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Results for vision, mission translation from Tagalog to English

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Tagalog

mission

English

mission- vision statement

Last Update: 2016-02-29
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference: Anonymous

Tagalog

saling-wika sa vision at mission

English

im'leaving

Last Update: 2015-01-14
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference: Anonymous

Tagalog

saling-wika sa vision at mission

English

figth

Last Update: 2015-01-14
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference: Anonymous

Tagalog

saling-wika sa vision at mission

English

hello

Last Update: 2015-01-14
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference: Anonymous

Tagalog

saling-wika sa vision at mission

English

goodluck

Last Update: 2015-01-14
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference: Anonymous

Tagalog

mis- vision

English

mission- vision

Last Update: 2016-06-14
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference: Anonymous

Tagalog

Anu ang mission

English

anu ang vission

Last Update: 2019-01-29
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference: Anonymous

Tagalog

mission- paningin

English

mission- vision

Last Update: 2015-06-15
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference: Anonymous

Tagalog

misyon-vision

English

nurturing

Last Update: 2014-08-06
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference: Anonymous

Tagalog

Ang DepEd Vision

English

deped vision

Last Update: 2018-06-13
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference: Anonymous

Tagalog

Ang DepEd Vision

English

The DepEd Vision

Last Update: 2016-03-17
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference: Anonymous

Tagalog

misyonero vision nvsu

English

mission- vision nvsu

Last Update: 2016-01-21
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference: Anonymous

Tagalog

ilocano term of vision

English

Ilocano term of snow

Last Update: 2018-05-11
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference: Anonymous

Tagalog

halimbawa ng vision test

English

example of vision test

Last Update: 2018-03-21
Usage Frequency: 3
Quality:

Reference: Anonymous

Tagalog

deped vision sa filipino

English

deped vision in filipino

Last Update: 2018-06-13
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference: Anonymous

Tagalog

mis- vision tagalog translation

English

mission- vision tagalog translation

Last Update: 2016-04-25
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference: Anonymous

Tagalog

emcee script para sa medical mission

English

emcee script for medical mission

Last Update: 2018-04-22
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference: Anonymous

Tagalog

Ano ang ibig Sabihin Ng vision ay isang tagalog

English

ano ang ibig sabihin ng vision sa tagalog

Last Update: 2016-09-01
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference: Anonymous

Tagalog

How they concretize their schools vision and goals into the curriculum

English

to concretize words and symbols

Last Update: 2019-01-15
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference: Anonymous

Tagalog

The Religious SchismThe only living and tangible result of the revolution was the Filipinochurch, popularly known as the Aglipayan or Philippine Independent Church.When at the start of the second phase of the Revolution the Spanisharchbishop enlisted Father Gregorio Aglipay’s help in bringing back theFilipinos to the Spanish side, Aguinaldo persuaded Aglipay to divert hisenergies to the cause of the people Mabini, riding on the crest of the popularnationalistic movement, suggested the founding of a Filipino NationalChurch. Though unsuccessful owing to war conditions, his idea laid thegroundwork of the later Philippine Independent Church. The story of thebirth of this Church is to a great extent the story of the struggle of theFilipino clergy to Filipinize the Catholic Church in the Philippines.Gregorio Aglipay on the Scene–The Revolution which began in1896 was primarily a conflict of races. On one side were the Filipino civiland clerical groups who were up in arms against the Spanish civil and clericalsegments, on the other side. As it turned out, the second phase of theRevolution was not only political, but religious as well. The PhilippineCatholic Church, whose majority belonged to the party of the oppressors,aided and abetted the colonial government in its policy of repression. Mabinihimself, in his letter to General Otis in 1898, accused the Spanish friars ofgiving aid and comfort to the colonial administration and of taking up arms,when necessity arose, against the revolutionists. In the circumstances, herefused to free the friar-prisoners.In the second phase of the revolution, which commenced withAguinaldo’s return from Hong Kong, Governor-General Basilio Augustin andArchbishop Bernardino Nozaleda, knowing that Father Gregorio Aglipay wasstill sympathetic to Spain but rather hostile to the United States, played agame in which Aglipay was the pawn. They commissioned him to conferwith revolutionary leaders, particularly with Mariano Trias, Artemio Recarte,and Emiliano Riego de Dios, in order to bring them back to the Spanish side.The bait to win them over to their side was the promise of autonomy. Aglipaydid as he was told, but his mission was failure, for the revolutionary leadershad lost their faith in Spanish promises. Meanwhile, Aguinaldo, who had justreturned from Hong Kong, sent Colonel Luciano San Miguel as his emissaryto Aglipay for the purpose of persuading the latter to work for the Filipinocause. Nozaleda countered by commissioning Aglipay to win over Aguinaldoto the Spanish cause. Aguinaldo, however, was firm in his determination tocooperate with the Americans and urged Aglipay to go to the north to workfor the revolutionary cause. Nozaleda was well posted on these mover, andtaking advantage of the situation, encouraged Aglipay to go north not to heedAguinaldo’s prompting, but to investigate the condition of the bishopric ofNueva Segovia. Aglipay toured the northern provinces and secured therelease of two Jesuit priests. Upon his return to Manila to report to Nozaleda,

