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Afrikaans

Slot

English

Slot

Last Update: 2015-06-01
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference: Wikipedia

Afrikaans

Van die wal af in die slot

English

Last Update: 2020-07-13
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference: Anonymous

Afrikaans

Kan nie slot lêer oopmaak nie.

English

Unable to open temporary file.

Last Update: 2011-10-23
Usage Frequency: 2
Quality:

Reference: Anonymous

Afrikaans

Kan nie slot lêer oopmaak nie .

English

Unable to open temporary file .

Last Update: 2011-10-24
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference: Anonymous

Afrikaans

Is die voordeur nog steeds nie op slot?

English

Front door still unlocked?

Last Update: 2016-10-27
Usage Frequency: 7
Quality:

Reference: Anonymous

Afrikaans

Afsonderlik het die slot en die leer geen steek. Maar as jy hulle saamvoeg, kry jy dit.

English

Separately, the lock and the leather didn't make any sense, but when you put them together, you get this.

Last Update: 2016-10-27
Usage Frequency: 7
Quality:

Reference: Anonymous

Afrikaans

knoppie / druk _BAR_ sleutel (gebruik in 'n slot)

English

button / push _BAR_ key (used in a lock)

Last Update: 2014-08-20
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference: Anonymous

Afrikaans

U moes 'n kopie van die GNU Algemene Publieke Lisensie ontvang het saam met hierdie program. Indien nie, sien .slot type

English

You should have received a copy of the GNU General Public License along with this program. If not, see .

Last Update: 2014-08-20
Usage Frequency: 2
Quality:

