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English

relevant

Tagalog

mga taon ng may-katuturang karanasan

Last Update: 2018-06-07
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference: Anonymous

English

relevant

Tagalog

may kaugnayan

Last Update: 2015-05-28
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference: Anonymous

English

relevant information

Tagalog

kaugnay na impormasyon

Last Update: 2018-09-03
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference: Anonymous

English

relevant skills

Tagalog

espesyal na mga kasanayan

Last Update: 2016-10-23
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference: Anonymous

English

responsive and relevant

Tagalog

matugunin at may-katuturang

Last Update: 2015-04-14
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference: Anonymous

English

meaning ng relevant obtain

Tagalog

kaugnayan

Last Update: 2015-03-30
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference: Anonymous

English

this leads to relevant concepts about emergent literacy and guide knowledge about early literacy behavior

Tagalog

kumplikadong proseso7

Last Update: 2019-03-04
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference: Anonymous

English

This study is relevant to the ABM Students as it gain their competence in terms of Balancing Transactions

Tagalog

Ang pag-aaral na ito ay may kaugnayan sa mga Mag-aaral ng ABM habang nakakakuha ito ng kanilang kakayahang sa mga tuntunin ng Mga Pagbabansang Transaksyon

Last Update: 2019-02-08
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference: Anonymous

English

Nomination entries should describe the causes, conditions and remedies of injustice and critical analysis of relevant public policies, programs, attitudes, and private endeavors.

Tagalog

Sa pagsusumite ng nominasyon, kasamang magbibigay ang lalahok ng mga detalye tungkol sa mga dahilan, sitwasyon at lunas sa kawalang-hustisya, at magsusulat ng kritikal ng pagsusuri tungkol sa mga polisiya at programa ng pamahalaan, sa pampublikong pananaw, at sa mga pribadong simulain.

Last Update: 2016-02-24
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference: Anonymous

