them to be bad and do bad things if they will approach you. I feel afraid of them; I think that they will take my cell phone, bag, my money in my pocket, or any thing when I am walking on the street. At the same time I’ve experience were I am taking my lunch break, I saw children who are facing in front of me begging for the food I ‘m eating. And what a damn thing I do to them, I surely eat my food until the chicken is flesh-less and leave the plate with a bone of the chicken, without thinking that there is a young individual that will get it and eat it just to feed there hungriness. Even at home, I am so choosy in the food at the table. I will not eat if I do not like the viand that is being served on the table. But don’t mind that I’m lucky enough that there is a blessing, a food that nourished me to survive in this world. Maybe I’m just thinking about my hungriness, but not for them who are hungrier. I realize after watching the movie, a flash back of what I did to the hungry individual, that I am really bad person, self-centered and damn. I think that I am a person without morality, feel enriching, and annoying; and pretending to be blind about the things that need my help. I am not worth to live in this place if what I think is just the world and me. I am so sorry for that. What I did is really a big sin to the society, to the world and to God. I should do even just a little thing, or the things that I really can for the welfare of those in need. I should struggle a lot rather than them because they are not obliged to do so. It is not there responsibility to travel from one place to another just to seek for money. I am educated enough, my range of thinking is good enough, and I already know how to start things move but don’t know how to move for those who do not experience what I do. I am aware about many things about poverty, I feel lose for them but just stop there, no action is being implemented. We are not here in this world just to understand for the things that must be understood, but to act what we really can. I suggest that we as a human who live with better nourishment should give even just a little time for them, by earning money, and maybe someday we can build a better living for them. We should share wholeheartedly, not just in terms of costly things but also in terms of caring and loving, as how God loves us and all of us. “Awareness is useless without action.”

Tagalog

anong paglilimi papel Ng I-sa kambas Ng lipunan

Letzte Aktualisierung: 2015-06-27
Nutzungshäufigkeit: 1
Qualität:

Referenz: Anonym

Englisch

I do not seek to lead earnings

Tagalog

Ala akong ibang hinangad

Letzte Aktualisierung: 2014-11-17
Nutzungshäufigkeit: 1
Qualität:

Referenz: Anonym

Englisch

earnings miss

Tagalog

mis n kita

Letzte Aktualisierung: 2014-10-28
Nutzungshäufigkeit: 1
Qualität:

Referenz: Anonym

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