Reference: Anonymous

Afrikaans

I am delighted to be here this morning. Looking through the list of participants, I would like to say how wonderful it is, because it conveys how far we have travelled on the agenda of equality and human rights. I am humbled and honoured to share the platform with Gus and Angela who have been pioneers in this agenda. It is very much the next stage and next big step that we will be taking in equality over the next period. We know that race equality, sex equality and the issues that arise around disability have for too long been a preoccupation of those in London, but have they really been the preoccupation in Shropshire or Warwickshire? We need to think how that can be achieved. Everyone knows that the Commission for Equality and Human Rights will essentially be about equality. But while equality is always about dignity, dignity is not always about equality. In other words, human rights includes but goes beyond equality. It is the fabric which meshes the two together. It reaches the parts that some equality policies cannot reach, and those are precisely the parts we must reach if we are to change the politics of equality from a minority issue into an issue for all of us. The young people in constituencies like mine desperately need that to be the case. Therefore, human rights need to inform and support the six equality strands. And the new body needs to be able to promote human rights whether or not there is a linked equality issue. In a sense I'm really glad we're ending the artificial distinction that has developed in this country - not in the rest of the world, I might say - between equality on the one hand and human rights on the other. We should never forget that the human rights movement was born out of the horror of the Second World War in Europe. That involved clearly the worst case of discrimination the world has ever seen. Yet, for too long in the UK we didn't connect the human rights agenda with our own domestic anti-discrimination agenda. It is ironic that when you hear some of the horrifying things said by young people who have been captured by movements like the BNP in northern cities like Oldham. Their own grandparents fought against that discrimination in World War II. We didn't see how human rights would help make the step change that we so desperately wanted. A lot of people said - and felt - that human rights are what foreign countries lack and what Britain doesn't need. We can now see that we do have human rights issues in the UK - and that they do indeed relate directly to equality. They are issues about degrading treatment, such as people in care homes being fed their breakfast on commodes. I remember when I was a Minister at the Department of Health I went into an Accident and Emergency ward - an elderly woman, in her 80's, was going round with her gown on back to front, and no-one was concerned enough about her dignity to put it on the right way round. My slot today says that I am going to talk to you about how we are going to deliver a new approach to human rights. I am going to talk about that but, actually, the approach isn't really new at all. Its just that a lot of people weren't listening to us when we said it back in 1998 when we put through the Human Rights Act, that we're bringing rights home, that it wasn't about a litigation culture, but a human rights culture. So, what do we mean by a human rights culture and who is to deliver it? Definition is easy, because the Joint Committee on Human Rights (JCHR) has done the job for us. They say: "A culture of respect for human rights would exist when there was a widely-shared sense of entitlement to these rights, of personal responsibility and of respect for the rights of others, and when this influenced all our institutional policies and practices." [Page 12, para 9 of Vol. 1 of the Report] They go on to say: "This [culture] would help create a more humane society, a more responsive government and better public services, and could help deepen and widen democracy by increasing the sense amongst individual men and women that they have a stake in the way in which they are governed. For these and other reasons we believe a culture of respect for human rights is a goal worth striving for." Two points, then, on the JCHR definition: one - it is about profound, systematic and gradual change. This isn't the language of one off individual court cases and damages. Is it really about something that the judges are equipped to build at all? It is much bigger than the Courts can provide. Two - though the buck clearly stops with Government, the definition is telling us something very important about the responsibilities we have to one another. Reciprocity is key. Awareness and training is key. Again, are the courts really in a position to deliver and manage training and awareness raising? It's clearly for public service institutions and managers. And it's for people like you in this room. That is why the cross section of people here today is so important. The job Parliament has given to the courts is to deal with violations of fundamental legal rights. That's absolutely as it should be. But violations of fundamental legal rights isn't what's going on up and down this country. I am not saying that there aren't human rights issues out there. On the contrary, there are plenty of those, sadly - I gave examples a few minutes ago. What I am saying - and it's the lesson of the three years since we introduced the Act - is that, by and large, bare legal compliance with the Convention rights isn't the big problem. In a sense, we are not into mountains of violations, that is what the record shows. Let me put it this way. If our idea of a human rights culture is just staying on the right side of a writ then, fine, let's leave it to the lawyers. But that isn't what is going to make a difference for public services. You are not going to sue your way to a better Britain. At least, not the better Britain I want to see. Trust me on that - I'm a lawyer! Our vision is not just bare compliance with Convention rights - and we never said it was. Our vision takes shape in the new Commission for Equality and Human Rights. Please don't get me wrong - enforcing minimum rights is vital. Access in our own courts is part of what we meant by setting up the Human Rights Act and saying we "brought rights home". But there was always a bigger prize. It's about making rights connect with our everyday lives. It's about deepening and strengthening our awareness of respect for human rights and what that actually means. And underpinning that, not just in our homes, but in communities all around the country. It goes back to what I said about A&E wards and care homes. Human rights is relevant to each and every person