English

Business Letters What this handout is about This handout will help you write business letters required in many different situations, from applying for a job to requesting or delivering information. While the examples that are discussed specifically are the application letter and cover letter, this handout also highlights strategies for effective business writing in general. Principles to keep in mind Business writing is different Writing for a business audience is usually quite different than writing in the humanities, social sciences, or other academic disciplines. Business writing strives to be crisp and succinct rather than evocative or creative; it stresses specificity and accuracy. This distinction does not make business writing superior or inferior to other styles. Rather, it reflects the unique purpose and considerations involved when writing in a business context. When you write a business document, you must assume that your audience has limited time in which to read it and is likely to skim. Your readers have an interest in what you say insofar as it affects their working world. They want to know the “bottom line”: the point you are making about a situation or problem and how they should respond. Business writing varies from the conversational style often found in email messages to the more formal, legalistic style found in contracts. A style between these two extremes is appropriate for the majority of memos, emails, and letters. Writing that is too formal can alienate readers, and an attempt to be overly casual may come across as insincere or unprofessional. In business writing, as in all writing, you must know your audience. In most cases, the business letter will be the first impression that you make on someone. Though business writing has become less formal over time, you should still take great care that your letter’s content is clear and that you have proofread it carefully. Pronouns and active versus passive voice Personal pronouns (like I, we, and you) are important in letters and memos. In such documents, it is perfectly appropriate to refer to yourself as I and to the reader as you. Be careful, however, when you use the pronoun we in a business letter that is written on company stationery, since it commits your company to what you have written. When stating your opinion, use I; when presenting company policy, use we. The best writers strive to achieve a style that is so clear that their messages cannot be misunderstood. One way to achieve a clear style is to minimize your use of the passive voice. Although the passive voice is sometimes necessary, often it not only makes your writing dull but also can be ambiguous or overly impersonal. Here’s an example of the same point stated in passive voice and in the active voice: PASSIVE: The net benefits of subsidiary divestiture were grossly overestimated. [Who did the overestimating?] ACTIVE: The Global Finance Team grossly overestimated the net benefits of subsidiary divestiture. The second version is clearer and thus preferable. Of course, there are exceptions to every rule. What if you are the head of the Global Finance Team? You may want to get your message across without calling excessive attention to the fact that the error was your team’s fault. The passive voice allows you to gloss over an unflattering point—but you should use it sparingly. Focus and specificity Business writing should be clear and concise. Take care, however, that your document does not turn out as an endless series of short, choppy sentences. Keep in mind also that “concise” does not have to mean “blunt”—you still need to think about your tone and the audience for whom you are writing. Consider the following examples: After carefully reviewing this proposal, we have decided to prioritize other projects this quarter. Nobody liked your project idea, so we are not going to give you any funding. The first version is a weaker statement, emphasizing facts not directly relevant to its point. The second version provides the information in a simple and direct manner. But you don’t need to be an expert on style to know that the first phrasing is diplomatic and respectful (even though it’s less concise) as compared with the second version, which is unnecessarily harsh and likely to provoke a negative reaction. Business letters: where to begin Reread the description of your task (for example, the advertisement of a job opening, instructions for a proposal submission, or assignment prompt for a course). Think about your purpose and what requirements are mentioned or implied in the description of the task. List these requirements. This list can serve as an outline to govern your writing and help you stay focused, so try to make it thorough. Next, identify qualifications, attributes, objectives, or answers that match the requirements you have just listed. Strive to be exact and specific, avoiding vagueness, ambiguity, and platitudes. If there are industry- or field-specific concepts or terminology that are relevant to the task at hand, use them in a manner that will convey your competence and experience. Avoid any language that your audience may not understand. Your finished piece of writing should indicate how you meet the requirements you’ve listed and answer any questions raised in the description or prompt. Application letters and cover letters Many people believe that application letters and cover letters are essentially the same. For purposes of this handout, though, these kinds of letters are different. The letter of application is a sales