Ask Google

Results for its never end translation from English to Tagalog

Human contributions

From professional translators, enterprises, web pages and freely available translation repositories.

Add a translation

English

Tagalog

Info

English

Its now it never

Tagalog

b

Last Update: 2019-12-23
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference: Anonymous

English

it will never end

Tagalog

Kailan kaya ito matatapos

Last Update: 2019-04-01
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference: Anonymous

English

true love never ends

Tagalog

Ang tunay na pag-ibig ay hindi kailanman nagtatapos

Last Update: 2019-02-05
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference: Anonymous

English

love will never ends

Tagalog

ang pag-ibig ay hindi kailanman magwawakas

Last Update: 2018-06-14
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference: Anonymous

English

I wish summer would never end!

Tagalog

Sana'y walang katapusan ang tag-init!

Last Update: 2014-02-01
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference: Anonymous

English

my love never ends

Tagalog

Hindi mabibilang ng numero ang pagmamahal ko sayo

Last Update: 2019-07-04
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference: Anonymous

English

Family where life begins and love never end

Tagalog

Ang pag-ibig sa aming pamilya ay dumadaloy nang malakas at malalim na nag-iiwan sa amin ng mga alaala upang pondohan at panatilihin

Last Update: 2019-04-08
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference: Anonymous

English

its never too late for a new beggining in your life

Tagalog

hindi kailanman huli na upang maging kung ano ang maaaring ikaw ay naging

Last Update: 2019-01-03
Usage Frequency: 2
Quality:

Reference: Anonymous

English

he who never begins never ends

Tagalog

He who never begins never ends

Last Update: 2020-01-10
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference: Anonymous

English

It's never too late for summer

Tagalog

hindi pa ito huli na maging kung ano ang

Last Update: 2019-06-07
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference: Anonymous

English

Follow your heart, for it never lies.

Tagalog

Sundan mo ang puso mo, dahil di siya nagsisinungaling.

Last Update: 2014-02-01
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference: Anonymous

English

I love you I want to become your lost call of the night and your first thought of the morning. I actually feel for you before I never realized I did. I don't want anything from life except you are next to me.if I could be anything in the world. I want to be a teardrop because I would be born in your eyes.live on your cheeks and die on your lips.my six-wold love story. I can't imagine life without you.my heart for you will never break my smile for you will never end. I love you.you are the single greatest source of my joy.you are the sun of my life and I revolve around you.you nourish me you give me life BECAUSE OF YOU I HAVE A REASON to live every day surely I am being rewarded because I have you.what matters most to me is you I live to make you happy.you the one for me. I have never been so sure of anything in all my life, I smile every time I see you when you return that smile to me, my heart overflows with Joy ☺

Tagalog

QUERY LENGTH LIMIT EXCEDEED. MAX ALLOWED QUERY : 500 CHARS

Last Update: 2018-04-13
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference: Anonymous

English

It's hard to see in a crimson love So hard to breathe Walk with me and maybe Nights of light so soon become Wild and free, I could feel the sun Your every wish will be done They tell me Show me the meaning of being lonely Is this the feeling I need to walk with? Tell me why I can't be there where you are There's something missing in my heart Life goes on as it never ends Eyes of stone observe the trends They never say, forever gaze, if only Beauty roams to an endless love There's no control, are you with me now? Your every wish will be done They tell me Show me the meaning of being lonely Is this the feeling I need to walk with? Tell me why I can't be there where you are There's something missing in my heart There's nowhere to run, I have no place to go Surrender my heart, body and soul How can it be you're asking me To feel the things you never show? Tell me why can't I be there where you are Show me the meaning of being lonely Is this the feeling I need to walk with? Tell me why I can't be there where you are There's something missing in my heart Show me the meaning of being lonely Is this the feeling I need to walk with? Tell me why I can't be there where you are There's something missing in my heart

Tagalog

ipakita sa akin ang kahulugan ng pagiging lonely

Last Update: 2017-02-22
Usage Frequency: 2
Quality:

Reference: Anonymous

English

All it took was a solar eclipse and five-car collision atop the Magnetic Hill for the souls of five individuals --- the virginal bride-to-be (Angelica Panganiban), her histrionically litigious godmother (Eugene Domingo), her ringbearer's destitute nanny (Tuesday Vargas), her husband-to-be's amorous grandfather (Jaime Fabregas), and her gay beautician (John Lapuz) --- to switch bodies. With the bride-to-be's soul transferring to the godmother's body; the godmother's soul transferring to the nanny's body; the nanny's soul transferring to the grandfather's body; the grandfather's soul transferring to the beautician's body; and the beautician's soul transferring to the bride-to-be's body, the dream beach wedding turns into a hilarious riot, where long-dormant passions are awakened, sexual fantasies are fulfilled, economic alleviation is achieved, and a chance at love is obtained. Let us get it out of the way. Chris Martinez's Here Comes the Bride is top-notch entertainment. Martinez was able to come up with everything most recent Filipino mainstream comedies lack: that no-nonsense singular objective of making people laugh. From the getgo to the post-credit extra scene, the film never stopped to be overtly pedantic or moralistic, a problem that most Filipino comedies have since there always seems to be this need to use cinema as replacement for Sunday school. For example, Wenn Deramas' Ang Tanging Ina (The True Mother, 2003), and its sequel and many offshoots, are always derailed by its insistence on teaching a lesson; even Joyce Bernal's Kimmy Dora (2009) is stalled by its apologetic dénouement that went too long and too serious. Never mind the forced logic to explain the illogic, the negligible business about solar eclipses and souls, the history and science behind the soul-swap, as authoritatively explained by television trivia-master Kim Atienza. Here Comes the Bride is deliriously funny nonsense all the way and it thankfully works. The film's success is not entirely surprising. After all, Martinez is arguably one of the Philippines' better screenwriters. His screenplays, from Bridal Shower (Jeffrey Jeturian, 2004), about three friends in search of love, to Caregiver (Chito Roño, 2008), about a mother who follows her husband to London in the hopes of earning enough to live comfortably, reflect his ability to articulate something as minute as the language to something as pertinent as the needs of the rapidly-changing Filipino society for mainstream appeal. 100 (2008), his directorial debut about a woman who is dying from cancer, is salvaged from being a run-of-the-mill melodrama by an abundance of relevant humor. Martinez understands the Filipino soul, that the very best way to tackle something as devastating as death is to treat it with levity, to make it familiar and therefore personal. That said, Martinez may very well be the most current of all actively working screenwriters, actively pursuing entertainment without being dumbed down by the demands of commercial accessibility. Despite its astounding technical polish, Here Comes the Bride is fundamentally closer to Joey Gosiengfiao's redeemed Temptation Island (1981), where a bunch of beauty queens and the men surrounding them are stranded in a deserted island, than the mechanically churned comedies Star Cinema has been producing the past recent years. Underneath the caricatures that Martinez connected by the conceit of the convenient soul-swap, underneath the blatant inanity of its carefully conceived proceedings, is a well-pronounced understanding that life, as it is, is unfair, that there are those who are born poor, those who live loveless, and those who inevitably grow old and inutile. In a twist of fate, cruel only to the bride-to-be who suddenly gets a first-hand experience of the inequity of living after a lifetime of being sheltered and protected, inabilities and deficiencies are cured, emphasizing in what essentially is a film created for no other reason than to be an escapist fantasy that the key to a happy life is as unrealistic and as incredible as swapping souls via rare natural phenomena. Like Temptation Island whose gay pageant director becomes the unwilling sacrificial lamb simply because he presumably has the least to lose among the other loved and loving survivors, the most fully realized character in Here Comes the Bride is the love-starved gay beautician whose fortune of being transported to the body of the beautiful and sexy bride-to-be is the most dramatic out of the five. As expected, it is mostly played for laughs and Panganiban does a brilliant job in emulating the fabulous larger-than-life gestures of Lapuz. After all, the very idea of a gay man suddenly and surprisingly getting everything he ever wanted, from the body parts he can only have in his wildest dreams to the straight men who he can only love and lust for from a safe distance, is in itself a hoot. The hilarity of the absurd situation, at that scene where the bride-to-be in the body of her godmother insists that the gay beautician return her body, unravels into a well-pronounced statement of gay angst and sentiment as he emotionally shouts "Hindi ninyo maiintindihan dahil hindi kayo bakla! (You will never understand because you are not gay!). At that moment, the film, notwithstanding the fact that it never stopped being funny, reflected a current fundamental truth, something that not even a mainstream film as self-promotedly queer as Olivia Lamasan's In My Life (2009) can have the guts to state as plainly and matter-of-factly as that. The gay man becomes a girl. The loveless godmother feels how it is to be loved. The amorous yet incapacitated grandfather relives the passion and the romance of his distant youth. The poor nanny turns into a millionaire. The innocent bride-to-be wallows in the realities of life's misfortune. Martinez fills the screen with realized desires at the expense of the bride-to-be, emphasizing the frailty of the human soul in the face of happiness. In the midst of the film's invaluable wit and humor that frequently pumps in rhythm with the Latin beats of the apt lively music score, the film's characters, ideally uncomplicated and stereotypical, are allowed to live their desires realized, concretizing in easy-to-understand cinematic terms the pleasures of escape, of living a fantasy even if it is only momentarily. I am very happy to say that Here Comes the Bride is as current and relevant as it is entertaining and hysterical.