English

religious schismThe Religious SchismThe only living and tangible result of the revolution was the Filipinochurch, popularly known as the Aglipayan or Philippine Independent Church.When at the start of the second phase of the Revolution the Spanisharchbishop enlisted Father Gregorio Aglipay’s help in bringing back theFilipinos to the Spanish side, Aguinaldo persuaded Aglipay to divert hisenergies to the cause of the people Mabini, riding on the crest of the popularnationalistic movement, suggested the founding of a Filipino NationalChurch. Though unsuccessful owing to war conditions, his idea laid thegroundwork of the later Philippine Independent Church. The story of thebirth of this Church is to a great extent the story of the struggle of theFilipino clergy to Filipinize the Catholic Church in the Philippines.Gregorio Aglipay on the Scene–The Revolution which began in1896 was primarily a conflict of races. On one side were the Filipino civiland clerical groups who were up in arms against the Spanish civil and clericalsegments, on the other side. As it turned out, the second phase of theRevolution was not only political, but religious as well. The PhilippineCatholic Church, whose majority belonged to the party of the oppressors,aided and abetted the colonial government in its policy of repression. Mabinihimself, in his letter to General Otis in 1898, accused the Spanish friars ofgiving aid and comfort to the colonial administration and of taking up arms,when necessity arose, against the revolutionists. In the circumstances, herefused to free the friar prisoners.In the second phase of the revolution, which commenced withAguinaldo’s return from Hong Kong, Governor General Basilio Augustin andArchbishop Bernardino Nozaleda, knowing that Father Gregorio Aglipay wasstill sympathetic to Spain but rather hostile to the United States, played agame in which Aglipay was the pawn. They commissioned him to conferwith revolutionary leaders, particularly with Mariano Trias, Artemio Recarte,and Emiliano Riego de Dios, in order to bring them back to the Spanish side.The bait to win them over to their side was the promise of autonomy. Aglipaydid as he was told, but his mission was failure, for the revolutionary leadershad lost their faith in Spanish promises. Meanwhile, Aguinaldo, who had justreturned from Hong Kong, sent Colonel Luciano San Miguel as his emissaryto Aglipay for the purpose of persuading the latter to work for the Filipinocause. Nozaleda countered by commissioning Aglipay to win over Aguinaldoto the Spanish cause. Aguinaldo, however, was firm in his determination tocooperate with the Americans and urged Aglipay to go to the north to workfor the revolutionary cause. Nozaleda was well posted on these mover, andtaking advantage of the situation, encouraged Aglipay to go north not to heedAguinaldo’s prompting, but to investigate the condition of the bishopric ofNueva Segovia. Aglipay toured the northern provinces and secured therelease of two Jesuit priests. Upon his return to Manila to report to Nozaleda,

Last Update: 2019-01-29
Usage Frequency: 1
Quality:

Reference: Anonymous

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