letter in which you market your skills, abilities, and knowledge. A cover letter, on the other hand, is primarily a document of transmittal. It identifies an item being sent, the person to whom it is being sent, and the reason for its being sent, and provides a permanent record of the transmittal for both the writer and the reader. Application letters When writing an application letter, remember that you probably have competition. Your audience is a professional who screens and hires job applicants—someone who may look through dozens or even hundreds of other applications on the day she receives yours. The immediate objective of your application letter and accompanying resume is to attract this person’s attention. Your ultimate goal is to obtain an interview. As you write your application letter, be sure you complete three tasks: catch the reader’s attention favorably, convince the reader that you are a qualified candidate for the job, and request an interview. Application letter checklist: Identify the job by title and let the recipient know how you heard about it. Summarize your qualifications for the job, specifically your work experience, activities that show your leadership skills, and your educational background. Refer the reader to your enclosed resume. Ask for an interview, stating where you can be reached and when you will be available. If your prospective employer is located in another city and you plan to visit the area, mention the dates for your trip. If you are applying for a specific job, include any information pertinent to the position that is not included in your resume. To save your reader time and to call attention to your strengths as a candidate, state your objective directly at the beginning of the letter. Example: I am seeking a position as a manager in your Data Center. In such a management position, I can use my master’s degree in information systems and my experience as a programmer/analyst to address business challenges in data processing. If you have been referred to a company by one of its employees, a career counselor, a professor, or someone else, mention that before stating your job objective. Example: During the recent ARRGH convention in Washington, D.C., one of your sales representatives, Dusty Brown, informed me of a possible opening for a manager in your Data Center. My extensive background in programming and my master’s degree in information systems make me highly qualified for the position. In subsequent paragraphs, expand on the qualifications you mentioned in your opening. Add any appropriate details, highlighting experience listed on your resume that is especially pertinent to the job you are seeking. Close with a request for an interview. Proofread your letter carefully. Two sample letters of application are presented below. The first letter (Sample #1) is by a recent college graduate responding to a local newspaper article about the company’s plan to build a new computer center. The writer is not applying for a specific job opening but describes the position he seeks. The second letter (Sample #2) is from a college senior who does not specify where she learned of the opening because she is uncertain whether a position is available. Sample #1 6123 Farrington Road Apt. B11 Chapel Hill, NC 27514 January 11, 2005 Taylor, Inc. 694 Rockstar Lane Durham, NC 27708 Dear Human Resources Director: I just read an article in the News and Observer about Taylor’s new computer center just north of Durham. I would like to apply for a position as an entry-level programmer at the center. I understand that Taylor produces both in-house and customer documentation. My technical writing skills, as described in the enclosed resume, are well suited to your company. I am a recent graduate of DeVry Institute of Technology in Atlanta with an Associate’s Degree in Computer Science. In addition to having taken a broad range of courses, I served as a computer consultant at the college’s computer center where I helped train users to work with new systems. I will be happy to meet with you at your convenience and discuss how my education and experience match your needs. You can reach me at my home address, at (919) 233-1552, or at krock@devry.alumni.edu. Sincerely, Raymond Krock Sample #2 6123 Farrington Road Apt. G11 Chapel Hill, NC 27514 January 11, 2005 Taylor, Inc. 694 Rockstar Lane Durham, NC 27708 Dear Ms. Jones: I am seeking a position in your engineering department where I may use my training in computer sciences to solve Taylor’s engineering problems. I would like to be a part of the department that developed the Internet Selection System but am unsure whether you have a current opening. I expect to receive a Bachelor of Science degree in Engineering from North Carolina State University in June and by that time will have completed the Computer Systems Engineering Program. Since September 2000, I have been participating, through the University, in the Professional Training Program at Computer Systems International in Raleigh. In the program I was assigned to several staff sections as an apprentice. Most recently, I have been a programmer trainee in the Engineering Department and have gained a great deal of experience in computer applications. Details of the academic courses I have taken are included in the enclosed resume. If there is a position open at Taylor Inc., please let me know whom I should contact for further information. I look forward to hearing from you soon. I may be reached at my office (919-866-4000 ext. 232) or via email (Brock@aol.com). Sincerely,