in this country whether or not the courts are involved. It applies to every-day situations. It applies to every-day attitudes. The principles of human rights - fairness, respect for individual human dignity, balancing rights - sometimes rights conflict - reciprocity. That's what we are looking for. We want our public services to be fair for all, and personal to the user. So the culture we want to build isn't really about the courts. It is about policy and good practice, based on the principles of human rights. Its about doing as you would be done by. And it is about treating the rights in the Human Rights Act as a floor, not a ceiling. It's tragic and, frankly, pathetic that some public authorities see human rights as a matter for their legal departments and no one else. We're not going to get very far if we continue like that. That is something that I and the Government take very seriously indeed. The fact is that the culture change we want has been happening slowly, where it is happening at all. The JCHR report, the British Institute of Human Rights 'Something for Everyone' report, the work of the Audit Commission. Three stories, one message. Our public services need help in changing gear - and in some cases, moving into gear. The CEHR is that help. What these reports indicate is that we are moving to that human rights culture, but that it needs to go deeper in our public authorities. That is the big policy decision. Many details remain to be worked out and the Task Force is contributing to that thinking. We are still aiming for a White Paper to issue in April. But even if we do not yet have all the details, we can still recognise and celebrate the decision as great for equality and great for human rights. Most importantly, it's great for all the people in this country. For the first time in this country we will be looking at a truly inclusive agenda of fairness and opportunity for all. And that is what we need. A society that doesn't make full use of the talents of all its members, as we know, is a failing society. Equality matters to us all. Broadly speaking, the intention is that the human rights remit of the new body will focus, as does the Human Rights Act, on the work of public authorities, and on promoting a culture of respect for human rights. It should - and I am borrowing a phrase here from Mary Robinson who gave evidence to the JCHR about this - "complement access to justice". Do we envisage that the new body would have a specific legal enforcement role in relation to human rights? Let me say this: of course human rights are bound to feature in the legal work of the Commission. The Human Rights Act means that all legal proceedings where those Convention rights are engaged are human rights cases. Obviously some discrimination cases will engage Convention rights. I expect the new body to be under the HRA duty to act compatibly with the Convention rights. And I expect that it, like all of us, will be bound to interpret and give effect to its legislation compatibly with those Convention rights. There is work to be done in Government in working through the precise implications of this for the new legislation. But let me also say this. The Government is clear that there is no serious gap in the human rights litigation market for the new body to fill. Its role should be complementary to access to justice. Nor, even more to the point, do I believe that court cases are going to make the difference we so badly need. I for one don't want the new body to get bogged down or distracted in that way. But I do foresee the new body helping to co-ordinate and develop monitoring and inspection work in relation to human rights. I also hope we shall see thematic inquiries into the handling of human rights issues in particular sectors. I am also keen to see the Commission work on ways to use the Human Rights Act as a means of building bridges between communities who have forgotten how much we all have in common. Trevor Phillips has made this point very well recently. I completely agree with what he had to say. I want to say something about leadership. The fact that the obligation under the Human Rights Act rests with individual public authorities - who will have to justify their own actions in any legal challenge - means that there needs to be a corporate approach to the Act. This demands a consistent analysis of practices and procedures, to ensure that human rights are mainstreamed into the core processes of every public authority. This is not a one-off exercise - and it does require leadership from the top. A key consideration is the consequences of out-sourcing the delivery of some services. This is something we have to think about very clearly. Public authorities need to be clear that contracting-out the delivery of some of their tasks does not mean they duck their human rights obligations. Nor does it mean that the task of developing good practice can safely be kissed good bye, and handed over to the contractor. I made sure that every Chief Executive and Council Leader received a copy of the recent Audit Commission report, highlighting outsourcing as one of the greatest concerns. The Audit commission says that, at the very least, the contract needs to ensure that the contractor must comply with the public authority's obligation under the Act. There is a JCHR inquiry on the topic running now. I'm sure they will underline the need for responsible action in this area. The new Commission should help in these and other areas. But public authorities cannot sit back, do nothing and wait for that to happen. They need to take stock and act now. We are doing the same in central Government. So, to recap on my main messages today: The CEHR is great news for those who care for and work on the human rights agenda and great news for the equality agenda in this country. It's a new beginning. Litigation has a role but we know litigation on bare compliance with the basic Convention rights isn't going to get us the human rights culture we all want to see - and the CEHR remit needs to reflect that. There is detail still to be resolved in this area but, in general, we are going for what I called the Mary Robinson approach - a Commission role on human rights which is "complementary" to access to justice. We have to get into the business of promotion. We cannot hand this one to our legal departments. We are certainly not looking at a talking shop role for the new Commission. Now that we have decided to have a Commission, Government and public authorities cannot sit back and wait. They must act now. There is a tremendous amount to be done and ground to be made up. That's a DCA priority. I know that it is a priority for everyone in this room. All of us can benefit from a new dawn in this country