Tagalog

All it took was a solar eclipse and five-car collision atop the Magnetic Hill for the souls of five individuals --- the virginal bride-to-be (Angelica Panganiban), her histrionically litigious godmother (Eugene Domingo), her ringbearer's destitute nanny (Tuesday Vargas), her husband-to-be's amorous grandfather (Jaime Fabregas), and her gay beautician (John Lapuz) --- to switch bodies. With the bride-to-be's soul transferring to the godmother's body; the godmother's soul transferring to the nanny's body; the nanny's soul transferring to the grandfather's body; the grandfather's soul transferring to the beautician's body; and the beautician's soul transferring to the bride-to-be's body, the dream beach wedding turns into a hilarious riot, where long-dormant passions are awakened, sexual fantasies are fulfilled, economic alleviation is achieved, and a chance at love is obtained. Let us get it out of the way. Chris Martinez's Here Comes the Bride is top-notch entertainment. Martinez was able to come up with everything most recent Filipino mainstream comedies lack: that no-nonsense singular objective of making people laugh. From the getgo to the post-credit extra scene, the film never stopped to be overtly pedantic or moralistic, a problem that most Filipino comedies have since there always seems to be this need to use cinema as replacement for Sunday school. For example, Wenn Deramas' Ang Tanging Ina (The True Mother, 2003), and its sequel and many offshoots, are always derailed by its insistence on teaching a lesson; even Joyce Bernal's Kimmy Dora (2009) is stalled by its apologetic dénouement that went too long and too serious. Never mind the forced logic to explain the illogic, the negligible business about solar eclipses and souls, the history and science behind the soul-swap, as authoritatively explained by television trivia-master Kim Atienza. Here Comes the Bride is deliriously funny nonsense all the way and it thankfully works. The film's success is not entirely surprising. After all, Martinez is arguably one of the Philippines' better screenwriters. His screenplays, from Bridal Shower (Jeffrey Jeturian, 2004), about three friends in search of love, to Caregiver (Chito Roño, 2008), about a mother who follows her husband to London in the hopes of earning enough to live comfortably, reflect his ability to articulate something as minute as the language to something as pertinent as the needs of the rapidly-changing Filipino society for mainstream appeal. 100 (2008), his directorial debut about a woman who is dying from cancer, is salvaged from being a run-of-the-mill melodrama by an abundance of relevant humor. Martinez understands the Filipino soul, that the very best way to tackle something as devastating as death is to treat it with levity, to make it familiar and therefore personal. That said, Martinez may very well be the most current of all actively working screenwriters, actively pursuing entertainment without being dumbed down by the demands of commercial accessibility. Despite its astounding technical polish, Here Comes the Bride is fundamentally closer to Joey Gosiengfiao's redeemed Temptation Island (1981), where a bunch of beauty queens and the men surrounding them are stranded in a deserted island, than the mechanically churned comedies Star Cinema has been producing the past recent years. Underneath the caricatures that Martinez connected by the conceit of the convenient soul-swap, underneath the blatant inanity of its carefully conceived proceedings, is a well-pronounced understanding that life, as it is, is unfair, that there are those who are born poor, those who live loveless, and those who inevitably grow old and inutile. In a twist of fate, cruel only to the bride-to-be who suddenly gets a first-hand experience of the inequity of living after a lifetime of being sheltered and protected, inabilities and deficiencies are cured, emphasizing in what essentially is a film created for no other reason than to be an escapist fantasy that the key to a happy life is as unrealistic and as incredible as swapping souls via rare natural phenomena. Like Temptation Island whose gay pageant director becomes the unwilling sacrificial lamb simply because he presumably has the least to lose among the other loved and loving survivors, the most fully