Tagalog

halimbawa ng sulat ng negosyo

Last Update: 2019-01-06
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference: Anonymous

English

All it took was a solar eclipse and five-car collision atop the Magnetic Hill for the souls of five individuals --- the virginal bride-to-be (Angelica Panganiban), her histrionically litigious godmother (Eugene Domingo), her ringbearer's destitute nanny (Tuesday Vargas), her husband-to-be's amorous grandfather (Jaime Fabregas), and her gay beautician (John Lapuz) --- to switch bodies. With the bride-to-be's soul transferring to the godmother's body; the godmother's soul transferring to the nanny's body; the nanny's soul transferring to the grandfather's body; the grandfather's soul transferring to the beautician's body; and the beautician's soul transferring to the bride-to-be's body, the dream beach wedding turns into a hilarious riot, where long-dormant passions are awakened, sexual fantasies are fulfilled, economic alleviation is achieved, and a chance at love is obtained. Let us get it out of the way. Chris Martinez's Here Comes the Bride is top-notch entertainment. Martinez was able to come up with everything most recent Filipino mainstream comedies lack: that no-nonsense singular objective of making people laugh. From the getgo to the post-credit extra scene, the film never stopped to be overtly pedantic or moralistic, a problem that most Filipino comedies have since there always seems to be this need to use cinema as replacement for Sunday school. For example, Wenn Deramas' Ang Tanging Ina (The True Mother, 2003), and its sequel and many offshoots, are always derailed by its insistence on teaching a lesson; even Joyce Bernal's Kimmy Dora (2009) is stalled by its apologetic dénouement that went too long and too serious. Never mind the forced logic to explain the illogic, the negligible business about solar eclipses and souls, the history and science behind the soul-swap, as authoritatively explained by television trivia-master Kim Atienza. Here Comes the Bride is deliriously funny nonsense all the way and it thankfully works. The film's success is not entirely surprising. After all, Martinez is arguably one of the Philippines' better screenwriters. His screenplays, from Bridal Shower (Jeffrey Jeturian, 2004), about three friends in search of love, to Caregiver (Chito Roño, 2008), about a mother who follows her husband to London in the hopes of earning enough to live comfortably, reflect his ability to articulate something as minute as the language to something as pertinent as the needs of the rapidly-changing Filipino society for mainstream appeal. 100 (2008), his directorial debut about a woman who is dying from cancer, is salvaged from being a run-of-the-mill melodrama by an abundance of relevant humor. Martinez understands the Filipino soul, that the very best way to tackle something as devastating as death is to treat it with levity, to make it familiar and therefore personal. That said, Martinez may very well be the most current of all actively working screenwriters, actively pursuing entertainment without being dumbed down by the demands of commercial accessibility. Despite its astounding technical polish, Here Comes the Bride is fundamentally closer to Joey Gosiengfiao's redeemed Temptation Island (1981), where a bunch of beauty queens and the men surrounding them are stranded in a deserted island, than the mechanically churned comedies Star Cinema has been producing the past recent years. Underneath the caricatures that Martinez connected by the conceit of the convenient soul-swap, underneath the blatant inanity of its carefully conceived proceedings, is a well-pronounced understanding that life, as it is, is unfair, that there are those who are born poor, those who live loveless, and those who inevitably grow old and inutile. In a twist of fate, cruel only to the bride-to-be who suddenly gets a first-hand experience of the inequity of living after a lifetime of being sheltered and protected, inabilities and deficiencies are cured, emphasizing in what essentially is a film created for no other reason than to be an escapist fantasy that the key to a happy life is as unrealistic and as incredible as swapping souls via rare natural phenomena. Like Temptation Island whose gay pageant director becomes the unwilling sacrificial lamb simply because he presumably has the least to lose among the other loved and loving survivors, the most fully realized character in Here Comes the Bride is the love-starved gay beautician whose fortune of being transported to the body of the beautiful and sexy bride-to-be is the most dramatic out of the five. As expected, it is mostly played for laughs and Panganiban does a brilliant job in emulating the fabulous larger-than-life gestures of Lapuz. After all, the very idea of a gay man suddenly and surprisingly getting everything he ever wanted, from the body parts he can only have in his wildest dreams to the straight men who he can only love and lust for from a safe distance, is in itself a hoot. The hilarity of the absurd situation, at that scene where the bride-to-be in the body of her godmother insists that the gay beautician return her body, unravels into a well-pronounced statement of gay angst and sentiment as he emotionally shouts "Hindi ninyo maiintindihan dahil hindi kayo bakla! (You will never understand because you are not gay!). At that moment, the film, notwithstanding the fact that it never stopped being funny, reflected a current fundamental truth, something that not even a mainstream film as self-promotedly queer as Olivia Lamasan's In My Life (2009) can have the guts to state as plainly and matter-of-factly as that. The gay man becomes a girl. The loveless godmother feels how it is to be loved. The amorous yet incapacitated grandfather relives the passion and the romance of his distant youth. The poor nanny turns into a millionaire. The innocent bride-to-be wallows in the realities of life's misfortune. Martinez fills the screen with realized desires at the expense of the bride-to-be, emphasizing the frailty of the human soul in the face of happiness. In the midst of the film's invaluable wit and humor that frequently pumps in rhythm with the Latin beats of the apt lively music score, the film's characters, ideally uncomplicated and stereotypical, are allowed to live their desires realized, concretizing in easy-to-understand cinematic terms the pleasures of escape, of living a fantasy even if it is only momentarily. I am very happy to say that Here Comes the Bride is as current and relevant as it is entertaining and hysterical.