English

Last Update: 2020-06-22
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference: Anonymous
Warning: Contains invisible HTML formatting

Afrikaans

Agter ‘n baard. Hennie Aucamp Toe die troepetrein die stasie binnekom, is Marina een van die baie meisies en vroue wat hul mans met vreugde inwag, maar die kameras soek haar uit omdat sy - 'n paar maande swanger, en met 'n netjiese seuntjie aan haar hand - groter simboolwaarde het as die ander. En natuurlik is sy nog mooi ook. Die seuntjie bevestig haar skoonheid, want hy het haar witblonde hare, 'n welige dos tot oor die ore, maar versorg, en hy het dieselfde intense oë, alikruikblou, of amper. Dis sy paar oë, nie hare nie, wat die man agter die baard herken: “Pappa! Pappa!” Deon steek sy bruin hande onder die warm okseltjies in en hou sy seun soos 'n trofee in die lug. Dan bring hy die kind se gesig met heftigheid tot teen syne, en soen dit wild op die voorkop, wange en neus. “Eina,” kla die kind, “eina, jou baard maak seer.” Marina kyk toe, maar sonder die teerheid wat die oomblik voorskryf. “Ek herken jou skaars,” verwyt sy hom. “Ag,” sê hy, “in die bos, weet jy ...” “Natuurlik,” gee sy gretig toe, en reik op na hom - haar buik warm teen sy uniform. Hy kyk weer na die seuntjie; streel jaloers oor die blonde hare wat byna elektries gloei in 'n streep sonlig. “Die eerste ding wat ek gaan doen,” sê hy met die nadruklikheid van een wat teenstand verwag, “is om my hare te laat uitgroei.” “Ja, ja,” sê Marina, “en jou baard af te skeer.” “Ja, ons sal sien,” antwoord hy vaag. “Nee, maar jy meet,” sê sy 'n iets te ernstig, “dis asof jy ons van agter 'n bos beloer.” Sy probeer die kind se medewerking kry: “Né, Bennie?” Maar Bennie sê niks nie. “Ek het gewerk aan die baard,” probeer Deon skerts, “daar sit opoffering agter die groei¬sel.” “Nou het jy dit gesê,” reageer Marina vinnig. “Dis 'n slordige baard, skat, so boskasierig.” “Ek weet; en ek weet ook van die brak kolle waar niks wil vat nie, al het ek al die boererate geprobeer.” Hy lag verleë: “juis daarom is ek lief daarvoor: oor dit so stief is.” Hulle beweeg saam met talle mense na die uitgang, maar stadig, want die hele stad is daar om die manne van die grens af te verwelkom. Die luidsprekers hou vol, oor en oor: “Ons vir jou, Suid-Afrika.” Marina besef dat hulle nog net oor sy baard gepraat het. “En verder gesond?” vra sy. “Dit leef, dit leef,” sê hy neutraal, en dan met groot hartstog: “Ek is by jou, Marina. En by Bennie.” Hy steek sy hand uit na die seuntjie, maar Bennie deins terug; klou wantrouig aan sy ma se rok. “Nee, Bennaman,” betig Marina hom, “jy smeer my rok vuil, jong.” “Hoe gaan dit met die nuwe een?” Deon fluister by haar oor, sommer uit Ius om haar hare te ruik en sy asem oor haar nek te blaas sodat sy - gepla, maar tog geprikkel - kan beswaar maak: “Ag nee, man, daar's 'n tyd vir alles.” Die keer sê sy niks nie; verduur die ritueel, maar vryf daarna oor haar nek. “O,” sê sy na 'n rukkie, “omtrent die aanstaande: nie so goed soos destyds met Bennie nie. Sal wel spanning wees.” By die motor vra sy: “Wil jy bestuur?” Deon wens hy kan terugsit teen die kussing, sy seun op sy skoot. Maar juis die seun wil dit anders hê; sy hele houding en oë eis om bewyse van gesag. Deon hou sy hand uit vir die sleu¬tel. “Dit gaan 'n vreeslike deurmekaar ete wees,” giggel Marina. “Ek het al jou gunstelinge pro¬beer maak.” “Boontjiebredie?” pleit Deon. Marina lag geheimsinnig. “En slaphakskeentjies?” “Slaphakskeentjies, slaphakskeentjies,” skree die kind, en toe hy nie genoeg aandag kry nie, nog nadrukliker: “Slap-hak-skeentjies!” “Van een ding is ek darem seker,” glimlag Deon, en hy