realized character in Here Comes the Bride is the love-starved gay beautician whose fortune of being transported to the body of the beautiful and sexy bride-to-be is the most dramatic out of the five. As expected, it is mostly played for laughs and Panganiban does a brilliant job in emulating the fabulous larger-than-life gestures of Lapuz. After all, the very idea of a gay man suddenly and surprisingly getting everything he ever wanted, from the body parts he can only have in his wildest dreams to the straight men who he can only love and lust for from a safe distance, is in itself a hoot. The hilarity of the absurd situation, at that scene where the bride-to-be in the body of her godmother insists that the gay beautician return her body, unravels into a well-pronounced statement of gay angst and sentiment as he emotionally shouts "Hindi ninyo maiintindihan dahil hindi kayo bakla! (You will never understand because you are not gay!). At that moment, the film, notwithstanding the fact that it never stopped being funny, reflected a current fundamental truth, something that not even a mainstream film as self-promotedly queer as Olivia Lamasan's In My Life (2009) can have the guts to state as plainly and matter-of-factly as that. The gay man becomes a girl. The loveless godmother feels how it is to be loved. The amorous yet incapacitated grandfather relives the passion and the romance of his distant youth. The poor nanny turns into a millionaire. The innocent bride-to-be wallows in the realities of life's misfortune. Martinez fills the screen with realized desires at the expense of the bride-to-be, emphasizing the frailty of the human soul in the face of happiness. In the midst of the film's invaluable wit and humor that frequently pumps in rhythm with the Latin beats of the apt lively music score, the film's characters, ideally uncomplicated and stereotypical, are allowed to live their desires realized, concretizing in easy-to-understand cinematic terms the pleasures of escape, of living a fantasy even if it is only momentarily. I am very happy to say that Here Comes the Bride is as current and relevant as it is entertaining and hysterical. All it took was a solar eclipse and five-car collision atop the Magnetic Hill for the souls of five individuals --- the virginal bride-to-be (Angelica Panganiban), her histrionically litigious godmother (Eugene Domingo), her ringbearer's destitute nanny (Tuesday Vargas), her husband-to-be's amorous grandfather (Jaime Fabregas), and her gay beautician (John Lapuz) --- to switch bodies. With the bride-to-be's soul transferring to the godmother's body; the godmother's soul transferring to the nanny's body; the nanny's soul transferring to the grandfather's body; the grandfather's soul transferring to the beautician's body; and the beautician's soul transferring to the bride-to-be's body, the dream beach wedding turns into a hilarious riot, where long-dormant passions are awakened, sexual fantasies are fulfilled, economic alleviation is achieved, and a chance at love is obtained. Let us get it out of the way. Chris Martinez's Here Comes the Bride is top-notch entertainment. Martinez was able to come up with everything most recent Filipino mainstream comedies lack: that no-nonsense singular objective of making people laugh. From the getgo to the post-credit extra scene, the film never stopped to be overtly pedantic or moralistic, a problem that most Filipino comedies have since there always seems to be this need to use cinema as replacement for Sunday school. For example, Wenn Deramas' Ang Tanging Ina (The True Mother, 2003), and its sequel and many offshoots, are always derailed by its insistence on teaching a lesson; even Joyce Bernal's Kimmy Dora (2009) is stalled by its apologetic dénouement that went too long and too serious. Never mind the forced logic to explain the illogic, the negligible business about solar eclipses and souls, the history and science behind the soul-swap, as authoritatively explained by television trivia-master Kim Atienza. Here Comes the Bride is deliriously funny nonsense all the way and it thankfully works. The film's success is not entirely surprising. After all, Martinez is arguably one of the Philippines' better screenwriters. His screenplays, from Bridal Shower (Jeffrey Jeturian, 2004), about three friends in search of love, to Caregiver (Chito Roño, 2008), about a mother who follows her husband to London in the hopes of earning enough to live comfortably, reflect his ability to articulate something as minute as the language to something as pertinent as the needs of the rapidly-changing Filipino society for mainstream appeal. 