Tagalog

All it took was a solar eclipse and five-car collision atop the Magnetic Hill for the souls of five individuals --- the virginal bride-to-be (Angelica Panganiban), her histrionically litigious godmother (Eugene Domingo), her ringbearer's destitute nanny (Tuesday Vargas), her husband-to-be's amorous grandfather (Jaime Fabregas), and her gay beautician (John Lapuz) --- to switch bodies. With the bride-to-be's soul transferring to the godmother's body; the godmother's soul transferring to the nanny's body; the nanny's soul transferring to the grandfather's body; the grandfather's soul transferring to the beautician's body; and the beautician's soul transferring to the bride-to-be's body, the dream beach wedding turns into a hilarious riot, where long-dormant passions are awakened, sexual fantasies are fulfilled, economic alleviation is achieved, and a chance at love is obtained. Let us get it out of the way. Chris Martinez's Here Comes the Bride is top-notch entertainment. Martinez was able to come up with everything most recent Filipino mainstream comedies lack: that no-nonsense singular objective of making people laugh. From the getgo to the post-credit extra scene, the film never stopped to be overtly pedantic or moralistic, a problem that most Filipino comedies have since there always seems to be this need to use cinema as replacement for Sunday school. For example, Wenn Deramas' Ang Tanging Ina (The True Mother, 2003), and its sequel and many offshoots, are always derailed by its insistence on teaching a lesson; even Joyce Bernal's Kimmy Dora (2009) is stalled by its apologetic dénouement that went too long and too serious. Never mind the forced logic to explain the illogic, the negligible business about solar eclipses and souls, the history and science behind the soul-swap, as authoritatively explained by television trivia-master Kim Atienza. Here Comes the Bride is deliriously funny nonsense all the way and it thankfully works. The film's success is not entirely surprising. After all, Martinez is arguably one of the Philippines' better screenwriters. His screenplays, from Bridal Shower (Jeffrey Jeturian, 2004), about three friends in search of love, to Caregiver (Chito Roño, 2008), about a mother who follows her husband to London in the hopes of earning enough to live comfortably, reflect his ability to articulate something as minute as the language to something as pertinent as the needs of the rapidly-changing Filipino society for mainstream appeal. 100 (2008), his directorial debut about a woman who is dying from cancer, is salvaged from being a run-of-the-mill melodrama by an abundance of relevant humor. Martinez understands the Filipino soul, that the very best way to tackle something as devastating as death is to treat it with levity, to make it familiar and therefore personal. That said, Martinez may very well be the most current of all actively working screenwriters, actively pursuing entertainment without being dumbed down by the demands of commercial accessibility. Despite its astounding technical polish, Here Comes the Bride is fundamentally closer to Joey Gosiengfiao's redeemed Temptation Island (1981), where a bunch of beauty queens and the men surrounding them are stranded in a deserted island, than the mechanically churned comedies Star Cinema has been producing the past recent years. Underneath the caricatures that Martinez connected by the conceit of the convenient soul-swap, underneath the blatant inanity of its carefully conceived proceedings, is a well-pronounced understanding that life, as it is, is unfair, that there are those who are born poor, those who live loveless, and those who inevitably grow old and inutile. In a twist of fate, cruel only to the bride-to-be who suddenly gets a first-hand experience of the inequity of living after a lifetime of being sheltered and protected, inabilities and deficiencies are cured, emphasizing in what essentially is a film created for no other reason than to be an escapist fantasy that the key to a happy life is as unrealistic and as incredible as swapping souls via rare natural phenomena. Like Temptation Island whose gay pageant director becomes the unwilling sacrificial lamb simply because he presumably has the least to lose among the other loved and loving survivors, the most fully realized character in Here Comes the Bride is the love-starved gay beautician whose fortune of being transported to the body of the beautiful and sexy bride-to-be is the most dramatic out of the five. As expected, it is mostly played for laughs and Panganiban does a brilliant job in emulating the fabulous larger-than-life gestures of Lapuz. After all, the very idea of a gay man suddenly and surprisingly getting everything he ever wanted, from the body parts he can only have in his wildest dreams to the straight men who he can only love and lust for from a safe distance, is in itself a hoot. The hilarity of the absurd situation, at that scene where the bride-to-be in the body of her godmother insists that the gay beautician return her body, unravels into a well-pronounced statement of gay angst and sentiment as he emotionally shouts "Hindi ninyo maiintindihan dahil hindi kayo bakla! (You will never understand because you are not gay!). At that moment, the film, notwithstanding the fact that it never stopped being funny, reflected a current fundamental truth, something that not even a mainstream film as self-promotedly queer as Olivia Lamasan's In My Life (2009) can have the guts to state as plainly and matter-of-factly as that. The gay man becomes a girl. The loveless godmother feels how it is to be loved. The amorous yet incapacitated grandfather relives the passion and the romance of his distant youth. The poor nanny turns into a millionaire. The innocent bride-to-be wallows in the realities of life's misfortune. Martinez fills the screen with realized desires at the expense of the bride-to-be, emphasizing the frailty of the human soul in the face of happiness. In the midst of the film's invaluable wit and humor that frequently pumps in rhythm with the Latin beats of the apt lively music score, the film's characters, ideally uncomplicated and stereotypical, are allowed to live their desires realized, concretizing in easy-to-understand cinematic terms the pleasures of escape, of living a fantasy even if it is only momentarily. I am very happy to say that Here Comes the Bride is as current and relevant as it is entertaining and