knipoog vir Bennie. Bennie druk met sy vinger teen sy pa se neus. “Moenie vir Pappa hinder wanneer hy bestuur nie,” vermaan Marina, maar Deon sê met 'n halwe bewing in sy stem: “Laat hom vat, Marina, en jy ook. As jy weet hoe ek hierna uitgesien het: dat julle aan my vat - en ek aan julle.” Tuis onttrek Deon hom aan Marina en Bennie. “Ek sal niks waardeer voor ek my nie gereinig het nie, soos die Bybel sê. Marina hoor hoe hy hom insluit in die badkamer, maar voel nie geaf¬fronteerd nie: Deon se badkameruur is altyd syeie. In elk geval het sy dinge om na om te sien: die ete; vars blomme vir die tafel; Bennie se ete. lets bly haar kwel: die baard. Dis asof sy nie heeltemal tot Deon kan deurdring nie. Nuanses van kwetsbaarheid en teerheid bly verskole agter sy baard; deel van sy nuwe ervarings ook. En sy het 'n reg op sy belewenisse, want hoe anders kan sy hom troos? Sy briewe was so weinigseggend. Daar was die “liewes”, van aanhef tot slot, of die onver¬wagte poësie van: “Jou Iyf is my sekuriteit”; maar van oorlog het hy niks gerep nie. Instruksies, neem sy aan: “Moenie paniek saai nie.” 'n Paar van sy onskuldige briewe is selfs gesensureer. Bennie begin vaak word; knies oor sy bord kos: “Wanneer kom Pappa?” Sy is self haastig, want sy hoop dat die “reiniging” volkome gaan wees: 'n Deon sonder baard. Nooit, vandat sy hom ken, het hy ooit 'n baard of snor probeer kweek nie. Hy is nie die tipe nie; kwetsbaar, gevoelig, maar óóp - dis sy styl. Die baard kleef nog aan hom toe hy uit die badkamer kom; doen afbreuk aan die vars reuk wat hy saambring. Marina pruil: “Ek dog ek gaan jou van aangesig tot aangesig sien.” “Hou nou op, Marina,” sê hy skerp. “Jy klink asof ek jou op die een of ander manier wil bedrieg.” As vroulike strategie dan nie help nie, moet sy nugter te werk gaan: “Skat, dis net of jy 'n masker dra. Ek wil elke roering in jou gesig sien, elke spiertrekkie.” Hy vat afgetrokke aan die kind; stap buitentoe. Deur die venster sien sy hom oor 'n roosstruik buig. “Wat dink hy op hierdie oomblik?” vra sy haarself ergerlik af. “Hy het 'n onbillike voordeel bo my: ek Iyk my swakheid; hy nie.” Sy neem Bennie badkamer toe, help hom om homself te was. Toe hy klaar is, gaan soek sy na Deon, maar hy sit al klaar by die kind se bed en wag. Bennie spook teen die vaak. “'n Storie,” soebat hy, “van bosape en ter ... ter...” Deon help hom nie. “Terroriste,” sê Marina van die deur af. “Maar nie vanaand nie; jy sal nagmerries kry.” Sy steek die kerse op die feestafel aan. Deon se stem klink baie ver. 'n Keer of wat lag Bennie alleen; dan lag hulle saam. Toe sy wyn uit die koelkas haal, sien sy 'n bottel brandewyn en 'n glas op die kombuistafel, en frons, want daar is drie, vier stywe doppe geskink uit 'n bottel wat so pas oopgemaak is. Sy ruk van die skrik toe Deon agter haar praat: “Moenie bang wees nie, skat, daar is geen gevaar nie. Maar vanaand moes ek.” “Natuurlik,” sê sy, “natuurlik,” en leun terug. Twee sterk arms ontvang en omsluit haar, 'n baard kriewel teen haar nek, 'n brandewynasem kom oor haar skouer. “Slaap hy?” vra Marina. “Die dag was te vol vir hom.” “Vir my ook,” sê Deon. “Net na ete moet ons bed toe.” Marina voel bedreig en bedruk. Deon het reg op haar, selfs nou, met haar groot Iyf; hy was weg en het swaar gekry en was alleen; sekerlik mag hy troos vra. Maar dis Deon met sy oop gesig wat sy by haar wil hê, en nie 'n bebaarde man wat na drank ruik nie. “Die struike het mooi aangekom,” sê Deon aan tafel, en skink vir hulle wyn. “'n Wonder," sê sy, “veral as jy aan die wind dink. Die suidoos het vier sonneblomme nek omgedraai, net so.” Deon kyk verskrik op, maar sy uitdrukking verdwyn