100 (2008), his directorial debut about a woman who is dying from cancer, is salvaged from being a run-of-the-mill melodrama by an abundance of relevant humor. Martinez understands the Filipino soul, that the very best way to tackle something as devastating as death is to treat it with levity, to make it familiar and therefore personal. That said, Martinez may very well be the most current of all actively working screenwriters, actively pursuing entertainment without being dumbed down by the demands of commercial accessibility. Despite its astounding technical polish, Here Comes the Bride is fundamentally closer to Joey Gosiengfiao's redeemed Temptation Island (1981), where a bunch of beauty queens and the men surrounding them are stranded in a deserted island, than the mechanically churned comedies Star Cinema has been producing the past recent years. Underneath the caricatures that Martinez connected by the conceit of the convenient soul-swap, underneath the blatant inanity of its carefully conceived proceedings, is a well-pronounced understanding that life, as it is, is unfair, that there are those who are born poor, those who live loveless, and those who inevitably grow old and inutile. In a twist of fate, cruel only to the bride-to-be who suddenly gets a first-hand experience of the inequity of living after a lifetime of being sheltered and protected, inabilities and deficiencies are cured, emphasizing in what essentially is a film created for no other reason than to be an escapist fantasy that the key to a happy life is as unrealistic and as incredible as swapping souls via rare natural phenomena. Like Temptation Island whose gay pageant director becomes the unwilling sacrificial lamb simply because he presumably has the least to lose among the other loved and loving survivors, the most fully realized character in Here Comes the Bride is the love-starved gay beautician whose fortune of being transported to the body of the beautiful and sexy bride-to-be is the most dramatic out of the five. As expected, it is mostly played for laughs and Panganiban does a brilliant job in emulating the fabulous larger-than-life gestures of Lapuz. After all, the very idea of a gay man suddenly and surprisingly getting everything he ever wanted, from the body parts he can only have in his wildest dreams to the straight men who he can only love and lust for from a safe distance, is in itself a hoot. The hilarity of the absurd situation, at that scene where the bride-to-be in the body of her godmother insists that the gay beautician return her body, unravels into a well-pronounced statement of gay angst and sentiment as he emotionally shouts "Hindi ninyo maiintindihan dahil hindi kayo bakla! (You will never understand because you are not gay!). At that moment, the film, notwithstanding the fact that it never stopped being funny, reflected a current fundamental truth, something that not even a mainstream film as self-promotedly queer as Olivia Lamasan's In My Life (2009) can have the guts to state as plainly and matter-of-factly as that. The gay man becomes a girl. The loveless godmother feels how it is to be loved. The amorous yet incapacitated grandfather relives the passion and the romance of his distant youth. The poor nanny turns into a millionaire. The innocent bride-to-be wallows in the realities of life's misfortune. Martinez fills the screen with realized desires at the expense of the bride-to-be, emphasizing the frailty of the human soul in the face of happiness. In the midst of the film's invaluable wit and humor that frequently pumps in rhythm with the Latin beats of the apt lively music score, the film's characters, ideally uncomplicated and stereotypical, are allowed to live their desires realized, concretizing in easy-to-understand cinematic terms the pleasures of escape, of living a fantasy even if it is only momentarily. I am very happy to say that Here Comes the Bride is as current and relevant as it is entertaining and hysterical.