hysterical. All it took was a solar eclipse and five-car collision atop the Magnetic Hill for the souls of five individuals --- the virginal bride-to-be (Angelica Panganiban), her histrionically litigious godmother (Eugene Domingo), her ringbearer's destitute nanny (Tuesday Vargas), her husband-to-be's amorous grandfather (Jaime Fabregas), and her gay beautician (John Lapuz) --- to switch bodies. With the bride-to-be's soul transferring to the godmother's body; the godmother's soul transferring to the nanny's body; the nanny's soul transferring to the grandfather's body; the grandfather's soul transferring to the beautician's body; and the beautician's soul transferring to the bride-to-be's body, the dream beach wedding turns into a hilarious riot, where long-dormant passions are awakened, sexual fantasies are fulfilled, economic alleviation is achieved, and a chance at love is obtained. Let us get it out of the way. Chris Martinez's Here Comes the Bride is top-notch entertainment. Martinez was able to come up with everything most recent Filipino mainstream comedies lack: that no-nonsense singular objective of making people laugh. From the getgo to the post-credit extra scene, the film never stopped to be overtly pedantic or moralistic, a problem that most Filipino comedies have since there always seems to be this need to use cinema as replacement for Sunday school. For example, Wenn Deramas' Ang Tanging Ina (The True Mother, 2003), and its sequel and many offshoots, are always derailed by its insistence on teaching a lesson; even Joyce Bernal's Kimmy Dora (2009) is stalled by its apologetic dénouement that went too long and too serious. Never mind the forced logic to explain the illogic, the negligible business about solar eclipses and souls, the history and science behind the soul-swap, as authoritatively explained by television trivia-master Kim Atienza. Here Comes the Bride is deliriously funny nonsense all the way and it thankfully works. The film's success is not entirely surprising. After all, Martinez is arguably one of the Philippines' better screenwriters. His screenplays, from Bridal Shower (Jeffrey Jeturian, 2004), about three friends in search of love, to Caregiver (Chito Roño, 2008), about a mother who follows her husband to London in the hopes of earning enough to live comfortably, reflect his ability to articulate something as minute as the language to something as pertinent as the needs of the rapidly-changing Filipino society for mainstream appeal. 100 (2008), his directorial debut about a woman who is dying from cancer, is salvaged from being a run-of-the-mill melodrama by an abundance of relevant humor. Martinez understands the Filipino soul, that the very best way to tackle something as devastating as death is to treat it with levity, to make it familiar and therefore personal. That said, Martinez may very well be the most current of all actively working screenwriters, actively pursuing entertainment without being dumbed down by the demands of commercial accessibility. Despite its astounding technical polish, Here Comes the Bride is fundamentally closer to Joey Gosiengfiao's redeemed Temptation Island (1981), where a bunch of beauty queens and the men surrounding them are stranded in a deserted island, than the mechanically churned comedies Star Cinema has been producing the past recent years. Underneath the caricatures that Martinez connected by the conceit of the convenient soul-swap, underneath the blatant inanity of its carefully conceived proceedings, is a well-pronounced understanding that life, as it is, is unfair, that there are those who are born poor, those who live loveless, and those who inevitably grow old and inutile. In a twist of fate, cruel only to the bride-to-be who suddenly gets a first-hand experience of the inequity of living after a lifetime of being sheltered and protected, inabilities and deficiencies are cured, emphasizing in what essentially is a film created for no other reason than to be an escapist fantasy that the key to a happy life is as unrealistic and as incredible as swapping souls via rare natural phenomena. Like Temptation Island whose gay pageant director becomes the unwilling sacrificial lamb simply because he presumably has the least to lose among the other loved and loving survivors, the most fully realized character in Here Comes the Bride is the love-starved gay beautician whose fortune of being transported to the body of the beautiful and sexy bride-to-be is the most dramatic out of the five. As expected, it is mostly played for laughs and Panganiban does a brilliant job in emulating the fabulous larger-than-life gestures of Lapuz. After all, the very idea of a gay man suddenly and surprisingly getting everything he ever wanted, from the body parts he can only have in his wildest dreams to the straight men who he can only love and lust for from a safe distance, is in itself a hoot. The hilarity of the absurd situation, at that scene where the bride-to-be in the body of her godmother insists that the gay beautician return her body, unravels into a well-pronounced statement of gay angst and sentiment as he emotionally shouts "Hindi ninyo maiintindihan dahil hindi kayo bakla! (You will never understand because you are not gay!). At that moment, the film, notwithstanding the fact that it never stopped being funny, reflected a current fundamental truth, something that not even a mainstream film as self-promotedly queer as Olivia Lamasan's In My Life (2009) can have the guts to state as plainly and matter-of-factly as that. The gay man becomes a girl. The loveless godmother feels how it is to be loved. The amorous yet incapacitated grandfather relives the passion and the romance of his distant youth. The poor nanny turns into a millionaire. The innocent bride-to-be wallows in the realities of life's misfortune. Martinez fills the screen with realized desires at the expense of the bride-to-be, emphasizing the frailty of the human soul in the face of happiness. In the midst of the film's invaluable wit and humor that frequently pumps in rhythm with the Latin beats of the apt lively music score, the film's characters, ideally uncomplicated and stereotypical, are allowed to live their desires realized, concretizing in easy-to-understand cinematic terms the pleasures of escape, of living a fantasy even if it is only momentarily. I am very happy to say that Here Comes the Bride is as current and relevant as it is entertaining and hysterical.