gou in sy baard. “Nog bredie?” Dean skud sy kop. “'n Mens verleer om te eet. Later eet jy of jy luister; heeltyd luister.” Hy vat aan haar hand. “Maar jou kos is wonderlik.” Hy beur oor die blomme, soen haar skrams. “Ek moet gaan opwas,” sê Marina. “Ek sal help,” bied Dean aan. “Nie vanaand nie,” sê sy. “Lees die koerant, of kyk televisie; ek is netnou by jou.” Deon tel 'n koerant op; kyk na die foto van 'n vermiste grenssoldaat en sê: “Ag-my-Here.” Toe Marina uiteindelik uit die badkamer kom, 'n dun nagrok oar haar vermoeide liggaam, Iê Dean met sy hande agter sy kop. Sy sien die hare in sy oksels, ruik sy vars sweet. En dan kyk sy weer na sy woeste baard. “Jy het mos niks om weg te steek nie, skat: geen swak ken of 'n litteken of wat nie,” praat sy van die spieëltafel af, waar sy room aan haar gesig smeer. “Hou op! Hou op!” skree hy, en gooi die komberse van hom af. Sy vrees dat hy haar te Iyf wil gaan; beroep haar op die kind: “Deon, Bennie sal wakker word en skrik.” Deon draai op sy sy; Iê na die muur en kyk. Eers nadat die lig afgeskakel is, soek hy toena¬dering. Sy hand op haar maag word 'n warm kol wat haar irriteer, maar sy durf hom nie beledig nie. Toe hy nader aan haar kom, al dringender raak, ruik sy weer die brandewyn, maar nog verset sy haar nie. Eers toe hy die bandjie van haar nagrok oor haar skouer rem, sy gesig teen haar arm skuur, praat sy: “Nie vanaand nie, Deon; net nie vanaand nie.” Sy soek na sy hand; druk dit. Na 'n rukkie trek hy sy hand weg, draai terug na die muur. Ten spyte van haar hartseer raak sy gou aan die slaap; slaap so vas dat sy hom nie hoor op¬staan en beweeg nie. Dis sy kyk wat haar wek. Hy staan in die straatlig wat deur die venster val; staan wit en na¬kend - en sonder baard. “Deon!” Sy druk 'n hand teen haar mond, soek met die ander na die bed lamp. Hy kom kniel by haar; Iyk soos 'n nar, met die bleek stroke waar daar baard was. Plek-plek het hy hom raakgeskeer. “Staan op, Deon; staan op, my man.” “Kyk na my,” beveel hy. Sy kyk na die ervarings waarvan sy briewe niks gesê het nie; sidder, en maak haar oë toe. “Kom Iê nou, Deon, asseblief. Jy is baie moeg.” Hy gaan Iê langs haar, maar raak nie aan haar nie. En begin vertel. “Moenie,” smeek sy, “ek wil nie hoor nie.” In 'n stadium Iê sy haar hand oor sy mond. Hy stoot dit ru weg; praat voort. Dis asof die bed van bloed deurtrokke raak - taai en lou, met 'n souterige reuk. Ander reuke kom by: uitskeidings, braaksels, verrottende vlees. Sy probeer orent kom; hy druk haar terug. “Oppas, die kind,” pleit sy. Maar dis hy wat uiteindelik begin huil, verlore en gebroke. Toe Deon lankal rukkerig teen haar slaap, Iê sy nog wakker, en weet nie dat sy haar een hand oop- en toemaak nie, oop en toe.

English

behind a beard Hennie Aucamp

Last Update: 2017-01-25
Usage Frequency: 2
Quality:

Reference: Takemehome
Warning: Contains invisible HTML formatting

Afrikaans

Wanneer gekies , sal ' n gebruiker waarvan die sessie onderbreek was deurdat X bedieneromgeval het automaties ingelog word . Let daarop dat dit ' n sekuriteits risiko skep : indien jy ' n skerm slot gebruik wat nie geintegreer is met KDE nie , kan dit die oorbrugging van ' n wagwoord beskermde skerm slot moontlik maak .

English

When this option is on , a user will be logged in again automatically when their session is interrupted by an X server crash ; note that this can open a security hole : if you use a screen locker than KDE 's integrated one , this will make circumventing a password-secured screen lock possible .

Last Update: 2011-10-24
Usage Frequency: 3
Quality:

Reference: Takemehome

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