Last Update: 2016-12-05
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference: Anonymous
Warning: Contains invisible HTML formatting

English

Scene 2: An Angel Visits Mary MARY enters from the side and stands near the BASKET OF CLOTHES. MARY begins folding the clothes. NARRATOR God sent the angel Gabriel to Nazareth, a town in Galilee. ANGEL begins sneakily tip-toeing from the side, making their way to stand behind MARY, who doesn’t notice. NARRATOR He was sent to a girl named Mary. The angel greeted her and said... ANGEL 1 (Jumps out from behind MARY) Mary! MARY throws the piece of clothing she was folding in the air. MARY takes a few steps away and hides behind the RECTANGULAR BOX. ANGEL 1 The Lord has given you special favor. He is with you. NARRATOR Mary was very upset because of his words. Mary wondered... MARY stands up and scratches her head. MARY What kind of greeting this could be? NARRATOR But the angel said to her... ANGEL 1 (Holds out a hand out) Do not be afraid, Mary. God is very pleased with you. NARRATOR Then the angel said... The ANGEL reaches into their sash, pulls out the FOLDED LETTER, walks over to the NARRATOR, and hands it to them. The NARRATOR unfolds the letter and glances over it, then looks at the ANGEL quizzically. The ANGEL leans over and whispers in the NARRATOR’S ear. The NARRATOR nods. NARRATOR Ladies and Gentlemen, the angel has informed me that, after a long and tiring trip from heaven, they’d like a little help delivering their long message from God. Any volunteers? (Waits a second.) Ah, yes, you over there. The ANGEL’S MOM OR DAD comes and stands next to the NARRATOR. The NARRATOR hands the LETTER to the ANGEL’S MOM OR DAD. The ANGEL returns to where they were onstage. NARRATOR The angel continued... PARENT NARRATOR You will become pregnant... The ANGEL pats their belly a few times. PARENT NARRATOR And give birth to a son. You must name him Jesus. The ANGEL grabs the JESUS SIGN from the back of the stage, holds it up for the audience to see, and hands it to MARY, who holds it in one hand. PARENT NARRATOR He will be great and will be called the Son of the Most High God. The ANGEL flexes their muscles several times like a body builder. PARENT NARRATOR The Lord God will make him a king like his father David of long ago. The ANGEL grabs the CROWN SIGN from the back of the stage, holds it up for the audience to see, and hands it to MARY, who holds it in her other hand. PARENT NARRATOR He will rule forever over his people, who came from Jacob's family. His kingdom will never end. NARRATOR Mary asked the angel... PARENT NARRATOR How can this happen? MARY shrugs. NARRATOR The angel answered... PARENT NARRATOR The Holy Spirit will come to you. The ANGEL reaches up to the sky and slowly lowers their hands to waist level while wiggling their fingers. PARENT NARRATOR The power of the Most High God will cover you. So the holy one that is born will be called the Son of God. ANGEL 1 Nothing is impossible with God. NARRATOR Mary answered... MARY I serve the Lord. May it happen to me just as you said it would. NARRATOR Then the angel left her. The ANGEL exits to the side of the stage. MARY sets the SIGNS back on the back of the stage. MARY puts the clothes in the basket and exits to the side of the stage. Scene 3: An Angel Visits Joseph in a Dream NARRATOR This is how the birth of Jesus Christ came about. JOSEPH enters from the side of the stage, holding a BOUQUET OF FLOWERS. NARRATOR His mother Mary and Joseph had promised to get married. JOSEPH gestures over to the side of the stage for someone to come over. MARY enters in slowly from the side of the stage with a noticeably pregnant belly, holding one hand against the small of her back. NARRATOR But before they started to live together, it became clear that she was going to have a baby. She became pregnant by the power of the Holy Spirit. JOSEPH stares with his mouth open, throws the FLOWERS in the air, and puts his head in his hands. MARY covers her face, crying, and runs, exiting to the side of the stage. NARRATOR Her husband Joseph was a godly man. JOSEPH paces back and forth, pretending to talk to himself. NARRATOR He did not want to put her to shame in public. So he planned to divorce her quietly. NARRATOR But as Joseph was thinking about this... JOSEPH sits down on the RECTANGULAR BOX and poses like the thinker. He slowly leans his head and lays down on the