Last Update: 2016-12-05
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference: Anonymous
Warning: Contains invisible HTML formatting

English

MISSION The University aims to provide advanced professional and technical instruction for special purposes, advanced studies, industrial trade, teacher education, agriculture, fishery, forestry, engineering, maritime, aeronautics and land-based programs, arts and sciences, health sciences, information technology and other relevant fields of study. It shall undertake research, production and extension services, and provide progressive leadership across the areas of specialization for global empowerment.

Tagalog

misyonero paningin ng CTU

Last Update: 2015-10-24
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference: Anonymous

English

The University aims to provide advanced professional and technical instruction for special purposes, advanced studies, industrial trade, teacher education, agriculture, fishery, forestry, engineering, maritime, aeronautics and land-based programs, arts and sciences, health sciences, information technology and other relevant fields of study. It shall undertake research, production and extension services, and provide progressive leadership across the areas of specialization for global empowerment.

Tagalog

nagta-type buong pangungusap sa iyong langage

Last Update: 2014-11-10
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference: Anonymous

English

the argument is extremely relevant. depending on the artificiality of how gender is determined at birth for intersex people, how they self-identify may not conform with how they were "gendered". for many of these people being asked to declare a gender so as to judge their qualification for a opposite gendered marriage is unfair. with the legalization of same sex marriage, gender is no longer an element in the marital equation, therefore sparing intersexed and transgendered individuals the trouble of choosing and declaring a gender to get married.

Tagalog

El gato diablo

Last Update: 2014-09-18
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference: Anonymous
Warning: Contains invisible HTML formatting

English

* Highlight: One line in the package list will be highlighted. It indicates which package(s) will be affected by presses of `+', `-' and `_'. * The dividing line in the middle of the screen shows a brief explanation of the status of the currently-highlighted package, or a description of which group is highlighted if a group line is. If you don't understand the meaning of some of the status characters displayed, go to the relevant package and look at this divider line, or use the `v' key for a verbose display (press `v' again to go back to the terse display). * The bottom of the screen shows more information about the currently-highlighted package (if there is only one). It can show an extended description of the package, the internal package control details (either for the installed or available version of the package), or information about conflicts and dependencies involving the current package (in conflict/dependency resolution sublists). Use the `i' key to cycle through the displays, and `I' to hide the information display or expand it to use almost all of the screen.

Tagalog

* Highlight: Isang linya sa listahan ng pakete ay may highlight. Pinapahiwatig kung aling (mga) pakete ang apektado ng pagpindot ng `+', `-' at `_'. * Ang linyang naghahati sa gitna ng tabing ay nagpapakita ng maikling paliwanag tungkol sa kalagayan ng paketeng naka-highlight, o paglarawan ng grupong naka- highlight, kung grupo ito. Kung hindi niyo naintindihan ang ibig sabihin ng ilan sa mga character na nagpapakita ng kalagayan, pumunta sa akmang pakete at tignan itong linyang naghahati, o gamitin ang tikladong `v' para sa verbose na display (pindutin ang `v' muli upang bumalik sa modong terse). * Ang ibaba ng tabing ay nagpapakita ng karagdagang impormasyon tungkol sa kasalukuyang naka-highlight na pakete (kung iisa lamang). Maaaring ipakita ang pinalawig na paglalarawan ng pakete, ang internal na detalye ng pag-control ng pakete (maging ang naka-luklok o ng maaaring magamit na bersyon ng pakete), o ng impormasyon tungkol sa conflict at dependensiya na kaugnay ng kasalukuyang pakete (sa sublist ng pag-ayos ng conflict/dependensiya). Gamiting ang tikladong `i' upang umikot sa mga display, at `I' upang itago ang display ng impormasyon o lakihan ito na gamitin ang halos buong tabing.

Last Update: 2014-08-15
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference: Anonymous

English

Dependency/conflict resolution - introduction. One or more of your choices have raised a conflict or dependency problem - some packages should only be installed in conjunction with certain others, and some combinations of packages may not be installed together. You will see a sub-list containing the packages involved. The bottom half of the display shows relevant conflicts and dependencies; use `i' to cycle between that, the package descriptions and the internal control information. A set of `suggested' packages has been calculated, and the initial markings in this sub-list have been set to match those, so you can just hit Return to accept the suggestions if you wish. You may abort the change(s) which caused the problem(s), and go back to the main list, by pressing capital `X'. You can also move around the list and change the markings so that they are more like what you want, and you can `reject' my suggestions by using the capital `D' or `R' keys (see the keybindings help screen). You can use capital `Q' to force me to accept the situation currently displayed, in case you want to override a recommendation or think that the program is mistaken. Press to leave help and enter the sub-list; remember: press `?' for help.

Tagalog

Pag-ayos ng conflict/dependensiya - pagpapakilala. May isa o ilan sa inyong mga pinili na nag-angat ng problemang conflict o dependensiya - may ilang mga pakete na kailangang iluluklok na may kasamang iba, at may iba namang kumbinasyon ng mga pakete na hindi maaaring iluluklok ng sabay. Makikita ninyo ang sub-list na naglalaman ng mga paketeng tinutukoy. Ang ibabang kalahati ng tabing ay nagpapakita ng mga conflict at dependensiya; gamitin ang `i' upang umikot dito, sa paglalarawan ng mga pakete at sa impormasyong control na panloob. May koleksyon ng mga pakete na `minumungkahi' na tinantsya, at mga panimulang mga marka sa sub-list na ito na nakatakda upang matapatan ito, upang maari niyo lamang pindutin ang Return upang tanggapin ang mga mungkahi kung inyong naisin. Maaari ding hintuin ang (mga) pagbabago na nagsanhi ng (mga) problema, at bumalik sa pangunahing listahan sa pagpindot ng capital `X'. Maaari din kayong gumalaw sa listahan at palitan ang mga marka upang tumugma sa inyong kagustuhan, at maaari ninyong hindian ang aking mga mungkahi sa pagpindot ng capital `D' o `R' (tignan ang tulong sa tiklado). Maaari niyong gamitin ang capital `Q' upang pilitin akong tanggapin ang kasalukuyang ayos, kung sakaling nais niyong i-override ang rekomendasyon o kung sa tingin niyo ay mali ang programa. Pindutin ang upang lumabas sa tulong at pumasok sa sub-list; alalahanin: pindutin ang `?' para sa tulong.

Last Update: 2014-08-15
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference: Anonymous
Warning: Contains invisible HTML formatting

English

Welcome to dselect's main package listing. You will be presented with a list of packages which are installed or available for installation. You can navigate around the list using the cursor keys, mark packages for installation (using `+') or deinstallation (using `-'). Packages can be marked either singly or in groups; initially you will see that the line `All packages' is selected. `+', `-' and so on will affect all the packages described by the highlighted line. Some of your choices will cause conflicts or dependency problems; you will be given a sub-list of the relevant packages, so that you can solve the problems. You should read the list of keys and the explanations of the display. Much on-line help is available, please make use of it - press `?' at any time for help. When you have finished selecting packages, press to confirm changes, or `X' to quit without saving changes. A final check on conflicts and dependencies will be done - here too you may see a sublist. Press to leave help and enter the list now.

Tagalog

Maligayang pagdating sa pangunahing listahan ng mga pakete sa dselect. Ipapakita sa inyo ang listahan ng mga pakete na naka-luklok o magagamit na iluluklok. Maaari kayong gumalaw sa listahan sa pamamagitan ng mga cursor key, markahan ang mga paketeng iiluluklok (gamitin ang `+') o tatanggalin (gamitin ang `-'). Ang mga pakete ay maaaring markahan ng isahan o sa grupo; sa umpisa makikita ninyo na ang linyang `Lahat ng pakete' ay nakapili. `+', `-' at iba pa ay makakaapekto sa lahat ng mga pakete na tinutukoy ng naka-highlight na linya. Ilan sa inyong mga pipiliin ay magkakaroon ng mga conflict o problema sa dependensiya; kayo ay bibigyan ng sub-list ng mga paketeng may kinalaman dito, upang inyong malutas ang mga problema. Dapat ninyong basahin ang talaan ng tiklado at mga paliwanag na nakadisplay. Maraming tulong na magagamit, mangyaring gamitin niyo ang mga ito - pindutin ang `?' kahit kailan para makamit ang tulong. Kapag natapos na kayong makapagpili ng mga pakete, pindutin ang upang tiyakin ang mga pagbabago, o `X' upang lumabas na hindi itatago ang mga pagbabago. May kahulihang pagsusuri ng mga conflict at dependensiya na gagawin - dito rin ay maaaring may ipakitang sublist. Pindutin ang upang lumabas sa tulong at bumalik sa listahan ngayon.

Last Update: 2014-08-15
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference: Anonymous
Warning: Contains invisible HTML formatting

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