RECTANGULAR BOX to sleep. NARRATOR ...an angel of the Lord appeared to him in a dream. The ANGEL runs in from the side, does a somersault, and jumps up with arms outstretched. NARRATOR The angel said... ANGEL 2 (Holding out one hand to Joseph) Joseph, son of David... JOSEPH sits up, startled. He hides behind the RECTANGULAR BOX. ANGEL 2 Don't be afraid to take Mary home as your wife. PARENT NARRATOR The baby inside her... The ANGEL pats their belly a few times. PARENT NARRATOR ...is from the Holy Spirit. The ANGEL holds out their hands up to the sky and wiggles his fingers while hopping from foot to foot. PARENT NARRATOR She is going to have a son. You must give him the name Jesus. The ANGEL grabs the JESUS SIGN from the back of the stage, holds it up for the audience to see, and hands it to JOSEPH, who holds it in one hand. PARENT NARRATOR That is because he will save his people from their sins. The ANGEL grabs the SAVIOR SIGN from the back of the stage, holds it up for the audience to see, and hands it to JOSEPH, who holds it in one hand. After a beat, the ANGEL takes the SIGNS back and sets the where they were before. The ANGEL helps JOSEPH lay back down on the RECTANGULAR BOX. The ANGEL grabs the BLANKET from behind the RECTANGULAR BOX and lays it on JOSEPH. The ANGEL then exits to the side of the stage, doing another somersault as they leave. NARRATOR Joseph woke up. JOSEPH sits up, pulls off the BLANKET, and sets it behind the RECTANGULAR BOX. JOSEPH rubs his eyes with his palms, pinches himself, and stands up. NARRATOR He did what the angel of the Lord commanded him to do. JOSEPH Mary! MARY does a pregnant-style run over to JOSEPH. JOSEPH pats down his torso, as if feeling in his pockets. He then does a “COME ON” gesture towards the NARRATOR. The NARRATOR walks over to JOSEPH and hands him a ring. JOSEPH bows down on one knee. MARY holds a hand, and JOSEPH puts a ring on it. NARRATOR He took Mary home as his wife. JOSEPH and MARY hold hands and exit to the side of the stage. Scene 4: Mary and Joseph Travel to Bethlehem NARRATOR In those days, Caesar Augustus made a law. CAESAR AUGUSTUS enters from the side holding a SCROLL and stands in the center of the stage. CAESAR AUGUSTUS lets the SCROLL roll to the ground and pretends to read it. CAESAR AUGUSTUS Hear ye, hear ye! Let there be a list be made of everyone in the whole Roman world. CAESAR AUGUSTUS exits to the side of the stage. NARRATOR All went to their own towns to be listed. So Joseph went also. He went from the town of Nazareth in Galilee to Judea. The INNKEEPERS enter from the side of stage, holding INNKEEPER SIGNS, with their heads poking out from the cutout of the sign. They stand, spread out in a long line. NARRATOR That is where Bethlehem, the town of David, was. JOSEPH enters from the side, pulling a WAGON with MARY riding in it. MARY is looking very pregnant. NARRATOR He went there with Mary to be listed. Mary was engaged to him. She was expecting a baby. JOSEPH pulls the wagon up to INNKEEPER 1 and knocks on their INNKEEPER SIGN. INNKEEPER 1 No room! JOSEPH pulls the wagon up to INNKEEPER 2 and knocks on their INNKEEPER SIGN. INNKEEPER 2 No room! JOSEPH pulls the wagon up to INNKEEPER 3 and knocks on their INNKEEPER SIGN. INNKEEPER 3 No room! NARRATOR There was no room for them in the inn. The INNKEEPERS exit to the side of the stage. The STABLEKEEPER enters from the side carrying the STABLEKEEPER SIGN and stands in the center of the stage, in front of the RECTANGULAR BOX. JOSEPH pulls the wagon over to the STABLEKEEPER and KNOCKS on their STABLEKEEPER SIGN. STABLEKEEPER There’s room in the barn! JOSEPH gives the STABLEKEEPER a bow of thanks. The STABLEKEEPER exits to the side of the stage. JOSEPH and MARY sit on the RECTANGULAR BOX. The STAGE HANDS carry the MANGER and set it in the middle of the stage. Scene 5: Jesus is Born in a Stable NARRATOR While Joseph and Mary were there, the time came for the child to be born. JOSEPH kneels next to MARY and grabs her hand. He rubs his hand once along her hair. NARRATOR She gave birth to her first baby. JOSEPH reaches behind the RECTANGULAR BOX and grabs the BABY. JOSPEH (Holding the BABY up) It’s a boy! MARY grabs the BLANKET from behind the RECTANGULAR BOX . JOSEPH hands the BABY to MARY. NARRATOR She wrapped him in large strips of cloth. MARY wraps the BABY in the BLANKET. NARRATOR Then she placed him in a manger. MARY places the BABY in the manger. MARY and JOSEPH exit to the side of the stage, taking the WAGON with them. Scene 6: The Angels Visit Shepherds NARRATOR There were shepherds living out in the fields nearby. A group of SHEPHERDS enter from the side of the stage. NARRATOR They were looking after their sheep. A group of children dressed as SHEEP enter from the side of the stage wearing SHEEP HATS and sit down, scattered near the center. NARRATOR It was night. The SHEEP yawn and stretch. The SHEPHERDS run to the side of the stage and grab blankets and pillows. The SHEPHERDS proceed to tuck each of the sheep in by laying then down on the floor, placing a pillow under their heads, and pulling a blanket over them. When the SHEPHERDS are finished, they sit down on or near the RECTANGULAR BOX . NARRATOR An angel of the Lord appeared to them. ANGEL 3 jumps out from the side of the stage with their hands up and stands near the SHEPHERDS. NARRATOR And the glory of the Lord shone around them and they were terrified. The SHEPHERDS kneel and cower in fear, hiding behind the RECTANGULAR BOX. NARRATOR But the angel said to them... ANGEL 3 (Holding out a hand) Do not be afraid. I bring you good news of great joy. PARENT NARRATOR It is for all the people. The ANGEL gestures out toward the audience. PARENT NARRATOR Today in the town of David a Savior has been born to you. He is Christ the Lord. The ANGEL makes the baseball “Safe!” sign with their arms. PARENT NARRATOR Here is how you will know I am telling you the truth. You will find a baby wrapped in strips of cloth... The ANGEL grabs the BABY SIGN from the back of the stage, holds it up for the audience to see, and hands it to one of the SHEPHERDS, who holds it in their hand. PARENT NARRATOR And lying in a manger. The ANGEL grabs the MANGER SIGN from the back of the stage, holds it up for the audience to see, and hands it to one of the SHEPHERDS, who holds it in their hand. NARRATOR Suddenly a large group of angels from heaven also appeared. ANGEL 1 and ANGEL 2 run on stage and stand next to ANGEL 1. NARRATOR They were praising God. They said... ANGELS 1, 2 AND 3 (Raising their hands to the sky) Glory to God in heaven! PARENT NARRATOR And may peace be given to those he is pleased with on earth! NARRATOR The angels left and went into heaven. The ANGELS exit to the side of the stage. NARRATOR Then the shepherds said to one another... SHEPHERDS Let's go to Bethlehem. PARENT NARRATOR Let's see this thing that has happened, which the Lord has told us about." NARRATOR So they hurried off... The SHEPHERDS and all of the SHEEP exit to the right of the stage. NARRATOR They found Mary and Joseph and the baby. MARY and JOSEPH enter from the side of the stage and sit on the RECTANGULAR BOX. NARRATOR The baby was lying in the manger. The SHEPHERDS enter from the side of the stage and kneel around the manger. NARRATOR After the shepherds had seen him, they told everyone. They reported what the angel had said about this child. The SHEPHERDS run all over into the audience, going to various people, putting their hands on their shoulders and saying, “Jesus is born!” After 30 seconds of this, they run to the back of the auditorium and wait. NARRATOR Everyone who heard it were amazed at what the shepherds said to them. (Pauses) I said, everyone who heard it were amazed at what the shepherds said to them. (Gestures to the congregation) CONGREGATION Oooooh! Aaaaaah! NARRATOR But Mary kept all these things like a secret treasure in her heart. MARY picks up the BABY and walks off the side of the stage, looking up contemplatively. JOSEPH exits to the side of the stage after her. NARRATOR She thought about them over and over. NARRATOR The shepherds returned. The SHEPHERDS run from the back on the auditorium and onto the stage. NARRATOR They gave glory and praise to God. The SHEPHERDS to a brief, silly dance of celebration. NARRATOR Everything they had seen and heard was just as they had been told. The SHEPHERDS exit to the side of the stage. THE END

Tagalog

script ng isang comedy-play

Last Update: 2014-12-27
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference: Anonymous
Warning: Contains invisible HTML formatting

Get a better translation with
4,401,923,520 human contributions

Users are now asking for help:



We use cookies to enhance your experience. By continuing to visit this site you agree to our use of cookies. Learn more. OK